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  • King Carl (American athlete)

    Carl Hubbell, American professional baseball (left-handed) pitcher who popularized the screwball pitch. In this pitch the ball, which is thrown with the same arm motion as a fastball, has reverse spin against the natural curve and, when thrown by a left-hander, breaks sharply down and away from

  • King Caucus (United States history)

    presidency of the United States of America: King Caucus: While popular voting was transforming the electoral college system, there were also dramatic shifts in the method for nominating presidential candidates. There being no consensus on a successor to Washington upon his retirement after two terms as president, the newly formed political parties quickly…

  • King Center (United States organization)

    assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.: Funeral rites: …on the grounds of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change adjacent to the Ebenezer Baptist Church. His new tomb bears the same epitaph as that of his original gravestone: “Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty I’m free at last.”

  • King Charles spaniel (dog)

    English toy spaniel: …whom it was named the King Charles spaniel), and Queen Victoria, as well as by members of the aristocracy. It is said that Charles II was rarely without his dogs, and he had an edict passed that such spaniels could not be refused entry to any public place in Britain.…

  • king cheetah (mammal)

    cheetah: Status and taxonomy: The king cheetah, once thought to be a distinct subspecies, is a Southern African form that has a “blotchy” coat pattern presumably from a rare recessive genetic mutation.

  • King Christian Island (island, Nunavut, Canada)

    King Christian Island, island, one of the Sverdrup Islands in Nunavut, Canada, in the Arctic Ocean, just south of Ellef Ringnes Island. About 26 miles (42 km) long and 17 miles (27 km) wide, it has an area of 448 square miles (1,160 square km) and a maximum elevation of 700 feet (213 metres). It

  • king cobra (reptile)

    King cobra, (Ophiophagus hannah), the world’s largest venomous snake, found predominantly in forests from India through Southeast Asia to the Philippines and Indonesia. The snake’s maximum confirmed length is 5.6 metres (18 feet), but most do not exceed 3.6 metres (12 feet). The king cobra is the

  • King Cole Trio (American jazz group)

    Nat King Cole: There he formed the King Cole Trio (originally King Cole and His Swingsters), with guitarist Oscar Moore (later replaced by Irving Ashby) and bassist Wesley Prince (later replaced by Johnny Miller). The trio specialized in swing music with a delicate touch in that they did not employ a drummer;…

  • King Cotton (United States history)

    King Cotton, phrase frequently used by Southern politicians and authors prior to the American Civil War, indicating the economic and political importance of cotton production. After the invention of the cotton gin (1793), cotton surpassed tobacco as the dominant cash crop in the agricultural

  • King Country (region, New Zealand)

    King Country, geographical region in North Island, New Zealand. Lying west of Lake Taupo and south of Hamilton, it embraces an area of 7,000 sq mi (18,000 sq km). It is bordered by the Waikato River (northeast), the Tasman Sea (west), the Ohura River (southwest), and by the Kaimanawa Mountains

  • king crab (chelicerate)

    Horseshoe crab, (order Xiphosura), common name of four species of marine arthropods (class Merostomata, subphylum Chelicerata) found on the east coasts of Asia and of North America. Despite their name, these animals are not crabs at all but are related to scorpions, spiders, and extinct trilobites.

  • king crab (crustacean)

    King crab, (Paralithodes camtschaticus), marine crustacean of the order Decapoda, class Malacostraca. This edible crab is found in the shallow waters off Japan, along the coast of Alaska, and in the Bering Sea. The king crab is one of the largest crabs, weighing 5 kg (11 pounds) or more. Its size

  • King Crimson (British rock group)

    art rock: …such British bands as Genesis, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, and Yes. The term art rock is best used to describe either classically influenced rock by such British groups as the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Emerson, Lake and Palmer (ELP), Gentle Giant, the

  • king crow (bird)

    drongo: …Asia is the 33-cm (13-inch) black drongo (D. macrocercus), also called king crow because it can intimidate the true crow. The 24-cm (9.5-inch) African drongo (D. adsimilis; perhaps the same as D. macrocercus) is common throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

  • King David Hotel (hotel, Jerusalem)

    Irgun Zvai Leumi: …up a wing of the King David Hotel in Jerusalem, killing 91 soldiers and civilians (British, Arab, and Jewish). On April 9, 1947, a group of Irgun commandos raided the Arab village of Dayr Yāsīn (modern Kefar Sha?ul), killing about 100 of its inhabitants.

