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  • Kawaihae (Hawaii, United States)

    Kawaihae, deepwater port lying along Kawaihae Bay, on the northwestern coast of Hawaii island, Hawaii, U.S. It marks the northernmost point of a 40-mile (65-km) stretch known as the “Gold Coast,” a resort-beach development area that follows the Queen Kaahumanu Highway around Anaehoomalu and Kiholo

  • Kawakami Genichi (Japanese businessman)

    Genichi Kawakami, Japanese businessman (born Jan. 30, 1912, Hamakita, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan—died May 25, 2002, near Hamamatsu, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan), was the visionary president of the Yamaha Corp. for three decades (1950–77 and 1980–83). The company, which had been founded in the late 1

  • Kawakami Hajime (Japanese journalist)

    Kawakami Hajime, journalist, poet, and university professor who was one of Japan’s first Marxist theoreticians. While working as a journalist after his graduation from Tokyo University in 1902, Kawakami translated from the English E.R.A. Seligman’s Economic Interpretation of History, the first

  • Kawakami Otojirō (Japanese dramatist)

    Japanese performing arts: Meiji period: …arranged and acted in by Kawakami Otojirō. Kawakami’s first plays were political and nationalistic in intent. After he and his wife Sada Yakko had performed in Europe and America (1899 and 1902), they introduced to Japan adaptations of Shakespeare, Maurice Maeterlinck, and Victorien Sardou. These shimpa, or “new school,” plays,…

  • kawakawa (beverage)

    Kava, nonalcoholic, euphoria-producing beverage made from the root of the pepper plant, principally Piper methysticum, in most of the South Pacific islands. It is yellow-green in colour and somewhat bitter, and the active ingredient is apparently alkaloidal in nature. Consumption of the beverage

  • Kawakubo, Rei (Japanese fashion designer)

    Rei Kawakubo, self-taught Japanese fashion designer known for her avant-garde clothing designs and her high fashion label, Comme des Gar?ons (CDG), founded in 1969. Kawakubo’s iconoclastic vision made her one of the most influential designers of the late 20th century. Kawakubo studied fine arts and

  • Kawamoto Nobuhiko (Japanese businessman)

    Kawamoto Nobuhiko, Japanese business executive who, as president of Honda Motor Company, Ltd. (1990–98), oversaw that company’s spectacular growth during the 1990s. Kawamoto developed a passion for cars early in life, and as an engineering student at Tōhoku University in Sendai he organized a club

  • Kawamura Fujio (Japanese actor)

    Nakamura Utaemon VI, (Fujio Kawamura), Japanese actor (born Jan. 20, 1917, Tokyo, Japan—died March 31, 2001, Tokyo), was regarded as the preeminent performer of Japan’s traditional kabuki theatre during his lifetime. Born into a family of kabuki actors, Utaemon VI made his theatrical debut in 1

  • Kawanabe Gyōsai (Japanese painter)

    Kawanabe Kyōsai, Japanese painter and caricaturist. After working briefly with Utagawa Kuniyoshi, the last great master of the Japanese colour print, Kyōsai received most of his artistic training in the studio of Kanō Tōhaku. He soon abandoned the formal traditions of this master for the greater

  • Kawanabe Kyōsai (Japanese painter)

    Kawanabe Kyōsai, Japanese painter and caricaturist. After working briefly with Utagawa Kuniyoshi, the last great master of the Japanese colour print, Kyōsai received most of his artistic training in the studio of Kanō Tōhaku. He soon abandoned the formal traditions of this master for the greater

  • Kawanishi (Japan)

    Kawanishi, city, southeastern Hyōgo ken (prefecture), west-central Honshu, Japan. It lies on the west bank of the Ina River and is bordered by Ikeda (southeast), Itami (south), and Takarazuka (west). Factories in the city use the river water to produce dyed cloth and bleached and tanned leather.

