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  • Katanga (province, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Relief: …ridges of the plateaus of Katanga (Shaba) province tower over the region; they include Kundelungu at 5,250 feet (1,600 metres), Mitumba at 4,920 feet (1,500 metres), and Hakansson at 3,610 feet (1,100 metres). The Katanga plateaus reach as far north as the Lukuga River and contain the Manika Plateau, the…

  • Katanga (historical state, Africa)

    Katanga, historical region in southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, bordering Lake Tanganyika to the east, Zambia to the south, and Angola to the west. The name Shaba, the region’s name during the Zairean period, comes from the Swahili word for copper, and the region’s mines yield most of

  • Katanga River (river, Russia)

    Podkamennaya Tunguska River, tributary of the Yenisey River in western Siberia, Irkutsk oblast (province), Russia. It has a total length of 1,159 miles (1,865 km) and a drainage basin of 96,100 square miles (249,000 square km). Known in its upper section as the Katanga, it rises on the Central

  • Katangan Complex (geology)

    Katangan Complex, major division of late Precambrian rocks (the Precambrian era began about 4.6 billion years ago and ended 542 million years ago) in central Africa, especially in Katanga province, Congo (Kinshasa). The Katangan Complex is a complicated array of diverse sedimentary and metamorphic

  • Katanning (Western Australia, Australia)

    Katanning, town, southwestern Western Australia. It is located approximately 95 miles (150 km) north of Albany and 155 miles (250 km) southeast of Perth in the state’s Great Southern region. Although sandalwood cutters had been in the area for some time, there was no permanent settlement until the

  • Katanyan, Vasily (Russian literary historian)

    Vasily Katanyan, Soviet literary historian who was best known as an authority on the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky. Of Armenian origin, Katanyan grew up in Tiflis (now Tbilisi) before returning to Moscow, where he became a figure in a circle of notable writers and artists that included Mayakovsky and

  • Katanyan, Vasily Abgarovich (Russian literary historian)

    Vasily Katanyan, Soviet literary historian who was best known as an authority on the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky. Of Armenian origin, Katanyan grew up in Tiflis (now Tbilisi) before returning to Moscow, where he became a figure in a circle of notable writers and artists that included Mayakovsky and

  • katapayadi (mathematics)

    Indian mathematics: Classical mathematical literature: …500 ce), was the so-called katapayadi system in which each of the 10 decimal digits was assigned to a set of consonants (beginning with the letters k, t, p, and y), while vowels had no numerical significance. This meant that numbers could be represented not only by normal-sounding syllables but…

  • katar (weapon)

    dagger: …by the Gurkhas, the Hindu katar with its flat triangular blade, and innumerable others.

  • Katara pass (mountain pass, Greece)

    Pindus Mountains: …the principal one is the Métsovo (Katára pass; 5,593 feet [1,705 metres]), a historic defile that carries the highway from the Epirus (ípeiros) to Thessaly.

  • katari-be (Japanese reciters)

    epic: The epic in Japan: …times families of reciters (katari-be) whose duty was to hand down myths and legends by word of mouth and to narrate them during official ceremonies and banquets. After the introduction of Chinese letters, however, from the 4th century ce onward, these traditional tales were put in writing and the…

  • katarimono (Japanese music)

    stringed instrument: For accompaniment: …style of music known as katarimono; here the biwa is used only between verses for interludes and commentaries. A similar technique is in use among the minstrels of North Africa: the lute (gimbrī) is played only between verses of the story, as a descriptive comment.

  • Katarina, Sankta (Swedish saint)

    Saint Catherine of Sweden, ; feast day March 24), daughter of St. Bridget of Sweden, whom she succeeded as superior of the Brigittines. Catherine was married to Egard Lydersson von Kyren, who died shortly after she left for Rome (1350) to join Bridget as her constant companion. She did not return

  • Katatsumori (film by Kawase [1994])

    Naomi Kawase: Her second film, Katatsumori (1994), was a portrait of her grandmother, who had helped to rear Kawase. Turning to full-length features, Kawase directed as well as wrote the screenplay for Moe no suzaku, about family life in a remote Japanese village. Besides earning her the Caméra d’Or at…

