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  • ketjak (dance)

    Southeast Asian arts: Balinese dance-drama: In the ketjak, or monkey dance, as many as 150 village men, sitting in concentric circles around a flaming lamp, chant and gesticulate in unison until, in trance, they appear to have become ecstatically possessed by the spirits of monkeys. This performance, however, has no ritual function…

  • ketjap ikan (seasoning)

    Fish sauce, in Southeast Asian cookery, a liquid seasoning prepared by fermenting freshwater or saltwater fish with salt in large vats. After a few months time, the resulting brownish, protein-rich liquid is drawn off and bottled. It is sometimes allowed to mature in the sun in glass or

  • Ketmen Range (mountains, Asia)

    Tien Shan: Physiography: …(6,811 metres), and the isolated Ketpen (Ketmen) Range, which rises to an elevation of 11,936 feet (3,474 metres) in the central part of the depression.

  • keto acid (chemistry)

    carboxylic acid: Hydroxy and keto acids: The 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-hydroxycarboxylic acids all lose water upon heating, although the products are not the same. The 2-hydroxy acids form cyclic dimeric esters (formed by the esterification of two molecules of the acid) called lactides, whereas the 3- and 4-hydroxy…

  • keto form (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: Keto–enol tautomerism, acid- and base-catalyzed: Acids and bases both bring about the establishment of an equilibrium between ketones (or aldehydes) and their enol forms, which contain a hydroxyl group directly attached to a doubly bonded carbon atom:

  • keto-enol tautomerism (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: Keto–enol tautomerism, acid- and base-catalyzed: Acids and bases both bring about the establishment of an equilibrium between ketones (or aldehydes) and their enol forms, which contain a hydroxyl group directly attached to a doubly bonded carbon atom:

  • ketoacidosis (metabolic condition)

    diabetes mellitus: Treatment: Untreated diabetes leads to ketoacidosis, the accumulation of ketones (products of fat breakdown) and acid in the blood. Continued buildup of these products of disordered carbohydrate and fat metabolism result in nausea and vomiting, and eventually the patient goes into a diabetic coma.

  • β-ketoacyl coenzyme A (enzyme)

    metabolism: Fragmentation of fatty acyl coenzyme A molecules: The product is called a β-ketoacyl coenzyme A.

  • β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Fatty acids: …the reaction is catalyzed by β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase. Reduced NADP+ is the electron donor, however, and not reduced NAD+ (which would participate in the reversal of reaction [24]). NADP? is thus a product in [65].

  • β-ketoacyl-ACP synthetase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Fatty acids: …in a reaction catalyzed by β-ketoacyl-ACP synthetase so that the acetyl moiety (CH3CO―) is transferred to the malonyl moiety (?OOCH2CO―). Simultaneously, the carbon dioxide fixed in step [62] is lost, leaving as a product a four-carbon moiety attached to ACP and called acetoacetyl-S-ACP (reaction [64]).

  • ketoconazole (drug)

    antiandrogen: For example, ketoconazole, an antifungal drug, blocks the synthesis of steroids, including testosterone and cortisol. Spironolactone, a diuretic, is also a weak inhibitor of the androgen receptor and a weak inhibitor of testosterone synthesis. Androgen-receptor antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide can be used in combination with…

  • Ketoff, Paolo (Italian engineer)

    electronic instrument: The electronic music synthesizer: …built by the Italian engineer Paolo Ketoff in 1962, was designed for live performance of experimental music. It had three small, closely spaced, touch-sensitive keyboards, each of which controlled a single tone. Its foremost exponent was John Eaton, who concertized widely on his Synket throughout the 1960s and ’70s, performing…

  • ketone (chemical compound)

    Ketone, any of a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of a carbonyl group in which the carbon atom is covalently bonded to an oxygen atom. The remaining two bonds are to other carbon atoms or hydrocarbon radicals (R): Ketone compounds have important physiological properties.