  • Kawara On (Japanese artist)

    On Kawara, Japanese conceptual artist noted for several series of works that test concepts of time and diaristic revelation. After graduating from high school in 1951, Kawara moved to Tokyo. In 1953 his dispassionate paintings of dismembered bodies were exhibited at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of

  • Kawara, On (Japanese artist)

    On Kawara, Japanese conceptual artist noted for several series of works that test concepts of time and diaristic revelation. After graduating from high school in 1951, Kawara moved to Tokyo. In 1953 his dispassionate paintings of dismembered bodies were exhibited at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of

  • kawara-ban (Japanese newspaper printing)

    history of publishing: Early newspapers in Japan: …by reading them aloud) or kawara-ban (“tile-block printing,” the method of production). The kawara-ban broadsheets appeared continuously throughout the Tokugawa period (1603–1867), reporting popular festivals, natural disasters, important events such as the siege of Osaka Castle in 1615, and personal scandals—notably the double suicides fashionable during the Genroku period (1688–1704).…

  • Kawartha Lakes (lakes, Ontario, Canada)

    Kawartha Lakes, chain of 14 lakes in southeastern Ontario, Canada. They stretch across Peterborough and Victoria counties, just north and west of Peterborough and 30–70 miles (50–115 km) northeast of Toronto. Ranging in size from 2 to 18 square miles (5 to 47 square km), the lakes form a major

  • Kawartha Lakes (town, Ontario, Canada)

    Kawartha Lakes, city, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It was formed in 2001 by the merger of the former town of Lindsay and the other communities constituting what until the amalgamation had been Victoria county. It was named for the Kawartha Lakes, a chain of lakes in the region. It lies along the

  • Kawasaki (Japan)

    Kawasaki, city and port, northwestern Kanagawa ken (prefecture), east-central Honshu, Japan. It lies on the western shore of Tokyo Bay, between Tokyo (north) and Yokohama (south). Its population is the third largest in the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolitan area. During the Edo (Tokugawa) period

  • Kawasaki disease (disease)

    Kawasaki syndrome, rare, acute inflammatory disease of unknown origin that is one of the leading causes of acquired heart disease in children. Kawasaki syndrome, which usually occurs in children of less than 5 years of age, was first described in Japan in 1967. It is characterized by prolonged

  • Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (Japanese manufacturer)

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., major Japanese manufacturer of transportation equipment and machinery and an important member of the Kawasaki group of industries. The company maintains head offices in both Kōbe and Tokyo. The original enterprise was a shipyard established by Kawasaki Shōzō in

  • Kawasaki Jūkōgyō KK (Japanese manufacturer)

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., major Japanese manufacturer of transportation equipment and machinery and an important member of the Kawasaki group of industries. The company maintains head offices in both Kōbe and Tokyo. The original enterprise was a shipyard established by Kawasaki Shōzō in

  • Kawasaki Seitetsu KK (Japanese manufacturer)

    Kawasaki Steel Corporation, major Japanese steel manufacturer and leading member of the Kawasaki group of industries. Headquarters are in Kōbe. The company, originally a subsidiary of Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., was incorporated in 1950 as a separate company. Its new post-World War II plant

  • Kawasaki Shipyard Company (Japanese manufacturer)

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., major Japanese manufacturer of transportation equipment and machinery and an important member of the Kawasaki group of industries. The company maintains head offices in both Kōbe and Tokyo. The original enterprise was a shipyard established by Kawasaki Shōzō in

  • Kawasaki Steel Corporation (Japanese manufacturer)

    Kawasaki Steel Corporation, major Japanese steel manufacturer and leading member of the Kawasaki group of industries. Headquarters are in Kōbe. The company, originally a subsidiary of Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., was incorporated in 1950 as a separate company. Its new post-World War II plant

  • Kawasaki syndrome (disease)

    Kawasaki syndrome, rare, acute inflammatory disease of unknown origin that is one of the leading causes of acquired heart disease in children. Kawasaki syndrome, which usually occurs in children of less than 5 years of age, was first described in Japan in 1967. It is characterized by prolonged

  • Kawase, Naomi (Japanese film director)

    Naomi Kawase, Japanese film director who was the youngest person to win the Caméra d’Or (for best debut feature film) at the Cannes film festival, for Moe no suzaku (1997). After Kawase graduated (1989) from the Osaka School of Photography, she lectured there for four years. She began her career in