  • katauta (poetic form)

    Katauta, a Japanese poetic form that consists of 17 or 19 syllables arranged in three lines of either 5, 7, and 5 or 5, 7, and 7 syllables. The form was used for poems addressed to a lover, and a single katauta was considered incomplete or a half-poem. A pair of katautas of the 5,7,7 type were

  • Katay Don Sasorith (prime minister of Laos)

    Katay Don Sasorith, Lao nationalist and author of eloquent resistance pamphlets in his youth, who later held many government posts, among them that of premier in 1954–56. Katay’s 33 years of government service began with a civil service post in the French administration of Laos from 1926 to 1945.

  • Katayama Tetsu (prime minister of Japan)

    Japan: Political trends: …cabinet headed by the Socialist Katayama Tetsu (1947–48). A similar fate confronted Ashida Hitoshi, who became prime minister for five months in 1948. Yoshida’s return to power in the fall of 1948 resulted in a more stable situation and ushered in the Yoshida era, which lasted until 1954. During those…

  • Katayev, Valentin (Soviet writer)

    Valentin Katayev, Soviet novelist and playwright whose lighthearted, satirical treatment of postrevolutionary social conditions rose above the generally uninspired official Soviet style. Katayev, whose father was a schoolteacher in Odessa, started writing and publishing his poetry at an early age.

  • Katayev, Valentin Petrovich (Soviet writer)

    Valentin Katayev, Soviet novelist and playwright whose lighthearted, satirical treatment of postrevolutionary social conditions rose above the generally uninspired official Soviet style. Katayev, whose father was a schoolteacher in Odessa, started writing and publishing his poetry at an early age.

  • Katayev, Yevgeny Petrovich (Soviet humorist)

    Ilf and Petrov: Petrov, the son of a teacher, began his career as a news-service correspondent, worked briefly as a criminal investigator, and went to Moscow in 1923, where he became a professional journalist. Initially, Ilf worked on the staff of Gudok (“The Whistle”), the central rail-workers’ newspaper,…

  • Katchalski, Ephraim (president of Israel)

    Ephraim Katzir, Russian-born scientist and politician who was the fourth president of Israel (1973–78). Katzir moved with his family to Palestine when he was nine years old. After graduating from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he became an assistant in the university’s department of

  • katchi (housing)

    Pakistan: Housing: …brick, cement, concrete, or timber; katchi (or kuchha [“ramshackle”]) houses, constructed of less-durable material (e.g., mud, bamboo, reeds, or thatch); and semi-pukka houses, which are a mix between the two. Housing stocks comprise an equal number of semi-pukka and katchi houses (about two-fifths each), and remaining houses (roughly one-fifth of…

  • katchi abadi (shanty town housing)

    Pakistan: Urban settlement: …makeshift communities known collectively as katchi abadis. Water supply and sewerage systems are inadequate, and in many areas residents have to share communal water taps. Inadequate urban transport is also a major problem.

  • katcina (North American Indian religion)

    Kachina, in traditional religions of the Pueblo Indians of North America, any of more than 500 divine and ancestral spirit beings who interact with humans. Each Pueblo culture has distinct forms and variations of kachinas. Kachinas are believed to reside with the tribe for half of each year. They

  • Kate (people)

    Oceanic music and dance: Musical style and cultural context: …cultural context: the Monumbo, the Kate, the Watut, and the Kaluli. A more detailed discussion of Kate music illustrates the stylistic heterogeneity of the Kate, who live in the hinterland of the Huon Peninsula of northeastern Papua New Guinea and speak a non-Austronesian (Papuan) language, while some of their neighbours…

  • Kate & Leopold (film by Mangold [2001])

    Sting: Later work and assessment: …well as the romantic comedy Kate & Leopold (2001) and the Civil War drama Cold Mountain (2003). He earned Academy Award nominations for the songs he contributed to each of them (2001, 2002, and 2004, respectively) and won a Golden Globe (2002) for the song “Until…” from Kate & Leopold.…

  • Kate Smith Sings (American radio program)

    Kate Smith: …develop the radio show “Kate Smith Sings” (CBS, 1931–47), one of the most popular programs of the 1930s and early ’40s. On her first broadcast she adopted “When the Moon Comes over the Mountain” as her theme song (she had helped to write its lyrics). The song that she…

  • Kate Vaiden (novel by Price)

    Reynolds Price: …The Source of Light (1981); Kate Vaiden (1986), the orphaned heroine of which was based on the author’s own mother; and The Tongues of Angels (1990). He also wrote poetry, plays, translations from the Bible, and essays.

