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  • Kelly’s Heroes (film by Hutton [1970])

    Don Rickles: …included the madcap war adventure Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Martin Scorsese’s mob drama Casino (1995), and the Toy Story series of animated films (1995, 1999, and 2010), in which he voiced the character of Mr. Potato Head; archival sound of Rickles’s voice was used for Toy Story 4, which was released…

  • Kelly’s Point (New Zealand)

    Invercargill, city, Southland regional council, South Island, New Zealand. Invercargill lies in the southernmost part of the South Island along the Waihopai River, near its confluence with the New River estuary. A service centre for the region’s agricultural industries, the city is situated on a

  • Kelly, Barbara (Canadian-born actress)

    Barbara Kelly, Canadian-born actress (born Oct. 5, 1924 , Vancouver, B.C.—died Jan. 15, 2007, London, Eng.), enjoyed widespread popularity as a regular panelist on the long-running British edition of the television quiz show What’s My Line? (1951–63; 1984–87) and as the host of Criss Cross Quiz in

  • Kelly, Betty (American singer)

    Martha and the Vandellas: Later members included Betty Kelly (b. September 16, 1944, Attalla, Alabama), Lois Reeves (b. April 12, 1948, Detroit), and Sandra Tilley (b. May 6, 1946—d. September 9, 1981).

  • Kelly, Charles (British actor)

    Ellen Terry: …Watts and married an actor, Charles Kelly, mainly to give her children a “name.” They soon separated, and Kelly died in 1885.

  • Kelly, David (Irish actor)

    David Kelly, Irish actor (born July 11, 1929, Dublin, Ire.—died Feb. 12, 2012, Dublin), was a reliable character actor for more than 50 years on the Dublin stage, in movies, and on television programs, but to international audiences he was best known for portraying broadly comic Irishmen, notably

  • Kelly, Edward (English alchemist)

    alchemy: Modern alchemy: In 1595 Edward Kelley, an English alchemist and companion of the famous astrologer, alchemist, and mathematician John Dee, lost his life in an attempt to escape after imprisonment by Rudolf II, and in 1603 the elector of Saxony, Christian II, imprisoned and tortured the Scotsman Alexander Seton,…

  • Kelly, Edward (Australian bandit)

    Ned Kelly, most famous of the bushrangers, Australian rural outlaws of the 19th century. In 1877 Kelly shot and injured a policeman who was trying to arrest his brother, Dan Kelly, for horse theft. The brothers fled to the bush, where two other men joined them to form the Kelly gang. The Kelly

  • Kelly, Edward J. (American politician)

    Chicago: No little plans: The new mayor, Edward J. Kelly, gladly accepted federal relief funds that employed thousands on projects that completed the Outer Drive Bridge, built the State Street subway, and constructed hundreds of miles of streets, sewers, sidewalks, and curbs. Workers for other relief projects painted murals in post offices…

  • Kelly, Ellsworth (American painter, sculptor, and printmaker)

    Ellsworth Kelly, American painter, sculptor, and printmaker who was a leading exponent of the hard-edge style, in which abstract contours are sharply and precisely defined. Though often associated with Minimalism, Kelly preceded the movement by a decade. Before serving in the army during World War

  • Kelly, Emmett (American clown)

    Emmett Kelly, one of the great American circus clowns, best known for his role as Weary Willie, a mournful tramp dressed in tattered clothes and made up with a growth of beard and a bulbous nose. Kelly as a young man studied to become a cartoonist, and he originally created the Weary Willie

  • Kelly, Emmett Leo (American clown)

    Emmett Kelly, one of the great American circus clowns, best known for his role as Weary Willie, a mournful tramp dressed in tattered clothes and made up with a growth of beard and a bulbous nose. Kelly as a young man studied to become a cartoonist, and he originally created the Weary Willie

  • Kelly, Eugene Curran (American actor, dancer, and director)

    Gene Kelly, American dancer, actor, choreographer, and motion-picture director whose athletic style of dancing, combined with classical ballet technique, transformed the movie musical and did much to change the American public’s conception of male dancers. One of five children born to a record

  • Kelly, Gene (American actor, dancer, and director)

    Gene Kelly, American dancer, actor, choreographer, and motion-picture director whose athletic style of dancing, combined with classical ballet technique, transformed the movie musical and did much to change the American public’s conception of male dancers. One of five children born to a record