  • Kawatake Mokuami (Japanese dramatist)

    Kawatake Mokuami, versatile and prolific Japanese dramatist, the last great Kabuki playwright of the Tokugawa period (1603–1867). Growing up in Edo, Kawatake became a pupil of the Kabuki playwright Tsuruya Namboku V and wrote many kinds of plays during a long apprenticeship. He became the chief

  • Kawatake Shinshichi II (Japanese dramatist)

    Kawatake Mokuami, versatile and prolific Japanese dramatist, the last great Kabuki playwright of the Tokugawa period (1603–1867). Growing up in Edo, Kawatake became a pupil of the Kabuki playwright Tsuruya Namboku V and wrote many kinds of plays during a long apprenticeship. He became the chief

  • Kawate Bunjirō (Japanese religious leader)

    Shintō: Formation of Sect Shintō: …means, literally, “golden light”) by Kawate Bunjirō (1814–83); and Tenri-kyō (tenri means “divine reason or wisdom”) by Nakayama Miki (1798–1887)—were based mostly on individual religious experiences and aimed at healing diseases or spiritual salvation. These sectarian Shintō groups, numbering 13 during the Meiji period (1868–1912), were stimulated and influenced by…

  • Kawchottine (people)

    Hare, group of Athabaskan-speaking North American Indians originally living northwest of what is now Great Bear Lake in far northwestern Canada. Their name for themselves, Kawchottine, means “People of Great Hares”; it was used because Arctic hares were an important source of food in traditional

  • Kawkab al-Sharq (Egyptian musician)

    Umm Kulthūm, Egyptian singer who mesmerized Arab audiences from the Persian Gulf to Morocco for half a century. She was one of the most famous Arab singers and public personalities of the 20th century. Umm Kulthūm’s father was a village imam who sang traditional religious songs at weddings and

  • Kawkaw (Mali)

    Gao, town, eastern Mali, western Africa. It is situated on the Niger River at the southern edge of the Sahara, about 200 miles (320 km) east-southeast of Timbuktu. The population consists chiefly of Songhai people. Gao, founded by fishermen in the 7th century, is one of the oldest trading centres

  • Kawm Al-A?mar (ancient city, Egypt)

    Hierakonpolis, prehistoric royal residence of the kings of Upper Egypt and the most important site of the beginning of Egypt’s historical period. Evidence indicates a royal presence at Hierakonpolis, then called Nekhen, which enjoyed its period of greatest importance from about 3400 bce to the

  • Kawm Umbū (Egypt)

    Kawm Umbū, town and valley of Upper Egypt, situated about 30 miles (48 km) north of the Aswan High Dam in Aswān mu?āfa?ah (governorate). The town, an agricultural marketplace and a sugarcane-processing and cotton-ginning centre, lies on the east bank of the Nile River between the main valley

  • Kawm Umbū Temple (temple, Kawm Umbū, Egypt)

    Egyptian art and architecture: Greco-Roman Egypt: At Dandarah, Esna, Idfū, Kawm Umbū (K?m Ombo), and Philae the Egyptian cult temple can be studied better than at almost any earlier temple. Though erected by the Macedonian rulers of Egypt, these late temples employ purely Egyptian architectural conventions but include flourishes that appear only in the Ptolemaic…

  • Kawm, el- (archaeological site, Asia)

    ancient Middle East: Evolution of Middle Eastern civilizations: , at al-Kawm on the Upper Euphrates). Small-scale irrigation was practiced in Palestine (e.g., at Jericho) in the 7th millennium bc.

