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  • Kean, Ellen (British actress)

    Ellen Kean, one of the finest English actresses of her day and the wife of the actor Charles Kean, with whom she performed. Ellen was born of English parents and first appeared at Covent Garden, London, in 1823 as Olivia in William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. She then performed at Bath (1824–26),

  • Kean, Thomas (American politician)

    9-11 Commission: Former New Jersey governor Thomas Kean and former congressman Lee Hamilton subsequently agreed to chair and vice-chair the commission, which was composed of five Republicans and five Democrats. A staff of experts led by Philip Zelikow prepared the report after interviewing 1,200 individuals and studying thousands of classified and…

  • Keane, Bil (American cartoonist)

    Bil Keane, (William Keane), American cartoonist (born Oct. 5, 1922, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Nov. 8, 2011, Paradise Valley, Ariz.), celebrated the humorous side of family life in the lighthearted one-panel comic The Family Circus, which debuted on Feb. 19, 1960, and eventually appeared in nearly

  • Keane, Bob (American record producer)

    Ritchie Valens: …came to the attention of Bob Keane, owner of Del-Fi records, who produced the sessions at Gold Star Studios that resulted in Valens’s hits. His first hit, “Come On, Let’s Go” (1958), was followed later that year by “Donna,” a ballad written for an ex-girlfriend, and “La Bamba,” Valens’s best-remembered…

  • Keane, John Brendan (Irish writer)

    John Brendan Keane, Irish playwright and novelist (born July 21, 1928, Listowel, County Kerry, Ire.—died May 30, 2002, Listowel), eschewed as subject matter both the popular romantic mythology of Ireland and the vibrant modern nation to explore the darker complexities of rural Ireland in a series o

  • Keane, Molly (Irish author)

    Molly Keane, Anglo-Irish novelist and playwright whose subject is the leisure class of her native Ireland. Born into the Anglo-Irish gentry (the daughter of an estate owner and the poet Moira O’Neill), Keane was educated by a governess. She began to publish novels while in her 20s, under the name

  • Keane, William (American cartoonist)

    Bil Keane, (William Keane), American cartoonist (born Oct. 5, 1922, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Nov. 8, 2011, Paradise Valley, Ariz.), celebrated the humorous side of family life in the lighthearted one-panel comic The Family Circus, which debuted on Feb. 19, 1960, and eventually appeared in nearly

  • Keaney, Frank W. (American basketball coach)

    basketball: U.S. high school and college basketball: Frank W. Keaney, coach at the University of Rhode Island from 1921 to 1948, is credited with introducing the concept of “fast break” basketball, in which the offensive team rushes the ball upcourt hoping to get a good shot before the defense can get set.…

  • Keanu (film by Atencio [2016])

    Tiffany Haddish: …gang member in the comedy Keanu, the feature film debut of comedians Jordan Peele and Keegan-Michael Key. The following year she gave her breakout performance in Girls Trip, in which she costarred with (and stole the show from) Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, and Jada Pinkett Smith. In the wake of…

  • Kearney (Nebraska, United States)

    Kearney, city, seat (1874) of Buffalo county, south-central Nebraska, U.S. It lies on the north bank of the Platte River, about 130 miles (210 km) west of Lincoln. Pawnee Indians were early inhabitants of the area. The city was founded in 1871 at the junction of the Burlington and Missouri River

  • Kearney, Philip (United States Army officer)

    Second Battle of Bull Run: The first day: Phil Kearny and Brig. Gen. Isaac Stevens, drove the Confederate left out of its position; a Confederate counterattack, led by Brig. Gen. Jubal Early, dislodged the Union soldiers with a bayonet charge.

  • Kearns, Doris Helen (American historian)

    Doris Kearns Goodwin, American author and historian known for her highly regarded presidential studies. In 1964 Kearns received a bachelor’s degree from Colby College, Waterville, Maine, and in 1968 she earned a doctorate in government from Harvard University, where she later taught government. In

  • Kearny, Stephen Watts (United States military officer)

    Stephen Watts Kearny, U.S. Army officer who conquered New Mexico and helped win California during the Mexican War (1846–48). After serving in the War of 1812, Kearny spent most of the next 30 years on frontier duty. At the beginning of the Mexican War, he was ordered to lead an expedition from Fort

  • Kearsarge (ship)

    Alabama claims: …being sunk by the USS Kearsarge off Cherbourg, Fr. (June 1864).

