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  • Kerberos (satellite of Pluto)

    Pluto: Pluto’s moons: other four moons—Hydra, Nix, Kerberos, and Styx—are much smaller than Charon. All four are elongated. They revolve around Pluto outside Charon’s path in nearly circular orbits (like Charon) and in the same orbital plane as Charon. The orbital radius of Hydra is about 64,721 km (40,216 miles); that of…

  • Kerbogha of Mosul (Turkish magnate)

    Crusades: From Constantinople to Antioch: …by a relief force under Kerbogha of Mosul. The situation seemed so hopeless that some Crusaders deserted and attempted to return home. Among these was Peter the Hermit, who was caught and returned to the host, where he was quietly forgiven. Another deserter was the French knight Stephen of Blois,…

  • Kerbtal (geology)

    valley: Types of valleys: …action such as tropical mountains, Kerbtal (German for “notched valley”) forms occur. These are characterized by steep, knife-edge ridges and valley slopes meeting in a V-shape. Where slopes are steep but a broad valley floor occurs, Sohlenkerbtal (meaning precisely a valley with such characteristics) is the prevailing form. Valleys of…

  • Ker? (Ukraine)

    Kerch, city and seaport, Crimea republic, southern Ukraine, on the western shore of the Strait of Kerch at the head of a small bay. Founded in the 6th century bc by Miletan Greeks, it flourished as a trading centre, and in the 5th century it became the capital of the kingdom of the Cimmerian

  • Kerch (Ukraine)

    Kerch, city and seaport, Crimea republic, southern Ukraine, on the western shore of the Strait of Kerch at the head of a small bay. Founded in the 6th century bc by Miletan Greeks, it flourished as a trading centre, and in the 5th century it became the capital of the kingdom of the Cimmerian

  • Kerch Strait (strait, Europe)

    Crimea: Geography: …(19-km-) long bridge spans the Kerch Strait, linking Crimea and Russia.

  • Kerckhoff, Alan C. (American sociologist)

    collective behaviour: Hysterical contagion: sociologist Alan C. Kerckhoff and the U.S. psychologist Kurt W. Back found that the crisis came after a period during which the women employees had performed unusual amounts of overtime work. The women who became ill from the mysterious insect bites had generally worked more overtime…

  • Kerckring, valve of (anatomy)

    human digestive system: Absorption: These folds, known as plicae circulares, are approximately 5 to 6 cm (2 inches) long and about 3 mm (0.1 inch) thick. Plicae circulares are present throughout the small intestine except in the first portion, or bulb, of the duodenum, which is usually flat and smooth, except for a…

  • Kere-Nyaga (volcano, Kenya)

    Mount Kenya, volcano, central Kenya, lying immediately south of the Equator. It is the second highest mountain in Africa after Kilimanjaro, which is located some 200 miles (320 km) to the south. The Mount Kenya area was added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1997. The base of the mountain lies at

  • Kereit (people)

    Genghis Khan: Early struggles: …to Toghril, khan of the Kereit tribe, with whom Yesügei had had the relationship of anda, or sworn brother, and at that time the most powerful Mongol prince, for help in recovering B?rte. He had had the foresight to rekindle this friendship by presenting Toghril with a sable skin, which…

  • Kerek language

    Paleo-Siberian languages: Yeniseian, Luorawetlan, and Nivkh: …about 2,000 speakers, and (5) Kerek, with about 10 speakers.

  • Kérékou, Mathieu (president of Benin)

    Mathieu Kérékou, Beninese military and political leader (born Sept. 2, 1933, Kouarfa, French Dahomey [now Benin]—died Oct. 14, 2015, Cotonou, Benin), seized power in a military coup (1972), declared (1974) a one-party Marxist-Leninist state, renamed (1975) the country the People’s Republic of

  • kerels van Vlaanderen, De (work by Conscience)

    Hendrik Conscience: …first Flemish adventure novel, and De kerels van Vlaanderen (1871; “The Boys of Flanders”), another historical novel. The publication of his 100th book in 1881 led to mass tributes to him in Brussels, and in 1883 the city of Antwerp erected a statue in his honour.