  • Ketoprak (drama)

    Southeast Asian arts: Ketoprak and ludruk: Two other types of popular theatre, ketoprak and ludruk, were performed in Java by 150 to 200 professional troupes. Ketoprak, created by a Surakarta court official in 1914, evolved into a spoken drama of Javanese and Islamic history in which the clown…

  • ketosis (pathology)

    Ketosis, metabolic disorder marked by high levels of ketones in the tissues and body fluids, including blood and urine. With starvation or fasting, there is less sugar than normal in the blood and less glycogen (the storage form of sugar) in the cells of the body, especially the liver cells; fat

  • Kétou plateau (plateau, Benin)

    Benin: Relief: …750 feet high, and the Kétou plateau is up to 500 feet in height.

  • ketoxime (chemical compound)

    amine: Occurrence and sources of amines: …Beckmann rearrangement, by which a ketoxime, R2C=NOH, is rearranged to an amide, RCONHR, can be used to prepare primary amines when followed by hydrolysis.

  • Ketpen Range (mountains, Asia)

    Tien Shan: Physiography: …(6,811 metres), and the isolated Ketpen (Ketmen) Range, which rises to an elevation of 11,936 feet (3,474 metres) in the central part of the depression.

  • Kett, Robert (English rebel)

    Robert Ket, English leader of the Norfolk rising of 1549, which was afterwards known as Ket’s Rebellion. He was either a tanner or, more probably, a small landowner. The rising seems to have originated in a quarrel between the people of Wymondham, in Norfolk, and a certain Flowerdew and was at

  • Ketteler, Wilhelm Emmanuel, Freiherr von (Bavarian bishop)

    Wilhelm Emmanuel, baron von Ketteler, social reformer who was considered by some to have been Germany’s outstanding 19th-century Roman Catholic bishop. Ordained a priest in 1844 and appointed bishop of Mainz in 1850, Ketteler attracted national attention by his sermons and writings. He was

  • Kettering (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Kettering: Kettering, town and borough (district), administrative and historic county of Northamptonshire, England. From the 17th century Kettering was a centre for the production of woolen cloth and later of silk and plush. Since the Industrial Revolution, however, the town has been associated, like all its…

  • Kettering (Ohio, United States)

    Kettering, city, Montgomery county, southwestern Ohio, U.S. It lies immediately south of Dayton, in the Miami River valley. Stone quarries first attracted settlers to the site, which was organized in 1841 as Van Buren township. In 1952 it was incorporated as a village and renamed for the industrial

  • Kettering (England, United Kingdom)

    Kettering, town and borough (district), administrative and historic county of Northamptonshire, England. From the 17th century Kettering was a centre for the production of woolen cloth and later of silk and plush. Since the Industrial Revolution, however, the town has been associated, like all its

  • Kettering, Charles F. (American engineer)

    Charles F. Kettering, American engineer whose inventions, which included the electric starter, were instrumental in the evolution of the modern automobile. In 1904 Kettering began working for the National Cash Register Company in Dayton, where he developed the first electric cash register. He

  • Kettering, Charles Franklin (American engineer)

    Charles F. Kettering, American engineer whose inventions, which included the electric starter, were instrumental in the evolution of the modern automobile. In 1904 Kettering began working for the National Cash Register Company in Dayton, where he developed the first electric cash register. He

  • Ketterle, Wolfgang (German physicist)

    Wolfgang Ketterle, German-born physicist who, with Eric A. Cornell and Carl E. Wieman, won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2001 for creating a new ultracold state of matter, the so-called Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). In 1986 Ketterle received a Ph.D. from the University of Munich and the Max

  • kettle (geology)

    Kettle, in geology, depression in a glacial outwash drift made by the melting of a detached mass of glacial ice that became wholly or partly buried. The occurrence of these stranded ice masses is thought to be the result of gradual accumulation of outwash atop the irregular glacier terminus.

