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  • Killanin of Galway, Michael Morris, 3rd Baron (Irish author)

    Michael Morris, 3rd Baron Killanin, Irish author and businessman who in 1972 succeeded Avery Brundage as president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), after having served as IOC vice president since 1968. Morris succeeded his uncle to the title of Baron Killanin in 1927. After attending

  • Killarney (Ireland)

    Killarney, market town in County Kerry, southwestern Ireland. It lies near the Killarney lakes, famed for their beauty, about 45 miles (70 km) north-northwest of Cork. Rising steeply to the west are Tomies Mountain and Purple Mountain (2,739 feet [835 metres]), and beyond the Gap of Dunloe are

  • Killarney Provincial Park (park, Ontario, Canada)

    Killarney Provincial Park, wilderness park, southeastern Ontario, Canada, on the northern shore of Georgian Bay of Lake Huron. Established in 1964, it has an area of 132 sq mi (342 sq km), including the Canadian Shield country made famous by the painter A. Y. Jackson and the Group of Seven. Among

  • killdeer (bird)

    Killdeer, (Charadrius, sometimes Oxyechus, vociferus), American bird that frequents grassy mud flats, pastures, and fields. It belongs to the plover family of shorebirds (Charadriidae, order Charadriiformes). The killdeer’s name is suggestive of its loud insistent whistle. The bird is about 25

  • Killebrew, Harmon (American baseball player)

    Harmon Killebrew, American professional baseball player who amassed 573 home runs during his 22-year career (1954–75), which ranked him among the greatest home-run hitters in the sport’s history. Killebrew was signed by the Washington Senators at age 17, and he became an everyday player six years

  • Killebrew, Harmon Clayton, Jr. (American baseball player)

    Harmon Killebrew, American professional baseball player who amassed 573 home runs during his 22-year career (1954–75), which ranked him among the greatest home-run hitters in the sport’s history. Killebrew was signed by the Washington Senators at age 17, and he became an everyday player six years

  • Killeen (Texas, United States)

    Killeen, city, Bell county, central Texas, U.S., lying west of Temple and 65 miles (105 km) north of Austin. Laid out (1882) as Palo Alto by the Santa Fe Railway and named for Frank P. Killeen, a civil engineer with the line, it remained a small farming and ranching community until Camp Hood (a

  • Killen, Louis (British singer)

    Louis Joseph Killen, British folk singer (born Jan. 10, 1934, Gateshead, Durham, Eng.—died Aug. 9, 2013, Gateshead), was an important figure in the British folk music revival of the 1950s and ’60s, both as a solo performer and as a member of the Clancy Brothers Irish musical group. Killen, who was

  • Killen, Louis Joseph (British singer)

    Louis Joseph Killen, British folk singer (born Jan. 10, 1934, Gateshead, Durham, Eng.—died Aug. 9, 2013, Gateshead), was an important figure in the British folk music revival of the 1950s and ’60s, both as a solo performer and as a member of the Clancy Brothers Irish musical group. Killen, who was

  • Killens, John Oliver (American writer and activist)

    John Oliver Killens, American writer and activist known for his politically charged novels—particularly Youngblood (1954)—and his contributions to the Black Arts movement and as a founder of the Harlem Writers Guild. From an early age Killens was exposed to African American writers and thinkers.

  • Killer (album by Alice Cooper)

    Alice Cooper: …of significant albums that included Killer (1971) and Billion Dollar Babies (1973), all explorations of decadence, perversion, and psychosis. Best remembered for its shocking stage show, Alice Cooper blended the gore and grotesquerie of horror films with the camp of 1930s Berlin cabaret. The group was inducted into the Rock…

  • killer bee (insect)

    bee: The so-called killer bee is a hybrid between an African subspecies and European subspecies of honeybee. The Africanized honeybee subspecies was accidentally released in Brazil in 1957 during an attempt to create a hybrid that would adapt to tropical climates and produce large amounts of honey. Moving…