  • Kerema (Papua New Guinea)

    Kerema, minor port on the Gulf of Papua, south-central Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean. Located on Kerema Bay, the town occupies hilly savanna land between the deltas of the Vailala and Lakekamu rivers. Rubber is grown in the surrounding area, and coconuts are raised along the coast

  • keremet (sacred grove)

    lud: In the keremet of the Mordvins, sacrifices were made both upward to the sun or downward to the night. In groves of deciduous trees the high gods were worshiped, whereas the lower spirits lived in the fir groves. In the Cheremis keremet only the native language could…

  • Kerensky Offensive (Russian military operation [1917])

    June Offensive, (June [July, New Style], 1917), unsuccessful military operation of World War I, planned by the Russian minister of war Aleksandr Kerensky. The operation not only demonstrated the degree to which the Russian army had disintegrated but also the extent of the Provisional Government’s

  • Kerensky, Aleksandr (prime minister of Russia)

    Aleksandr Kerensky, moderate socialist revolutionary who served as head of the Russian provisional government from July to October 1917 (Old Style). While studying law at the University of St. Petersburg, Kerensky was attracted to the Narodniki (or populist) revolutionary movement. After graduating

  • Kerensky, Aleksandr Fyodorovich (prime minister of Russia)

    Aleksandr Kerensky, moderate socialist revolutionary who served as head of the Russian provisional government from July to October 1917 (Old Style). While studying law at the University of St. Petersburg, Kerensky was attracted to the Narodniki (or populist) revolutionary movement. After graduating

  • Kerényi, Károly (Hungarian philologist)

    Károly Kerényi, Hungarian classical philologist and authority in comparative religions, who pioneered research in ancient cultures and formulated a theory of the “Humanism of integral man.” A professor of classical studies (Pécs, Szeged) and visiting professor of Hungarian language (Basel), Kerényi

  • Kerepakupai Merú (waterfall, Venezuela)

    Angel Falls, waterfall in the Guiana Highlands in Bolívar state, southeastern Venezuela, on the Churún River, a tributary of the Caroní, 160 miles (260 km) southeast of Ciudad Bolívar. The highest waterfall in the world, the cataract drops 3,212 feet (979 metres) and is 500 feet (150 metres) wide

  • Keres (Greek religion)

    Ker, in ancient Greek religion, a destructive spirit. Popular belief attributed death and illness to the action of impersonal powers, often spoken of in the plural (Keres). The word was also used of an individual’s doom, with a meaning resembling the notion of destiny, as when Zeus weighs the Keres

  • Keres, Paul (Estonian chess player)

    Paul Keres, Estonian chess grandmaster, three times chess champion of the U.S.S.R., three times European champion, and a member of the winning Soviet team at seven world Chess Olympiads. Keres began to learn chess at the age of 4 by watching his father, and he played chess publicly at age 13. While

  • Keresan language

    Pueblo Indians: …groups who speak Tanoan and Keresan languages. Tanoan languages such as Tewa are distantly related to Uto-Aztecan, but Keresan has no known affinities. The western Pueblo villages include the Hopi villages of northern Arizona and the Zuni, Acoma, and Laguna villages, all in western New Mexico. Of the western Pueblo…

  • Keresun (Turkey)

    Giresun, city and seaport, northeastern Turkey. It lies along the Black Sea about 110 miles (175 km) west of Trabzon. The older parts of the city lie on a peninsula crowned by a ruined Byzantine fortress, sheltering the small natural harbour. Nearby is Giresun Island, in ancient times called Ares.