  • Kettle Creek, Battle of (United States history)

    Washington: During the American Revolution the Battle of Kettle Creek (February 14, 1779), which was fought nearby, disrupted the British plans to recapture Georgia. The last Cabinet meeting of the Confederacy was held there on May 5, 1865, at the end of the American Civil War. Local residents, who call the…

  • kettle gong (musical instrument)

    Kettle gong, percussion instrument of the Bronze Age cultures of China, Southeast Asia, and Indonesia. It was used mainly in rainmaking rites. Some kettle gongs from northern Vietnam are dated between the 5th and 3rd centuries bc. When played, they are suspended so that the striking surface (the

  • kettle hole (geology)

    Kettle, in geology, depression in a glacial outwash drift made by the melting of a detached mass of glacial ice that became wholly or partly buried. The occurrence of these stranded ice masses is thought to be the result of gradual accumulation of outwash atop the irregular glacier terminus.

  • kettle lake (geology)

    kettle: …with water they are called kettle lakes. Most kettles are circular in shape because melting blocks of ice tend to become rounded; distorted or branching depressions may result from extremely irregular ice masses.

  • kettle soap

    liquid crystal: Liquid crystal compounds: …a lamellar phase, also called neat soap. In this case it is important to recognize that soap molecules have a dual chemical nature. One end of the molecule (the hydrocarbon tail) is attracted to oil, while the other end (the polar head) attaches itself to water. When soap is placed…

  • kettledrum (musical instrument)

    Kettledrum, percussion instrument in which a membrane is stretched over a hemispheric or similar-shaped shell and held taut, usually by a hoop with rope lacings, adjusting screws, or various mechanical devices; in some varieties the lacings may pierce the skin directly or the membrane may be tied

  • ketubah (Judaism)

    Ketubba, (Hebrew: “marriage contract”) formal Jewish marriage contract written in Aramaic and guaranteeing a bride certain future rights before her marriage. Since Jewish religious law permits a man to divorce his wife at any time for any reason, the ketubba was introduced in ancient times to

  • ketubba (Judaism)

    Ketubba, (Hebrew: “marriage contract”) formal Jewish marriage contract written in Aramaic and guaranteeing a bride certain future rights before her marriage. Since Jewish religious law permits a man to divorce his wife at any time for any reason, the ketubba was introduced in ancient times to

  • Ketumadi (Myanmar)

    Toungoo, town, south-central Myanmar (Burma). Located on the right bank of the Sittang River, it was founded as Ketumadi in 1510 by King Minkyinyo and was capital of the Toungoo dynasty until 1540, when the seat of government was moved to Pegu (Bago), 125 miles (200 km) south. Parts of the old moat

  • Ketupa (genus of bird)

    fish owl: …species are of the genus Ketupa; the several African species are of the genus Scotopelia.

  • Ketupa zeylonensis (bird)

    fish owl: The brown fish owl (K. zeylonensis) ranges from the eastern Mediterranean to Taiwan and Japan. Pel’s fishing owl (S. peli) ranges over most of sub-Saharan Africa. It is about 50 to 60 cm (20 to 24 inches) long, brown above with barring, reddish yellow below with…

  • Ketuvim (biblical literature)

    Ketuvim, the third division of the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament. Divided into four sections, the Ketuvim include: poetical books (Psalms, Proverbs, and Job), the Megillot, or Scrolls (Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations of Jeremiah, Ecclesiastes, and Esther), prophecy (Daniel), and history (Ezra,

  • Kety, Seymour Solomon (American psychiatrist)

    Seymour Solomon Kety, American psychiatrist (born Aug. 25, 1915, Philadelphia, Pa.—died May 25, 2000, Westwood, Mass.), was the 1999 recipient of an Albert Lasker Special Achievement Award for his contributions to the study of schizophrenia—he classified it as a disease rather than the result of b

  • Keulen, Cornelis Johnson van (English painter)

    Cornelius Johnson, Baroque painter, considered the most important native English portraitist of the early 17th century. Johnson was the son of Dutch parents living in London. He was patronized by James I and Charles I but seems to have lost his popularity with the court when Van Dyck went to

  • Keuper (geology)

    geochronology: Completion of the Phanerozoic time scale: …the Muschelkalk Limestone, and the Keuper Marls and Clays, as constituting the Trias or Triassic System.