  • Kelly, George (American psychologist)

    humanistic psychology: …construct” theory of American psychologist George Kelly and the “self-centred” theory of American psychotherapist Carl Rogers, individuals are said to perceive the world according to their own experiences. This perception affects their personality and leads them to direct their behaviour to satisfy the needs of the total self. Rogers stressed…

  • Kelly, George (American playwright)

    George Kelly, playwright, actor, and director whose dramas of the 1920s reflect the foibles of the American middle class with a telling accuracy. Kelly followed his elder brother Walter into vaudeville as an actor, writing his first sketches himself. His first success on Broadway was The

  • Kelly, George Edward (American playwright)

    George Kelly, playwright, actor, and director whose dramas of the 1920s reflect the foibles of the American middle class with a telling accuracy. Kelly followed his elder brother Walter into vaudeville as an actor, writing his first sketches himself. His first success on Broadway was The

  • Kelly, George R. (American criminal)

    Machine Gun Kelly, bootlegger, small-time bank robber, and kidnapper who ranged through Tennessee, Mississippi, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico in the 1920s and ’30s. Abetted by his wife, Kathryn (née Cleo Coleman), whom he married in 1927, he joined gangs whose exploits won press headlines. Much

  • Kelly, Grace (American actress and princess of Monaco)

    Grace Kelly, American actress of films and television, known for her stately beauty and reserve. She starred in 11 motion pictures before abandoning a Hollywood career to marry Rainier III, prince de Monaco, in 1956. Kelly was born into a wealthy Irish Catholic family in Philadelphia; her father

  • Kelly, Grace Patricia (American actress and princess of Monaco)

    Grace Kelly, American actress of films and television, known for her stately beauty and reserve. She starred in 11 motion pictures before abandoning a Hollywood career to marry Rainier III, prince de Monaco, in 1956. Kelly was born into a wealthy Irish Catholic family in Philadelphia; her father

  • Kelly, Howard Atwood (American physician)

    Sir William Osler, Baronet: Kelly, chief of gynecology and obstetrics, and William S. Halsted, chief of surgery. Together, the four transformed the organization and curriculum of clinical teaching and made Johns Hopkins the most famous medical school in the world. Students studied their patients in the wards and presented…

  • Kelly, Hugh (British dramatist)

    Hugh Kelly, British dramatist, critic, and journalist who was, for a time, a serious rival of the playwright Oliver Goldsmith in the London theatre, after his play False Delicacy (staged in 1768) scored a triumph in opposition to Goldsmith’s Good-Natur’d Man. Kelly immigrated to London in 1760 and

  • Kelly, James Plunkett (Irish writer)

    James Plunkett, Irish novelist, dramatist, and short-story writer whose works, which deal with Ireland’s political and labour problems, contain vivid portraits of working-class and middle-class Dubliners. Educated by the Christian Brothers, Plunkett left school at age 17. He later studied violin

  • Kelly, Jim (American football player)

    Buffalo Bills: The Bills drafted quarterback Jim Kelly in the first round of the 1983 NFL draft. Kelly instead signed to play in the upstart United States Football League (USFL), and Buffalo posted league-worst 2–14 records in both 1984 and 1985. After the USFL folded in 1986, Kelly joined the Bills,…

  • Kelly, John B. (American athlete)

    John B. Kelly, American oarsman who won 126 consecutive races in single sculls in 1919 and 1920, a record that included a gold medal at the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp. Kelly also won the double sculls event (with his cousin Paul Costello) at the 1920 Games and at the 1924 Games in Paris. Kelly

  • Kelly, John Edward (American boxer)

    Nonpareil Jack Dempsey, Irish-born American bare-knuckle fighter who was the world middleweight champion from 1884 to 1891. Dempsey, who moved to the United States as a young child, was a proficient wrestler before he began his career as a boxer. For his first fight he gave his name as Jack

  • Kelly, John F. (United States general)

    Reince Priebus: …as chief of staff by John F. Kelly. Shortly thereafter, Priebus returned to private practice, and in 2019 he officially joined the U.S. Navy.