  • Kateb Yacine (Algerian author)

    Kateb Yacine, Algerian poet, novelist, and playwright, one of North Africa’s most respected literary figures. Kateb was educated in French-colonial schools until 1945, when the bloody suppression of a popular uprising at Sétif both ended his education and provided him with material that would

  • Kategoriai (work by Aristotle)

    history of logic: Aristotle: …but not chronological order, are:

  • Katehar (historical region, India)

    Rohilkhand, low-lying alluvial region in northwestern Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. The Rohilkhand is part of the Upper Ganges (Ganga) Plain and has an area of about 10,000 square miles (25,000 square km). It is bounded by the frontiers of China and Nepal to the north and the Ganges River to

  • Kater’s pendulum

    pendulum: …special reversible compound pendulum called Kater’s pendulum is designed to measure the value of g, the acceleration of gravity.

  • Kater, Henry (British physicist)

    gravity: Absolute measurements: In 1817 the English physicist Henry Kater, building on the work of the German astronomer Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel, was the first to use a reversible pendulum to make absolute measurements of g. If the periods of swing of a rigid pendulum about two alternative points of support are the same,…

  • Katerina Ismaylova (opera by Shostakovich)

    Dmitry Shostakovich: Early life and works: … (composed 1930–32; revised and retitled Katerina Izmaylova), marked a stylistic retreat. Yet even this more accessible musical language was too radical for the Soviet authorities.

  • Katerina Izmaylova (opera by Shostakovich)

    Dmitry Shostakovich: Early life and works: … (composed 1930–32; revised and retitled Katerina Izmaylova), marked a stylistic retreat. Yet even this more accessible musical language was too radical for the Soviet authorities.

  • Katerynoslav (Ukraine)

    Dnipro, city, south-central Ukraine. It lies along the Dnieper River, near its confluence with the Samara. The river was considerably widened by the construction of a dam about 50 miles (80 km) downstream. Founded in 1783 as Katerynoslav on the river’s north bank, the settlement was moved to its

  • Kath, Mary Joan (American singer)

    Bonnie Lou, (Mary Joan Kath), American country and rockabilly singer (born Oct. 27, 1924, Towanda, Ill.—died Dec. 8, 2015, Cincinnati, Ohio), was a fixture on country music radio and TV shows during the 1950s and later. Two of her recordings, “Seven Lonely Days” and “Tennessee Wig Walk,” were

  • Kathā-saritsāgara (work by Somadeva)

    Somadeva: Tawney, titled The Ocean of Story, was published in 1924–28. Somadeva wrote his monumental work during the two periods of Ananta’s interrupted rule, which ended in 1077.

  • kathak (dance)

    Kathak, one of the main forms of classical dance-drama of India, other major ones being bharata natyam, kathakali, manipuri, kuchipudi, and odissi. Kathak is indigenous to northern India and developed under the influence of both Hindu and Muslim cultures. Kathak is characterized by intricate

  • kathakali (dance)

    Kathakali, one of the main forms of classical dance-drama of India, other major ones being bharata natyam, kathak, manipuri, kuchipudi, and odissi. It is indigenous to southwestern India, particularly the state of Kerala, and is based on subject matter from the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, and

  • Kathakata (religious recital)

    West Bengal: Cultural life: The kathakata, a religious recital, is another traditional form of rural entertainment, based on folklore.

  • Kathapurushan (film by Gopalakrishnan [1995])

    Adoor Gopalakrishnan: Gopalakrishnan’s Kathapurushan (1995; “The Man of the Story”) examines the life of a communist activist from 1937 to 1980; it won the National Award for best film. In Shadow Kill, a hangman grapples with the knowledge that he executed an innocent man.