  • keurrecht (law, Low Countries)

    history of the Low Countries: Town opposition to the prince: …laws; this legislative right (the keurrecht) was in most towns originally restricted to the control of prices and standards in the markets and shops but was gradually extended to cover civil and criminal law. The extent of a man’s obligation to serve in the prince’s armed forces was often fixed…

  • keV (unit of measurement)

    particle accelerator: Accelerating particles: …above 10,000 eV, or 10 kiloelectron volts (keV). Many particle accelerators reach much higher energies, measured in megaelectron volts (MeV, or million eV), gigaelectron volts (GeV, or billion eV), or teraelectron volts (TeV, or trillion eV).

  • Kevajra (Buddhist deity)

    Hevajra, in northern Buddhism, a fierce protective deity, the yab-yum (in union with his female consort, Nairatmya) form of the fierce protective deity Heruka. Hevajra is a popular deity in Tibet, where he belongs to the yi-dam (tutelary, or guardian, deity) class. His worship is the subject of the

  • Kevin, Saint (patron of Dublin)

    Saint Kevin, ; feast day June 3), one of the patron saints of Dublin, founder of the monastery of Glendalough. The earliest life (10th/11th century?) states that Kevin was born into the royal line of the ancient Irish kingdom of Leinster and chose as a young man to become a hermit in Glendalough,

  • Kevlar (chemical compound)

    Kevlar, trademarked name of poly-para-phenylene terephthalamide, a nylonlike polymer first produced by Du Pont in 1971. Kevlar can be made into strong, tough, stiff, high-melting fibres, five times stronger per weight than steel; it is used in radial tires, heat- or flame-resistant fabrics,

  • Kevod Elohim (work by ibn Shem Tov)

    Joseph ben Shem Tov ibn Shem Tov: …best exemplified by his influential Kevod Elohim (written 1442; “The Glory of God”). Here he expounded his belief that answers sought through philosophical inquiry can be valuable in one’s quest for religious knowledge and that even religious principles should be subjected to such inquiry. Although as a philosopher he advocated…

  • Kevorkian, Jack (American physician)

    Jack Kevorkian, American physician who gained international attention through his assistance in the suicides of more than 100 patients, many of whom were terminally ill. Jack Kevorkian attended the University of Michigan and in 1952 graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School. Early in

  • Kew Bulletin (British periodical)

    Kew Gardens: …of the institution is the Kew Bulletin (issued quarterly). The Index Kewensis, which is edited at Kew, maintains a record of all described higher plant species of the world from the time of Linnaeus.

  • Kew Gardens (park, London, United Kingdom)

    Kew Gardens, botanical garden located at Kew, site of a former royal estate in the London borough of Richmond upon Thames. In 2003 Kew Gardens was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Privately owned gardens were tended at Kew from as early as the 16th century. The site was acquired from the

  • Kew Gardens (work by Woolf and Bell)

    Virginia Woolf: Early fiction: …with Vanessa Bell’s illustrations, Virginia’s Kew Gardens (1919), a story organized, like a Post-Impressionistic painting, by pattern. With the Hogarth Press’s emergence as a major publishing house, the Woolfs gradually ceased being their own printers.

  • Kew House (building, London, United Kingdom)

    orangery: …of Versailles in France and Kew House, Greater London.

  • Kew Seed Bank (agricultural project, England, United Kingdom)

    Kew Gardens: …Seed Bank Project (later the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership) to mitigate the extinction of at-risk and useful plants through seed preservation. Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank is the largest wild plant seed bank in the world. By 2018 it contained about 13 percent of the world’s wild plant species, holding some…

  • Kewanee (Illinois, United States)

    Kewanee, city, Henry county, northwestern Illinois, U.S. It lies about 45 miles (70 km) northwest of Peoria. Potawatomi, Winnebago, Sauk, and Fox Indians were early inhabitants of the area. Kewanee was laid out in 1854 in anticipation of the arrival of the railroad. Some of the early inhabitants

  • Keweenaw Bay (inlet, Michigan, United States)