  • Kelly, Kevin (American author)

    cultural globalization: Challenges to national sovereignty and identity: …Out of Control (1994), author Kevin Kelly predicted that the Internet would gradually erode the power of governments to control citizens; advances in digital technology would instead allow people to follow their own interests and form trans-state coalitions. Similarly, Richard Rosecrance, in The Rise of the Virtual State (1999), wrote…

  • Kelly, Lauren (American author)

    Joyce Carol Oates, American novelist, short-story writer, and essayist noted for her vast literary output in a variety of styles and genres. Particularly effective are her depictions of violence and evil in modern society. Oates was born in New York state, the daughter of a tool-and-die designer

  • Kelly, Machine Gun (American criminal)

    Machine Gun Kelly, bootlegger, small-time bank robber, and kidnapper who ranged through Tennessee, Mississippi, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico in the 1920s and ’30s. Abetted by his wife, Kathryn (née Cleo Coleman), whom he married in 1927, he joined gangs whose exploits won press headlines. Much

  • Kelly, Margaret (French dancer and choreographer)

    Margaret Kelly, Irish-born French dancer and choreographer (born June 24, 1910, Dublin, Ire.—died Sept. 11, 2004, Paris, France), was a professional chorus-line dancer by the time she was 14 and in 1932 formed what became the Bluebell Girls cabaret dance troupe. For more than half a century, she l

  • Kelly, Mark (American astronaut)

    Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly: Mark Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in marine engineering and transportation from the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York, in 1986. Scott Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College at Throggs…

  • Kelly, Mark and Scott (American astronauts)

    Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly, American astronauts and identical twins. Mark Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in marine engineering and transportation from the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York, in 1986. Scott Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering

  • Kelly, Mark Edward (American astronaut)

    Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly: Mark Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in marine engineering and transportation from the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York, in 1986. Scott Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College at Throggs…

  • Kelly, Mary (American artist and feminist)

    Western painting: Institutional critique, feminism, and conceptual art: 1968 and its aftermath: Mary Kelly’s important Post-Partum Document (completed 1979) consisted of a 135-item record, in a variety of modes of documentation (including fecal stains on diapers), of the rearing of her male child. It asserted that gender identity is produced via accession to language and that gender…

  • Kelly, Megyn (American journalist and television personality)

    Megyn Kelly, American attorney, journalist, and television personality who was known for her pointed interviews and commentary on the Fox News Channel. Kelly was raised in Syracuse and Delmar, New York, the third and youngest child of an education professor and his wife. After her father’s death in

  • Kelly, Megyn Marie (American journalist and television personality)

    Megyn Kelly, American attorney, journalist, and television personality who was known for her pointed interviews and commentary on the Fox News Channel. Kelly was raised in Syracuse and Delmar, New York, the third and youngest child of an education professor and his wife. After her father’s death in

  • Kelly, Michael (American journalist)

    Michael Kelly, American journalist (born March 17, 1957, Washington, D.C.—died April 3, 2003, south of Baghdad, Iraq), was a fierce and courageous reporter, editor, and columnist. Kelly’s reporting and investigative work at various publications had earned him positive notice by the time he p

  • Kelly, Molly (Australian Aboriginal icon)

    Molly Kelly, (Molly Craig), Australian Aboriginal icon (born c. 1917, Jigalong, W.Aus., Australia—died Jan. 13, 2004, Jigalong), walked, with her younger sister and a cousin, some 1,600 km (1,000 mi) home from the settlement she had been taken to as a young teenager; her journey inspired the 2002 m

  • Kelly, Ned (Australian bandit)

    Ned Kelly, most famous of the bushrangers, Australian rural outlaws of the 19th century. In 1877 Kelly shot and injured a policeman who was trying to arrest his brother, Dan Kelly, for horse theft. The brothers fled to the bush, where two other men joined them to form the Kelly gang. The Kelly

  • Kelly, R. (American musician)

    R. Kelly, American singer, songwriter, producer, and multi-instrumentalist who became one of the best-selling rhythm-and-blues (R&B) artists of the 1990s and early 21st century. Kelly was known for his gospel-tinged vocal delivery and highly sexualized lyrics. Kelly was raised in public-housing

  • Kelly, Red (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Toronto Maple Leafs: …Armstrong, goaltender Johnny Bower, centre Red Kelly, centre Dave Keon, defenseman Tim Horton, left wing Frank Mahovlich, left wing Bob Pulford, and defenseman Allan Stanley) won three Stanley Cups in a row from 1961–62 to 1963–64 and one more during the 1966–67 season.