  • Keate Award (British-South African history)

    South Africa: The decline of the African states: …and Boers in 1871 (the Keate Award), Colonial Secretary Lord Carnarvon’s more determined federation plan of 1875, Shepstone’s invasion of the Transvaal in 1877, and the British invasions of Zululand and Pediland in 1879. British troops also took part in an 1879 campaign that crushed Pedi military power in the…

  • Keate, Robert W. (British colonial agent)

    South Africa: Diamonds and confederation: …special hearing in October 1871, Robert W. Keate (then lieutenant governor of Natal) found in favour of Waterboer, but the British persuaded him to request protection against his Boer rivals, and the area was annexed as Griqualand West.

  • Keating Five (United States history)

    Charles H. Keating: In 1987 the so-called Keating Five—Alan Cranston, Dennis DeConcini, John Glenn, John McCain, and Donald Riegle—duly intervened on Keating’s behalf with the director of the federal agency that oversaw the operation of the country’s savings and loans. Keating was apparently so sure that he would benefit from his influence…

  • Keating, Charles H. (American businessman)

    Charles H. Keating, American businessman best known for his role in the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s and ’90s, which resulted in the closure of about half of all savings and loan associations in the United States and the bankruptcy of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation

  • Keating, Charles Humphrey (American businessman)

    Charles H. Keating, American businessman best known for his role in the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s and ’90s, which resulted in the closure of about half of all savings and loan associations in the United States and the bankruptcy of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation

  • Keating, Geoffrey (Irish writer)

    Celtic literature: Late period: Geoffrey Keating produced the first historical (as opposed to annalistic) work in his Foras Feasa ar éirinn (written c. 1640; History of Ireland) as well as some fine verse in both old and new metres and two spiritual treatises.

  • Keating, H. R. F. (British author)

    H(enry) R(eymond) F(itzwalter) Keating, British novelist (born Oct. 31, 1926, St. Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, Eng.—died March 27, 2011, London, Eng.), wrote more than 50 crime novels over a 50-year career, notably 26 books featuring the unassuming Inspector Ganesh Ghote of the Bombay (now Mumbai)

  • Keating, Henry Reymond Fitzwalter (British author)

    H(enry) R(eymond) F(itzwalter) Keating, British novelist (born Oct. 31, 1926, St. Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, Eng.—died March 27, 2011, London, Eng.), wrote more than 50 crime novels over a 50-year career, notably 26 books featuring the unassuming Inspector Ganesh Ghote of the Bombay (now Mumbai)

  • Keating, Paul (prime minister of Australia)

    Paul Keating, politician who was leader of the Australian Labor Party and prime minister of Australia from December 1991 to March 1996. Growing up in working-class Bankstown, a suburb of Sydney, Keating left school at age 14. He became involved in trade union activity and labour politics and was

  • Keating, Paul John (prime minister of Australia)

    Paul Keating, politician who was leader of the Australian Labor Party and prime minister of Australia from December 1991 to March 1996. Growing up in working-class Bankstown, a suburb of Sydney, Keating left school at age 14. He became involved in trade union activity and labour politics and was

  • Keating-Owen Act (United States [1916])

    Grace Abbott: …the employment of juveniles, the Keating-Owen Act (1916). This law was declared unconstitutional in 1918, but Abbott secured a continuation of its policy by having a child-labour clause inserted into all war-goods contracts between the federal government and private industry. In October 1919 Abbott returned to Illinois as director of…

  • keatite (mineral)

    silica mineral: Keatite: Keatite is a tetragonal form of silica known only from the laboratory, where it can be synthesized metastably in the presence of steam over a temperature range of 300 to 600 °C and a pressure range of 400 to 4,000 bars (standard atmospheric pressure…

  • Keaton, Buster (American actor)

    Buster Keaton, American film comedian and director, the “Great Stone Face” of the silent screen, known for his deadpan expression and his imaginative and often elaborate visual comedy. The son of vaudevillians, Keaton is said to have earned his famous nickname when, at age 18 months, he fell down a

  • Keaton, Diane (American actress and director)

    Diane Keaton, American film actress and director who achieved fame in quirky comic roles prior to gaining respect as a dramatic actress. Keaton studied acting at Santa Ana College in California and at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York. She appeared in summer stock in the mid-1960s and in 1968

  • Keaton, Joseph Francis, IV (American actor)

