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  • Keiyō Industrial Zone (industrial site, Japan)

    Keiyō Industrial Zone, industrial region in east-central Japan that, along with the Keihin Industrial Zone, is part of the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolitan area. Keiyō is neither an administrative nor a political entity. It occupies part of Chiba prefecture (ken) on the Bōsō Peninsula, along the n

  • Keiyō Kōgyō Chitai (industrial site, Japan)

    Keiyō Industrial Zone, industrial region in east-central Japan that, along with the Keihin Industrial Zone, is part of the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolitan area. Keiyō is neither an administrative nor a political entity. It occupies part of Chiba prefecture (ken) on the Bōsō Peninsula, along the n

  • Keizai Dantai Rengōkai (Japanese association)

    Keidanren, Japanese association of business organizations that was established in 1946 for the purpose of mediating differences between member industries and advising the government on economic policy and related matters. It is considered one of the most powerful organizations in Japan. Created as

  • Keizan (Buddhist priest)

    Keizan Jōkin, priest of the Sōtō sect of Zen Buddhism, who founded the Sōji Temple (now in Yokohama), one of the two head temples of the sect. At the age of 12 Keizan entered the priesthood under Koun Ejō, the second head priest of the Eihei Temple (in modern Fukui prefecture), the headquarters of

  • Keizan Jōkin (Buddhist priest)

    Keizan Jōkin, priest of the Sōtō sect of Zen Buddhism, who founded the Sōji Temple (now in Yokohama), one of the two head temples of the sect. At the age of 12 Keizan entered the priesthood under Koun Ejō, the second head priest of the Eihei Temple (in modern Fukui prefecture), the headquarters of

  • Keizersgracht (canal, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam: City development: …Herengracht (Gentlemen’s Canal), Keizersgracht (Emperor’s Canal), and Prinsengracht (Prince’s Canal). These concentric canals, together with the smaller radial canals, form a characteristic spiderweb pattern, which was extended east along the harbour and west into the district known as the Jordaan during the prosperous Golden Age (the 17th and early…

  • Kejia (people)

    Hakka, ethnic group of China. Originally, the Hakka were North Chinese, but they migrated to South China (especially Guangdong, Fujian, Jiangxi, and Guangxi provinces) during the fall of the Nan (Southern) Song dynasty in the 1270s. Worldwide they are thought to number about 80 million today,

  • Kejia language (Chinese language)

    Hakka language, Chinese language spoken by considerably fewer than the estimated 80 million Hakka people living mainly in eastern and northern Guangdong province but also in Fujian, Jiangxi, Guangxi, Hunan, and Sichuan provinces. Hakka is also spoken by perhaps 7 million immigrants in widely

  • Kejser og Galil?er (work by Ibsen)

    Henrik Ibsen: Self-imposed exile: Peer Gynt, A Doll’s House, and Ghosts: …title Kejser og Galilaeer (Emperor and Galilean) but in a 10-act form too diffuse and discursive for the stage. He wrote a modern satire, De unges forbund (1869; The League of Youth) and then after many preliminary drafts a prose satire on small-town politics, Samfundets st?tter (1877; Pillars of…

  • KEK (laboratory, Tsukuba, Japan)

    particle accelerator: Electron storage rings: …the KEK-B facility at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK) in Tsukuba, electrons and positrons are stored at different energies so that they have different values of momentum. When they annihilate, the net momentum is not zero, as it is with particles of equal and opposite momentum, so…

  • Kek Lok Si Temple (temple, George Town, Malaysia)

    George Town: …city’s most spectacular temple, the Kek Lok Si Temple, or, as it is sometimes called, the Million Buddhas Precious Pagoda, a complex of structures on three levels with thousands of gilded Buddhas. George Town’s cultural and architectural traditions were recognized in 2008 when UNESCO designated the city a World Heritage…

  • Kekaya (people)