  • Keresztessy, József (Hungarian fencing master)

    Luigi Barbasetti: …teachings of the Hungarian master József Keresztessy (called the “father of Hungarian sabre fencing”). Barbasetti’s school attracted the best fencers in both Austria and Hungary, and the so-called Hungarian style of swordplay he developed with the sabre dominated international competitions during the first half of the 20th century. He returned…

  • Keret Epic (Ugaritic epic)

    epic: In the ancient Middle East: …fragment, the Ugaritic epic of Keret, has been interpreted as a Phoenician version of the Indo-European theme of the siege of an enemy city for the recovery of an abducted woman. This theme is also the subject of the Greek legend of the Trojan War and of the Indian epic…

  • Kerewe (people)

    African art: Region of Lakes Victoria and Tanganyika: The Kerewe of Ukerewe Island in Lake Victoria carved large wooden figures, about 3 feet (90 cm) high, which appear to have been effigies of deceased chiefs. Other examples of wood sculpture, including figures and masks, are known, some showing possible influences from the Luba of…

  • Kergomard, Pauline (French educator)

    maternal school: Pauline Kergomard, general inspector of schools from 1879 to 1917, abolished fees in 1881. In 1886 she issued guidelines advocating that children should be offered challenging toys and games and allowed to move about. By 1911 every French child had access to either a specially…

  • Kerguelen cabbage (plant)

    Kerguelen cabbage, (Pringlea antiscorbutica), plant resembling the common cabbage and belonging to the same family (Brassicaceae), named for the Kerguelen Islands, where it was discovered. The sole member of its genus, Kerguelen cabbage inhabits only a few, remote islands near Antarctica at roughly

  • Kerguelen Island (island, Indian Ocean)

    Kerguelen Islands: …of Kerguelen (also known as Desolation Island) and nearly 300 islets, which together cover about 2,400 square miles (6,200 square km). Heavily glaciated Kerguelen Island, about 100 miles (160 km) in length, has active glaciers and peaks up to 6,445 feet (1,965 metres).

  • Kerguelen Islands (islands, Indian Ocean)

    Kerguelen Islands, archipelago in the southern Indian Ocean. Administratively a part of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands (Terres Australes et Antarctiques Fran?aises), it consists of the island of Kerguelen (also known as Desolation Island) and nearly 300 islets, which together cover about

  • Kerguelen Plateau (submarine plateau, Indian Ocean)

    Antarctica: The surrounding seas: Drilling of the Kerguelen Plateau near the Amery Ice Shelf (1987–88) entailed the study of the rifting history of the Indian-Australian Plate from East Antarctica and revealed that this submerged plateau—the world’s largest such feature—is of oceanic origin and not a continental fragment, as had been previously thought.

  • Kerguélen-Trémarec, Yves-Joseph de (French navigator)

    Kerguelen Islands: …1772 by the French navigator Yves-Joseph de Kerguélen-Trémarec and later explored by the British explorer Captain James Cook, the archipelago was often frequented by whalers and seal hunters. In 1950 a permanent base and scientific centre, Port-aux-Fran?ais, was established on the main island.

  • Kerimov, Kerim (Azerbaijani scientist)

    Kerim Aliyevich Kerimov, Soviet rocket scientist (born Nov. 14/17, 1917, Baku, Azerbaijan, Russian Empire—died March 29, 2003, Moscow, Russia), was for many years a central figure in the Soviet space program, though his name was kept secret from the public. During and after World War II, Kerimov w

  • Kerimov, Kerim Aliyevich (Azerbaijani scientist)

    Kerim Aliyevich Kerimov, Soviet rocket scientist (born Nov. 14/17, 1917, Baku, Azerbaijan, Russian Empire—died March 29, 2003, Moscow, Russia), was for many years a central figure in the Soviet space program, though his name was kept secret from the public. During and after World War II, Kerimov w

  • Kering (French company)

    Stella McCartney: …of her line after acquiring Kering’s 50 percent stake in the business. However, in 2019 she entered a partnership with LVMH Mo?t Hennessy–Louis Vuitton, the largest luxury products company in the world. As part of the deal, she retained a majority stake in her brand.