  • King David with His Harp (painting by Rethel)

    Western painting: Germany: …an effect in his haunting “King David with His Harp” (c. 1831; Museum of Art, Düsseldorf). Not long afterward there was a move toward the more dramatic, though no less nostalgic, approach of von Schadow and his pupil Karl Friedrich Lessing.

  • King Dick (prime minister of New Zealand)

    Richard John Seddon, New Zealand statesman who as prime minister (1893–1906) led a Liberal Party ministry that sponsored innovating legislation for land settlement, labour protection, and old age pensions. After working in iron foundries in England, Seddon went to Australia in 1863 to work at the

  • King Dome (stadium, Seattle, Washington, United States)

    construction: Postwar developments in long-span construction: Another example is the King Dome, in Seattle, Washington, which covers a sports stadium with a thin single shell concrete parabolic dome stiffened with ribs 201 metres (661 feet) in diameter.

  • King Drinks, The (painting by Jordaens)

    Jacob Jordaens: …most popular pictures, such as The King Drinks and The Satyr and Peasant.

  • king eider (bird species)

    anseriform: Importance to humans: …of the of the king eider’s (Somateria spectabilis) billknob as an aphrodisiac in Greenland. Wary and difficult to approach in their watery haunts, waterfowl required ingenuity to take them before the advent of efficient weapons. The period of flightlessness was discovered early and exploited by driving the birds into corrals…

  • King Fahd Causeway (bridge, Bahrain-Saudi Arabia)

    Bahrain: Domestic and foreign relations since independence: The construction of the causeway linking Bahrain with Saudi Arabia has strengthened bilateral relations and regional defense and has helped both countries economically and politically. Bahrain has maintained relatively good relations with the United States and has continued to house the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet. Iran’s ties to the…

  • King Fahd Highway (highway, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)

    Riyadh: Transportation: …in Riyadh, including the King Fahd (running north-south) and Mecca (Makkah; running east-west) highways, which constitute the two main axes of the city. With its grid system of wide thoroughfares and expressways, modern Riyadh was designed as an automobile-oriented city. Taxis are a significant form of transportation in Riyadh; local…

  • King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (university, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia)

    Dhahran: The government-sponsored King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals was founded there in 1963. Pop. (2004) 97,678; (2010) 120,521.

  • King for a Day (opera by Verdi)

    Giuseppe Verdi: Early years: …Verdi saw his next opera, Un giorno di regno (King for a Day), a comedy, hissed off the stage. This compounded trauma led to a severe depression and either caused or fixed the dour, fatalistic, sometimes harsh aspects of Verdi’s character.

  • King George III Sound (harbour, Western Australia, Australia)

    King George Sound, one of the finest natural harbours of Western Australia’s south coast. An inlet of the Indian Ocean, the sound, with a surface area of 35 square miles (91 square km), has an entrance 5 miles (8 km) wide flanked by Bald Head on the southwest and Cape Vancouver on the northeast.

  • King George IV Bridge (bridge, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Edinburgh: Edinburgh’s bridges: …South Bridge (1788) and the King George IV Bridge (1834), are multiple-arch constructions that span the Cowgate ravine. These new bridges opened the south to rapid expansion. In the same period Waterloo Bridge, with its Regency Arch (1820), opened the eastern slopes of Calton Hill (northeast of the Castle Rock)…

  • King George Sound (harbour, Western Australia, Australia)

    King George Sound, one of the finest natural harbours of Western Australia’s south coast. An inlet of the Indian Ocean, the sound, with a surface area of 35 square miles (91 square km), has an entrance 5 miles (8 km) wide flanked by Bald Head on the southwest and Cape Vancouver on the northeast.