    India: Location: The Kekayas, Madras, and Ushinaras, who had settled in the region between Gandhara and the Beas River, were described as descendants of the Anu tribe. The Matsyas occupied an area to the southwest of present-day Delhi. The Kuru-Pancala, still dominant in the Ganges–Yamuna Doab area, were…

  • Kekchí (people)

    Kekchí, Mayan Indians of central Guatemala, living in damp highlands and lowlands of irregular terrain. The Kekchí raise corn and beans as staple crops. These are planted together in plots that are burned off and then worked with digging sticks. Sexual taboos and fertility rituals are associated

  • Kekenodon (fossil mammal genus)

    basilosaurid: …consist of the single genus Kekenodon, which was only poorly known and is the only basilosaurid dating from the Oligocene Epoch. Stromerius nidensis was described in 2007 and dated to the late Eocene of Egypt; it is the only species classified in subfamily Stromeriinae.

  • Kekere Ekun (work by Olabimtan)

    African literature: Yoruba: …Olabimtan wrote a realistic novel, Kekere ekun (1967; “Leopard Boy”), a heavily Christian work. Akinwunmi Isola wrote O le ku (1974; “Fearful Incidents”), a realistic novel.

  • Kékes, Mount (mountain, Hungary)

    Mátra Mountains: …maximum elevation is reached at Mount Kékes (3,327 feet [1,014 m]). The Mátra is a sharply defined volcanic mass consisting in large part of lava and measuring approximately 25 miles (40 km) east-west between the Tarna and Zagyva rivers and 9 miles (14 km) north-south across the range’s spine. The…

  • Kekkonen, Urho Kaleva (president of Finland)

    Urho Kaleva Kekkonen, Finnish prime minister (1950–53, 1954–56) and president (1956–81), noted for his Soviet-oriented neutrality. A northern lumberman’s son, Kekkonen studied at the University of Helsinki, receiving bachelor’s and doctoral degrees in civil law in 1928 and 1936, respectively. While

  • keklap (cyanobacteria)

    commercial fishing: Seaweeds and plankton: A related scum, keklap, found in Java, is used chiefly as fish feed. Another species is made into dried sheets in Japan and prepared for food by heating in water. Successful cultivation of some blue-green species has been carried through on a semicommercial scale.

  • Kekri (Scandinavian feast day)

    Kekri, in ancient Finnish religion, a feast day marking the end of the agricultural season that also coincided with the time when the cattle were taken in from pasture and settled for a winter’s stay in the barn. Kekri originally fell on Michaelmas, September 29, but was later shifted to November

  • Kekuaokalani (Hawaiian chief)

    Kailua-Kona: …abandoned traditional Hawaiian religion, and Kekuaokalani, who led the forces supporting the ancient Hawaiian religion; Kekuaokalani and his warriors were overwhelmed. Lekeleke Burial Grounds, 7 miles (11 km) south of Kailua, commemorates the battle. Hulihee Palace (1837), now a museum, became the summer residence of the kings who succeeded Kamehameha…

  • Kekulé structure (chemistry)

    chemical bonding: Resonant structures: …for each of these so-called Kekulé structures. (They are so called after Friedrich August Kekulé, who is commonly credited with having first proposed the hexagonal structure for benzene in 1865; however, a cyclic structure had already been proposed by Joseph Loschmidt four years earlier.) The actual structure is a superposition…

  • Kekule von Stradonitz, August (German chemist)

    August Kekule von Stradonitz, German chemist who established the foundation for the structural theory in organic chemistry. Kekule was born into an upper-middle-class family of civil servants and as a schoolboy demonstrated an aptitude for art and languages, as well as science subjects. Intending

  • Kekule, August (German chemist)

    August Kekule von Stradonitz, German chemist who established the foundation for the structural theory in organic chemistry. Kekule was born into an upper-middle-class family of civil servants and as a schoolboy demonstrated an aptitude for art and languages, as well as science subjects. Intending

  • Kekulé, Friedrich August (German chemist)

