You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Kol Nidre, Opus 39 (work by Schoenberg)

    Arnold Schoenberg: Evolution from tonality: …of particular Jewish interest, including Kol Nidre for mixed chorus, speaker, and orchestra, Op. 39 (1938)—the Kol Nidre is a prayer sung in synagogues at the beginning of the service on the eve of Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)—and the Prelude to the “Genesis Suite” for orchestra and mixed chorus,…

  • Kol sipurav shel Sh. Y. Agnon (works by Agnon)

    S.Y. Agnon: …one in 11 volumes (Kol sipurav shel Shmuel Yosef Agnon, vol. 1–6, Berlin, 1931–35; 7–11, Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, 1939–52) and one in 8 volumes (Tel Aviv, 1953–62). The archaic structure of his prose presents great difficulties for the translator, yet even in translation his power is unmistakable.

  • kol wa-homer (Judaism)

    middot: …more prominent middot are the kol wa-?omer (“how much more”), in which the interpreter proceeds from a minor to a major premise, and the gezera shawa (comparison of similar expressions, or laws), in which an inference is made by analogy. The kol wa-?omer rule is limited by the principle of…

  • kola nut (plant)

    Kola nut, caffeine-containing nut of Cola acuminata and Cola nitida, trees of the cocoa family (Sterculiaceae) native to tropical Africa and cultivated extensively in the American tropics. The evergreen tree grows to 18.3 metres (60 feet) and resembles the chestnut. The 5-centimetre- (2-inch-) long

  • Kola Peninsula (peninsula, Russia)

    Kola Peninsula, large promontory in Murmansk oblast (province), far northern Russia. The Kola Peninsula covers some 40,000 square miles (100,000 square km) and extends across the Arctic Circle for about 190 miles (305 km) north-south and 250 miles (400 km) east-west, separating the White and

  • Kolakowski, Leszek (Polish philosopher)

    Leszek Kolakowski, Polish philosopher and historian of philosophy who became one of Marxism’s greatest intellectual critics. Kolakowski was educated privately and in the underground school system during the German occupation of Poland in World War II. In 1950 he received an M.A. in philosophy from

  • kōlakretai (Athenian society)

    Kōlakretai, Athenian financial administrators of the 6th and 5th centuries bce. Their title (“collectors of legs”) indicates their original function as collectors of animal sacrifices. In the 6th century bce they managed the Athenian treasury and after the reforms of Cleisthenes (c. 508) were

  • kolam (masked drama)

    South Asian arts: Masked drama: …of the four folk-drama forms—kolam, sokari, nadagam, and pasu—the most highly developed and significant is the kolam, in which actors wear brightly painted and intricately carved wooden masks. The word kolam is of Tamil origin and means “costume,” “impersonation,” or “guise.” The performance consists of the masked representation of…

  • Kolamba (national capital, Sri Lanka)

    Colombo, city, executive and judicial capital of Sri Lanka. (Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte, a Colombo suburb, is the legislative capital.) Situated on the west coast of the island, just south of the Kelani River, Colombo is a principal port of the Indian Ocean. It has one of the largest artificial

  • Kolami language

    Dravidian languages: Central Dravidian languages: Kolami has the largest number of speakers, approximately 122,000 people, and has borrowed heavily from Telugu.

  • Kolana, Mount (mountain, Indonesia)

    Alor Islands: …two major mountains of which, Kolana (5,791 feet [1,765 metres]) and Muna (4,724 feet [1,440 metres]), are both old volcanoes. Alor is broken up by steep ravines, with only one plateau and some small coastal plains. Pantar Island is high (Mount Delaki rises to 4,324 feet [1,318 metres]), with a…

  • Kolar (India)

    Kolar, city, southeastern Karnataka state, southern India. The city is situated in an upland region of the Karnataka Plateau, about 35 miles (55 km) northest of Bengaluru (Bangalore). Kolar lies in Karnataka’s dry zone, with scrub vegetation suitable for sheep raising in the surrounding area. Its

  • Kolar Gold Fields (mining area, India)

    Kolar Gold Fields, mining area, southeastern Karnataka state, southern India. It lies on a Southern Railway spur that loops from Bangarapet to Bengaluru (Bangalore). Economic activities centred on the goldfields, which were the southern portion of a gold-bearing region that extends for 40 miles (65

  • Kolar, Jiri (Czech artist and author)