  • killer cell (cytology)

    immune system: Activation of killer cells: …cells, which may be either cytotoxic T cells or natural killer cells, have receptors that bind to the tail portion of the IgG antibody molecule (the part that does not bind to antigen). Once bound, killer cells insert a protein called perforin into the target cell, causing it to swell…

  • killer cell, natural (biology)

    immune system: Activation of killer cells: …either cytotoxic T cells or natural killer cells, have receptors that bind to the tail portion of the IgG antibody molecule (the part that does not bind to antigen). Once bound, killer cells insert a protein called perforin into the target cell, causing it to swell and burst. Killer cells…

  • Killer Clown, the (American serial killer)

    John Wayne Gacy, American serial killer whose murders of 33 boys and young men in the 1970s received international media attention and shocked his suburban Chicago community, where he was known for his sociability and his performance as a clown at charitable events and childrens’ parties. Gacy was

  • Killer Elite (film by McKendry [2011])

    Robert De Niro: Comedies and later work: …Limitless (2011), the action drama Killer Elite (2011), and the ensemble romantic comedy New Year’s Eve (2011).

  • Killer Elite, The (film by Peckinpah [1975])

    Sam Peckinpah: Later films: The widely panned The Killer Elite (1975) starred James Caan as a CIA agent who is severely wounded when his partner (Robert Duvall) betrays him; he survives, undergoes a grueling martial-arts training program, then wreaks his revenge on Duvall’s mercenary cartel of assassins. The antiwar Cross of Iron…

  • Killer Fog of 1952, The (environmental disaster, England, United Kingdom [1952])

    Great Smog of London, lethal smog that covered the city of London for five days (December 5–9) in 1952, caused by a combination of industrial pollution and high-pressure weather conditions. This combination of smoke and fog brought the city to a near standstill and resulted in thousands of deaths.

  • Killer Inside Me, The (novel by Thompson)

    Jim Thompson: The Killer Inside Me (1952) is admired as a chilling depiction of a criminally warped mind; its narrator, a small-town deputy, pretends to be an agreeable hick but is actually a calculating madman who, like most Thompson narrators, speaks directly and colloquially to the reader.…

  • Killer Is Loose, The (film by Boetticher [1956])

    Budd Boetticher: Westerns: He next helmed The Killer Is Loose (1956), a crime drama about a psychopathic ex-convict (Wendell Corey) swearing revenge on the policeman (Joseph Cotten) who sent him to prison and accidentally caused the death of his wife.

  • Killer Joe (film by Friedkin [2011])

    William Friedkin: …Friedkin adapted another Letts play, Killer Joe, which centred on a drug dealer who hires a contract killer (Matthew McConaughey) to dispose of his mother for a life insurance payout. He later returned to the subject of exorcism with the documentary The Devil and Father Amorth (2017), about the chief…

  • Killer Joe (play by Letts)

    Tracy Letts: …1991 Letts wrote the play Killer Joe, about a Texas family that enlists the titular murderer-for-hire to kill a relative with a sizable life insurance policy. The script was so graphic and violent, however, that no theatre company would agree to produce it. Two years later Letts and a few…

  • Killer of Sheep (film by Burnett [1977])

    Charles Burnett: …of Congress’s National Film Registry: Killer of Sheep (1977) in 1990 and To Sleep with Anger (1990) in 2017.

  • killer robot (military technology)
  • Killer Robots: The Future of War?

    Artificial intelligence (AI) will transform our lives. It will touch almost every aspect of society: business, education, transportation, medicine, even politics. In most places, this will be a good thing, removing drudgery and improving productivity. But there is one place that I fear its arrival,

  • killer T cell (cytology)

    immune system: Activation of killer cells: …cells, which may be either cytotoxic T cells or natural killer cells, have receptors that bind to the tail portion of the IgG antibody molecule (the part that does not bind to antigen). Once bound, killer cells insert a protein called perforin into the target cell, causing it to swell…

  • killer whale (mammal)

    Killer whale, (Orcinus orca), largest member of the dolphin family (Delphinidae). The killer whale is easy to identify by its size and its striking coloration: jet black on top and pure white below with a white patch behind each eye, another extending up each flank, and a variable “saddle patch”