    August Kekule von Stradonitz, German chemist who established the foundation for the structural theory in organic chemistry. Kekule was born into an upper-middle-class family of civil servants and as a schoolboy demonstrated an aptitude for art and languages, as well as science subjects. Intending

  • KEL (gene)

    Kell blood group system: …various antigens encoded by the KEL gene. The system, discovered in 1946, is characterized by a high degree of polymorphism (genetic variation), and thus studies of the Kell antigens have provided insight into the development of polymorphic traits in the context of human evolution. Antibodies generated against antigens in the…

  • Kel A?r (people)

    Niger: Ethnic groups: …region in the west, the Asben (Kel A?r) in the A?r region, and the Itesen (Kel Geres) to the south and east of A?r. The Tuareg people are also found in Algeria and in Mali. The Kanuri, who live to the east of Zinder, are divided into a number of…

  • Kel Geres (people)

    Niger: Ethnic groups: …the A?r region, and the Itesen (Kel Geres) to the south and east of A?r. The Tuareg people are also found in Algeria and in Mali. The Kanuri, who live to the east of Zinder, are divided into a number of subgroups—the Manga, the Dogara (Dagara), the Mober, the Buduma,…

  • Kelaa des Sraghna, el- (province, Morocco)

    el-Kelaa des Srarhna: El-Kelaa des Srarhna province is bounded by the provinces of Settat (north), Beni Mellal (northeast), Azilal (southeast), Marrakech (south), Safi (southwest), and el-Jadida (northwest). It comprises the most arid area of Morocco west of the Atlas Mountains. The western part of the province is a…

  • Kelaa des Sraghna, el- (Morocco)

    El-Kelaa des Srarhna, city, provincial capital, and province (established 1973), Tensift region, western Morocco. The city, located about 47 miles (75 km) northeast of Marrakech, is a local market centre in the eastern part of the province; its name means the “Citadel of the Srarhna,” referring to

  • Kelaa des Srarhna, el- (Morocco)

    El-Kelaa des Srarhna, city, provincial capital, and province (established 1973), Tensift region, western Morocco. The city, located about 47 miles (75 km) northeast of Marrakech, is a local market centre in the eastern part of the province; its name means the “Citadel of the Srarhna,” referring to

  • Kelaa des Srarhna, el- (province, Morocco)

    el-Kelaa des Srarhna: El-Kelaa des Srarhna province is bounded by the provinces of Settat (north), Beni Mellal (northeast), Azilal (southeast), Marrakech (south), Safi (southwest), and el-Jadida (northwest). It comprises the most arid area of Morocco west of the Atlas Mountains. The western part of the province is a…

  • Kelabit (people)

    Malaysia: Sarawak: Kayan, Kelabit, Bisaya (Bisayah), Penan, and others—also contribute much to Sarawak’s ethnic and cultural character. The Kenyah, Kayan, and Kelabit generally trace their origins to the southern mountains on the border with North Kalimantan, Indonesia. Other Orang Ulu groups stem from lower-lying inland areas, primarily in…

  • Kelang (Malaysia)

    Klang, city and port, west-central Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies on the Kelang River and the 40-mile (64-km) Kuala Lumpur–Port Kelang railway. The city is an administrative centre of a rubber- and fruit-growing district. During the 19th-century tin rush, Klang served as a port of entry to the

  • Kelang (river, Malaysia)

    Kuala Lumpur: …astride the confluence of the Kelang and Gombak rivers; its name in Malay means “muddy estuary.” Malaysia’s Main Range rises nearby to the north, east, and southeast. The climate is equatorial, with high temperatures and humidity that vary little throughout the year. The area receives about 95 inches (2,400 mm)…

  • Kelimat ha-Goyim (work by Duran)

    Profiat Duran: …also wrote an anti-Christian polemic, Kelimat ha-Goyim (“Shame of the Gentiles”), in about 1397, which discredited the Gospels and other early Christian writings.