  • Kawoela Island (island, Indonesia)

    Lomblen Island, largest of the Solor Islands, in the Lesser Sundas, Nusa Tenggara Timur provinsi (“province”), Indonesia. Lomblen lies between the Flores Sea (north) and the Savu Sea (south), about 25 miles (40 km) east of Flores and just east of Adonara Island. The island is irregular in shape,

  • Kawula Island (island, Indonesia)

    Lomblen Island, largest of the Solor Islands, in the Lesser Sundas, Nusa Tenggara Timur provinsi (“province”), Indonesia. Lomblen lies between the Flores Sea (north) and the Savu Sea (south), about 25 miles (40 km) east of Flores and just east of Adonara Island. The island is irregular in shape,

  • kawwanah (Judaism)

    Kavvanah, in Judaism, the attitude or frame of mind that is appropriate when one performs religious duties, especially prayer. The 12th-century philosopher Moses Maimonides recommended that to attain kavvanah when praying, a person should mentally place himself in the presence of God and totally

  • kawwanot (Judaism)

    Kavvanah, in Judaism, the attitude or frame of mind that is appropriate when one performs religious duties, especially prayer. The 12th-century philosopher Moses Maimonides recommended that to attain kavvanah when praying, a person should mentally place himself in the presence of God and totally

  • kawwanoth (Judaism)

    Kavvanah, in Judaism, the attitude or frame of mind that is appropriate when one performs religious duties, especially prayer. The 12th-century philosopher Moses Maimonides recommended that to attain kavvanah when praying, a person should mentally place himself in the presence of God and totally

  • Kaxgar (China)

    Kashgar, oasis city, western Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, far western China. Kashgar lies at the western end of the Tarim Basin, in a fertile oasis of loess (silt deposited by the wind) and alluvial soils watered by the Kaxgar (Kashgar) River and by a series of wells. The climate of the

  • Kaxgar River (river, Asia)

    Tarim River: …by the confluence of the Kaxgar (Kashgar) and Yarkand (Yarkant) rivers in the far west; flowing northeastward from this confluence, the river is then joined some 230 miles (370 km) downstream by the Aksu and the Hotan (Khotan) rivers. Only the Aksu River flows for the entire year. It is…

  • Kay Scarpetta (fictional character)

    Patricia Cornwell: …develop the fictional character of Kay Scarpetta, who had appeared in minor roles in the early attempts. Scarpetta—much like Cornwell in appearance and ideology and seemingly a self-portrait—was featured as a medical examiner in Postmortem (1990), and with this book Cornwell’s writing career was launched. The series continued with Body…

  • Kay’s threshold (biology)

    primate: Diet: …point of 500 grams (Kay’s threshold, after the primatologist Richard Kay, who first drew attention to it) has been proposed as an upper limit for species subsisting mainly on insects and a lower limit for those relying on leaves. The reason is that insects are small and hard to…

  • Kay, Alan (American computer scientist)

    Alan Kay, American computer scientist and winner of the 2003 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for his contributions to object-oriented programming languages, including Smalltalk. Kay received a doctorate in computer science from the University of Utah in 1969. In 1972 he

  • Kay, Connie (American musician)

    Modern Jazz Quartet: …piano; Percy Heath, bass; and Connie Kay, drums.

  • Kay, James Phillips (British educator)

    Sir James Kay-Shuttleworth, 1st Baronet, physician, public-health reformer, and chief founder of the English system of publicly financed elementary education. Kay studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh and obtained his medical degree there in 1827. His subsequent work as a physician among

  • Kay, John (British engineer and inventor)

    John Kay, English machinist and engineer, inventor of the flying shuttle, which was an important step toward automatic weaving. The son of a woolen manufacturer, Kay was placed in charge of his father’s mill while still a youth. He made many improvements in dressing, batting, and carding machinery.

  • Kay, John (British physician)

    John Caius, prominent humanist and physician whose classic account of the English sweating sickness is considered one of the earliest histories of an epidemic. Caius attended Gonville Hall (now Gonville and Caius College) in Cambridge, Eng., where he is believed to have studied the humanities and

  • Kay, Paul (American linguist)

    language: General and specific designations: …research by Brent Berlin and Paul Kay in the 1960s sought to show that “there exist universally for humans eleven basic perceptual color categories” that serve as reference points for the colour words of a language, whatever number may be regularly employed at any time. The claim remains controversial.