  • Killer’s Head (play by Shepard)

    Sam Shepard: In Killer’s Head (produced 1975), for example, the rambling monologue, a Shepard stock-in-trade, blends horror and banality in a murderer’s last thoughts before electrocution; Angel City (produced 1976) depicts the destructive machinery of the Hollywood entertainment industry; and Suicide in B-flat (produced 1976) exploits the potentials…

  • Killer’s Kiss (film by Kubrick [1955])

    Stanley Kubrick: Early life and films: …a boxing-related film noir romance, Killer’s Kiss (1955). At this point he joined forces with producer James B. Harris to form Harris-Kubrick Productions. Encouraged by the respectable reviews for Killer’s Kiss, United Artists provided Kubrick with enough money to hire a cast of quality B-film supporting actors—including Sterling Hayden, Marie…

  • Killer, The (film by Woo [1989])

    Chow Yun-Fat: …II ), Diexue shangxiong (1989; The Killer), Zongheng sihai (1991; Once a Thief), and Lat sau san taam (1992; Hard-Boiled). Chow also made several popular action films with director Ringo Lam, including Lung fu fong wan (1987; City on Fire), Ban wo chuang tian ya (1989; Wild Search), and Xia…

  • Killers (film by Luketic [2010])

    Katherine Heigl: …appeared in the action comedies Killers (2010), as a woman who unknowingly marries a former assassin, and One for the Money (2012), as a novice bounty hunter. The latter film was based on a best-selling novel by Janet Evanovich. In the thriller Unforgettable (2017) Heigl played a woman who terrorizes…

  • Killers, The (film by Siegel [1964])

    The Killers, American crime film, released in 1964, that was adapted from an Ernest Hemingway short story that was originally brought to the screen in 1946. The film opens with Johnny North (played by John Cassavetes), a race-car driver turned teacher, being fatally shot by hit men. The killers,

  • Killers, The (film by Siodmak [1946])

    The Killers, American film noir, released in 1946, that is considered a classic of the genre. It features Burt Lancaster in his breakthrough role. The film opens with two hit men fatally shooting Pete (“Swede”) Lund (played by Lancaster). After an insurance investigator is assigned the case, Lund’s

  • Killian, James Rhyne, Jr. (United States statesman)

    James Rhyne Killian, Jr., American statesman and academic administrator who was instrumental in the formation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) both as chairman of the President’s Science Advisory Committee and as presidential assistant to Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1957 to

  • Killian, Lewis M. (American sociologist)

    social movement: Types of social movements: Killian advances still another typology based on the direction of the change advocated or opposed. A reactionary movement advocates the restoration of a previous state of social affairs, while a progressive movement argues for a new social arrangement. A conservative movement opposes the changes proposed…

  • Killiecrankie (mountain pass, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Killiecrankie, Grampian mountain pass, Perth and Kinross council area, Scot., 4 miles (6 km) north of Pitlochry. A modern road and railway use the narrow, wooded glen, which, in 1689, was the scene of the massacre of a royal force by insurgent Jacobite

  • killifish (fish)

    Killifish, any of a few hundred species of usually elongated fishes of the family Cyprinodontidae (order Atheriniformes), found worldwide, especially in the tropics of Africa and the New World. They inhabit brackish, salt, and fresh water, including certain desert hot springs. Killifish grow, at

  • Killigrew, Thomas (English dramatist)

    Thomas Killigrew, English dramatist and playhouse manager who was better known for his wit than for his plays, although some of the jokes in The Parson’s Wedding (acted c. 1640) were appropriated by the playwright William Congreve. In 1641 Killigrew published two tragicomedies, The Prisoners and

  • Killing Commendatore (novel by Murakami)

    Haruki Murakami: …14th novel, Kishidanchō goroshi (2017; Killing Commendatore), about a painter in the midst of marital difficulties whose life takes a bizarre turn after he moves into the house of another artist.