  • Kell blood group system (physiology)

    Kell blood group system, classification of human blood based on the presence on the surfaces of red blood cells of various antigens encoded by the KEL gene. The system, discovered in 1946, is characterized by a high degree of polymorphism (genetic variation), and thus studies of the Kell antigens

  • Kell, George Clyde (American baseball player)

    George Clyde Kell, American baseball player (born Aug. 23, 1922, Swifton, Ark.—died March 24, 2009, Swifton), was a slugging third baseman who played for 15 seasons (1943–57) for a succession of teams in the American League (AL), including the Philadelphia Athletics, the Detroit Tigers, the Boston

  • Kell, Joseph (British author)

    Anthony Burgess, English novelist, critic, and man of letters whose fictional explorations of modern dilemmas combine wit, moral earnestness, and a note of the bizarre. Trained in English literature and phonetics, Burgess taught in the extramural department of Birmingham University (1946–50),

  • Kell, Sir Vernon (British military officer)

    MI5: …1909 under the leadership of Vernon Kell, then a captain in the British army, to identify and counteract German spies then working in Britain, which it did with great effect. Kell retired as a major general in 1924 and was later knighted but remained in charge of the agency until…

  • Kell, Vernon (British military officer)

    MI5: …1909 under the leadership of Vernon Kell, then a captain in the British army, to identify and counteract German spies then working in Britain, which it did with great effect. Kell retired as a major general in 1924 and was later knighted but remained in charge of the agency until…

  • Kellar, Harry (American magician)

    Harry Kellar, first great magician native to the United States. Called the “dean of magic” and “the most beloved magician in history,” he was the most popular magician from 1896 until 1908. From age 12 to 18 Kellar learned magic while travelling as an assistant to I.H. Hughes. Kellar opened his

  • Kellas, Eliza (American educator)

    Eliza Kellas, American educator, best remembered for her strong and effective leadership of the Emma Willard School in Troy. Kellas graduated from the Potsdam Normal School (now State University of New York College at Potsdam) in 1889, remaining as a member of the faculty. In 1891 she was appointed

  • Kellaway, Cecil (South African-American actor)

    Harvey: Chumley (Cecil Kellaway), releases Veta and attempts to track down Elwood. As it turns out, though, Chumley is able to see Harvey, and Veta—who has confessed to having seen him as well—eventually decides that Elwood’s affable disposition compensates for his eccentricities.

  • Kellaway, Edmund (British actor)

    George Seaton: Miracle on 34th Street and The Country Girl: …that the elderly man (Edmund Gwenn in an Oscar-winning performance) hired to play Santa Claus at Macy’s department store might actually be St. Nick. Seaton won an Oscar for his screenplay. Apartment for Peggy (1948) was a light romance, with Jeanne Crain and William Holden as campus newlyweds; Gwenn…

  • kellegi (floor covering)

    rug and carpet: Uses of rugs and carpets: The principal rug, or kellegi, averaging 12 × 6 feet (3.7 × 1.8 metres), is placed at one end of the arrangement of three carpets, so that its length stretches almost completely across their collective widths.

  • Keller, Christoph (German historian)

    history of Europe: The term and concept before the 18th century: … (1688), by the German historian Christoph Keller—although Keller observed that in naming the period he was simply following the terminology of earlier and contemporary scholars. By the late 17th century the most commonly used term for the period in Latin was medium aevum, and various equivalents of Middle Ages or…

  • Keller, Ferdinand (Swiss archaeologist and prehistorian)

    Ferdinand Keller, Swiss archaeologist and prehistorian who conducted the first systematic excavation of prehistoric Alpine lake dwellings, at Obermeilen on Lake Zürich. He thus initiated the study of similar remains elsewhere in Switzerland and Europe, from which much was learned about Late Stone

  • Keller, Gottfried (Swiss author)

    Gottfried Keller, the greatest German-Swiss narrative writer of late 19th-century Poetischer Realismus (“Poetic Realism”). His father, a lathe artisan, died in Keller’s early childhood, but his strong-willed, devoted mother struggled to provide him with an education. After being expelled from