  • Katharevousa

    Katharevusa Greek language, a “purist” variety of modern Greek, which until 1976 was the official written language of Greece. Katharevusa was used in government and judiciary documents as well as in most newspapers and technical publications. In 1976 it was replaced by Demotic Greek as the official

  • Katharevusa Greek language

    Katharevusa Greek language, a “purist” variety of modern Greek, which until 1976 was the official written language of Greece. Katharevusa was used in government and judiciary documents as well as in most newspapers and technical publications. In 1976 it was replaced by Demotic Greek as the official

  • Katharina (fictional character)

    Katharina, the shrew of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. The play revolves around Katharina’s transformation into the ideal

  • Katharine (fictional character, “Love’s Labour’s Lost”)

    Love's Labour's Lost: …three ladies (Rosaline, Maria, and Katharine), arrives on a diplomatic mission from the king of France and must therefore be admitted into Navarre’s park. The gentlemen soon discover that they are irresistibly attracted to the ladies. Their attempts at concealing their infatuations from one another are quickly exploded. Their next…

  • Katharine (fictional character, “Henry VIII”)

    Henry VIII: …the king’s reservations and Queen Katharine’s entreaties for justice and truth, Buckingham is convicted as a traitor on the basis of the false testimony of a dismissed servant. As he is taken away for execution, Buckingham conveys a prophetic warning to beware of false friends.

  • Katharine, Queen (fictional character, “Henry VIII”)

    Henry VIII: …the king’s reservations and Queen Katharine’s entreaties for justice and truth, Buckingham is convicted as a traitor on the basis of the false testimony of a dismissed servant. As he is taken away for execution, Buckingham conveys a prophetic warning to beware of false friends.

  • katharsis (criticism)

    Catharsis, the purification or purgation of the emotions (especially pity and fear) primarily through art. In criticism, catharsis is a metaphor used by Aristotle in the Poetics to describe the effects of true tragedy on the spectator. The use is derived from the medical term katharsis (Greek:

  • Kathavatthu (Buddhist text)

    Moggaliputtatissa: …bce) and author of the Kathāvatthu (“Points of Controversy”). Included among the Pāli Abhidamma Pi?aka, the Kathāvatthu is a series of questions from a non-Theravāda point of view, with their implications refuted in the answers; the long first chapter debates the existence of a soul. Moggaliputtatissa is credited with ordaining…

  • kathenotheism (religion)

    polytheism: The nature of polytheism: …the 19th century the terms henotheism and kathenotheism were used to refer to the exalting of a particular god as exclusively the highest within the framework of a particular hymn or ritual—e.g., in the hymns of the Vedas (the ancient sacred texts of India). This process often consisted in loading…

  • Katherine (Northern Territory, Australia)

    Katherine, town, north-central Northern Territory, Australia. It lies along the Katherine River at the junction of the Victoria Highway and the Stuart Highway, approximately 170 miles (270 km) southeast of Darwin. The Katherine River was explored in 1862 by John McDouall Stuart, who named it for

  • Katherine Gorge National Park (national park, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Katherine: …National Park features the colourful Katherine Gorge, with walls of red and brown quartzite; it is located some 22 miles (35 km) northeast of the town. There are thermal springs in the town and at Mataranka, to the southeast. A Royal Australian Air Force base is located at Tindal, about…

  • Katherine Group (English literary works)

    Katherine Group, a group of five Middle English prose devotional works dating from c. 1180 to 1210. It consists of accounts of the lives of Saints Katherine, Margaret, and Juliana (found together in a single manuscript) and two treatises, “Hali Meidenhad” (“Holy Maidenhood”) and “Sawles Warde”

  • Katherine Mansfield and Other Literary Portraits (work by Murry)

    John Middleton Murry: …are studies of Mansfield (Katherine Mansfield and Other Literary Portraits, 1949) and Lawrence (Son of Woman, the Story of D.H. Lawrence, 1931), as well as several works on Keats. Murry’s autobiography, Between Two Worlds (1935), is strikingly revealing about his own life. A large selection of his letters to…

  • Katherine River (river, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Katherine: It lies along the Katherine River at the junction of the Victoria Highway and the Stuart Highway, approximately 170 miles (270 km) southeast of Darwin.