  • Keritai senaka (novel by Wataya)

    Wataya Risa: Her second novel, Keritai senaka (roughly, “The Back I Want to Kick”), was released when she was a third-year university student. It vividly portrays the self-consciousness and alienation that a girl in her first year of high school experiences. The teen struggles to relate to her peers and…

  • Keriya River (river, Asia)

    Takla Makan Desert: Physiography: The Hotan and Keriya river valleys have survived up to the present day, but most of the shallower rivers have been lost in the sands, after which their empty valleys were filled by wind-borne sand.

  • Keriya, Mount (mountain, Asia)

    Kunlun Mountains: Physiography: …the western Kunlun Mountains is Mount Keriya, at an elevation of 23,359 feet (7,120 metres). Several peaks exceeding 20,000 feet (6,000 metres) punctuate the skyline in the central to eastern reaches, including Mount Muztag and Bukadaban Peak (22,507 feet [6,860 metres]). The surrounding plain lies above 16,000 feet (4,900 metres);…

  • Kerketeus, Mount (mountain, Greece)

    Sámos: …island is wooded and mountainous; Mount Kerketeus, the highest peak (4,701 feet [1,433 metres]), forms the western tip of the island. The east coast is amply indented, but the smoother south coast has broad, deep plains except around the port of Tigáni, which is hemmed in by hills. It forms…

  • Kerkhoven’s Third Existence (work by Wassermann)

    Jakob Wassermann: …Joseph Kerkhovens dritte Existenz (1934; Kerkhoven’s Third Existence). Mein Weg als Deutscher und Jude (1921; My Life as German and Jew) is Wassermann’s autobiography.

  • Kérkira (island, Greece)

    Corfu, island in the Ionian Sea (Modern Greek: Ióvio Pélagos), with adjacent small islands making up the dímos (municipality) and pereferiakí enótita (regional unit) of Kérkyra (also called Corfu), Ionian Islands (Iónia Nisiá) periféreia (region), western Greece. Lying just off the coast of Epirus

  • Kerkorian, Kirk (American business executive)

    Kirk Kerkorian, (Kerkor Kerkorian), American financier (born June 6, 1917, Fresno, Calif.—died June 15, 2015, Beverly Hills, Calif.), bought, sold, and traded shares in airlines, hotels, casinos, movie studios, and car companies with tremendous success and became one of the wealthiest people in the

  • Kerkrade (Netherlands)

    Kerkrade, gemeente (municipality), southeastern Netherlands, east of Maastricht on the German border. One of Europe’s oldest coal-mining towns, Kerkrade served as an important coal-mining centre from 1113 until the early 1970s, when the mines were closed. The former abbey of Rolduc (1104) has a

  • Kérkyra (Greece)

    Corfu: Modern Kérkyra (Corfu), the chief city, port, and capital of the dímos, lies on a peninsula on the east coast. The twin-peaked old citadel, with fortifications built by the Venetians (1550), was once an islet. Its old town, with its labyrinth of hilly, narrow streets, is…

  • Kérkyra (island, Greece)

    Corfu, island in the Ionian Sea (Modern Greek: Ióvio Pélagos), with adjacent small islands making up the dímos (municipality) and pereferiakí enótita (regional unit) of Kérkyra (also called Corfu), Ionian Islands (Iónia Nisiá) periféreia (region), western Greece. Lying just off the coast of Epirus

  • Kerlin, Isaac Newton (American physician and administrator)

    Isaac Newton Kerlin, American physician and administrator who was a strong proponent of institutionalizing people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Kerlin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1856. In 1858 he became the assistant superintendent at

  • Kerll, Johann Caspar von (German composer)

    Johann Caspar von Kerll, organist and leading master of the middle-Baroque generation of south-German Catholic composers. In 1645 Kerll was sent by Ferdinand III to study in Rome with the prominent composers Giacomo Carissimi and Girolamo Frescobaldi; earlier he had studied in Vienna. His study in