  • Keller, Harry (American magician)

    Harry Kellar, first great magician native to the United States. Called the “dean of magic” and “the most beloved magician in history,” he was the most popular magician from 1896 until 1908. From age 12 to 18 Kellar learned magic while travelling as an assistant to I.H. Hughes. Kellar opened his

  • Keller, Helen (American author and educator)

    Helen Keller, American author and educator who was blind and deaf. Her education and training represent an extraordinary accomplishment in the education of persons with these disabilities. Keller was afflicted at the age of 19 months with an illness (possibly scarlet fever) that left her blind and

  • Keller, Helen Adams (American author and educator)

    Helen Keller, American author and educator who was blind and deaf. Her education and training represent an extraordinary accomplishment in the education of persons with these disabilities. Keller was afflicted at the age of 19 months with an illness (possibly scarlet fever) that left her blind and

  • Keller, Helen Adams (American author and educator)

    Helen Keller, American author and educator who was blind and deaf. Her education and training represent an extraordinary accomplishment in the education of persons with these disabilities. Keller was afflicted at the age of 19 months with an illness (possibly scarlet fever) that left her blind and

  • Keller, Louis (American publisher)

    Social Register: …was founded in 1887 by Louis Keller, a former gossip-sheet publisher; it was priced at $1.75 and contained 3,600 names. Ownership stayed among three families related to Keller until 1976, when control reportedly passed to a business publishing house, the Forbes Corporation. The publication continues to guard its reputation for…

  • Keller, Patricia Joan (American diver)

    Pat McCormick, American diver who was the first athlete to win gold medals in both the springboard and platform diving events at two Olympic Games. Growing up in Long Beach, California, McCormick established a reputation as a daring athlete, performing dives that few men attempted and that were

  • Keller, Robert (American anarchist, political philosopher, trade-union organizer, and educator)

    Murray Bookchin, American anarchist, political philosopher, trade-union organizer, and educator best known for his organizing activities on behalf of labour unions and his vehement critiques of capitalism, globalization, and humanity’s treatment of the environment. Bookchin was the son of Russian

  • Keller, Rose (French prostitute)

    Marquis de Sade: Heritage and youth: …first public scandal erupted: the Rose Keller affair.

  • Keller, Thomas (American chef)

    Grant Achatz: …1996 Achatz persuaded California chef Thomas Keller to hire him at the French Laundry, then one of the country’s most-acclaimed restaurants. After four years under Keller’s mentorship—along with a short spell at a nearby winery and a trip to Spain to dine at Ferran Adrià’s groundbreaking El Bulli—Achatz in 2001…

  • Kellerman, Annette (Australian athlete)

    physical culture: Women and athletics: …and vaudeville and movie star Annette Kellerman epitomized the physical culture ideal. In 1905 Kellerman swam from Dover to Ramsgate, England, a distance of 20 miles (32 km), in 4 hours and 28 minutes. She also introduced the one-piece bathing suit at a beach near Boston, Massachusetts. Although she was…

  • Kellermann, Bernhard (German writer)

    Bernhard Kellermann, German journalist and writer best known for his novel Der Tunnel (1913; The Tunnel, 1915), a sensational technical-utopian work about the construction of a tunnel between Europe and North America. Kellermann was a painter before he turned to writing. His early novels, Yester

  • Kellermann, Fran?ois-Christophe, duc de Valmy (French general)

    Fran?ois-Christophe Kellermann, duke de Valmy, French general whose defeat of a Prussian army at Valmy in September 1792 halted an invasion that threatened the Revolutionary regime in France. Born into a family of the judicial nobility, Kellermann became an officer in the French Army in 1752. He

  • Kelley Barnes dam (dam, Toccoa, Georgia, United States)

    Toccoa: In November 1977 the Kelley Barnes earthen dam on the creek burst after torrential rains and flooded the campus, killing 39 persons. Traveler’s Rest State Historic Site is 6 miles (10 km) east, and Tugaloo State Park is about 15 miles (25 km) southeast. Inc. 1875. Pop. (2000) 9,323;…