  • Katherine, Saint (Egyptian martyr)

    St. Catherine of Alexandria, ; feast day November 25), one of the most popular early Christian martyrs and one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers (a group of Roman Catholic saints venerated for their power of intercession). She is the patron of philosophers and scholars and is believed to help protect

  • Kathiawar Peninsula (peninsula, India)

    Kathiawar Peninsula, peninsula in southwestern Gujarat state, west-central India. It is bounded by the Little Rann (marsh) of Kachchh (Kutch) to the north, the Gulf of Khambhat to the east, the Arabian Sea to the southwest, and the Gulf of Kachchh to the northwest. From the northeast an ancient

  • kathina (Buddhist ceremony)

    vassa: The lively kathina (“cloth”) ceremony, in which groups of laymen present gifts to the monks, takes place during the first month following the conclusion of vassa.

  • Kathīrī (people)

    Kathiri sultanate: The Kathīrī tribe dominated the Hadhramaut from about 1500 until the early 19th century, when the rising Qu?aiti sultanate challenged it. The British intervened on behalf of the latter, and the Kathīrī people were cut off from the seacoast under a treaty that was signed in…

  • Kathiri sultanate (historical state, Yemen)

    Kathiri sultanate, former semi-independent state in the southern Arabian Peninsula, in the inland Hadhramaut region now included in Yemen. The sultanate, with its capital at Saywūn (Say?ūn), once extended from the Wadi ?a?ramawt, an intermittent stream, northward to the Rub? al-Khali, the vast

  • Kathmandu (national capital, Nepal)

    Kathmandu, capital of Nepal. It lies in a hilly region near the confluence of the Baghmati and Vishnumati rivers, at an elevation of 4,344 feet (1,324 metres) above sea level. It was founded in 723 by Raja Gunakamadeva. Its early name was Manju-Patan; the present name refers to a wooden temple

  • Kāthmāndu Valley (valley, Nepal)

    Himalayas: Geologic history: …Vale of Kashmir and the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, lakes formed temporarily and then filled with Pleistocene deposits. After drying up some 200,000 years ago, the Kathmandu Valley rose at least 650 feet (200 metres), an indication of localized uplift within the Lesser Himalayas.

  • Kathodi (people)

    Rajasthan: Population composition: The Grasia and Kathodi also largely live in the south, mostly in the Mewar region. Sahariya communities are found in the southeast, and the Rabari, who traditionally are cattle breeders, live to the west of the Aravallis in west-central Rajasthan.

  • katholikos (Greek religious title)

    Catholicos, (“universal” bishop), in Eastern Christian Churches, title of certain ecclesiastical superiors. In earlier times the designation had occasionally been used, like archimandrite and exarch, for a superior abbot; but the title eventually came to denote a bishop who, while head of a major c

  • Katholische Liga (Catholic military alliance)

    Catholic League, a military alliance (1609–35) of the Catholic powers of Germany led by Maximilian I, duke of Bavaria, and designed to stem the growth of Protestantism in Germany. In alliance with the Habsburg emperors, the League’s forces, led by Johann Tserclaes, Graf von Tilly, played a key role

  • katholou (philosophy)

    Western philosophy: Philosophy: …transcendent Forms with something (katholou) corresponding to them that the human mind can grasp in individual things.

  • Kathua (India)

    Kathua, town, southwestern Jammu and Kashmir state, northern India. It is situated just west of the Ravi River and near the border with Punjab state, about 45 miles (72 km) southeast of Jammu. Kathua is a main population centre of a region bounded by Pakistan to the southwest, Punjab state to the

  • Kati Bihu (Indian culture)

    Assam: Cultural life: The third Bihu festival, the Kati Bihu (in mid-October or November), is also called the Kangali Bihu (from kangali, meaning poor), because by this time of year the house of an ordinary family is without food grains, as the stock is usually consumed before the next harvest.