    Jiri Kolar, Czech artist and writer (born Sept. 24, 1914, Protivin, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary—died Aug. 11, 2002, Prague, Czech Rep.), excelled in both poetry and collage, but his works embodied independence and originality at a time when communist cultural repression made such qualities l

  • Kolar, Slavko (Croatian author)

    Croatian literature: …wrote gripping historical novels; and Slavko Kolar, who depicted the life of the peasant in a changing world. The dominant writers of the interwar period were August Cesarec (Zlatni mladi? [1928; “The Golden Boy”]) and Miroslav Krle?a (Povratak Filipa Latinovicza [1932; The Return of Philip Latinovicz] and the collection of…

  • Kolarovgrad (Bulgaria)

    Shumen, town, northeastern Bulgaria. It lies in a valley in the eastern foothills of the Shumen limestone plateau. The town is a road and rail centre with such industries as tobacco processing, canning and brewing, furniture making, and the manufacture of enamelware. Shumen also has a factory that

  • Kolbe, Adolph Wilhelm Hermann (German chemist)

    Hermann Kolbe, German chemist who accomplished the first generally accepted synthesis of an organic compound from inorganic materials. Kolbe studied chemistry with Friedrich W?hler at the University of G?ttingen and earned his doctorate in 1843 with Robert Bunsen at the University of Marburg

  • Kolbe, Georg (German sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Conservative reaction (1920s): In Germany, Georg Kolbe’s “Standing Man and Woman” of 1931 seems a prelude to the Nazi health cult, and the serene but vacuous figures of Arno Breker, Karl Albiker, and Ernesto de Fiori were simply variations on a studio theme in praise of youth and body culture.…

  • Kolbe, Hermann (German chemist)

    Hermann Kolbe, German chemist who accomplished the first generally accepted synthesis of an organic compound from inorganic materials. Kolbe studied chemistry with Friedrich W?hler at the University of G?ttingen and earned his doctorate in 1843 with Robert Bunsen at the University of Marburg

  • Kolbe, Peter-Michael (German athlete)

    Pertti Karppinen: …and 1985, tied him with Peter-Michael Kolbe of Germany as the only five-time single sculls champions.

  • Kolbe, Rajmund (Polish martyr)

    St. Maksymilian Maria Kolbe, ; canonized October 10, 1982), Franciscan priest and religious founder martyred by the Nazis for aiding Jewish refugees during World War II. In 1906 young Kolbe had a vision of the Virgin Mary in which she offered him a white crown and a red crown and asked which he

  • Kolbe, St. Maksymilian Maria (Polish martyr)

    St. Maksymilian Maria Kolbe, ; canonized October 10, 1982), Franciscan priest and religious founder martyred by the Nazis for aiding Jewish refugees during World War II. In 1906 young Kolbe had a vision of the Virgin Mary in which she offered him a white crown and a red crown and asked which he

  • Kolberg (Poland)

    Ko?obrzeg, city, Zachodniopomorskie województwo (province), northwestern Poland. It lies at the mouth of the Pars?ta River on the Baltic Sea. It is a port and health spa, with its economy relying on fishing and tourism. Founded as a Slavic stronghold in the 8th century, Ko?obrzeg was incorporated

  • Kolchak, Aleksandr Vasilyevich (Russian naval officer)

    Aleksandr Vasilyevich Kolchak, Arctic explorer and naval officer, who was recognized in 1919–20 by the “Whites” as supreme ruler of Russia; after his overthrow he was put to death by the Bolsheviks. At the outbreak of World War I, Kolchak was flag captain of the Baltic fleet. By August 1916, as a

  • Kolchugino (Russia)

    Leninsk-Kuznetsky, city, in Kemerovo oblast (region), central Russia. It lies along the Inya River, a tributary of the Ob. In 1912 a French company started coal-mining operations there; from the 1930s the city developed rapidly to become a major coal-mining centre, with many pits located in the

  • K?lcsey, Ferenc (Hungarian poet)

    Ferenc K?lcsey, Hungarian Romantic poet whose poem “Hymnusz” (1823), evoking the glory of Hungary’s past, became the national anthem of Hungary. Orphaned at an early age and handicapped by the loss of an eye, K?lcsey spent much of his solitary youth reading Greek poets and German classicists.