  • Kerma (archaeological site, Sudan)

    Karmah, archaeological site, northern Sudan. It is located near the town of Karmah al-Nuzul, about 30 miles (50 km) north of Dunqulah (Dongola) on the right bank of the Nile above its Third Cataract. An American expedition from Harvard University carried out extensive archaeological excavations

  • Kermadec Islands (islands, New Zealand)

    Kermadec Islands, volcanic island group in the South Pacific Ocean, 600 mi (1,000 km) northeast of Auckland, New Zealand; they are a dependency of New Zealand. They include Raoul (Sunday), Macauley, and Curtis islands and l’Esperance Rock and have a total land area of 13 sq mi (34 sq km). Raoul,

  • Kermadec Trench (trench, Pacific Ocean)

    Kermadec Trench, submarine trench in the floor of the South Pacific Ocean, about 750 mi (1,200 km) in length, forming the eastern boundary of the Kermadec Ridge. The two together comprise the southern half of the Tonga–Kermadec Arc, a structural feature completed to the north by the Tonga Trench

  • Kermān (province, Iran)

    Kermān: Kermān province is bounded by the provinces of Fārs on the west, Yazd on the north, South Khorāsān on the northeast, Sīstān va Balūchestān on the east, and Hormozgān on the south. It includes the southern part of the central Iranian desert, the Dasht-e Lūt.…

  • Kermān (Iran)

    Kermān, city, provincial capital, and ostān (province), southeastern Iran. The city lies on a sandy plain, 5,738 feet (1,749 metres) above sea level, under barren rocky hills. Surrounded by mountains on the north and east, it has a cool climate and frequent sandstorms in the autumn and spring. The

  • Kermān carpet

    Kermān carpet, floor covering handwoven in or about the city of Kermān in southern Iran, which has been the origin since the 16th century of highly sophisticated carpets in well-organized designs. To this city is now generally attributed a wide variety of 16th- and 17th-century carpets, including

  • Kermānshāh (Iran)

    Kermānshāh, city, capital of Kermānshāh province, western Iran. The city lies in the fertile valley of the Qareh Sū River and is situated on the ancient caravan route between the Mediterranean Sea and Central Asia. It was founded in the 4th century ce by Bahrām IV of the Sāsānian dynasty. Conquered

  • kermes (insect and dye)

    Kermes, (Kermes ilicis), a species of scale insect in the family Kermesidae (order Homoptera), the common name of which also represents the red dye that is obtained from the dried bodies of these insects. The dye was often part of the tribute paid to conquering Roman armies, and, in the Middle

  • Kermes ilicis (insect and dye)

    Kermes, (Kermes ilicis), a species of scale insect in the family Kermesidae (order Homoptera), the common name of which also represents the red dye that is obtained from the dried bodies of these insects. The dye was often part of the tribute paid to conquering Roman armies, and, in the Middle

  • kermes oak (plant)

    oak: suber), and the tannin-rich kermes oak (Q. coccifera) is the host of the kermes insect, once harvested for a dye contained in its body fluids.

  • Kermesses (work by Eekhoud)

    Georges Eekhoud: His cycles of stories, Kermesses (1884; “Country Fair”) and Nouvelles Kermesses (1887; “New Country Fair”), graphically describe the seamy side of peasant life; his city novels explore the world of the working classes and social outcasts. In the novel Escal-Vigor (1899; Escal-Vigor: A Strange Love), Eekhoud confronted his own…

  • Kermit the Frog (American puppet character)

    Kermit the Frog, American television puppet character, a featured figure among a group of highly articulated hand puppets called Muppets who were part of the long-running children’s television program Sesame Street and the prime-time comedy and variety series The Muppet Show (1976–81), as well as

  • Kermode, Sir John Frank (British critic and educator)

    Sir (John) Frank Kermode, British critic and educator (born Nov. 29, 1919, Douglas, Isle of Man, Eng.—died Aug. 17, 2010, Cambridge, Eng.), bridged the divide between literary criticism and reading for pleasure through more than 50 books and scores of essays. His numerous articles for such

  • Kern River (river, United States)

    Bakersfield: …distribute the waters of the Kern River; the region subsequently became important in the production of grain, alfalfa, and livestock. The discovery of the Kern River oil fields in 1899 brought a large-scale petroleum industry, which was centred at Bakersfield.