    Keweenaw Bay, inlet of southern Lake Superior, indenting for 22 miles (35 km) the coast of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, U.S. The bay narrows from a maximum width of 12 miles (19 km) at its mouth, and it is the eastern outlet for the Keweenaw Waterway, which cuts northward via Portage Lake

  • Keweenaw Peninsula (peninsula, Michigan, United States)

    Keweenaw Bay: …via Portage Lake through the Keweenaw Peninsula. The villages of Keweenaw Bay, Baraga, and L’Anse lie along the bay, which is popular as a summer resort area and is noted for its fishing. Early explorers, trappers, and missionaries used the site as a campground. L’Anse Reservation, which belongs to the…

  • Keweenawan rift system (geological feature, North America)

    Precambrian: Orogenic belts: …was the formation of the Midcontinent (or Keweenawan) rift system that extends southward for more than 2,000 km (about 1,240 miles) from Lake Superior.

  • Keweenawan System (geology)

    Keweenawan System, division of late Precambrian rocks and time in North America (the Precambrian began about 4.6 billion years ago and ended 542 million years ago). Rocks of the Keweenawan System are about 10,700 metres (about 35,000 feet) thick, overlie rocks of the Huronian System, and underlie

  • Kewpie (doll and illustrated character)

    Rose Cecil O'Neill: …and highly successful marketing of Kewpie characters and Kewpie dolls.

  • key (lock device)

    Key, in locksmithing, an instrument, usually of metal, by which the bolt of a lock (q.v.) is turned. The Romans invented metal locks and keys and the system of security provided by wards. This system was, for hundreds of years, the only method of ensuring that only the right key would rotate in

  • key (geography)

    Cay, small, low island, usually sandy, situated on a coral reef platform. Such islands are commonly referred to as keys in Florida and parts of the Caribbean. Sand cays are usually built on the edge of the coral platform, opposite the direction from which the prevailing winds blow. Debris broken

  • key (wind instrument)

    wind instrument: Flutes and reeds: …was covered by a closed key controlled by the fourth finger of the right hand. (A closed key covers the hole when at rest.)

  • key (taxonomy)

    taxonomy: The objectives of biological classification: …type of classification, called a key, provides as briefly and as reliably as possible the most obvious characteristics useful in identification. Very often they are set out as a dichotomous key with opposing pairs of characters. The butterflies of a region, for example, might first be separated into those with…

  • key (music)

    Key, in music, a system of functionally related chords deriving from the major and minor scales, with a central note, called the tonic (or keynote). The central chord is the tonic triad, which is built on the tonic note. Any of the 12 tones of the chromatic scale can serve as the tonic of a key.

  • key (machine component)

    Key, in machine construction, a device used to prevent rotation of a machine component, such as a gear or a pulley, relative to the shaft on which it is mounted. A common type of key is a square bar that fits half in a groove (keyway) in the shaft and half in an adjoining keyway in the component.

  • key (keyboard instrument)

    keyboard instrument: Evolution from early forms: …to the white and black keys on the modern piano) was only gradually standardized. The arrangement of the keys depended in part on the music played and partly on the current state of musical theory. Thus, early keyboards are reported with only a single raised key in each octave (B?),…

  • key (data base)

    information processing: Organization and retrieval of information: …to some characteristic called a key. Such characteristics may be intrinsic properties of the objects (e.g., size, weight, shape, or colour), or they may be assigned from some agreed-upon set, such as object class or date of purchase. The values of the key are arranged in a sorting sequence that…

  • key (cipher)

    Vernam-Vigenère cipher: …marks and spaces (a running key) were mingled with the message during encryption to produce what is known as a stream or streaming cipher.