  • Killing Fields, The (film by Joffé [1984])

    Cambodia: Democratic Kampuchea: …the release in 1984 of The Killing Fields, a film adaptation of the Khmer Rouge story. Conservative estimates are that between April 1975 and early 1979, when the regime was overthrown, at least 1.5 million Cambodians—about 20 percent of the total population—died from overwork, starvation, disease, or execution. Parallels have…

  • Killing of a Chinese Bookie, The (film by Cassavetes [1976])

    John Cassavetes: Independent filmmaker: 1960s and ’70s: …filmmaking with the crime drama The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976), in which Gazzara played the debt-ridden owner of a strip joint forced by the mob to commit a murder. The ambitious Opening Night (1977) also had its problems, including one that often plagued Cassavetes’s films, the perception of…

  • Killing of a Sacred Deer, The (film by Lanthimos [2017])

    Nicole Kidman: Resurgence and subsequent films: …surgeon in the psychological thriller The Killing of a Sacred Deer; a band manager in the adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s short story How to Talk to Girls at Parties; and a high-strung assistant to a wealthy man with quadriplegia in The Upside.

  • Killing of Sister George, The (film by Aldrich [1968])

    Robert Aldrich: The 1960s: The controversial The Killing of Sister George (1968) is an adaptation of the Frank Marcus play about an aging soap opera actress (Beryl Reid) who fears she is losing both her television role and her young lesbian lover (Susannah York). Although well made, the film initially received…

  • Killing Orders (novel by Paretsky)

    Sara Paretsky: …such as Deadlock (1984) and Killing Orders (1985), the sleuth becomes the target of violence and learns of conspiracies involving big business, organized crime, and (in Killing Orders) the Roman Catholic church. Paretsky explored social issues in many of her books, including Bitter Medicine (1987), which deals with abortion rights…

  • Killing Them Softly (film by Dominik [2012])

    James Gandolfini: …Violet & Daisy (2011) and Killing Them Softly (2012). Gandolfini later appeared in Not Fade Away (2012), the story of a teenage rock band in 1960s New Jersey that was directed by The Sopranos creator David Chase, and as Leon Panetta in Zero Dark Thirty (2012), about the U.S. military…

  • Killing Time (poetry by Armitage)

    Simon Armitage: Killing Time (1999) was written to mark the turn of the millennium. Out of the Blue (2008) consists of three commissioned pieces marking anniversaries of the 9/11 attacks, V-E Day, and the rise of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. Armitage also wrote a dramatic adaptation…

  • Killing, The (film by Kubrick [1956])

    The Killing, American film noir, released in 1956, that was the first major film of director Stanley Kubrick. Johnny Clay (played by Sterling Hayden) is a newly released convict who masterminds a complex and seemingly foolproof caper to rob a racetrack of $2 million during a race. However, the plan

  • Killing, Wilhelm (German mathematician)

    mathematics: Differential equations: Lie, and independently Wilhelm Killing in Germany, came to suspect that the systems of partial differential operators they were studying came in a limited variety of types. Once the number of independent variables was specified (which fixed the dimension of the system), a large class of examples, including…

  • Killingsworth, Edward Abel (American architect)

    Edward Abel Killingsworth, American architect (born Nov. 4, 1917, Taft, Calif.—died July 6, 2004, Long Beach, Calif.), designed elegant modernist houses in southern California and luxury hotels in Hawaii, Indonesia, and South Korea. Shortly after forming (1953) the architectural firm of K

  • Killington Peak (mountain, Vermont, United States)

    Green Mountains: …highest point in Vermont) and Killington Peak (4,235 feet [1,291 metres]). Highways cross at the passes cut by the Missisquoi, Lamoille, and Winooski rivers. The mountains are noted for their scenic beauty and form a popular tourist resort area well known for its skiing facilities. The Long Trail (partly identical…

  • Killy, Jean-Claude (French skier)

    Jean-Claude Killy, French skier, a dominant figure in men’s international Alpine skiing competitions from 1965 through 1968 and a popular sports personage known for his irreverent behaviour. Killy, a descendant of an Irish mercenary soldier named Kelly who fought for Napoleon I, was reared at

  • Kilmainham Treaty (Irish history)

    Charles Stewart Parnell: The Home Rule League and the Land League: …settlement was reached, the so-called Kilmainham Treaty, whereby tenants were to obtain substantial concessions and Parnell was to use all his influence to decrease further agitation.