  • Kold, Kristen Mikkelsen (Danish educator)

    Kristen Mikkelsen Kold, educator who did more than anyone else of his time to promote the folk high-school movement in Denmark. Kold was a shoemaker’s son and was educated as a teacher, but he found himself unable to adapt to the highly formal educational system. Instead, he founded a residential

  • Koldewey, Robert (German architect and archaeologist)

    Robert Koldewey, German architect and archaeologist who revealed the semilegendary Babylon of the Bible as a geographic and historical reality. Koldewey’s activities as a field archaeologist began with visits to ancient Assus (Assos) in western Turkey (1882) and the nearby island of Lesbos (1885).

  • Koldihwa (archaeological site, India)

    India: Developments in the Ganges basin: …at least one of these, Koldihwa, dates as early as the 7th millennium have been reported. The sites contain circular huts made of timber posts and thatch; associated implements and vessels include stone blades, ground stone axes, bone tools, and crude handmade pottery, often bearing the marks of cords or…

  • Kolding (Denmark)

    Kolding, city, eastern Jutland, Denmark. It lies at the head of Kolding Fjord, north of Haderslev. The name occurs in the 10th century, but the earliest-known town rights date from 1321. The settlement grew up around Koldinghus, a royal castle built in 1248 to defend the frontier. Kolding was the

  • Koldinghus (castle, Kolding, Denmark)

    Kolding: The settlement grew up around Koldinghus, a royal castle built in 1248 to defend the frontier. Kolding was the scene of a Danish victory over the Swedes in 1644 and of a Danish defeat by Schleswig-Holsteiners in 1849. The castle was severely damaged by fire in 1808 but has been…

  • Kolea (Algeria)

    Kolea, town, northern Algeria. It is located about 17 miles (27 km) southwest of Algiers, on the southern, inland slopes of the coastal hills overlooking the valley of Wadi Mazafran and the Mitidja plain. It was founded in 1550 by Khayr al-Dīn (Barbarossa), the Barbary pirate, and was originally

  • Kolehmainen, Hannes (Finnish athlete)

    Hannes Kolehmainen, Finnish athlete who was the first of the great modern Finnish long-distance runners. Noted for his exceptional endurance, he won four Olympic gold medals. Kolehmainen was born into an athletic family—two older brothers were also notable long-distance runners—and he began running

  • Kolehmainen, Johannes (Finnish athlete)

    Hannes Kolehmainen, Finnish athlete who was the first of the great modern Finnish long-distance runners. Noted for his exceptional endurance, he won four Olympic gold medals. Kolehmainen was born into an athletic family—two older brothers were also notable long-distance runners—and he began running

  • Kolekole Pass (mountain pass, Hawaii, United States)

    Waianae Range: Kolekole Pass (constructed 1937), 3 miles (5 km) south, is an important link between the west coast and the fertile central plateau.

  • Koleluttu (writing system)

    Malayalam language: Known as Koleluttu (“Rod Script”), it is derived from the Grantha script, which in turn is derived from Brahmi. Koleluttu has letters to represent the entire corpus of sounds from both Dravidian and Sanskrit.

  • Kolen Mountains (mountains, Sweden)

    Lapland: …the northern part of the Kolen Mountains, which reach elevations of more than 6,500 feet (2,000 metres). On its Norwegian (western) side this range slopes abruptly and is deeply eroded into fjords and headlands and fractured into archipelagoes. The eastern flank of the range, which is situated in Swedish Lapland…

  • Kolenté River (river, Africa)

    Great Scarcies River, river in western Africa, rising 25 miles (40 km) north of Kindia in the Fouta Djallon highlands of western Guinea. It marks 63 miles (101 km) of the Guinea–Sierra Leone border before entering Sierra Leone to complete its 160-mile (257-kilometre) course to the Atlantic Ocean. I

  • Koléttis, Ioánnis (prime minister of Greece)

    Greece: Greece under Otto of Wittelsbach: …with his crafty prime minister, Ioánnis Koléttis, was able to overturn the new constitution by establishing a kind of parliamentary dictatorship. The attempt to implant a liberal constitutional democracy onto an essentially premodern, traditional society that had evolved in quite a different fashion from those of western Europe gave rise…

  • kolf (game)

    golf: Scots as inventors: a popular fallacy: …such is referred to as kolven (the infinitive of a verb used as a noun). This confirms that the Scots word golf is indeed based on kolve or kolf. In the course of a dialogue in this text, the fictitious players also give the first indication of the existence of…

  • Kolff, Willem Johan (American physician)