  • King George V Drydock (dock, Southampton, England, United Kingdom)

    harbours and sea works: Dry docks: A classic example is the King George V Drydock at Southampton, England. Opened in 1933, it was 1,200 feet long and 135 feet wide and was capable of accommodating the largest vessels afloat at that time—namely, the two Cunard liners Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, each more than 80,000 tons…

  • King George V National Park (national park, Malaysia)

    Taman Negara National Park, large natural area in east-central Peninsular (West) Malaysia. The park, situated about 125 miles (200 km) northeast of Kuala Lumpur, occupies 1,677 square miles (4,343 square km). A portion of the area now constituting the park was established in 1925 as a game reserve,

  • King George’s Sound (inlet, Pacific Ocean)

    Nootka Sound, an inlet of the Pacific Ocean, on the western coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, some 168 miles (270 km) northwest of Victoria. The sound, which forms a good harbour, is 6 miles (10 km) wide and has three arms, one of which separates Nootka Island from Vancouver

  • King George’s War (United States history)

    King George’s War, (1744–48), American phase of the War of the Austrian Succession, third and inconclusive struggle between France and Great Britain for mastery of the North American continent. Though technically at peace between 1713 and 1744, the two colonial powers experienced continual

  • king greenhood (plant)

    greenhood: …Zealand, and the closely related king greenhood (P. baptistii) is from neighbouring Australia.

  • King Hart (work by Douglas)

    Gawin Douglas: …The Palice of Honour and King Hart; and the Aeneid. The Palice of Honour (1501), a dream allegory on the theme “where does true honour lie,” extols a sterner rhetorical virtue than the young poet was to exemplify in his own subsequent career. King Hart (uncertainly ascribed to Douglas) describes…

  • King Hedley II (play by Wilson)

    August Wilson: …plays in the series are King Hedley II, first produced in 1999, an account of an ex-con’s efforts to rebuild his life in the 1980s, and Gem of the Ocean, first produced in 2003, which takes place in 1904 and centres on Aunt Ester, a 287-year-old spiritual healer mentioned in…

  • king helmet (marine snail)

    helmet shell: …example is the 18-centimetre (7-inch) king helmet (Cassis tuberosa) of the Caribbean.

  • King Horn (Middle English work)

    English literature: Verse romance: King Horn and Floris and Blauncheflour both are preserved in a manuscript of about 1250. King Horn, oddly written in short two- and three-stress lines, is a vigorous tale of a kingdom lost and regained, with a subplot concerning Horn’s love for Princess Rymenhild. Floris…

  • King in New York, A (film by Chaplin [1957])

    Charlie Chaplin: Final works: A King in New York and A Countess from Hong Kong: …his next film, the British-made A King in New York (1957). Satirizing the very witch hunts that had sent him into self-imposed exile, Chaplin fashioned a diatribe against the foibles of 1950s America that only occasionally managed to nail its target. (Ironically, the film was not released in the United…

  • King Is Dead, The (album by The Decemberists)

    The Decemberists: The group’s follow-up, The King Is Dead (2011), marked The Decemberists’ return to both an independent label and the rustic folk-influenced sound of their earliest work, and it reached number one on the Billboard charts in the first week after its release.

  • King Island (island, Tasmania, Australia)

    King Island, island in Bass Strait, 50 miles (80 km) off the northwestern coast of Tasmania, Australia. The rougly oval-shaped island is about 40 miles (64 km) long and 15 miles (24 km) wide at its widest point. It has a gently rolling surface that rises to a hill known as Gentle Annie (531 feet

  • King James (American basketball player)

    LeBron James, American professional basketball player who is widely considered one of the greatest all-around players of all time and who won National Basketball Association (NBA) championships with the Miami Heat (2012 and 2013) and the Cleveland Cavaliers (2016). A locally known basketball

  • King James Bible (sacred text)

    King James Version (KJV), English translation of the Bible published in 1611 under the auspices of King James I of England. The translation had a marked influence on English literary style and was generally accepted as the standard English Bible from the mid-17th to the early 20th century. The

  • King James Version (sacred text)

    King James Version (KJV), English translation of the Bible published in 1611 under the auspices of King James I of England. The translation had a marked influence on English literary style and was generally accepted as the standard English Bible from the mid-17th to the early 20th century. The

  • King John (work by Shakespeare)

    King John, chronicle play in five acts by William Shakespeare, written perhaps in 1594–96 and published in the First Folio of 1623 from an authorial manuscript that may have been copied and supplied with some theatrical touches. The source of the play was a two-part drama generally known as The

  • King Kahn (German football player)

    Oliver Kahn, German football (soccer) player who is considered one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time. He was named world goalkeeper of the year on three occasions (1999, 2001, and 2002). Kahn began playing as a six-year-old with his local football club, and he made his upper-division debut

  • King Khālid International Airport (airport, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)

    Riyadh: Transportation: Riyadh is served by the King Khālid International Airport, which is located about 22 miles (35 km) north of the city and handles both domestic and international flights. There are thousands of miles of paved roads in Riyadh, including the King Fahd (running north-south) and Mecca (Makkah; running east-west) highways,…

  • King Khālid Military City (Saudi Arabia)

    King Khālid Military City, city, northeastern Saudi Arabia. The city, under construction in the early 1980s, was being built by U.S. Army engineers after developing the nearby port of Ra?s al-Mish?ab on the Persian Gulf to handle the materiel brought in for the King Khālid Military City project.