  • Kay, Ulysses (American composer)

    Ulysses Kay, American composer, a prominent representative of the neoclassical school. A nephew of the New Orleans jazz trumpeter King Oliver, Kay played jazz saxophone as a boy and later turned to piano, violin, and composition. After receiving his B.A. at the University of Arizona (1938), he

  • Kay, Ulysses Simpson (American composer)

    Ulysses Kay, American composer, a prominent representative of the neoclassical school. A nephew of the New Orleans jazz trumpeter King Oliver, Kay played jazz saxophone as a boy and later turned to piano, violin, and composition. After receiving his B.A. at the University of Arizona (1938), he

  • Kay-Kā?ūs II (Seljuq sultan)

    Anatolia: Division and decline: The eldest, ?Izz al-Dīn Kay-Kā?ūs II (ruled 1246–60), assumed the rule in the area west of the K?z?l River with the support of local Byzantine lords and the Turkmen borderland chieftains. Backed by Mongol generals and Iranian bureaucrats, his younger brothers Rukn al-Dīn Q?l?ch Arslān IV (1248–65) and ?Alā?…

  • Kay-Khusraw I (sultan of Rūm)

    Theodore I Lascaris: …the Seljuq sultan of Rūm, Kay-Khusraw, who had given asylum to the emperor Alexius, failed to persuade Theodore to abdicate, he invaded Theodore’s territory in the spring of 1211. Theodore, however, defeated and killed Kay-Khusraw in battle and also captured and imprisoned Alexius.

  • Kay-Khusraw II (Seljuq sultan)

    Anatolia: Seljuq expansion: …his eldest son Ghiyās? al-Dīn Kay-Khusraw II (1237–46), who reached the throne by killing his two half brothers and their Ayyūbid mother along with many military commanders and dignitaries. Although he initially obtained some successes in the southeastern part of his realm by annexing Amida (Diyarbak?r), thus pushing the boundaries…

  • Kay-Khusraw III (Seljuq sultan)

    Anatolia: Division and decline: …enthroned the child Ghiyās? al-Dīn Kay-Khusraw III (1265–84) in his father’s place.

  • Kay-Qubād I (Seljuq ruler)

    Anatolia: Seljuq expansion: …I (1211–20) and ?Alā? al-Dīn Kay-Qubādh I (1220–37), the Anatolian Seljuqs achieved the zenith of their power. Ghiyās? al-Dīn Kay-Khusraw I reunified the Seljuq state and began to expand at the expense of what was left of the Byzantine Empire in the west and north. His most important achievements included…

  • Kay-Qubādh II (Seljuq ruler)

    Anatolia: Division and decline: …IV (1248–65) and ?Alā? al-Dīn Kay-Qubādh II (1249–57) were installed east of the K?z?l. From this point onward the Seljuq sultans were essentially figureheads, while real power remained in the hands of administrators such as Shams al-Dīn I?fahānī (1246–49), Jalāl al-Dīn Qara?āy (1249–54), and especially Mu?īn al-Dīn Sulaymān Parvāna (1261–77).

  • Kay-Qubādh III (Seljuq ruler)

    Anatolia: Division and decline: …is recorded that ?Alā? al-Dīn Kay-Qubādh III (1298–1303) was put to death by order of Ghazan, the Mongol khan, the fate of his son Ghiyās? al-Dīn Mas?ūd III, who assumed the rule in 1307, is obscure. Though some sources mention the existence of Seljuq scions in later years in various…

  • Kay-Shuttleworth, Sir James, 1st Baronet (British educator)

    Sir James Kay-Shuttleworth, 1st Baronet, physician, public-health reformer, and chief founder of the English system of publicly financed elementary education. Kay studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh and obtained his medical degree there in 1827. His subsequent work as a physician among

  • Kaya (ancient Korean tribal league)

    Kaya, tribal league that was formed sometime before the 3rd century ad in the area west of the Naktong River in southern Korea. The traditional date for the founding of the confederation is given as ad 42, but this is considered to be highly unreliable. The confederation was sometimes known as K

  • kaya (plant)

    Japanese torreya, (Torreya nucifera), an ornamental evergreen timber tree of the yew family (Taxaceae), native to the southern islands of Japan. Although it is the hardiest species of its genus and may be 10 to 25 metres (about 35 to 80 feet) tall, it assumes a shrubby form in less temperate areas.