    Willem Johan Kolff, Dutch-born American physician (born Feb. 14, 1911, Leiden, Neth.—died Feb. 11, 2009, Newtown Square, Pa.), was a pioneering biomedical engineer who invented the kidney dialysis machine and led the medical team that on Dec. 2, 1982, implanted the first artificial human heart in

  • Kolguyev Island (island, Russia)

    Kolguyev Island, island, Arkhangelsk oblast (region), northwestern Russia. Kolguyev lies in the Barents Sea and is 45 miles (72 km) off the mainland. About 3,220 square miles (5,200 square km) in area, it is an island of bogs and morainic hills, covered by vegetation characteristic of the tundra;

  • Kolhapur (India)

    Kolhapur, city, southwestern Maharashtra state, western India. It is situated on the eastern side of the Western Ghats on the Pancaganga River. The city was the capital of the princely state of Kolhapur and was the seat of the British residency for Deccan states. An early centre of Buddhism, the

  • Kolhāpur (Indian dynasty)

    India: Rise of the peshwas: …family itself that relocated to Kolhapur and Nagpur, while the main line remained in the Deccan heartland, at Satara. The Kolhapur line derived from Rajaram and his wife, Tara Bai, who had refused in 1708 to accept Shahu’s rule and who negotiated with some Mughal court factions in a bid…

  • Kolh?rster, Werner (astronomer)

    Walther Bothe: With the astronomer Werner Kolh?rster, Bothe again applied this coincidence-counting method in 1929 and found that cosmic rays are not composed exclusively of gamma rays, as was previously believed. In 1930 Bothe discovered an unusual radiation emitted by beryllium when it is bombarded with alpha particles. This radiation…

  • Koli (hill, Finland)

    Lake Pielinen: …shore, which is capped by Koli hill; the latter rises to a height of 1,138 ft (347 m) and is the centre of an important winter-sports area. There is a ferry service on the lake during summer and an ice-road during winter.

  • Koli (caste)

    Koli, caste with many subgroups who inhabit the central and western mountain area of India. The largest groups of Koli live in the state of Maharashtra, especially in Mumbai, and in Gujarat state. The traditional occupation of the coastal Koli is fishing, although many are now employed in schools

  • Kolín, Battle of (European history)

    Frederick II: Trials and lessons: …after a serious defeat at Kolín in June. Brilliant victories over the French and Austrian armies, respectively, at Rossbach and Leuthen in November and December partially reestablished Frederick’s position, but it still remained extremely precarious. Ruthless exploitation of every available resource (notably of much of Saxony, which was under Prussian…

  • Kolingba, André (president of Central African Republic)

    André-Dieudonné Kolingba, Central African Republic army commander and politician (born Aug. 12, 1936, Bangui, Ubangi-Shari, French Equatorial Africa [now Bangui, C.A.R.]—died Feb. 7, 2010, Paris, France), held dictatorial rule over his country for 12 years, from Sept. 1, 1981, when he overthrew

  • kolinski (mammal)

    Kolinsky, any of several species of Asian weasels. See

  • kolinsky (mammal)

    Kolinsky, any of several species of Asian weasels. See

  • Koliqi, Ernest (Albanian writer)

    Albanian literature: …?ajupi), a poet and playwright; Ernest Koliqi, a short-story writer, poet, and novelist; Ndre Mjeda, a poet and linguist; and Migjeni (acronym of Milosh Gjergj Nikolla), a poet and novelist.

  • Kolja (film by Sverák [1996])
  • Koljada (religion)

    Slavic religion: Communal banquets and related practices: …in the case of the Koljada (Latin Kalendae)—the annual visit made by the spirits of the dead, under the disguise of beggars, to all the houses in the village. It is possible that the bones of the disinterred were kept for a long period inside the dwellings, as is still…

  • kolk (rotating current)

    whirlpool: These are called kolks, or boils, and are readily visible on the surface.

  • Kolkata (India)

    Kolkata, city, capital of West Bengal state, and former capital (1772–1911) of British India. It is one of India’s largest cities and one of its major ports. The city is centred on the east bank of the Hugli (Hooghly) River, once the main channel of the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 96 miles (154 km)

  • Kolkata High Court (court, Kolkata, India)

    Kolkata: Government: The Kolkata High Court, exercising original jurisdiction over the city and appellate jurisdiction over West Bengal, is also located there. A number of national government institutions—including the National Library, the Indian Museum, and the Geological Survey of India—are in the city as well.

  • Kolkata Knight Riders (Indian cricket team)

    Indian Premier League: …the 2008 season and the Kolkata Knight Riders $2.4 million to sign Gautam Gambhir, the opening batsman for the Indian national team, in the bidding for the 2011 season.