  • Kelley Park (park, San Jose, California, United States)

    San Jose: The contemporary city: Kelley Park, along Coyote Creek, includes a zoo, a Japanese garden, and an outdoor historic museum of restored and replicated buildings from San Jose’s early years. The 720-acre (290-hectare) Alum Rock Park (1872), on the eastern edge of the city, is California’s oldest municipal park.…

  • Kelley, Abigail (American abolitionist and feminist)

    Abigail Kelley Foster, American feminist, abolitionist, and lecturer who is remembered as an impassioned speaker for radical reform. Abby Kelley grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts. She was reared a Quaker, attended Quaker schools, and later taught in a Quaker school in Lynn, Massachusetts. She

  • Kelley, Clarence Marion (United States government official)

    Clarence Marion Kelley, American law-enforcement official (born Oct. 24, 1911, Kansas City, Mo.—died Aug. 5, 1997, Kansas City), in 1973 became the first permanent director of the FBI after the 49-year reign of J. Edgar Hoover; he served until 1978 and in that time brought modern techniques for

  • Kelley, David E. (American writer and producer)

    David E. Kelley, American writer and producer who was best known for creating television series set in the legal profession and populated with quirky characters. His notable shows included Ally McBeal (1997–2002), The Practice (1997–2004), and Boston Legal (2004–08). Kelley attended Princeton

  • Kelley, DeForest (American actor)

    DeForest Kelley, American actor best identified by his role as Dr. Leonard (“Bones”) McCoy on the popular science-fiction television series Star Trek (1966–69); he reprised the role in six Star Trek films; he also played supporting roles in such films as Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) and

  • Kelley, Florence (American social reformer)

    Florence Kelley, American social reformer who contributed to the development of state and federal labour and social welfare legislation in the United States. Kelley graduated from Cornell University in 1882. After a year spent conducting evening classes for working women in Philadelphia, she

  • Kelley, Florence Molthrop (American social reformer)

    Florence Kelley, American social reformer who contributed to the development of state and federal labour and social welfare legislation in the United States. Kelley graduated from Cornell University in 1882. After a year spent conducting evening classes for working women in Philadelphia, she

  • Kelley, John Adelbert (American athlete)

    John Adelbert Kelley, American marathoner (born Sept. 6, 1907, West Medford, Mass.—died Oct. 6, 2004, South Yarmouth, Mass.), ran the Boston Marathon a record 61 times. He ran his first Boston Marathon in 1928, won it in 1935 and 1945, and finished 18 times in the top 10. He was the first road r

  • Kelley, Michael (American performance and installation artist)

    Mike Kelley, (Michael Kelley), American performance and installation artist (born Oct. 27, 1954, Wayne, Mich.—found dead Feb. 1, 2012, South Pasadena, Calif.), carved out his own niche in the 1980s with his psychologically complex installations and sculptural artwork that often featured worn and

  • Kelley, Mike (American performance and installation artist)

    Mike Kelley, (Michael Kelley), American performance and installation artist (born Oct. 27, 1954, Wayne, Mich.—found dead Feb. 1, 2012, South Pasadena, Calif.), carved out his own niche in the 1980s with his psychologically complex installations and sculptural artwork that often featured worn and

  • Kelley, Oliver Hudson (American agriculturalist)

    Granger movement: …began with a single individual, Oliver Hudson Kelley. Kelley was an employee of the Department of Agriculture in 1866 when he made a tour of the South. Shocked by the ignorance there of sound agricultural practices, Kelley in 1867 began an organization—the Patrons of Husbandry—he hoped would bring farmers together…

  • Kelley, William (American author and screenwriter)
  • Kellgren, Johan Henric (Swedish poet)

    Johan Henrik Kellgren, poet considered the greatest literary figure of the Swedish Enlightenment and once called Sweden’s “national good sense.” The son of a rural clergyman, Kellgren became a lecturer in poetry and classical literature. A talented and ambitious young man, he soon found his way to