  • Kelly, Robert Sylvester (American musician)

    R. Kelly, American singer, songwriter, producer, and multi-instrumentalist who became one of the best-selling rhythm-and-blues (R&B) artists of the 1990s and early 21st century. Kelly was known for his gospel-tinged vocal delivery and highly sexualized lyrics. Kelly was raised in public-housing

  • Kelly, Scott (American astronaut)

    Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly: Scott Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College at Throggs Neck, New York, the following year. Scott and Mark became pilots in the U.S. Navy in 1987 and 1989, respectively. Mark flew 39 combat missions…

  • Kelly, Scott Joseph (American astronaut)

    Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly: Scott Kelly received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College at Throggs Neck, New York, the following year. Scott and Mark became pilots in the U.S. Navy in 1987 and 1989, respectively. Mark flew 39 combat missions…

  • Kelly, Thomas Joseph (American engineer)

    Thomas Joseph Kelly, American aerospace engineer (born June 14, 1929, New York, N.Y.—died March 23, 2002, Cutchogue, N.Y.), led the team of engineers that designed the Lunar Excursion Module Eagle, in which Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin (“Buzz”) Aldrin, Jr., landed on the Moon on J

  • Kelly, Walt (American cartoonist)

    Walt Kelly, American creator of the comic strip “Pogo,” which was noted for its sophisticated humour, gentle whimsy, and occasional pointed political satire. In 1935 Kelly went to Hollywood, where he did animation drawings for Walt Disney Productions. During the 1940s he was active as a commercial

  • Kelly, Walter Crawford (American cartoonist)

    Walt Kelly, American creator of the comic strip “Pogo,” which was noted for its sophisticated humour, gentle whimsy, and occasional pointed political satire. In 1935 Kelly went to Hollywood, where he did animation drawings for Walt Disney Productions. During the 1940s he was active as a commercial

  • Kelly, William (American inventor)

    William Kelly, American ironmaster who invented the pneumatic process of steelmaking, in which air is blown through molten pig iron to oxidize and remove unwanted impurities. Also patented by Sir Henry Bessemer of Great Britain, this process produced the first inexpensive steel, which became the

  • Kelly, William Russell (American entrepreneur)

    William Russell Kelly, American businessman who in 1965 became chairman of Kelly Services, Inc., which he had founded in 1946 to provide businesses with personnel for temporary assignments; the company grew from providing the services of a few "Kelly Girls" during its early years to finding

  • Kelman, Charles (American surgeon)

    Charles Kelman, American ophthalmic surgeon (born May 23, 1930, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died June 1, 2004, Boca Raton, Fla.), was posthumously awarded the 2004 Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research for having revolutionized the surgical removal of cataracts; he turned a 10-day hospital stay i

  • Kelmscott House (building, Hammersmith, London, United Kingdom)

    Hammersmith and Fulham: Kelmscott House, for 18 years the home of William Morris (now home to the William Morris Society), is situated in Hammersmith. Also notable are the Palais de Danse (Hammersmith Palais) dance hall, which opened in 1919, and the 17th-century Dove, which has been a coffeehouse…

  • Kelmscott Press (publishing company)

    Sir Emery Walker: …to the establishment of the Kelmscott Press (1891), considered the beginning of the private press movement in England. Walker played an important role in all its activities throughout the seven years of its existence.

  • Kelo v. City of New London (law case)

    eminent domain: …a landmark ruling in 2005, Kelo v. City of New London, the U.S. Supreme Court adopted an expansive interpretation of the power of eminent domain as defined in the “takings” clause of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution (“private property [shall not] be taken for public use without just compensation”).…

  • keloid (dermatology)

    Keloid, benign tumour and chronic skin disorder in which excessive scar tissue (mainly collagen) forms a smooth rubbery growth over, and often larger than, the original wound. Keloids are difficult to treat, and though they can form on any part of the body, they most commonly are found on the

  • Kelowna (British Columbia, Canada)

    Kelowna, city, southern British Columbia, Canada. It lies 80 miles (129 km) north of the U.S. (Washington) border, on the east shore of Okanagan Lake (there bridged), 284 miles (457 km) east-northeast of Vancouver. Kelowna originated around a mission established about 1859 by Father Charles

  • kelp (brown algae)

    Kelp, (order Laminariales), any of about 30 genera of brown algae that grow as large coastal seaweeds in colder seas. Kelps provide critical habitat and are an important food source for a wide range of coastal organisms, including many fish and invertebrates. Until early in the 19th century, the