  • Kolkata Metropolitan District (district, India)

    Kolkata: Government: …also a part of the Kolkata Metropolitan District, an entity created to oversee planning and development on a regional basis. This district includes a large rural hinterland around the urban centres.

  • Kolkata Municipal Corporation (government organization, Kolkata, India)

    Kolkata: Government: …is the responsibility of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation; the corporation’s council is composed of one elected representative from each of the city’s wards. The council members annually elect a mayor, a deputy mayor, and a number of committees to conduct the activities of the corporation. A commissioner, the executive head…

  • Kolkhida (coastal plain, Georgia)

    Kolkhida, coastal lowland plain of the eastern Black Sea, in Georgia. Named for the ancient kingdom of Colchis, it comprises the combined alluvial plains of the Rioni, Inguri, and other rivers rising in the Greater Caucasus range, which encloses the plain on the north, and the Lesser Caucasus, to

  • Kolkhidskaya Nizmennost (coastal plain, Georgia)

    Kolkhida, coastal lowland plain of the eastern Black Sea, in Georgia. Named for the ancient kingdom of Colchis, it comprises the combined alluvial plains of the Rioni, Inguri, and other rivers rising in the Greater Caucasus range, which encloses the plain on the north, and the Lesser Caucasus, to

  • kolkhos (Soviet agriculture)

    Kolkhoz, in the former Soviet Union, a cooperative agricultural enterprise operated on state-owned land by peasants from a number of households who belonged to the collective and who were paid as salaried employees on the basis of quality and quantity of labour contributed. Conceived as a voluntary

  • kolkhoz (Soviet agriculture)

    Kolkhoz, in the former Soviet Union, a cooperative agricultural enterprise operated on state-owned land by peasants from a number of households who belonged to the collective and who were paid as salaried employees on the basis of quality and quantity of labour contributed. Conceived as a voluntary

  • kolkhozy (Soviet agriculture)

    Kolkhoz, in the former Soviet Union, a cooperative agricultural enterprise operated on state-owned land by peasants from a number of households who belonged to the collective and who were paid as salaried employees on the basis of quality and quantity of labour contributed. Conceived as a voluntary

  • kolkoz (Soviet agriculture)

    Kolkhoz, in the former Soviet Union, a cooperative agricultural enterprise operated on state-owned land by peasants from a number of households who belonged to the collective and who were paid as salaried employees on the basis of quality and quantity of labour contributed. Conceived as a voluntary

  • Kolkwitzia amabilis (shrub)

    Beauty bush, (Kolkwitzia amabilis), ornamental flowering shrub of the Linnaea clade in the family Caprifoliaceae, native to central China. It is the only member of its genus. The beauty bush has deciduous oval leaves and can reach a maximum height of about 3 m (10 feet). Its paired bell-like

  • Kollam (India)

    Kollam, port city, southern Kerala state, southwestern India. It lies on the Malabar Coast of the Arabian Sea northwest of Thiruvananthapuram, the state capital. The city is situated next to Asthamudi Lake, an inlet of the sea, and is linked with Alappuzha and Kochi (Cochin) to the north by a

  • Kollam era (Indian history)

    chronology: Reckonings dated from a historical event: It is called the Kollam era (ad 825). Its years are current and solar; they start when the Sun enters into the zodiacal sign of Virgo in north Malabār and when it enters into Leo in south Malabār. It is sometimes divided into cycles of 1,000 years reckoned from…

  • Kollár, Ján (Slovak poet)

    Ján Kollár, Slovak poet who played an important part in the national and literary revival of the Slavs in the early 19th century. Kollár was educated at the University of Jena and served as pastor to the Slovak community in Pest (now Budapest) from 1819 to 1849. The last three years of his life

  • Ko???taj, Hugo (Polish priest)

    Hugo Ko???taj, Polish Roman Catholic priest, reformer, and politician who was prominent in the movement for national regeneration in the years following the First Partition of Poland (1772). After studying in Kraków, Vienna, and Rome, Ko???taj returned home in 1775 to play a leading part in the new

  • Kollegal (town, India)

    Kollegal, town located in the southernmost corner of Karnataka state, southern India. Kollegal is noted for the reeling of silk yarn and for silk weaving. Both Kannada, the official language of Karnataka, and Tamil are spoken there, a result of Kollegal’s proximity to Tamil-speaking areas and its

  • Kollegien (German college)

    college: In Germany Kollegien appears in the name of some institutions offering technical courses. See also higher education.