  • Kellgren, Johan Henrik (Swedish poet)

    Johan Henrik Kellgren, poet considered the greatest literary figure of the Swedish Enlightenment and once called Sweden’s “national good sense.” The son of a rural clergyman, Kellgren became a lecturer in poetry and classical literature. A talented and ambitious young man, he soon found his way to

  • Kelling, George L. (American criminologist)

    police: Community policing: Wilson and the American criminologist George L. Kelling maintained that the incidence as well as the fear of crime is strongly related to the existence of disorderly conditions in neighbourhoods. Using the metaphor of a broken window, they argued that a building in a constant state of disrepair conveys the…

  • Kellner, Sandor Laszlo (British film director)

    Sir Alexander Korda, Hungarian-born British motion-picture director and producer who made major contributions to the development of Britain’s film industry. Before he was 20 years old he was working as a journalist in Budapest, and in 1914 he started the film periodical Pesti Mozi (“Budapest

  • Kellner, Zoltán (Hungarian-born filmmaker)

    Zoltan Korda, Hungarian-born film director best known for such war dramas as The Four Feathers (1939) and Sahara (1943). He was the younger brother of Sándor Kellner, who later adopted the name Alexander Korda and became a noted director and producer; early in his career, Zoltan also changed his

  • Kello, Esther (Scottish calligrapher)

    Esther Inglis, Scottish calligrapher born in London to French parents, who produced about 55 miniature manuscript books between 1586 and 1624 and whose work was much admired and collected in her lifetime. Esther Inglis was a daughter of Nicholas Langlois and his wife, Marie Presot, French Huguenots

  • Kellogg (Idaho, United States)

    Kellogg, city, Shoshone county, northern Idaho, U.S. It is situated in the Coeur d’Alene mining district of the Bitterroot Range. Established as a prospecting camp in 1893 and originally called Milo, it was renamed (1894) to honour Noah S. Kellogg, discoverer of the Bunker Hill Mine. The community

  • Kellogg Company (American company)

    Kellogg Company, leading American producer of ready-to-eat cereals and other food products. Kellogg’s Corn Flakes was one of the earliest and remains one of the most popular breakfast cereals in the United States. Headquarters are in Battle Creek, Mich. The company was founded as the Sanitas Food

  • Kellogg Toasted Corn Flakes Company (American company)

    Kellogg Company, leading American producer of ready-to-eat cereals and other food products. Kellogg’s Corn Flakes was one of the earliest and remains one of the most popular breakfast cereals in the United States. Headquarters are in Battle Creek, Mich. The company was founded as the Sanitas Food

  • Kellogg’s Grove, Battles of (American history)

    Black Hawk War: Raids and retreat: …militiamen were killed in a battle at Kellogg’s Grove, near present-day Kent, Illinois.

  • Kellogg, Brown & Root (American business organization)

    Halliburton: Cheney, KBR, and Deepwater Horizon: Dick Cheney, who served as U.S. secretary of defense in the administration of George H.W. Bush (1989–93), became chairman and chief executive of Halliburton Co. in 1995. He continued the program of expansion by acquisition. His most notable purchase was Dresser…

  • Kellogg, Clara Louise (American singer)

    Clara Louise Kellogg, American opera singer, the first U.S.-born prima donna and the first American singer to achieve success in Europe. Kellogg began music studies in her mid-teens. She made her New York City debut in 1861 in a production of Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto at the New York Academy of

  • Kellogg, Eva Louise Phelps (American historian)

    Louise Phelps Kellogg, American historian who wrote extensively on the American Northwest. Kellogg graduated from Milwaukee Female College (later Milwaukee-Downer College and now part of Lawrence University) in 1882. After several years of teaching in private schools, she entered the University of

  • Kellogg, Frank B. (American politician)

    Frank B. Kellogg, U.S. secretary of state (1925–29) whose most important achievement was the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, a multilateral agreement designed to prohibit war as an instrument of national policy. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1929. Kellogg studied law and was admitted to