  • King Kong (film by Jackson [2005])

    Peter Jackson: Jackson next directed and cowrote King Kong (2005), a remake of the classic 1933 film, and The Lovely Bones (2009), an adaptation of Alice Sebold’s novel about a murdered girl who observes her family and killer from the afterlife. He then returned to the enchanting world of Tolkien with a…

  • King Kong (film by Guillermin [1976])

    Dino De Laurentiis: …of the Condor (1975), and King Kong (1976), as well as Ragtime (1981), a critically lauded adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’s novel. In 1984 he opened another film studio in Wilmington, North Carolina, and—after engineering the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group (DEG), an umbrella company—he opened production offices in Australia. DEG failed…

  • King Kong (film by Cooper and Schoedsack [1933])

    King Kong, landmark American monster film, released in 1933, that was noted for its pioneering special effects by Willis O’Brien. It was the first significant feature film to star an animated character and also made actress Fay Wray an international star. Director Carl Denham (played by Robert

  • King Lear (play by Shakespeare)

    King Lear, tragedy in five acts by William Shakespeare, written in 1605–06 and published in a quarto edition in 1608, evidently based on Shakespeare’s unrevised working papers. The text of the First Folio of 1623 often differs markedly from the quarto text and seemingly represents a theatrical

  • King Lear (fictional character)

    Lear: …moving of Shakespeare’s tragic figures, Lear grows in self-awareness as he diminishes in authority and loses his illusions. Lear at the outset presents the very picture of foolish egotism and is tricked out of what he has expected to be a carefree retirement by his own need for flattery. Believing…

  • King Lear of the Steppes (story by Turgenev)

    A Lear of the Steppes, short story by Ivan Turgenev, published in 1870 as “Stepnoy Korol Lir”; it has also been translated as “King Lear of the Steppes.” A loose adaptation of William Shakespeare’s tragedy King Lear, set in the Russian countryside, the story concerns the disrespectful treatment the

  • King Leopold Ranges (mountains, Western Australia, Australia)

    King Leopold Ranges, mountain chain of northern Western Australia, forming the southwestern edge of the Kimberley Plateau. It comprises a well-dissected escarpment extending from Collier Bay southeast for 150 miles (240 km). Averaging 2,000 feet (600 m) in height, the ranges rise to just over

  • king list (historical record)

    history of Mesopotamia: The rise of Assyria: The old lists of kings suggest that the same dynasty ruled continuously over Ashur from about 1600. All the names of the kings are given, but little else is known about Ashur before 1420. Almost all the princes had Akkadian names, and it can be assumed that…

  • king mackerel (fish)

    mackerel: …45 kg (100 pounds); the king mackerel, or kingfish (S. cavalla), a western Atlantic fish about 170 cm long and weighing 36 kg or more; and the cero, or painted mackerel (S. regalis), an abundant, spotted Atlantic fish reportedly about 120 cm long. Scomberomorus species are a favourite game fish,…

  • King Must Die, The (novel by Renault)

    Minotaur: …told in Mary Renault’s novel The King Must Die (1958).

  • King of America (album by Costello)

    Elvis Costello: Following his marriage, Costello recorded King of America (1986), a radical stylistic departure. Produced by T Bone Burnett, King of America featured spare acoustic arrangements and a more direct lyrical style. Costello continued to explore new sounds on his next album, Spike (1989). In both of these works, Costello wrote…

  • king of arms (medieval officer)

    Herald, originally, an officer in medieval Europe charged with carrying messages to and from the commanders of opposing armies; in modern times, a professional authority on armorial history and genealogy. In the 12th century heralds formally announced and conducted tournaments, including the

  • King of California (film by Cahill [2007])

    Michael Douglas: Later films: …The Sentinel (2006), and in King of California (2007) he portrayed a patient recently released from a mental hospital who is looking for gold underneath a discount store.