  • Kern, Hans-Georg (German artist)

    Georg Baselitz, German painter, printmaker, and sculptor who is considered to be a pioneering Neo-Expressionist. Baselitz was part of a wave of German painters from what was in their formative years East Germany who in the late 1970s rejected abstraction for highly expressive paintings with

  • Kern, Hendrik (Dutch scholar)

    Austronesian languages: Early classification work: …1880s the Dutch Sanskrit scholar Hendrik Kern began a series of studies that in principle encompassed the entire Austronesian family, drawing on data from both island Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The first true systematizer in the Austronesian field was the Swiss scholar Renward Brandstetter, whose work in the period…

  • Kern, Jerome David (American composer)

    Jerome Kern, one of the major U.S. composers of musical comedy, whose Show Boat (with libretto by Oscar Hammerstein II) inaugurated the serious musical play in U.S. theatre. Kern studied music in New York City and in 1903 in Heidelberg, Ger., later gaining theatrical experience in London. After his

  • Kern, Johann Conrad (Swiss diplomat)

    Johann Conrad Kern, longtime Swiss minister to France and one of the authors of the Swiss federal constitution of 1848. A lawyer and doctor of jurisprudence, Kern was, after 1837, the guiding spirit of Thurgau’s cantonal government, especially in the administration of justice. As deputy to the

  • Kern, John Worth (United States senator)

    United States presidential election of 1908: The candidates: Future senator John Worth Kern was chosen for the vice presidential slot.

  • Kern, Leonard (German sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Central Europe: …mainly in his ivories, and Leonard Kern in Franconia developed a similar Rubensian style for his small statuettes.

  • Kernaghan, Lee (Australian singer)

    Lee Kernaghan, Australian popular singer who reinvigorated Australian country music in the 1990s, synthesizing traditional country themes with energetic styles of contemporary rock and roll and images of an evolving Australian rural culture. Kernaghan was the eldest child of Ray Kernaghan, who rose

  • Kernaghan, Lee Raymond (Australian singer)

    Lee Kernaghan, Australian popular singer who reinvigorated Australian country music in the 1990s, synthesizing traditional country themes with energetic styles of contemporary rock and roll and images of an evolving Australian rural culture. Kernaghan was the eldest child of Ray Kernaghan, who rose

  • Kernaghan, Ray (Australian musician)

    Lee Kernaghan: …was the eldest child of Ray Kernaghan, who rose to great popularity as a country music singer during Lee’s teen years. In the mid-1970s Lee formed his first band with his brother Greg and his sister Tania—the latter of whom also went on to become a successful country singer—and he…

  • Kernberg, Otto (psychoanalyst)

    narcissism: Origins: …Austrian psychoanalysts Heinz Kohut and Otto Kernberg, posit that adult narcissism has its roots in early childhood experiences. Both Kohut and Kernberg focus on disturbances in early social (parental) relationships as the genesis of adult narcissistic personality disorder. Also, both view narcissism at its core as a defect in the…

  • kernel (analysis)

    Kernel, in mathematics, known function that appears in the integrand of an integral equation. Thus, in the equation (for symbol, see integration), both the kernel function, K(x, y), and g(x) are given, and f(x) is the function sought. As an example, in Abel’s equation for the curve followed by a

  • kernel sentence (linguistics)

    linguistics: Harris’s grammar: …example, English) two complementary subsets: kernel sentences (the set of kernel sentences being described as the kernel of the grammar) and nonkernel sentences. The difference between these two subsets lies in nonkernel sentences being derived from kernel sentences by means of transformational rules. For example, “The workers rejected the ultimatum”…