  • kayag?m (musical instrument)

    Kayag?m, Korean board zither with 12 silk strings, 12 movable bridges, and a convex upper surface. Fashioned from paulownia wood, it forms a rectangle about 160 cm (62 inches) long and 30 cm (12 inches) wide. The player, who is seated on the floor, places one end of the instrument on the right knee

  • Kayah (people)

    Karen: …them into White Karen and Red Karen. The former consist of two groups, the Sgaw and the Pwo; the Red Karen include the Bre, the Padaung, the Yinbaw, and the Zayein. They occupy areas in southeastern Myanmar on both sides of the lower Salween River, in contiguous parts of Thailand,…

  • kayak (boat)

    Kayak, one of the two common types of canoe used for recreation and sport. It originated with the Eskimos of Greenland and was later also used by Alaskan Eskimos. It has a pointed bow and stern and no keel and is covered except for a cockpit in which the paddler or paddlers sit, facing forward and

  • kayakeum (musical instrument)

    Kayag?m, Korean board zither with 12 silk strings, 12 movable bridges, and a convex upper surface. Fashioned from paulownia wood, it forms a rectangle about 160 cm (62 inches) long and 30 cm (12 inches) wide. The player, who is seated on the floor, places one end of the instrument on the right knee

  • kayaking (recreation)

    Gert Fredriksson: …winning seven world championships in kayaking events and eight Olympic medals, including six gold.

  • kayak?m (musical instrument)

    Kayag?m, Korean board zither with 12 silk strings, 12 movable bridges, and a convex upper surface. Fashioned from paulownia wood, it forms a rectangle about 160 cm (62 inches) long and 30 cm (12 inches) wide. The player, who is seated on the floor, places one end of the instrument on the right knee

  • kayal (music)

    Khayal, in Hindustani music, a musical form based on a Hindi song in two parts that recur between expanding cycles of melodic and rhythmic improvisation. In a standard performance a slow (vilambit) khayal is followed by a shorter, fast (drut) khayal in the same raga (melodic framework). The khayal

  • Kayan (people)

    Kayan, indigenous people of central Borneo. They numbered about 27,000 in the late 20th century. The Kayan are settled mainly along the middle reaches of the Baram, Bintulu, and Rajang rivers in Sarawak, Malaysia. In Indonesian Borneo they live mainly near the headwaters of the Kayan River, in the

  • Kāyastha (caste)

    India: Social mobility: …new castes, such as the Kayasthas (scribes) and Khatris (traders), are mentioned in the sources of this period. According to the Brahmanic sources, they originated from intercaste marriages, but this is clearly an attempt at rationalizing their rank in the hierarchy. Many of these new castes played a major role…

  • Kaye, Danny (American actor)

    Danny Kaye, energetic multitalented American actor and comedian who later became known for his involvement with humanitarian causes. The son of Ukrainian immigrants, Kaye began his performing career in the 1930s as a comic entertainer in hotels in the Catskill Mountains and in nightclubs across the

  • Kaye, John (British physician)

    John Caius, prominent humanist and physician whose classic account of the English sweating sickness is considered one of the earliest histories of an epidemic. Caius attended Gonville Hall (now Gonville and Caius College) in Cambridge, Eng., where he is believed to have studied the humanities and

  • Kaye, Lenny (American musician and critic)

    Patti Smith: …with the guitarist and critic Lenny Kaye. By 1973 they had formed a band and began performing widely in the downtown club scene. Smith’s mesmeric charisma, chantlike but hoarsely compelling musical declamation, visionary texts, and simple but ingenious rock music won her an intense cult following.