  • King of Comedy, The (film by Scorsese [1982])

    Martin Scorsese: Films of the 1980s: Raging Bull, The King of Comedy, and The Color of Money: In The King of Comedy (1982), De Niro gave yet another wholly original performance—this time, as Rupert Pupkin, a self-styled stand-up TV comedian. Blissfully unaware of his profound lack of talent, Rupert practices his pathetic comedy routines to no avail. Finally he kidnaps reigning late-night TV…

  • King of Hearts, The (film by Broca)

    Philippe de Broca: …Le Roi de coeur (1966; The King of Hearts), an antiwar film in which the inmates of an asylum take over a deserted village during wartime and elect a humble British soldier (played by Alan Bates) their king; The King of Hearts enjoyed long popularity as a cult film. His…

  • King of Jazz (film by Anderson [1930])
  • King of Kings (film by Ray [1961])

    Nicholas Ray: Later films: With King of Kings (1961) Ray took a deliberately nonepic approach to the life of Jesus (whose naturalistic portrayal by Hunter was generally praised). 55 Days at Peking (1963), with a cast that included Charlton Heston, Ava Gardner, and David Niven, was an epic portrayal of…

  • king of kings (Iranian title)

    ancient Iran: Social organization: The title king of kings, used even in the 20th century by the shahs of Iran, implies that the central authority exercised power through a pyramidal structure that was controlled at levels below the supreme authority by individuals who were themselves, in a certain sense, kings. Traditionally,…

  • King of Kings, The (film by DeMille [1927])

    Cecil B. DeMille: Early life and silent films: The Squaw Man to The Godless Girl: The most commercially successful was The King of Kings (1927), a life of Christ that was one of the most popular films of the silent era. The company’s last film and his last silent film, The Godless Girl (1929), was about atheism sweeping through a high school and was also…

  • King of Limbs, The (album by Radiohead)

    Radiohead: The group’s eighth release, The King of Limbs (2011), debuted using the same online distribution model as In Rainbows, but it adhered to a standard pricing model rather than a “pay what you wish” system. The album’s title was a reference to a 1,000-year-old oak tree in Wiltshire’s Savernake…

  • King of Marvin Gardens, The (film by Rafelson [1972])

    Bob Rafelson: Films of the 1960s and early 1970s: …Rafelson’s follow-up as a director, The King of Marvin Gardens (1972), a melancholy meditation on a pair of brothers whose dreams and dilemmas collide in prerevival Atlantic City, New Jersey, to which one of them, a wheeler-dealer con man who is in over his head (Bruce Dern), summons the other,…

  • King of Pop (American singer, songwriter, and dancer)

    Michael Jackson, American singer, songwriter, and dancer who was the most popular entertainer in the world in the early and mid-1980s. Reared in Gary, Indiana, in one of the most acclaimed musical families of the rock era, Michael Jackson was the youngest and most talented of five brothers whom his

  • King of Rock and Roll (American singer and actor)

    Elvis Presley, American popular singer widely known as the “King of Rock and Roll” and one of rock music’s dominant performers from the mid-1950s until his death. Presley grew up dirt-poor in Tupelo, moved to Memphis as a teenager, and, with his family, was off welfare only a few weeks when

  • King of Saxony’s bird-of-paradise (bird)

    bird-of-paradise: …of Parotia—and the King of Saxony’s bird-of-paradise (Pteridophora alberti). The former have elaborate flank plumes as well as six flag-tipped wires projecting back from the head; the latter has a shoulder-cape and a pair of long head-streamers composed of about 40 squarish lobes with an enameled appearance.