  • key (chess)

    chess: Standard problems: The first move, called the key, is rarely a check or other obvious move in modern problems, as it might be in a study. (See the composition.) In many cases the key is a waiting move—i.e., a nonchecking, noncapturing, and nonattacking move. Problem fans are often players with little or…

  • key (plant reproductive body)

    box elder: …seed is borne in a samara, or key—i.e., a broad, flat winglike structure. Owing to its quick growth and its drought resistance, the box elder was widely planted for shade by early settlers in the prairie areas of the United States. Maple syrup and sugar are sometimes obtained from the…

  • key bed (geology)

    Marker bed, a bed of rock strata that are readily distinguishable by reason of physical characteristics and are traceable over large horizontal distances. Stratigraphic examples include coal beds and beds of volcanic ash. The term marker bed is also applied to sedimentary strata that provide d

  • key block (printmaking)

    printmaking: Colour woodcut: The first, the key block, is generally the one that contains most of the structural or descriptive elements of the design, thus serving as a guide for the disposition of the other colours. After the key block is finished and printed, the print is transferred to the second…

  • key bugle (musical instrument)

    bugle: …1810 Joseph Halliday patented the key bugle, or Royal Kent bugle, with six brass keys (five closed, one open-standing) fitted to the once-coiled bugle to give it a complete diatonic (seven-note) scale. It became a leading solo instrument in military bands until replaced by the cornet. In France it inspired…

  • Key Club International (American organization)

    Kiwanis International: …organization’s coeducational youth affiliates are Key Club International, for high-school students, and Circle K International, for college students. Kiwanis International’s headquarters are located in Indianapolis, Ind.

  • Key deer (mammal)

    Key deer, subspecies of white-tailed deer

  • key enzyme (biochemistry)

    metabolism: Fine control: …the synthesis of key (pacemaker) enzymes. It was recognized in the 1950s, largely from work with microorganisms, that pacemaker enzymes can interact with small molecules at more than one site on the surface of the enzyme molecule. The reaction between an enzyme and its substrate—defined as the compound with…

  • Key Islands (islands, Indonesia)

    Kai Islands, island group of the southeastern Moluccas, lying west of the Aru Islands and southeast of Ceram (Seram), in the Banda Sea. The group, which forms part of Maluku propinsi (or provinsi; province), Indonesia, includes the Kai Besar (Great Kai), Kai Kecil (Little Kai) and Kai Dulah, and

  • Key Largo (film by Huston [1948])

    Key Largo, American film noir, released in 1948, that is widely considered a classic of the genre. It was directed by John Huston, stars married actors Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, and was loosely based on a 1939 play by Maxwell Anderson. Bogart played against type as Frank McCloud, a cynical

  • Key Largo (island, Florida, United States)

    Florida Keys: Largest of the keys is Key Largo, about 30 miles (50 km) long and formerly known for its plantations of key limes (used to make key lime pies). John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, which contains large living coral formations, is the first undersea park in the United States. It…

  • key light (photography)

    motion-picture technology: Light sources: …a scene is called the key light. The position of the key light has often been conventionalized (e.g., aimed at the actors at an angle 45 degrees off the camera-to-subject axis). Another school of cinematographers prefers source lighting, in the tradition of Renaissance and Old Master paintings; that is, a…

  • key lime pie (food)

    Key lime pie, an American dessert that consists of a graham-cracker or pastry crust, a yellow custard (primarily egg yolks, sweetened condensed milk, and key lime juice), and a topping of either whipped cream or meringue. The sweet and tart pie reportedly originated in Key West, Florida, in the

  • Key Marco carvings (Native American art)

    Key Marco carvings, large group of carvings excavated at Key Marco in southern Florida that provide the finest extant examples of North American Indian wood carving through the 15th century. The coastal mud of the area helped preserve hundreds of perishable artifacts, which were unearthed in 1896

  • key pattern (art and architecture)

    Fret, in decorative art and architecture, any one of several types of running or repeated ornament, consisting of lengths of straight lines or narrow bands, usually connected and at right angles to each other in T, L, or square-cornered G shapes, so arranged that the spaces between the lines or

  • key signature (musical notation)

    Key signature, in musical notation, the arrangement of sharp or flat signs on particular lines and spaces of a musical staff to indicate that the corresponding notes, in every octave, are to be consistently raised (by sharps) or lowered (by flats) from their natural pitches. (The keys of C major

  • Key to North American Birds (book by Coues)

    Elliott Coues: His monumental Key to North American Birds (1872) was the first work of its kind to present a taxonomic classification of birds according to an artificial key. Other important works by Coues include A Check List of North American Birds (1873), Field Ornithology (1874), and two monographs:…

  • Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, A (work by Stowe)
  • Key Tower (building, Cleveland, Ohio, United States)

    Cleveland: History: …Tower (1985) and the 63-story Key Tower (1991), at the time of its completion the tallest building between New York City and Chicago.