  • Kaye, M. M. (British writer and illustrator)

    M.M. Kaye, British writer and illustrator (born Aug. 21, 1908, Simla, India—died Jan. 29, 2004, Lavenham, Suffolk, Eng.), captured life in India and Afghanistan during the Raj in her immensely popular novel The Far Pavilions (1978). The daughter of a British civil servant working in India, Kaye s

  • Kaye, Mary Margaret (British writer and illustrator)

    M.M. Kaye, British writer and illustrator (born Aug. 21, 1908, Simla, India—died Jan. 29, 2004, Lavenham, Suffolk, Eng.), captured life in India and Afghanistan during the Raj in her immensely popular novel The Far Pavilions (1978). The daughter of a British civil servant working in India, Kaye s

  • Kaye, Nora (American dancer)

    Nora Kaye, American dramatic ballerina, called the “Duse of the Dance.” Nora Koreff began taking dance lessons at the Metropolitan Opera Ballet School at the age of eight. At age 15 she joined the Met’s corps de ballet, and, after further training under Michel Fokine and George Balanchine, she

  • Kaye, Stubby (American comedian)

    Stubby Kaye, American comedian and singer who electrified audiences with his showstopping rendition of "Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat" in the Broadway production of Guys and Dolls (1950); the portly performer also appeared on such television series as "Love and Marriage" and "My Sister Eileen"

  • Kaye-Smith, Emily Sheila (British author)

    Sheila Kaye-Smith, British novelist, best known for her many novels depicting life in her native rural Sussex. The daughter of a country doctor, Kaye-Smith began writing as a youth, publishing her first novel, The Tramping Methodist (1908), at age 21. Other novels and a book of verse were followed

  • Kaye-Smith, Sheila (British author)

    Sheila Kaye-Smith, British novelist, best known for her many novels depicting life in her native rural Sussex. The daughter of a country doctor, Kaye-Smith began writing as a youth, publishing her first novel, The Tramping Methodist (1908), at age 21. Other novels and a book of verse were followed

  • Kayentachelys aprix (fossil turtle)

    turtle: Origin and evolution: …the other turtle suborder, Cryptodira, Kayentachelys aprix of the Late Jurassic (some 150 million years ago) is almost assuredly a cryptodire; it is also the oldest known North American turtle. Other cryptodires are known from the Late Jurassic, although they are not representative of existing families. The largest known turtles…

  • Kayes (Mali)

    Kayes, town, western Mali, western Africa. It lies along the Sénégal River. Kayes is both the terminus of Sénégal River traffic and an important stop on the Mali Railway (Regie des Chemins de Fer du Mali; in Senegal, Regie des Chemins de Fer du Senegal). Southeast of Kayes is the French fort of

  • Kaygusuz Abdal (Turkish poet)

    Islamic arts: Influence of Yunus Emre: …the Bektashis may be mentioned Kaygusuz Abdal (15th century), who probably came from the European provinces of the Ottoman Empire. His verses are full of burlesque and even coarse images; in their odd mixture of worldliness and religious expression, they are often as amusing as they are puzzling. In the…

  • Kayibanda, Grégoire (president of Rwanda)

    Juvénal Habyarimana: Grégoire Kayibanda. A civilian-military government was established, of which Habyarimana became president.

  • Kaylānī, Rashid ?Alī al- (prime minister of Iraq)

    Rashīd ?Alī al-Gaylānī, Iraqi lawyer and politician who was prime minister of Iraq (1933, 1940–41, 1941) and one of the most celebrated political leaders of the Arab world during his time. The son of an aristocratic Sunnite family, Gaylānī studied law at Baghdad Law School. After several years of

  • kayotsarga (yoga posture)

    Tirthankara: …in the pose known as kayotsarga (“dismissing the body”) or seated cross-legged on a lion throne in the posture of meditation, dhyanamudra. The images are often carved out of marble or other highly polished stone or are cast in metal, the cold surfaces serving to emphasize the frozen detachment from…

  • K?yri (Scandinavian feast day)

    Kekri, in ancient Finnish religion, a feast day marking the end of the agricultural season that also coincided with the time when the cattle were taken in from pasture and settled for a winter’s stay in the barn. Kekri originally fell on Michaelmas, September 29, but was later shifted to November

  • Kayser (German pewter firm)

    metalwork: 16th century to modern: The firm of Kayser in Oppum near Krefeld played a leading part in this revival. But the outbreak of World War I spelled the end of Art Nouveau—whose heady run of success had anyway been short-lived—and with it the end of old pewter.