  • King of Schnorrers, The (work by Zangwill)

    Israel Zangwill: …content include a picaresque novel, The King of Schnorrers (1894), concerning an 18th-century rogue, and Dreamers of the Ghetto (1898), essays on famous Jewish figures, including Benedict de Spinoza, Heinrich Heine, and Ferdinand Lassalle. The image of America as a crucible wherein the European nationalities would be transformed into a…

  • King of Swings (Pakistani cricket player)

    Wasim Akram, Pakistani cricket player generally regarded as the greatest left-handed bowler of all time, arguably among the very best fast bowlers ever, and an outstanding all-rounder, who helped lead Pakistan to the World Cup championship of one-day international (ODI) cricket in 1992. Akram was

  • King of the Children (film by Chen Kaige [1987])

    Chen Kaige: Haizi wang (1987; King of the Children) is the story of a young teacher sent to a squalid rural school “to learn from the peasants.” Chen’s fourth film, Bienzou bienchang (1991; Life on a String), chronicles the deeds of a blind storyteller and his blind apprentice as they…

  • King of the Golden River (work by Ruskin)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): John Ruskin’s King of the Golden River (1851) and William Makepeace Thackeray’s “fireside pantomime” The Rose and the Ring (1855) were signs of a changing climate, even though the Grimm-like directness of the first is partly neutralized by Ruskin’s moralistic bent and the gaiety of the second…

  • King of the Hill (American television program)

    Mike Judge: …The Simpsons) the animated series King of the Hill (1997–2010). The show centred on propane salesman Hank Hill (voiced by Judge), his family, and his neighbours in a small Texas town. Although much more sentimental than Judge’s previous series, King of the Hill nevertheless contained a strong satirical bent, often…

  • King of the Jungle (film by Humberstone [1933])

    H. Bruce Humberstone: …(with Max Marcin) the campy King of the Jungle, which starred Buster Crabbe as Tarzan, and the following year he made the Philo Vance mystery The Dragon Murder Case. In 1936 Humberstone was assigned to the highly successful Charlie Chan series starring Warner Oland, and he made some of the…

  • King of the Swiss (Swiss military leader)

    Ludwig Pfyffer, Swiss military leader, spokesman for Roman Catholic interests in the cantons, and probably the most important Swiss political figure in the latter half of the 16th century. For many years an active and intrepid warrior in the service of France, Pfyffer won fame by safely leading the

  • King of Wartnaby, John Leonard King, Baron (British business magnate)

    John Leonard King, Baron King of Wartnaby, British industrialist (born August 1917?, Brentwood, Essex, Eng.—died July 12, 2005, Wartnaby, Leicestershire, Eng.), privatized the struggling state-owned British Airways (BA) and elevated it from a debt of some $1 billion to a highly prosperous e

  • King of Zydeco (American musician)

    Clifton Chenier, American popular musician and pioneer in the development of zydeco music—a bluesy, southern Louisiana blend of French, African American, Native American, and Afro-Caribbean traditions. He was a master keyboard accordionist, a bold vocalist, and the unofficial (but virtually

  • King Ottocar, His Rise and Fall (work by Grillparzer)

    Franz Grillparzer: …performed or published until 1825; King Ottocar, His Rise and Fall). Here the action is drawn from Austrian history, and the rise of Rudolph of Habsburg (the first of Grillparzer’s characters to avoid guilt and tragedy) is contrasted with the fall of the tyrant Ottokar of Bohemia, so that Ottokar’s…

  • king penguin (bird)

    King penguin, (Aptenodytes patagonicus), second largest member of the penguin order (Sphenisciformes), characterized by its dignified, upright posture, long bill, and vivid coloration. Although many ornithologists divide the species into two subspecies, Aptenodytes patagonicus patagonicus and A.

  • King Philip (Wampanoag leader)

    Metacom, sachem (intertribal leader) of a confederation of indigenous peoples that included the Wampanoag and Narraganset. Metacom led one of the most costly wars of resistance in New England history, known as King Philip’s War (1675–76). Metacom was the second son of Massasoit, a Wampanoag sachem

  • King Philip’s War (British-Native American conflict)

    King Philip’s War, (1675–76), in British American colonial history, war that pitted Native Americans against English settlers and their Indian allies that was one of the bloodiest conflicts (per capita) in U.S. history. Historians since the early 18th century, relying on accounts from the

  • King Rama IX Royal Park (botanical park, Bangkok, Thailand)

    Bangkok: Cultural life: In 1987 the 200-acre (80-hectare) King Rama IX Royal Park with its extensive botanical gardens was opened to commemorate the king’s 60th birthday.