  • Kati Thanda–Lake Eyre (lake, Australia)

    Lake Eyre, great salt lake in central South Australia, with a total area of 4,281 square miles (11,088 square km). It lies in the southwestern corner of the Great Artesian Basin, a closed inland basin about 440,150 square miles (1,140,000 square km) in area that is drained only by intermittent

  • Kati, Mahmud (African Muslim scholar)

    Mu?ammad I Askia: Organization of the Songhai empire: The chronicler Mahmud Kati, who accompanied Mu?ammad, wrote in Ta?rīkh al-fattāsh that the jinn of Mecca had had Mu?ammad named caliph and had told him what his rights were over the former vassal groups of the Sonnis. By the time he returned in 1497 or 1498, he…

  • Katian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Katian Stage, second of three internationally defined stages of the Upper Ordovician Series, encompassing all rocks deposited during the Katian Age (453 million to 445.2 million years ago) of the Ordovician Period. In 2006 the International Commission on Stratigraphy established the Global

  • Katib ?eleb? (Turkish historian)

    Katip ?elebi, Turkish historian, geographer, and bibliographer. Katip became an army clerk and took part in many campaigns in the east, meanwhile collecting material for his historical works. As a child he was taught the Qur?ān and Arabic grammar and calligraphy, but his later education was

  • Kātib, al- (Muslim writer)

    Arabic literature: The concept of adab: …epistle composition are associated with ?Abd al-?amīd, known as al-Kātib (“The Secretary”), who in the 8th century composed a work for the son of one of the Umayyad caliphs on the proper conduct of rulers.

  • Katif, Al- (Saudi Arabia)

    Al-Qa?īf, town and oasis, Al-Sharqiyyah (Eastern) region, northeastern Saudi Arabia. It lies along the Persian Gulf, over Al-Qa?īf petroleum field. Since the development of the oil fields in the late 1940s, Al-Qa?if has lost its status as an important port to nearby Al-Dammām. In addition to

  • Katihar (India)

    Katihar, city, eastern Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated east of the Saura River, a tributary of the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 15 miles (25 km) north of the confluence of the two rivers. Katihar is a major road and rail junction with railway workshops and is engaged in agricultural

  • Katima Mulilo Rapids (rapids, Africa)

    Zambezi River: Physiography: … (Sioma) Falls south to the Katima Mulilo Rapids, after which for about 80 miles it forms the border between Zambia to the north and the eastern Caprivi Strip—an extension of Namibia—to the south. In this stretch the river meanders through the broad grasslands of the Sesheke Plain until it is…

  • Katip ?elebi (Turkish historian)

    Katip ?elebi, Turkish historian, geographer, and bibliographer. Katip became an army clerk and took part in many campaigns in the east, meanwhile collecting material for his historical works. As a child he was taught the Qur?ān and Arabic grammar and calligraphy, but his later education was

  • katipo (spider)

    Black widow, (genus Latrodectus), any of several species of black spiders distinguished by an hourglass-shaped marking on the abdomen. Black widows, especially Latrodectus mactans, are found throughout much of the world. The bite of the black widow often produces muscle pain, nausea, and mild

  • Katipunan (Filipino nationalist organization)

    Katipunan, (“Supreme Worshipful Association of the Sons of the People”), Filipino nationalist organization founded in 1892 to oppose Spanish rule. The organization numbered anywhere from 100,000 to 400,000 members. The Filipino nationalist Emilio Aguinaldo was the leader of this group, which

  • Katkov, Mikhail Nikiforovich (Russian journalist)

    Mikhail Nikiforovich Katkov, Russian journalist who exercised a high degree of influence in government circles during the reigns of Alexander II (reigned 1855–81) and Alexander III (reigned 1881–94). After study at the Moscow University (graduated 1838) and the University of Berlin (1840–41),

  • Katla (volcano, Iceland)

    Katla, subglacial volcano, southern Iceland, located underneath Myrdalsj?kull (Myrdals Glacier). Katla’s summit sits at 4,961 feet (1,512 metres) above sea level, and its oval caldera is about 6 miles (10 km) across at its widest. Katla is one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes, having erupted at

  • Katmai National Monument (national park, Alaska, United States)

    Katmai National Park and Preserve, large area of wilderness and unique geologic features in southwestern Alaska, U.S., at the head of the Alaska Peninsula on Shelikof Strait. Katmai was designated a national monument in 1918 after the violent eruption of Novarupta Volcano there in 1912. The