    Buster Keaton, American film comedian and director, the “Great Stone Face” of the silent screen, known for his deadpan expression and his imaginative and often elaborate visual comedy. The son of vaudevillians, Keaton is said to have earned his famous nickname when, at age 18 months, he fell down a

  • Keaton, Michael (American actor)

    Michael Keaton, American actor who began his career in mostly comedic roles but later found success in dramas. Keaton studied speech for two years at Kent State University before moving to Pittsburgh, where he struggled as a stand-up comic. After a stint as a TV cameraman in a cable station, he

  • Keats, John (British poet)

    John Keats, English Romantic lyric poet who devoted his short life to the perfection of a poetry marked by vivid imagery, great sensuous appeal, and an attempt to express a philosophy through classical legend. The son of a livery-stable manager, John Keats received relatively little formal

  • Keban Dam (dam, Turkey)

    Tigris-Euphrates river system: Physiography of the Euphrates: …Keban, near Elaz??, where the Keban Dam (completed 1974), spans a deep gorge. The river breaks through the Taurus Mountains and descends to the high plain of southeastern Turkey (site of the ancient kingdom of Commagene) through the Karakaya and Atatürk dams, both built in the 1980s. The Atatürk Dam…

  • Kebar Dam (ancient dam, Persia)

    dam: Early dams of East Asia: In Persia (modern-day Iran) the Kebar Dam and the Kurit Dam represented the world’s first large-scale thin-arch dams. The Kebar and Kurit dams were built early in the 14th century by Il-Khanid Mongols; the Kebar Dam reached a height of 26 metres (85 feet), and the Kurit Dam, after successive…

  • Kebara (cave, Israel)

    Kebara, paleoanthropological site on Mount Carmel in northern Israel that has yielded a trove of Neanderthal bones and associated artifacts. The Kebara cave was occupied by humans and various other animals from the Middle Paleolithic Period (approximately 200,000 to 40,000 years ago) through the

  • Kebara 2 (human fossil)

    Kebara: …young adult skeleton (known as Kebara 2) that dates to about 60,000 years ago, and fragments of many more individuals. The infant and adult skeletons were clearly interred intentionally, although burial pits could not be discerned. Of the fragile fragmentary infant fossils, only their teeth indicate that they were Neanderthals.…

  • Kebbi (historical kingdom, Africa)

    Yauri: Muhammadu Kanta, founder of the Kebbi kingdom to the north, conquered Yauri in the mid-16th century; and Yauri, although essentially independent after Kanta’s death (c. 1561), paid tribute to Kebbi until the mid-18th century. About 1810 King Albishir (Mohammadu dan Ayi), the Hausa ruler of Yauri, pledged allegiance to the…

  • Kebbi (state, Nigeria)

    Kebbi, state, northwestern Nigeria. It was created in 1991 from the southwestern half of Sokoto (q.v.) state. Kebbi borders the nations of Niger to the west and Benin to the southwest, and it borders the Nigerian states of Sokoto and Zamfara to the north and east and Niger to the south. Kebbi’s

  • Kebbi River (river, Nigeria)

    Sokoto River, river in northwestern Nigeria, rising just south of Funtua on the northern plateau. It flows northwestward in a wide arc for 200 miles (320 km) to Sokoto town, west of which the Rima River joins it in its lower course to its confluence with the Niger River east of Illo. The alluvial

  • Kebiishi (Japanese official)

    Kebiishi, body of police commissioners who constituted the only effective military force during Japan’s Heian period (ad 794–1185). The Kebiishi was the backbone of the administration during this time, and its decline about 1000 marked the beginning of the disintegration of central control over the

  • Keble College (college, England, United Kingdom)

    William Butterfield: His few secular works include Keble College, Oxford, mostly complete by 1876.

  • Keble, John (British priest and poet)

    John Keble, Anglican priest, theologian, and poet who originated and helped lead the Oxford Movement (q.v.), which sought to revive in Anglicanism the High Church ideals of the later 17th-century church. Ordained in 1816, Keble was educated at the University of Oxford and served as a tutor there

  • Kebne, Mount (mountain, Sweden)

    Norrbotten: …the highest point in Sweden, Mount Kebne (6,926 feet [2,111 metres]).