  • King Ranch (ranch, Texas, United States)

    King Ranch, largest ranch in the United States, composed of a group of four tracts of land in southeastern Texas, totaling approximately 825,000 acres (333,800 hectares). The King Ranch was established by Richard King, a steamboat captain born in 1825 in Orange county, New York. Drawn to Texas by

  • King Rat (novel by Clavell)

    James Clavell: He based his first novel, King Rat (1962; filmed 1965), on his experiences as a prisoner of the Japanese during World War II. Struggles for power and wealth and, secondarily, sex and love occupy his fiction as East and West and male and female clash. Clavell’s other novels include Tai-Pan…

  • King Records (American music company)

    King Records in the Queen City: Record store owner Syd Nathan established King Records in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1943. Situated just across the Ohio River from more rural, Southern-oriented Kentucky, Nathan recorded country acts who came to town to play on WLW’s Midwestern Hayride and the touring black singers and bands…

  • King Records in the Queen City

    Record store owner Syd Nathan established King Records in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1943. Situated just across the Ohio River from more rural, Southern-oriented Kentucky, Nathan recorded country acts who came to town to play on WLW’s Midwestern Hayride and the touring black singers and bands who

  • King René’s Daughter (work by Hertz)

    Henrik Hertz: …and Kong Renés datter (1845; King René’s Daughter), based on Proven?al folklore. He was also a prolific writer of many kinds of verse. Unfortunately he often felt compelled to conform to his audience’s tastes in form rather than to meet his own artistic demands, and his reputation faded along with…

  • King Rother (German romance)

    K?nig Rother, medieval German romance (c. 1160) that is the earliest record of the type of popular entertainment literature circulated by wandering minstrels. It combines elements from German heroic literature (without the grimness of the older tales) with Orientalisms derived from the Crusades. In

  • king salmon (fish)

    Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) prized North Pacific food and sport fish of the family Salmonidae. It weighs up to 60 kg (130 pounds) and is silvery with round black spots. Spawning runs occur in spring, adults swimming as far as 3,200 km (2,000 miles) up the Yukon. Young chinook salmon

  • King Saud University (university, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)

    Riyadh: Education: King Sa?ūd University (1957) and Islamic University of Imam Mu?ammad ibn Sa?ūd (1953) are both national universities. In addition, there are a number of military academies, including King ?Abd al-?Azīz Military College (1955), King Khālid Military College (1982), and King Fahd Security College, originally established…

  • king snake (reptile)

    King snake, (genus Lampropeltis), any of seven species of moderate- to large-sized terrestrial snakes found from southeastern Canada to Ecuador. Adults generally range in length from 1 to 1.5 metres (3.3 to 5 feet), but some have grown to 2.1 metres. They are nonvenomous constrictors and have a

  • King Solomon’s Mines (ancient mine, Israel)

    Timna?: The ancient mines, called Mikhrot Shelomo ha-Melekh (“King Solomon’s Mines”), are at the top of a north-south–trending mesa, about 1,000 feet (305 m) long and more than 425 feet (130 m) wide at its widest point. Scenic columnar rock formations along the mesa’s north wall show traces of the…

  • King Solomon’s Mines (film by Bennett and Marton [1950])
  • King Solomon’s Mines (novel by Haggard)

    King Solomon’s Mines, novel by H. Rider Haggard, published in 1885. One of the first African adventure stories, it concerns the efforts of a group of Englishmen to find the legendary diamond mines of King Solomon. The explorer Allan Quatermain agrees to take Sir Henry Curtis and a friend on an

  • King Sound (inlet, Western Australia, Australia)

    King Sound, inlet of the Indian Ocean, northern Western Australia, measuring 90 miles by 35 miles (145 km by 56 km). Its entrance is flanked by Cape Leveque to the west and the four island clusters of the Buccaneer Archipelago in Yampi Sound to the east. The mouths of the Fitzroy, Meda, Lennard,

  • King Tut (song by Martin)

    Steve Martin: …and his hit single “King Tut” (1978) sold more than a million copies.

  • King Tut (king of Egypt)

    Tutankhamun, king of ancient Egypt (reigned 1333–23 bce), known chiefly for his intact tomb, KV 62 (tomb 62), discovered in the Valley of the Kings in 1922. During his reign, powerful advisers restored the traditional Egyptian religion and art, both of which had been set aside by his predecessor

  • King v. Burwell (law case)

    King v. Burwell, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on June 25, 2015, held (6–3) that consumers who purchase health insurance on an exchange (marketplace) run by the federal government under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA; commonly ACA) are eligible for subsidies in

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