  • Katmai National Park and Preserve (national park, Alaska, United States)

    Katmai National Park and Preserve, large area of wilderness and unique geologic features in southwestern Alaska, U.S., at the head of the Alaska Peninsula on Shelikof Strait. Katmai was designated a national monument in 1918 after the violent eruption of Novarupta Volcano there in 1912. The

  • Katmai, Mount (mountain, Alaska, United States)

    Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes: …eruption of the Novarupta and Mount Katmai volcanoes. Its name derives from the myriad fumaroles (fissures spouting smoke, gas, and steam) that developed in the valley floor. Covering about 56 square miles (145 square km), it is now a part of Katmai National Park and Preserve.

  • Katmai-Novarupta (volcano, Alaska, United States)

    Novarupta, volcanic vent and lava dome, southern Alaska, U.S., located at an elevation of 841 metres (2,759 feet) within Katmai National Park and Preserve. Its violent eruption, which began on June 6, 1912, and lasted 60 hours, is considered the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century.

  • Katmandu (national capital, Nepal)

    Kathmandu, capital of Nepal. It lies in a hilly region near the confluence of the Baghmati and Vishnumati rivers, at an elevation of 4,344 feet (1,324 metres) above sea level. It was founded in 723 by Raja Gunakamadeva. Its early name was Manju-Patan; the present name refers to a wooden temple

  • Katna (ancient city, Syria)

    Katna, ancient Syrian city, Syria. It prospered especially during the 2nd millennium bc and was frequently named as Qatanum in the royal archives of Mari on the Euphrates. Excavations there in 1924–29 revealed a temple dedicated to the Sumerian goddess Nin-E-Gal. Foreign trade and influence were

  • Katnall (gene)

    sperm: …by a gene known as Katnal1, which is expressed by the Sertoli cells that support and nourish immature sperm within the walls of the seminiferous tubules (the site of spermatogenesis). Dysfunction of Katnal1 is suspected to underlie some instances of male infertility, and thus, the gene represents a potential target…

  • Katni (India)

    Murwara, city, east-central Madhya Pradesh state, central India. It is situated in an upland basin on the Katni River, a tributary of the Mahanadi River. Murwara was the property of a wealthy Brahman family. The city’s name is derived from mund (“head”) to commemorate the fact that an ancestor of

  • Kato (fictional character)

    Green Hornet: Kato, his chauffeur, assists him and drives a specially designed car called the Black Beauty.

  • Katō Hiroyuki, Danshaku (Japanese political theorist and author)

    Danshaku Katō Hiroyuki, Japanese writer, educator, and political theorist who was influential in introducing Western ideas into 19th-century Japan. After the fall of the shogunate in 1868, he served as one of the primary formulators of Japan’s administrative policy. Katō’s interest in Western

  • Katō Kiyomasa (Japanese military leader)

    Katō Kiyomasa, Japanese military leader who helped both Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu in their attempts to unify Japan. As an ardent Buddhist, he also led the struggle to ban Christianity from Japan. A relative of Hideyoshi, Katō entered his service upon reaching manhood and soon

  • Katō Kōmei (prime minister of Japan)

    Katō Takaaki, Japanese prime minister in the mid-1920s whose government and policies were considered the most democratic in Japan before World War II. Katō’s first job was with the great Japanese cartel of Mitsubishi, which backed him throughout his political career; he, in turn, watched over its

  • Katō Sawao (Japanese gymnast)

    Katō Sawao, Japanese gymnast, who won eight Olympic gold medals as a member of the Japanese team that dominated men’s gymnastics during the 1960s and ’70s. Katō attended the Tokyo University of Education (now University of Tsukuba). At the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, he won a gold medal in

  • Katō Shirōzaemon (Japanese potter)

    Seto ware: …ware is usually attributed to Katō Shirōzaemon (Tōshirō), who is said to have studied ceramic manufacture in southern China and produced pottery of his own in the Seto district upon his return. The wares, clearly influenced by those of the Southern Sung dynasty in China and those of the Kory?…

  • Kato Shizue Hirota (Japanese politician)

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