  • Kebnekaise (mountain range, Sweden)

    Kebnekaise, mountain range in the l?n (county) of Norrbotten, northern Sweden. It lies 25 miles (40 km) from the Norwegian border and about 103 miles (166 km) north of the Arctic Circle. The name is a Sami word meaning “kettle top.” One of its peaks, Mount Kebne (6,926 feet [2,111 metres]), is the

  • Kebnekaise, Mount (mountain, Sweden)

    Norrbotten: …the highest point in Sweden, Mount Kebne (6,926 feet [2,111 metres]).

  • Kebo Tengali (Indonesian chief minister)

    Kertanagara: Legacy: …Raganatha (Kebo Arema) and appointed Aragani, who could serve him delicious food every day. Aragani is also known as Kebo Tengali, though some scholars say these were two separate men. He drank palm wine and held orgies, which eventually led to his death—he was killed by his enemies during one…

  • Kebra Negast (Ethiopian literary work)

    Ethiopia: The Zagwe and Solomonic dynasties: …early 14th century in the Kebra negast (“Glory of the Kings”), a collection of legends that related the birth of Menilek I, associated Ethiopia with the Judeo-Christian tradition, and provided a basis for Ethiopian national unity through the Solomonic dynasty, Semitic culture, and the Amharic language. Well-armed ideologically, the Ethiopian…

  • Kebun Binatang Jakarta (zoo, Jakarta, Indonesia)

    Ragunan Zoological Gardens, zoo in Jakarta, Indon., that is one of the world’s notable collections of Southeast Asian flora and fauna. More than 3,500 specimens of approximately 450 animal species are exhibited on the 200-hectare (494-acre) park grounds. Among these are the orangutan, Sumatran

  • Kebun Binatang Ragunan (zoo, Jakarta, Indonesia)

    Ragunan Zoological Gardens, zoo in Jakarta, Indon., that is one of the world’s notable collections of Southeast Asian flora and fauna. More than 3,500 specimens of approximately 450 animal species are exhibited on the 200-hectare (494-acre) park grounds. Among these are the orangutan, Sumatran

  • Kebun Raya Indonesia (garden, Bogor, Indonesia)

    Indonesia Botanical Gardens, tropical garden in Bogor, West Java, Indonesia. It is renowned for its research on regional flora. The 215-acre (87-hectare) site was first used by the Dutch for introducing tropical plants from other parts of the world into the region. In 1817 it was converted into a

  • Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences (school, California, United States)

    Claremont Colleges: …(Claremont Graduate University and the Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences). The campuses are adjacent to one another, and many facilities are shared, including the consortium’s main library, the Honnold/Mudd Library, which houses nearly two million volumes. The idea of creating a cluster of colleges at Claremont was developed…

  • Keck Observatory (observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii, United States)

    Keck Observatory, astronomical observatory located near the 4,200-metre (13,800-foot) summit of Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano on north-central Hawaii Island, Hawaii, U.S. Keck’s twin 10-metre (394-inch) telescopes, housed in separate domes, constitute the largest optical telescope system of the

  • Keck telescopes (telescopes, Mauna Kea, Hawaii, United States)

    Keck Observatory: …domes, constitute the largest optical telescope system of the burgeoning multi-observatory science reserve located on Mauna Kea.

  • Keckley, Elizabeth (American author)

    African American literature: The Civil War and Reconstruction: Elizabeth Keckley, who rose from slavery in St. Louis to become the modiste and confidante of first lady Mary Todd Lincoln, articulated in her autobiography, Behind the Scenes; or, Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House (1868), a spirit of sectional…

  • Kecskemét (Hungary)

    Kecskemét, city of county status and seat of Bács-Kiskun megye (county), central Hungary. Long established as a centre for handicrafts and cattle raising, it has also grown in importance for its viticulture, vegetables, and fruit. It is surrounded by flat sandy farmland, often referred to as “the

  • Kedarnath (India)

    Uttarakhand: Pilgrimage centres: At Kedarnath, somewhat to the southeast of Gangotri at an elevation approaching 12,000 feet (3,500 metres), is a stone temple to Shiva that is considered to be more than 1,000 years old; a large statue of the bull Nandi, one of Shiva’s chief attendants, stands outside…

  • Kedazan (people)

    Kadazan, term embracing a number of peoples that together constitute the largest indigenous ethnic group in the state of Sabah, Malaysia, on the northeastern extremity of the island of Borneo. The Kadazan are grouped along the coastal plain from Kudat to Beaufort and in the hills around Tambunan.