  • Kilmarnock (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Kilmarnock, industrial town, East Ayrshire council area, historic county of Ayrshire, southwestern Scotland. It lies along Kilmarnock Water south of the metropolitan complex of Glasgow. Kilmarnock is the administrative centre and largest town of East Ayrshire. Although it became a burgh in 1591, it

  • Kilmarnock Volume (work by Burns)

    Robert Burns: Development as a poet: It was entitled Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect and appeared on July 31, 1786. Its success was immediate and overwhelming. Simple country folk and sophisticated Edinburgh critics alike hailed it, and the upshot was that Burns set out for Edinburgh on November 27, 1786, to be lionized,…

  • Kilmer, Alfred Joyce (American poet)

    Joyce Kilmer, American poet known chiefly for his 12-line verse entitled “Trees.” He was educated at Rutgers and Columbia universities. His first volume of verse, Summer of Love (1911), showed the influence of William Butler Yeats and the Irish poets. After his conversion to Catholicism, Kilmer

  • Kilmer, Joyce (American poet)

    Joyce Kilmer, American poet known chiefly for his 12-line verse entitled “Trees.” He was educated at Rutgers and Columbia universities. His first volume of verse, Summer of Love (1911), showed the influence of William Butler Yeats and the Irish poets. After his conversion to Catholicism, Kilmer

  • Kilmister, Ian Fraser (British musician)

    Lemmy Kilmister, (Ian Fraser Kilmister), British musician (born Dec. 24, 1945, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, Eng.—died Dec. 28, 2015, Los Angeles, Calif.), founded, fronted, and was the only constant member of the hard-rock band Mot?rhead. He played the bass guitar, using distorted sound and

  • Kilmister, Lemmy (British musician)

    Lemmy Kilmister, (Ian Fraser Kilmister), British musician (born Dec. 24, 1945, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, Eng.—died Dec. 28, 2015, Los Angeles, Calif.), founded, fronted, and was the only constant member of the hard-rock band Mot?rhead. He played the bass guitar, using distorted sound and

  • kiln (oven)

    Kiln, oven for firing, drying, baking, hardening, or burning a substance, particularly clay products but originally also grain and meal. The brick kiln was a major advance in ancient technology because it provided a stronger brick than the primitive sun-dried product. Modern kilns are used in

  • kilning (beverage production)

    malt: stages: steeping, germination, and kilning. In steeping, the grain is placed in a tank with water and absorbs moisture, awakening the embryo within the kernel. The dampened grain is then allowed to germinate, or sprout, and tiny rootlets grow out from the bottom of the kernel. During germination, enzymes…

  • kilobyte (computer science)

    byte: …in binary digits, originally one kilobyte was not 1,000 bytes but 1,024 bytes (1,024 = 210), and thus one megabyte (MB) was 1,024 × 1,024 bytes and so on. However, with some notable exceptions such as the Microsoft Windows operating system, the computer industry has switched over to decimal prefixes,…

  • kilocalorie (unit of measurement)

    calorie: …use it to mean the kilocalorie, sometimes called the kilogram calorie, or large Calorie (equal to 1,000 calories), in measuring the calorific, heating, or metabolizing value of foods. Thus, the “calories” counted for dietary reasons are in fact kilocalories, with the “kilo-” prefix omitted; in scientific notations a capitalized Calorie…

  • kiloelectron volt (unit of measurement)

    particle accelerator: Accelerating particles: …above 10,000 eV, or 10 kiloelectron volts (keV). Many particle accelerators reach much higher energies, measured in megaelectron volts (MeV, or million eV), gigaelectron volts (GeV, or billion eV), or teraelectron volts (TeV, or trillion eV).