  • Kellogg, Frank Billings (American politician)

    Frank B. Kellogg, U.S. secretary of state (1925–29) whose most important achievement was the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, a multilateral agreement designed to prohibit war as an instrument of national policy. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1929. Kellogg studied law and was admitted to

  • Kellogg, John Harvey (American physician and nutritionist)

    John Harvey Kellogg, American physician and health-food pioneer whose development of dry breakfast cereals was largely responsible for the creation of the flaked-cereal industry. Kellogg received an M.D. from Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City, in 1875. A Seventh-day Adventist and

  • Kellogg, Louise Phelps (American historian)

    Louise Phelps Kellogg, American historian who wrote extensively on the American Northwest. Kellogg graduated from Milwaukee Female College (later Milwaukee-Downer College and now part of Lawrence University) in 1882. After several years of teaching in private schools, she entered the University of

  • Kellogg, Paula (American reformer)

    Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis, American feminist and social reformer, active in the early struggle for woman suffrage and the founder of an early periodical in support of that cause. Paulina Kellogg grew up from 1820, when her parents died, in the home of a strict and religious aunt in LeRoy, New

  • Kellogg, W. K. (American industrialist)

    W. K. Kellogg, American industrialist and philanthropist who founded (1906) the W.K. Kellogg Company to manufacture cereal products as breakfast foods. His cereals have found widespread use throughout the United States. Kellogg established the firm after working with his brother John Harvey

  • Kellogg, Will Keith (American industrialist)

    W. K. Kellogg, American industrialist and philanthropist who founded (1906) the W.K. Kellogg Company to manufacture cereal products as breakfast foods. His cereals have found widespread use throughout the United States. Kellogg established the firm after working with his brother John Harvey

  • Kellogg-Briand Pact (France-United States [1928])

    Kellogg-Briand Pact, (August 27, 1928), multilateral agreement attempting to eliminate war as an instrument of national policy. It was the most grandiose of a series of peacekeeping efforts after World War I. Hoping to tie the United States into a system of protective alliances directed against a

  • Kells (Ireland)

    Ceanannus Mór, market town and urban district of County Meath, Ireland, on the River Blackwater. The town was originally a royal residence. In the 6th century it was granted to St. Columba and became a centre of learning. A bishopric was founded there about 807 and was united to that of Meath in

  • Kells, Book of (illuminated manuscript)

    Book of Kells, illuminated gospel book (MS. A.I. 6; Trinity College Library, Dublin) that is a masterpiece of the ornate Hiberno-Saxon style. It is probable that the illumination was begun in the late 8th century at the Irish monastery on the Scottish island of Iona and that after a Viking raid the

  • Kells, Council of (Roman Catholic history)

    Saint Malachy: …his life—was realized at the Council of Kells, County Meath, in 1152. He was the first Irish Catholic to be canonized. No writings of Malachy are known to exist, but falsely ascribed to him is the Prophecy of the Popes, a 16th-century forgery consisting of a list of mottoes supposedly…

  • Kellwasser Event (paleontology)

    Devonian Period: Extinction events: …goniatites, corals, and brachiopods; the Kellwasser Event saw the extinction of the beloceratid and manticoceratid goniatite groups, many conodont species, most colonial corals, several groups of trilobites, and the atrypid and pentamerid brachiopods at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary; and the Hangenberg Event saw the extinction of phacopid trilobites, several groups of…

  • kelly (drill pipe)

    petroleum production: The drill pipe: …eight-sided) cross section called the kelly. The kelly passes through a similarly shaped hole in the turntable. At the bottom end of the drill pipe are extra-heavy sections called drill collars, which serve to concentrate the weight on the rotating bit. In order to help maintain a vertical well bore,…

  • Kelly Air Base (air base, San Antonio, Texas, United States)

    San Antonio: The contemporary city: The region’s first air base, Kelly (established 1917), was closed in 2001, and its site was redeveloped for business use.

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