  • Kede (people)

    Nupe: Zam, Batache (Bataci), and Kede (Kyedye) are the most important. The Kede and Batache are river people, subsisting primarily by fishing and trading; the other Nupe are farmers, who grow the staple crops millet, sorghum, yams, and rice. Commercial crops include rice, peanuts (groundnuts), cotton, and shea nuts. The…

  • kedesha (temple prostitute)

    Qedesha, one of a class of sacred prostitutes found throughout the ancient Middle East, especially in the worship of the fertility goddess Astarte (Ashtoreth). Prostitutes, who often played an important part in official temple worship, could be either male or female. In Egypt, a goddess named

  • kedeshah (temple prostitute)

    Qedesha, one of a class of sacred prostitutes found throughout the ancient Middle East, especially in the worship of the fertility goddess Astarte (Ashtoreth). Prostitutes, who often played an important part in official temple worship, could be either male or female. In Egypt, a goddess named

  • Kedge (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Air-to-surface: …the television-guided AS-10 Karen and AS-14 Kedge (the last with a range of about 25 miles). These missiles were fired from tactical fighters such as the MiG-27 Flogger and attack helicopters such as the Mi-24 Hind and Mi-28 Havoc.

  • Kediet Ijill (inselberg, Mauritania)

    Mauritania: Relief: …of which the highest is Mount Ijill at 3,002 feet (915 metres), an enormous block of hematite.

  • Kedir, Mohammed (Ethiopian athlete)

    Miruts Yifter: Yifter the Shifter: Mohammed Kedir, a fellow Ethiopian, was on the inside, while Ireland’s Eamonn Coghlan held the outside. Kedir, however, yielded to his teammate, and Yifter shifted one more time, exploding for a time of 27.2 seconds in the closing 200 metres to snare the gold medal…

  • Kediri (regency, Indonesia)

    Kediri, traditional region of eastern Java, Indonesia. From the 11th to the early 13th century, Kediri was the dominant kingdom in eastern Java, renowned for its naval and commercial strength and for its achievements in literature. It was absorbed into the later kingdoms of Singasari and Majapahit

  • Kediri (Indonesia)

    Kediri, city, East Java (Jawa Timur) propinsi (or provinsi; province), eastern Java, Indonesia. It is situated on the Brantas River at the foot of Mount Wilis, 65 miles (105 km) southwest of Surabaya. Kediri is the centre of a sugar industry and of trade in such agricultural products as coffee,

  • Kedleston Hall (building, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom)

    Robert Adam: The Adam style: The south front of Kedleston Hall (1757–59) provides an example of Adam’s exterior treatment. His theme of a triumphal arch as the exterior expression of the domed interior hall is the first use of this particular Roman form in domestic architecture. The double portico (an open space created by…

  • Kedrova, Lila (Russian-born actress)

    Lila Kedrova, (Elizabeth Kedrova), Russian-born character actress (born 1918/19?, Petrograd [now St. Petersburg], Russia—died Feb. 16, 2000, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.), was an accomplished stage and screen actress in Europe, Canada, and Hollywood but never fully escaped from being associated with h

  • Kedu Plain (region, Indonesia)

    Indonesia: Central Java from c. 700 to c. 1000: …undertakings; the monuments of the Kedu Plain are the most famous in Indonesia. The Borobudur temple complex, in honour of Mahayana Buddhism, contains 2,000,000 cubic feet (56,600 cubic metres) of stone and includes 27,000 square feet (2,500 square metres) of stone bas-relief. Its construction extended from the late 8th century…

  • Keegan, Sir John Desmond Patrick (British historian)

    Sir John Desmond Patrick Keegan, British historian (born May 15, 1934, London, Eng.—died Aug. 2, 2012, Kilmington, Wiltshire, Eng.), was perhaps the leading exponent of military history as the social history of war. Keegan published more than 20 books on warfare across the centuries, most notably

  • keel (bird anatomy)

    flightless bird: Physical characteristics: …example, flying birds have a keel—a ridge on the sternum, or breastbone, which is a main site of attachment for flight muscles. Ratites do not possess this keel, and its absence is one reason why the group’s muscles are unsuitable for flight.