  • kelp crab (crustacean)

    Kelp crab, Pacific species of spider crab

  • kelp forest (ecology)

    otter: Saltwater otters: …herbivorous urchins (genus Strongylocentrotus) enables kelp forests and the fish associated with them to flourish. However, large numbers of sea otters can deplete shellfish populations, conflicting with fisheries for crabs, clams, and abalones. Females give birth in water to only one young, which remains dependent on the mother until six…

  • kelp goose (bird)

    sheldgoose: …South American species of Chlo?phaga—the kelp goose (C. hybrida), the Magellan goose (C. picta), and the Andean goose (C. melanoptera)—and the Orinoco goose (Neochen jubatus). African sheldgeese include the spur-winged goose (Plectropterus gambensis) and the Egyptian goose (Alopochen aegyptiacus

  • kelp gull (bird)

    gull: The kelp gull (L. dominicanus) is a very wide-ranging black-backed species of the Southern Hemisphere, including Antarctica. The laughing gull (L. atricilla), a medium-sized bird with a black head, red bill, and red feet, often gives vent to a strident, laughing call. It breeds from Maine…

  • Kelsen, Hans (American scholar)

    Hans Kelsen, Austrian-American legal philosopher, teacher, jurist, and writer on international law, who formulated a kind of positivism known as the “pure theory” of law. Kelsen was a professor at Vienna, Cologne, Geneva, and the German university in Prague. He wrote the Austrian constitution

  • Kelsey, Frances Oldham (Canadian-born American physician)

    Frances Oldham Kelsey, (Frances Kathleen Oldham), Canadian-born American physician (born July 24, 1914, Cobble Hill, B.C.—died Aug. 7, 2015, London, Ont.), as a medical review officer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in 1960 withheld approval of the sedative thalidomide and thus

  • Kelsey, Henry (British explorer)

    Henry Kelsey, British mariner and explorer of the Canadian plains who played a significant role in the establishment of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Kelsey was apprenticed to the Hudson’s Bay Company (chartered 1670) by 1684, and in a trip to the region begun that year he conducted some exploration

  • Kelso (American racehorse)

    Eddie Arcaro: …Arcaro teamed with the horse Kelso to win several major stakes. After his retirement, he became a television sports commentator.

  • Kelso (Washington, United States)

    Kelso, city, seat (1932) of Cowlitz county, southwestern Washington, U.S., on the Cowlitz River, immediately northeast of Longview. Built on the site of the Cowlitz Indian village of Tiahanakshih, the area that became Kelso was settled in 1847 by Peter Crawford, a Scottish surveyor who laid out the

  • Kelso (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Kelso, small burgh (town) and agricultural market centre, Scottish Borders council area, historic county of Roxburghshire, southeastern Scotland. It lies on the River Tweed at the head of the Merse, a rich agricultural plain south of the Lammermuir Hills. The town’s centrepiece is its large cobbled

  • Kelso, William M. (American archaeologist)

    William M. Kelso, American archaeologist who directed the Jamestown Rediscovery Project, an organized effort to uncover and preserve artifacts from the Jamestown Colony, the first permanent English settlement in North America. Kelso began working in field archaeology after earning an M.A. (1964) in

  • Kelt (people)

    Celt, a member of an early Indo-European people who from the 2nd millennium bce to the 1st century bce spread over much of Europe. Their tribes and groups eventually ranged from the British Isles and northern Spain to as far east as Transylvania, the Black Sea coasts, and Galatia in Anatolia and

  • Kelt (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Antiship: 5 AS-5 Kelt was first deployed in 1966. The Mach-3 AS-6 Kingfish, introduced in 1970, could travel 250 miles.