  • kilogram (unit of measurement)

    Kilogram (kg), basic unit of mass in the metric system. A kilogram is very nearly equal (it was originally intended to be exactly equal) to the mass of 1,000 cubic cm of water. The pound is defined as equal to 0.45359237 kg, exactly. As originally defined, the kilogram was represented in the late

  • kilojoule (unit of energy measurement)

    calorie: …has been proposed that the kilojoule replace the kilocalorie as the unit of choice for discussing the energy value of foods. Such a change would bring the nomenclature of food scientists into closer agreement with that of other scientists. The conversion factor for expressing kilocalories as kilojoules, as recommended by…

  • kilometer (unit of measurement)

    Kilometre (km), unit of length equal to 1,000 metres and the equivalent of 0.6214 mile (see metric

  • kilometre (unit of measurement)

    Kilometre (km), unit of length equal to 1,000 metres and the equivalent of 0.6214 mile (see metric

  • kilopascal (unit of measurement)

    Kilopascal (kPa), one thousand times the unit of pressure and stress in the metre-kilogram-second system (the International System of Units [SI]). It was named in honour of the French mathematician-physicist Blaise Pascal (1623–62). One pascal is a pressure of one newton per square metre, or, in SI

  • kiloton (unit of measurement)

    thermonuclear bomb: …atomic bombs is measured in kilotons, each unit of which equals the explosive force of 1,000 tons of TNT. The explosive power of hydrogen bombs, by contrast, is frequently expressed in megatons, each unit of which equals the explosive force of 1,000,000 tons of TNT. Hydrogen bombs of more than…

  • Kilpatrick, Ben (American outlaw)

    Wild Bunch: Harry Longabaugh (the “Sundance Kid”), Ben (the “Tall Texan”) Kilpatrick, George Sutherland (“Flat Nose”) Curry, Will Carver, and O.C. (“Camilla”) Hanks. Soldiers, Pinkerton detectives, and lawmen eventually captured or killed most of the Wild Bunch in the late 1890s and the early 20th century. A few—including Butch Cassidy and the…

  • Kilpatrick, James Jackson (American columnist and commentator)

    James Jackson Kilpatrick, American columnist and commentator (born Nov. 1, 1920, Oklahoma City, Okla.—died Aug. 15, 2010, Washington, D.C.), became famous as the voice of the conservative American South in print and later on television in political debates opposite liberal journalist Shana

  • Kilpatrick, Kwame (American politician)

    Detroit: History: …the city’s next mayor, populist Kwame Kilpatrick, who was elected at age 31 but forced to resign in 2008 during his second term. Kilpatrick, who was briefly incarcerated for obstruction of justice in 2008, was later accused of having abused the power of the mayor’s office. In March 2013 he…

  • Kilpi, Volter (Finnish writer)

    Volter Kilpi, Finnish novelist and social critic who was an exponent of the modern experimental novel. Beginning as an “aesthetic” novelist, Kilpi turned to descriptions of 19th-century Finnish island life. In his important novel Alastalon salissa (1933; “In the Parlour at Alastalo”), a work of

  • Kilrain, Jake (American boxer)

    boxing: The Queensberry rules: …he defended his title against Jake Kilrain in the last heavyweight championship bare-knuckle fight in the United States. Legal problems followed the Kilrain match, because bare-knuckle boxing had by that time been made illegal in every state, and so when Sullivan went up against James J. Corbett in 1892, he…

  • Kilrymont (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    St. Andrews, city, royal burgh (1160), university town, golfing mecca, and former fishing port in Fife council area and historic county, Scotland. Located on St. Andrews Bay of the North Sea 13 miles (20 km) southeast of Dundee, it occupies a plateau of sandstone rock about 50 feet (15 metres) in

  • kilt (Scottish dress)

    Kilt, knee-length skirtlike garment that is worn by men as a major element of the traditional national garb of Scotland. (The other main component of Highland dress, as the traditional male garb of Scotland is called, is the plaid, which is a rectangular length of cloth worn over the left