  • kernel tune (music)

    Central Asian arts: Instrumental and vocal styles: …development of short melodies called kernel tunes. In the komuz piece shown below, the kernel tune is stated in the first two measures and is varied and developed elaborately as the piece progresses. Another Kyrgyz-Kazakh specialty is program music, in which instrumentalists suggest situations or tell specific stories without words,…

  • Kerner Commission (United States government commission)

    American civil rights movement: From black power to the assassination of Martin Luther King: In 1968 the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (also known as the Kerner Commission) concluded that the country, despite civil rights reforms, was moving “toward two societies one black, one white—separate and unequal.” By the time of the commission’s report, claims that black gains had resulted in…

  • Kerner, Justinus Andreas Christian (German writer)

    Justinus Andreas Christian Kerner, German poet and spiritualist writer. He and the poet Ludwig Uhland founded the so-called Swabian group of late Romantic poets. After the death of his father (1799), Kerner worked in a cloth factory until he was able to study medicine at Tübingen. There he met

  • kernicterus (pathology)

    Kernicterus, severe brain damage caused by an abnormal concentration of the bile pigment bilirubin in brain tissues at or shortly after birth. Kernicterus may occur because of Rh blood-group incompatibility between mother and child, as in erythroblastosis fetalis, where the mother’s immune system

  • kernite (mineral)

    Kernite, borate mineral, hydrated sodium borate (Na2B4O7·4H2O), that was formerly the chief source of borax (q.v.). It forms very large crystals, often 60 to 90 centimetres (2 to 3 feet) thick; the largest observed measured 240 by 90 cm. The crystals are colourless and transparent but are usually c

  • Kernot, Cheryl (Australian politician)

    Cheryl Kernot, Australian politician who led the Australian Democrats (AD) from 1993 to 1997. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree and Diploma of Education from the Universities of Sydney and Newcastle, she taught in secondary schools for 10 years and worked in the communications

  • kerogen (chemical compound)

    Kerogen, complex waxy mixture of hydrocarbon compounds that is the primary organic component of oil shale. Kerogen consists mainly of paraffin hydrocarbons, though the solid mixture also incorporates nitrogen and sulfur. Kerogen is insoluble in water and in organic solvents such as benzene or

  • kerogen oil (petroleum)

    shale oil: …synthetic crude is also called kerogen oil. Under present technology the oil is recovered by either of two processes. One involves mining and crushing oil shale and then transporting the rock to a processing plant where it is heated in special retorts to temperatures of about 500 °C (930 °F).…

  • kerogen shale (geology)

    Oil shale, any sedimentary rock containing various amounts of solid organic material that yields petroleum products, along with a variety of solid by-products, when subjected to pyrolysis—a treatment that consists of heating the rock to above 300 °C (about 575 °F) in the absence of oxygen. The

  • kerogenite (geology)

    Oil shale, any sedimentary rock containing various amounts of solid organic material that yields petroleum products, along with a variety of solid by-products, when subjected to pyrolysis—a treatment that consists of heating the rock to above 300 °C (about 575 °F) in the absence of oxygen. The

  • kerosene (chemical compound)

    Kerosene, flammable hydrocarbon liquid commonly used as a fuel. Kerosene is typically pale yellow or colourless and has a not-unpleasant characteristic odour. It is obtained from petroleum and is used for burning in kerosene lamps and domestic heaters or furnaces, as a fuel or fuel component for

  • Kerosene (album by Lambert)

    Miranda Lambert: …(2004), Lambert released the album Kerosene in 2005. Although its songs made only a modest impression on country radio, the album eventually found an audience, which consisted largely of young women who admired her artistic self-determination (she had a writing credit on all but one song) and her earthy demeanour.…

  • kerosene lamp (lighting)