  • Keltic languages

    Celtic languages, branch of the Indo-European language family, spoken throughout much of Western Europe in Roman and pre-Roman times and currently known chiefly in the British Isles and in the Brittany peninsula of northwestern France. On both geographic and chronological grounds, the languages

  • Kelton, Elmer (American author)

    Elmer Kelton, American novelist (born April 29, 1926, Andrews, Texas—died Aug. 22, 2009, San Angelo, Texas), penned dozens of westerns, notably The Good Old Boys (1978; filmed 1995), that were recognized for their sharply drawn characters and historical verisimilitude. Kelton served (1944–46) in

  • Keluarga gerilja (novel by Pramoedya)

    Pramoedya Ananta Toer: The novel Keluarga gerilja (1950; “Guerrilla Family”) chronicles the tragic consequences of divided political sympathies in a Javanese family during the Indonesian Revolution against Dutch rule, while Mereka jang dilumpuhkan (1951; “The Paralyzed”) depicts the odd assortment of inmates Pramoedya became acquainted with in the Dutch prison…

  • Kelud, Mount (volcano, Indonesia)

    Indonesia: Volcanoes: Mount Kelud (5,679 feet [1,731 metres]), near Kediri in eastern Java, can be particularly devastating, because the water in its large crater lake is thrown out during eruption, causing great mudflows that rush down into the plains and sweep away all that is before them.

  • kelvin (unit of measurement)

    Kelvin (K), base unit of thermodynamic temperature measurement in the International System of Units (SI). The 2018 General Conference on Weights and Measures decided that effective from May 20, 2019, the unit would be defined such that the Boltzmann constant would be equal to 1.380649 × 10?23 joule

  • Kelvin effect (physics)

    Thomson effect, the evolution or absorption of heat when electric current passes through a circuit composed of a single material that has a temperature difference along its length. This transfer of heat is superimposed on the common production of heat associated with the electrical resistance to

  • Kelvin of Largs, William Thomson, Baron (Scottish engineer, mathematician, and physicist)

    William Thomson, Baron Kelvin, Scottish engineer, mathematician, and physicist who profoundly influenced the scientific thought of his generation. Thomson, who was knighted and raised to the peerage in recognition of his work in engineering and physics, was foremost among the small group of British

  • Kelvin temperature scale (measurement)

    thermodynamics: Temperature: …Celsius scale is called the Kelvin (K) scale, and that related to the Fahrenheit scale is called the Rankine (°R) scale. These scales are related by the equations K = °C + 273.15, °R = °F + 459.67, and °R = 1.8 K. Zero in both the Kelvin and Rankine…

  • Kelvin wave (hydrology)

    Kelvin wave, in oceanography, an extremely long ocean wave that propagates eastward toward the coast of South America, where it causes the upper ocean layer of relatively warm water to thicken and sea level to rise. Kelvin waves occur toward the end of the year preceding an El Ni?o event when an

  • Kelvin wedge (fluid mechanics)

    fluid mechanics: Waves on deep water: …is now known as the Kelvin wedge.

  • Kelvin, Lord (Scottish engineer, mathematician, and physicist)

    William Thomson, Baron Kelvin, Scottish engineer, mathematician, and physicist who profoundly influenced the scientific thought of his generation. Thomson, who was knighted and raised to the peerage in recognition of his work in engineering and physics, was foremost among the small group of British

  • Kelvin, William Thomson, Baron (Scottish engineer, mathematician, and physicist)

    William Thomson, Baron Kelvin, Scottish engineer, mathematician, and physicist who profoundly influenced the scientific thought of his generation. Thomson, who was knighted and raised to the peerage in recognition of his work in engineering and physics, was foremost among the small group of British

  • Kem Ley (Cambodian political analyst and activist)

    Cambodia: Tensions between the CPP and the opposition: On July 10, 2016, Kem Ley, an activist and political analyst critical of the government of Prime Minister Hun Sen, was shot dead while stopping for coffee at a gas station in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. A suspect was arrested near the scene, and within hours a leaked video showed…

  • Kemal Bey, Yusuf (Turkish statesman)

    Treaty of Ankara: …French diplomat Henri Franklin-Bouillon and Yusuf Kemal Bey, the Turkish nationalist foreign minister. It formalized the de facto recognition by France of the Grand National Assembly, rather than the government of the Ottoman sultan Mehmed VI, as the sovereign power in Turkey.