  • Key West (Florida, United States)

    Key West, city, seat (1824) of Monroe county, southwestern Florida, the southernmost city within the continental United States. It lies about 100 miles (160 km) from the mainland on a sand and coral island about 4 miles (6.5 km) long and 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide in the western Florida Keys. The name

  • Key Witness (film by Karlson [1960])

    Phil Karlson: Later films: The crime drama Key Witness (1960) featured Dennis Hopper as a gang leader, and the spy adventure The Secret Ways (1961) starred Richard Widmark as an American mercenary hired to smuggle a famous scholar out of Hungary following the country’s 1956 revolution. Karlson continued to explore new genres…

  • key, cryptographic (data encryption)

    Cryptographic key, Secret value used by a computer together with a complex algorithm to encrypt and decrypt messages. Since confidential messages might be intercepted during transmission or travel over public networks, they require encryption so that they will be meaningless to third parties in

  • Key, David M. (American politician)

    David M. Key, lawyer and Confederate Army officer who was appointed U.S. postmaster general by Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes in fulfillment of a campaign pledge made by Hayes during the disputed election of 1876. Admitted to the bar in 1850, Key practiced law in Chattanooga and became active in

  • Key, David McKendree (American politician)

    David M. Key, lawyer and Confederate Army officer who was appointed U.S. postmaster general by Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes in fulfillment of a campaign pledge made by Hayes during the disputed election of 1876. Admitted to the bar in 1850, Key practiced law in Chattanooga and became active in

  • Key, Ellen (Swedish writer)

    Ellen Key, Swedish feminist and writer whose advanced ideas on sex, love and marriage, and moral conduct had wide influence; she was called the “Pallas of Sweden.” Key was born the daughter of the landowner and politician Emil Key (1822–92). Family misfortune obliged her to take up teaching in

  • Key, Ellen Karolina Sofia (Swedish writer)

    Ellen Key, Swedish feminist and writer whose advanced ideas on sex, love and marriage, and moral conduct had wide influence; she was called the “Pallas of Sweden.” Key was born the daughter of the landowner and politician Emil Key (1822–92). Family misfortune obliged her to take up teaching in

  • Key, Francis Scott (American lawyer)

    Francis Scott Key, American lawyer, best known as the author of the U.S. national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Key was born into an affluent family on an estate called Terra Rubra. At age 10 he entered St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, from which he graduated in 1796. An extremely

  • Key, John (prime minister of New Zealand)

    John Key, New Zealand business executive and politician who was leader of the New Zealand National Party (2006–16) and prime minister of New Zealand (2008–16). Key was the son of an English father and a Jewish mother, who fled Austria for the United Kingdom in 1939. The couple married in 1948 and

  • Key, John Phillip (prime minister of New Zealand)

    John Key, New Zealand business executive and politician who was leader of the New Zealand National Party (2006–16) and prime minister of New Zealand (2008–16). Key was the son of an English father and a Jewish mother, who fled Austria for the United Kingdom in 1939. The couple married in 1948 and

  • Key, V. O., Jr. (American political scientist)

    V. O. Key, Jr., U.S. political scientist known for his studies of the U.S. political process and for his contributions to the development of a more empirical and behavioral political science. Educated at the University of Texas (B.A., 1929; M.A., 1930) and the University of Chicago (Ph.D., 1934),

  • Key, Valdimer Orlando, Jr. (American political scientist)

    V. O. Key, Jr., U.S. political scientist known for his studies of the U.S. political process and for his contributions to the development of a more empirical and behavioral political science. Educated at the University of Texas (B.A., 1929; M.A., 1930) and the University of Chicago (Ph.D., 1934),

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