  • Kilusan Bagong Lipunan (political organization, Philippines)

    Philippines: Political process: …Nacionalista and Liberal parties, Marcos’s New Society Movement (Kilusan Bagong Lipunan; KBL), an organization created from elements of the Nacionalista Party and other supporters, emerged as predominant. Organized political opposition was revived for legislative elections held in 1978, and, since the downfall of Marcos, partisan politics has returned to its…

  • Kilwa (historical city-state, Tanzania)

    Kilwa, former Islamic city-state on an island off the coast of what is now southern Tanzania. Founded in the late 10th century by settlers from Arabia and Persia (now Iran), it became one of the most active commercial centres on the east coast of Africa. Held briefly by the Portuguese (1505–12), it

  • Kilwa Kisiwani (historical city-state, Tanzania)

    Kilwa, former Islamic city-state on an island off the coast of what is now southern Tanzania. Founded in the late 10th century by settlers from Arabia and Persia (now Iran), it became one of the most active commercial centres on the east coast of Africa. Held briefly by the Portuguese (1505–12), it

  • Kim (novel by Kipling)

    Kim, novel by Rudyard Kipling, published in 1901. Kim, Kipling’s final and most famous novel, chronicles the adventures of an Irish orphan in India who becomes the disciple of a Tibetan monk while learning espionage from the British secret service. The book is noteworthy for its nostalgic,

  • Kim Ch’aek (North Korea)

    Kimch’aek, city, North Hamgy?ng do (province), eastern North Korea. It is on the estuary of the Namdae River, along the East Sea (Sea of Japan). Protected by promontories, it has a good natural harbour and is a port city. Formerly a poor fishing village, it began to develop when it became an open

  • Kim Ch?ng Hi (Korean calligrapher)

    Kim Ch?ng-hui, the best-known Korean calligrapher of the 19th century. Kim was born into a family of artists and government officials. As a young man he accompanied his father on a trip to Peking, where he became friendly with many of the leading Chinese scholars of the day. Returning to Korea, he

  • Kim Chong Il (North Korean political leader)

    Kim Jong Il, North Korean politician, son of the former North Korean premier and (communist) Korean Workers’ Party (KWP) chairman Kim Il-Sung, and successor to his father as ruler (1994–2011) of North Korea. The official North Korean version of Kim Jong Il’s life, different from the biography

  • Kim Ch?ng-hui (Korean calligrapher)

    Kim Ch?ng-hui, the best-known Korean calligrapher of the 19th century. Kim was born into a family of artists and government officials. As a young man he accompanied his father on a trip to Peking, where he became friendly with many of the leading Chinese scholars of the day. Returning to Korea, he

  • Kim Dae-g?n, Saint (Korean priest)

    Saint Kim Dae-g?n, ; feast day September 20), the first Korean Catholic priest. The son of Korean converts to Roman Catholicism, Kim received religious training in the Portuguese colony of Macau and was ordained in Shanghai in 1845 by Bishop Jean Ferréol. Much of his short life was spent traveling

  • Kim Dae-jung (president of South Korea)

    Kim Dae-Jung, South Korean politician who became a prominent opposition leader during the tenure of Pres. Park Chung-Hee. He became the first opposition leader to win election to his country’s presidency (1998–2003). Kim received the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2000 for his efforts to restore

  • Kim Dae-Jung (president of South Korea)

    Kim Dae-Jung, South Korean politician who became a prominent opposition leader during the tenure of Pres. Park Chung-Hee. He became the first opposition leader to win election to his country’s presidency (1998–2003). Kim received the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2000 for his efforts to restore

  • Kim Dong-Sung (South Korean speed skater)

    Apolo Anton Ohno: …race second behind South Korea’s Kim Dong-Sung, Kim was subsequently disqualified for having obstructed Ohno’s path. Ohno claimed his second overall World Cup title in 2003 and achieved a third in 2005. At the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, he was the only American to win a short-track gold…