  • Kayser, Heinrich Gustav Johannes (German physicist)

    Heinrich Kayser, German physicist who discovered the presence of helium in the Earth’s atmosphere. Kayser’s early research work was on the properties of sound. In collaboration with the physicist and mathematician Carl D.T. Runge, Kayser carefully mapped the spectra of a large number of elements

  • Kayseri (Turkey)

    Kayseri, city, central Turkey. It lies at an elevation of 3,422 feet (1,043 metres) on a flat plain below the foothills of the extinct volcano Mount Ereiyes (ancient Mount Argaeus, 12,852 feet [3,917 metres]). The city is situated 165 miles (265 km) east-southeast of Ankara. It was originally known

  • Kayseri rug

    Kayseri rug, floor covering handwoven in or around the city of Kayseri in central Turkey. The best-known rugs from this district are those produced in the 20th century, largely for sale to tourists and undiscriminating collectors. Free imitations of Ghiordes, Persian, or Cairene designs, they are

  • Kaysone Phomvihan (president of Laos)

    Kaysone Phomvihan, Laotian political leader and revolutionary who was a communist leader from 1955 and, following the overthrow of the 600-year-old monarchy (1975), ruler of Laos. Kaysone was born in southern Laos of a Lao mother and a Vietnamese father, a civil servant in the French colonial

  • Kaz Da?i (mountain range, Turkey)

    Ida, mountain range in northwestern Asia Minor (now Turkey), near the site of ancient Troy. A classic shrine, Ida was where Paris passed judgment on the rival goddesses and was the scene of the rape of Ganymede. From its highest peak, about 5,800 feet (1,800 m), the gods are said to have w

  • KaZaA (American company)

    Janus Friis: KaZaA: In 2000 Friis and Zennstr?m created KaZaA, a second-generation peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing application that they distributed for free, though it was notoriously loaded with adware (typically, software that generates pop-up ads), spyware (programs that monitor users’ actions), and other malware applications that were secretly…

  • Kazacharthra (fossil crustacean order)

    branchiopod: Annotated classification: ?Order Kazacharthra Early Jurassic; large carapace covers part of trunk; last 32–40 segments lack limbs; 6 pairs of large trunk limbs project beyond carapace; trunk ends in a large flat telson with a pair of long rami; overall length up to 10 cm. Some…

  • Kazachskij Melkosopo?nik (region, Kazakhstan)

    Kazakh Uplands, hilly upland in central and eastern Kazakhstan, occupying about one-fifth of the republic. It is a peneplain, the mountainous Paleozoic foundation of which had already been worn down into an undulating plain by the beginning of the Mesozoic Era, beginning about 250 million years

  • Kazak (Russian and Ukrainian people)

    Cossack, (from Turkic kazak, “adventurer” or “free man”), member of a people dwelling in the northern hinterlands of the Black and Caspian seas. They had a tradition of independence and finally received privileges from the Russian government in return for military services. Originally (in the 15th

  • Kazak (people)

    Kazakh, an Asiatic Turkic-speaking people inhabiting mainly Kazakhstan and the adjacent parts of the Uighur Autonomous Region of Sinkiang in China. The Kazakhs emerged in the 15th century from an amalgam of Turkic tribes who entered Transoxiana about the 8th century and of Mongols who entered the

  • Kazak language

    Kazak language, member of the Turkic language family (a subfamily of the Altaic languages), belonging to the northwestern, or Kipchak, branch. The Kazak language is spoken primarily in Kazakhstan and in the Uighur Autonomous Region of Sinkiang in China but is also found in Uzbekistan, Mongolia, a

  • Kazak literature

    Kazakh literature, the body of literature, both oral and written, produced in the Kazakh language by the Kazakh people of Central Asia. The Kazakh professional bard once preserved a large repertoire of centuries-old poetry. In the mid-19th century, for example, a bard might recite a number of works

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