  • keel (ship part)

    Keel, in shipbuilding, the main structural member and backbone of a ship or boat, running longitudinally along the centre of the bottom of the hull from stem to stern. It may be made of timber, metal, or other strong, stiff material. Traditionally it constituted the principal member to which the

  • keel (plant anatomy)

    Fabales: Classification of Fabaceae: …usually fused and form a keel that encloses the stamens and pistil. The whole design is adapted for pollination by insects or, in a few members, by hummingbirds. Sweet nectar, to which the insects are cued by coloured petals, is the usual pollinator attractant. Various locking and releasing devices of…

  • keel (fish anatomy)

    clupeiform: Distinguishing characteristics: …of clupeiform fishes forms a keel, the function of which is widely considered to be an adaptation for removing the sharp shadow that would be created below the central part of the body by top lighting, were the fish cylindrical. Prevention of such a shadow is important to an open-water…

  • keel block (sea works)

    harbours and sea works: Keel and bilge blocks: Keel and bilge blocks, on which the ship actually rests when dry-docked, are of a sufficient height above the floor of the dock to give reasonable access to the bottom plates. Such blocks are generally made of cast steel with renewable…

  • keel molding (architecture)

    molding: Compound or composite: (4) A keel molding is a projection, which resembles the keel of a ship, consisting of a pointed arch with a small fillet attached at its outermost surface.

  • Keel, Howard (American actor and singer)

    Howard Keel, (Harold Clifford Leek), American actor-singer (born April 13, 1919, Gillespie, Ill.—died Nov. 7, 2004, Palm Desert, Calif.), had a booming baritone voice that, combined with his good looks, gained him the lead roles in a succession of Hollywood musicals in the early 1950s opposite t

  • keel-billed toucan (bird)

    toucan: …common zoo resident is the keel-billed toucan (R. sulfuratus), which is about 50 cm (20 inches) long. It is mainly black with lemon yellow on the face, throat, and chest, bright red under the tail, and multicoloured markings on the bill.

  • keelboat (boat)

    Mississippi River: Early settlement and exploration: Only the long, slim keelboats made the return trip. They were worked upstream under pole, paddle, or sail or by the backbreaking “cordelle,” a system under which the crew went ashore with a long bow hawser and pulled the vessel upstream by brute strength.

  • Keele Peak (mountain, Canada)

    Mackenzie Mountains: The highest peak is Keele Peak (9,751 feet [2,972 metres]), and many others, including Dome peak and Mounts Hunt, Sidney Dodson, Sir James MacBrien, and Ida, reach elevations exceeding 8,000 feet (2,400 metres).

  • Keele River (river, Canada)

    Mackenzie River: The lower course: …at Wrigley, the Redstone and Keele rivers enter from the west; they have deep canyons where they break out of the Mackenzie Mountains but flow across the lowland as shallow, braided streams. These rivers and the others that drain from the Mackenzie Mountains have their peak flows in June after…

  • keeled boxfish (fish)

    boxfish: …to the boxfishes are the keeled boxfishes of the family Aracanidae. These fishes also have a carapace, but there is a keel along the underside and openings behind the dorsal and anal fins. The members of this group are found from Japan to Australia.

  • keeled green snake

    green snake: aestivus), often called vine snake, is about 75 cm (23 inches) long.

  • keeled skink (reptile)

    skink: Keeled skinks (Tropidophorus), which are semiaquatic, are found from Southeast Asia to northern Australia. Mabuyas (Mabuya), with about 105 species, are ground dwellers and are distributed worldwide in the tropics. Sand skinks (Scincus), also called sandfish, run across and “swim” through windblown sand aided by…

  • Keeler gap (astronomy)

    Saturn: The ring system: …the A ring; and the Keeler gap (2.26 Saturn radii), almost at the outer edge of the A ring. Of these gaps, only Encke was known prior to spacecraft exploration of Saturn.

  • Keeler, Christine (British model)

    Christine Keeler, English model who, as one of the central figures in the Profumo affair, contributed to the collapse of the Conservative government of Harold Macmillan. At age 16, Keeler left home and moved to London to work as a fashion model. Over the next two years she took a number of

  • Keeler, James Edward (American astronomer)

    James Keeler, American astronomer who confirmed that Saturn’s ring system is not a solid unit but is composed of a vast swarm of tiny particles. Interested in astronomy from an early age, Keeler became assistant to the noted astronomer Samuel P. Langley at the Allegheny Observatory, Pittsburgh,

  • Keeler, Ruby (American actress)

    Ruby Keeler, Canadian-born U.S. actress and dancer (born Aug. 25, 1909, Halifax, N.S.—died Feb. 28, 1993, Rancho Mirage, Calif.), starred as a fresh-faced ingenue who would triumphantly emerge from the chorus line to replace an ailing or temperamental star in a string of lavish formulaic D