  • Kim D?k-gu (Korean boxer)

    boxing: Professional boxing: …1982 when South Korean boxer Kim D?k-gu (Duk Koo Kim) died after being knocked out by Ray (“Boom Boom”) Mancini in a championship fight that was nationally televised in the United States. (It was most likely the cumulative effect of the punishing blows throughout the match that led to Kim’s…

  • Kim Hong-do (Korean painter)

    Kim Hong-do, one of the first Korean artists to depict the common people in his work. Born into a family of officials, Kim was early appointed to official rank and made a member of the royal art academy. Nevertheless, he was a spendthrift who was at odds with other officials because of his r

  • Kim Il-Sung (president of North Korea)

    Kim Il-Sung, communist leader of North Korea from 1948 until his death in 1994. He was the country’s premier from 1948 to 1972, chairman of its dominant Korean Workers’ Party from 1949, and president and head of state from 1972. Kim was the son of parents who fled to Manchuria during his childhood

  • Kim Jae Kyu (South Korean military officer)

    Kim Jae Kyu, Korean military officer and head of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (KCIA; now the National Intelligence Service) who, on Oct. 26, 1979, assassinated the South Korean president, Park Chung Hee. Kim was the lifelong friend and confidant of Park. They were born in the same

  • Kim Jong Il (North Korean political leader)

    Kim Jong Il, North Korean politician, son of the former North Korean premier and (communist) Korean Workers’ Party (KWP) chairman Kim Il-Sung, and successor to his father as ruler (1994–2011) of North Korea. The official North Korean version of Kim Jong Il’s life, different from the biography

  • Kim Jong-Eun (North Korean political official)

    Kim Jong-Un, North Korean political official who succeeded his father, Kim Jong Il, as leader of North Korea (2011– ). The youngest of Kim Jong Il’s three sons, Kim Jong-Un lived most of his life out of the public eye, and little was known about him. Reportedly educated in Gümligen, Switzerland, at

  • Kim Jong-Nam (North Korean scion)

    Kim Jong-Nam, North Korean scion who was the eldest son of Kim Jong Il, ruler (1994–2011) of North Korea. Although he was widely expected for many years to succeed his father, he fell out of favour and went into exile. He was assassinated in an airport in Kuala Lumpur. Kim Jong-Nam’s mother was a

  • Kim Jong-Un (North Korean political official)

    Kim Jong-Un, North Korean political official who succeeded his father, Kim Jong Il, as leader of North Korea (2011– ). The youngest of Kim Jong Il’s three sons, Kim Jong-Un lived most of his life out of the public eye, and little was known about him. Reportedly educated in Gümligen, Switzerland, at

  • Kim Ki-ch’ang (Korean painter)

    Korean art: Modern period: …of radical painters such as Kim Ki-ch’ang, Pak Nae-hy?n, and Pak No-su. All of these artists were highly trained in the traditional mediums of ink and watercolour painting. Their paintings reflect a bold sense of composition and colour and also have the quality of genuine abstract art.

  • Kim Ki-su (Korean boxer)

    boxing: Asia: …its first world champion in Kim Ki-su, who defeated Nino Benvenuti in a WBA junior-middleweight title match in 1966. Since then the nation has produced some 43 world champions, including Hong Su-hwan, Jang Ch?ng-gu, and Yu My?ng-wu.

  • Kim Man-Jung (Korean writer)

    Korean literature: Later Chos?n: 1598–1894: …literature of natural sentiment, and Kim Man-Jung argued that folk songs sung by woodcutters and laundry women held more worth than literature written in Chinese. During the 18th century, Hong Man-Jong, in his Sihwa ch’ongnim (“Collection of Remarks on Poetry”), ventured to critique vernacular poetry, and Hong Tae-Yong set forth…

  • Kim ?k (Korean translator)

    Korean literature: Modern literature: 1910 to the end of the 20th century: …Symbolist literature were introduced by Kim ?k, the principal translator. Against the didacticism of the age Kim set Mallarmé, and against its rhetoric and sentimentality he set Verlaine, concluding in the process that free verse was the supreme creation of the Symbolists. Kim’s fascination with the Symbolist movement culminated in…

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