  • Kemal, Mehmed Nam?k (Turkish author and social reformer)

    Nam?k Kemal, Turkish prose writer and poet who greatly influenced the Young Turk and Turkish nationalist movements and contributed to the westernization of Turkish literature. An aristocrat by birth, he was educated privately, learning Persian, Arabic, and French, which resulted in his working for

  • Kemal, Mustafa (president of Turkey)

    Kemal Atatürk, (Turkish: “Kemal, Father of Turks”) soldier, statesman, and reformer who was the founder and first president (1923–38) of the Republic of Turkey. He modernized the country’s legal and educational systems and encouraged the adoption of a European way of life, with Turkish written in

  • Kemal, Nam?k (Turkish author and social reformer)

    Nam?k Kemal, Turkish prose writer and poet who greatly influenced the Young Turk and Turkish nationalist movements and contributed to the westernization of Turkish literature. An aristocrat by birth, he was educated privately, learning Persian, Arabic, and French, which resulted in his working for

  • Kemal, Ya?ar (Turkish author)

    Ya?ar Kemal, Turkish novelist of Kurdish descent best known for his stories of village life and for his outspoken advocacy on behalf of the dispossessed. A childhood mishap blinded Kemal in one eye, and at age five he saw his father murdered in a mosque. He left secondary school after two years and

  • Kemal, Yashar (Turkish author)

    Ya?ar Kemal, Turkish novelist of Kurdish descent best known for his stories of village life and for his outspoken advocacy on behalf of the dispossessed. A childhood mishap blinded Kemal in one eye, and at age five he saw his father murdered in a mosque. He left secondary school after two years and

  • Kemalpa?azade (Turkish historian)

    Kemalpa?azade, historian, poet, and scholar who is considered one of the greatest Ottoman historians. Born into an illustrious military family, as a young man he served in the army of ?brahim Pa?a, vezir (minister) to Sultan Bayezid II. He later studied under several famous religious scholars and

  • kemanche (musical instrument)

    Kamanjā, stringed instrument of the fiddle family prominent in Arab and Persian art music. It is a spike fiddle; i.e., its small, round or cylindrical body appears skewered by the neck, which forms a “foot” that the instrument rests on when played. Measuring about 30 inches (76 cm) from neck to

  • Kemano penstock tunnel (Canada)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Unlined tunnels: …progressive rockfall on the 14-mile Kemano penstock tunnel in Canada resulted in shutting down the whole town of Kitimat in British Columbia, and vacationing workers for nine months in 1961 since there were no other electric sources to operate the smelter. Thus, the choice of an unlined tunnel involves a…

  • kemari (Japanese sport)

    sports: History: …as the Japanese football game kemari, then they were sports in the most rigorously defined sense. That it cannot simply be assumed that they were contests is clear from the evidence presented by Greek and Roman antiquity, which indicates that ball games had been for the most part playful pastimes…

  • Kembar (Indonesian government official)

    Gajah Mada: …a minister of Majapahit named Kembar attempted to stop him from entering Sadeng. Gajah Mada broke the blockade and won the battle.

  • Kemble, Adelaide (British actress)

    Adelaide Kemble, celebrated singer and member of the famous theatrical family Kemble. Born to Charles and Maria Theresa Kemble, Adelaide turned her interests to music instead of acting and sang professionally from 1835 to 1842. She studied in Italy and was a brilliant success in her operatic debut

  • Kemble, Charles (British actor)

    Charles Kemble, theatrical manager, the first to use appropriately detailed historical sets and costumes on the English stage, and an actor noted for his supporting roles in several Shakespeare plays, but at his best in comedy. Kemble, the youngest member of a theatrical family, made his first

  • Kemble, Elizabeth (British actress [1763-1841])

    Elizabeth Kemble, English actress of great ability whose career was subordinated to that of her husband, George Stephen Kemble. Elizabeth Satchell was a talented performer when she married Kemble in 1783, and for several years they acted together, with critics consistently noting her superiority.

  • Kemble, Elizabeth (British actress)

    Elizabeth Whitlock, noted actress in England and the United States. The fifth child of Roger and Sarah Kemble, Elizabeth took naturally to the stage. She often went with her elder sisters Sarah Siddons and Frances Kemble Twiss to the Drury Lane Theatre, where she first appeared as Portia in 1783.

  • Kemble, Fanny (British actress)

    Fanny Kemble, popular English actress who is also remembered as the author of plays, poems, and reminiscences, the latter containing much information about the stage and social history of the 19th century. Kemble was the eldest daughter of actors Charles Kemble and Maria Theresa De Camp, and the

  • Kemble, Frances Ann (British actress)

    Fanny Kemble, popular English actress who is also remembered as the author of plays, poems, and reminiscences, the latter containing much information about the stage and social history of the 19th century. Kemble was the eldest daughter of actors Charles Kemble and Maria Theresa De Camp, and the

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