  • Keeler, Wee Willie (American athlete)

    Wee Willie Keeler, American professional baseball player nicknamed because his height was only 5 feet 412 inches (about 1.6 metres), whose place-hitting ability (“Hit ’em where they ain’t”) made up for his lack of power. Keeler was an outfielder who batted and threw left-handed. He played in the

  • Keeler, William Henry (American athlete)

    Wee Willie Keeler, American professional baseball player nicknamed because his height was only 5 feet 412 inches (about 1.6 metres), whose place-hitting ability (“Hit ’em where they ain’t”) made up for his lack of power. Keeler was an outfielder who batted and threw left-handed. He played in the

  • Keeling Curve (atmospheric science)

    Keeling Curve, graph showing seasonal and annual changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations since 1958 at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. The graph, which was devised by American climate scientist Charles David Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, charts the

  • Keeling Islands (territory, Australia)

    Cocos Islands, external territory of Australia in the eastern Indian Ocean. The islands lie 2,290 miles (3,685 km) west of Darwin, Northern Territory, on the northern Australian coast, and about 560 miles (900 km) southwest of Christmas Island (another external territory of Australia). The isolated

  • Keeling, Charles (American scientist)

    Charles David Keeling, American scientist (born April 20, 1928, Scranton, Pa.—died June 20, 2005, Hamilton, Mont.), presented the first evidence that carbon dioxide produced by automobiles and factories was negatively affecting the Earth’s climate. In 1958 he began measuring carbon dioxide in the a

  • Keelung (Taiwan)

    Chi-lung, city (shih, or shi), northern Taiwan. Situated on the East China Sea, it is the principal port of Taipei special municipality, 16 miles (26 km) to the southwest. The city first became known as Chi-lung—which is said to have been a corruption of Ketangalan, the name of a tribe of

  • Keely, John E. W. (American inventor)

    John E.W. Keely, fraudulent American inventor. Keely was orphaned in early childhood. He is said to have been an orchestra leader, a circus performer, and a carpenter. In 1873 he announced that he had discovered a new physical force, one that, if harnessed, would produce unheard-of power. He

  • Keely, John Ernst Worrell (American inventor)

    John E.W. Keely, fraudulent American inventor. Keely was orphaned in early childhood. He is said to have been an orchestra leader, a circus performer, and a carpenter. In 1873 he announced that he had discovered a new physical force, one that, if harnessed, would produce unheard-of power. He

  • Keen, Morris L. (American businessman)

    Hugh Burgess: …for his process, Burgess, with Morris L.Keen, founded the American Wood Paper Company at Royersford, Pa., in 1863, serving as manager until his death. Although this firm eventually went bankrupt, it established the soda process in the paper industry.

  • Keen, William Williams (American brain surgeon)

    William Williams Keen, doctor who was the United States’ first brain surgeon. After graduating (M.D., 1862) from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Keen was a surgeon for the U.S. Army in 1862–64 during the American Civil War. The next two years he did postgraduate work in Paris and Berlin.

  • Keenan, Brian (Irish republican and militant)

    Brian Keenan, Northern Irish republican militant (born 1942, Belfast, N.Ire.—died May 21, 2008, Dublin, Ire.), served two prison sentences for delivering weapons to the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and helping orchestrate the IRA bombing campaign in Britain in the 1970s, but he eventually assisted

  • Keenan, Philip Childs (American astronomer)

    Philip Childs Keenan, American astronomer (born March 31, 1908, Bellevue, Pa.—died April 20, 2000, Columbus, Ohio), developed with fellow astronomer William Wilson Morgan the influential MK (for Morgan Keenan) system for classifying stars by their luminosity and spectral type. In 1932 Keenan e

  • Keene (New Hampshire, United States)

    Keene, city, seat of Cheshire county, southwestern New Hampshire, U.S., on the Ashuelot River. The original site (Upper Ashuelot), one of the Massachusetts grants of 1733, was abandoned (1746–50) because of hostile Indians. Resettled and named for Sir Benjamin Keene (1697–1757), English minister to

  • Keene, Carolyn (American author)

    Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, American writer (born July 10, 1905, Ladora, Iowa—died May 28, 2002, Toledo, Ohio), as the original author of the Nancy Drew mysteries, abandoned the stereotypical view of the heroine then common and created a teenage female who was brainy, spirited, and i

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