    Kerosene lamp, vessel containing kerosene with a wick for burning to provide light. Such lamps were widely used from the 1860s, when kerosene first became plentiful, until the development of electric lighting. Compared with other oil lamps, they were safe, efficient, and simple to operate. The

  • kerosine (chemical compound)

    Kerosene, flammable hydrocarbon liquid commonly used as a fuel. Kerosene is typically pale yellow or colourless and has a not-unpleasant characteristic odour. It is obtained from petroleum and is used for burning in kerosene lamps and domestic heaters or furnaces, as a fuel or fuel component for

  • Kerouac, Jack (American writer)

    Jack Kerouac, American novelist, poet, and leader of the Beat movement whose most famous book, On the Road (1957), had broad cultural influence before it was recognized for its literary merits. On the Road captured the spirit of its time as no other work of the 20th century had since F. Scott

  • Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de (American writer)

    Jack Kerouac, American novelist, poet, and leader of the Beat movement whose most famous book, On the Road (1957), had broad cultural influence before it was recognized for its literary merits. On the Road captured the spirit of its time as no other work of the 20th century had since F. Scott

  • Kérouané (Guinea)

    Kérouané, town, southeastern Guinea, West Africa, on the road from Beyla to Kankan. It is the chief trading town (rice, millet, cattle) for savanna lands inhabited mainly by the Muslim Malinke people. Local rivers have been an important source of alluvial diamonds since the 1950s, and the Simandou

  • Kerr black hole (astronomy)

    Roy Kerr: …black holes are also called Kerr black holes. In later work (written jointly with A. Schild), he introduced a new class of solutions, known as Kerr–Schild solutions, which have had a profound influence on finding exact solutions to Einstein’s equations.

  • Kerr cell

    Kerr electro-optic effect: The Kerr cell, also referred to as a Kerr electro-optical shutter, is a device employing the Kerr effect to interrupt a beam of light up to 1010 times per second. Linearly polarized light (light vibrating in one plane, as shown in the Figure) is passed through…

  • Kerr Dam (dam, Montana, United States)

    Flathead Lake: …facilities are supplied by the Kerr Dam (completed 1958) near Polson at the south end of the lake. The University of Montana Biological Station is on the eastern shore, and the Swan River National Wildlife Refuge is nearby.

  • Kerr effect (physics)

    Kerr electro-optic effect, in physics, the inducement of double refraction of light in a transparent substance when a strong electric field is applied in a direction transverse to the beam of light. In double refraction, the index of refraction (a measure of the amount the ray is bent on entering

  • Kerr electro-optic effect (physics)

    Kerr electro-optic effect, in physics, the inducement of double refraction of light in a transparent substance when a strong electric field is applied in a direction transverse to the beam of light. In double refraction, the index of refraction (a measure of the amount the ray is bent on entering

  • Kerr electro-optical shutter

    Kerr electro-optic effect: The Kerr cell, also referred to as a Kerr electro-optical shutter, is a device employing the Kerr effect to interrupt a beam of light up to 1010 times per second. Linearly polarized light (light vibrating in one plane, as shown in the Figure) is passed through…

  • Kerr, Clark (American educator)

    Clark Kerr, American educator (born May 17, 1911, Stony Creek, Pa.—died Dec. 1, 2003, El Cerrito, Calif.), was chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1952 to 1958 and then served as president of the entire University of California system from 1958 to 1967. In the latter post h

  • Kerr, Clark (American sociologist)

    social change: Economic processes: …industrialization” thesis by American scholar Clark Kerr and his colleagues, states that industrialization everywhere has similar consequences, whether the property relations are called capitalist or communist.

  • Kerr, Deborah (British actress)

    Deborah Kerr, British film and stage actress known for the poise and serenity she exhibited in portraying complex characters. Kerr trained as a dancer in her aunt’s drama school in Bristol, England. She won a scholarship to Sadler’s Wells ballet school and at age 17 made her professional dancing

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