  • Kollegienkirche (church, Salzburg, Austria)

    Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach: Early career in Italy and Austria.: …almost geometric forms of the Kollegienkirche (University Church) surmounted by the undulating forms of its towers crown the university complex, providing a new architectural and symbolic accent to a city dominated by its massive cathedral, as Salzburg had been. Fischer also designed a new facade for the archbishop’s stables and…

  • Kollek, Teddy (Israeli politician)

    Teddy Kollek, Israeli politician, who was mayor of Jerusalem from 1965 to 1993. Kollek, who grew up in Vienna, moved to Palestine in 1934. There he helped found the Ein Gev kibbutz and became active in the Betar Zionist Youth Movement. He also helped organize the clandestine immigration of Jews to

  • Kollek, Theodor Herzl (Israeli politician)

    Teddy Kollek, Israeli politician, who was mayor of Jerusalem from 1965 to 1993. Kollek, who grew up in Vienna, moved to Palestine in 1934. There he helped found the Ein Gev kibbutz and became active in the Betar Zionist Youth Movement. He also helped organize the clandestine immigration of Jews to

  • kollektivnoye khozyaynstvo (Soviet agriculture)

    Kolkhoz, in the former Soviet Union, a cooperative agricultural enterprise operated on state-owned land by peasants from a number of households who belonged to the collective and who were paid as salaried employees on the basis of quality and quantity of labour contributed. Conceived as a voluntary

  • Koller, Carl (American surgeon)

    Carl Koller, Czech-born American ophthalmic surgeon whose introduction of cocaine as a surface anesthetic in eye surgery (1884) inaugurated the modern era of local anesthesia. Koller was an intern and house surgeon at the Vienna General Hospital when his colleague Sigmund Freud, attempting to cure

  • Koller, Xavier (Swiss director and writer)
  • Kolleru Lake (lake, India)

    Kolleru Lake, lake in northeastern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies between the Godavari and Krishna river deltas near the city of Eluru. During the height of the summer monsoon rainy season, the lake may expand to 100 square miles (260 square km). Carp and prawns are fished

  • Kollidam River (river, India)

    Kollidam River, river, east-central Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. Formed by the northern bifurcation of the Kaveri (Cauvery) River just west of Srirangam, the Kollidam River flows in an easterly and then northeasterly direction for about 95 miles (150 km) and empties through several mouths

  • K?lliker, Rudolf Albert von (Swiss embryologist)

    Rudolf Albert von K?lliker, Swiss embryologist and histologist, one of the first to interpret tissue structure in terms of cellular elements. K?lliker became professor of physiology and comparative anatomy at the University of Zürich in 1844; in 1847 he transferred to the University of Würzburg in

  • Kollikodontidae (fossil monotreme family)

    monotreme: Paleontology and classification: …galmani), and the uniquely specialized Kollikodontidae, which is also represented by a single species (Kollikodon ritchiei). Both are known only from opalized jaw fragments. The strange rounded cusps on the molar teeth of K. ritchiei were a surprise to paleontologists, suggesting that Cretaceous monotremes may have been more diverse and…

  • K?lln (Germany)

    Berlin: Origins: …that of its sister town, K?lln, with which it later merged. Both were founded near the beginning of the 13th century. In 1987 both East and West Berlin celebrated the city’s 750th anniversary. Whatever the date of foundation, it is certain that the two towns were established for geographic and…

  • Kollontay, Aleksandra Mikhaylovna (Soviet revolutionary and diplomat)

    Aleksandra Mikhaylovna Kollontay, Russian revolutionary who advocated radical changes in traditional social customs and institutions in Russia and who later, as a Soviet diplomat, became the first woman to serve as an accredited minister to a foreign country. The daughter of a general in the

  • Kollur (India)

    South Asian arts: Pre-Islāmic period: …local temple, were discovered at Kollur, in Mysore state.

  • Kollwitz, K?the (German artist)

    K?the Kollwitz, German graphic artist and sculptor who was an eloquent advocate for victims of social injustice, war, and inhumanity. The artist grew up in a liberal middle-class family and studied painting in Berlin (1884–85) and Munich (1888–89). Impressed by the prints of fellow artist Max

  • Kolmogorov, Andrey Nikolayevich (Russian mathematician)

    Andrey Nikolayevich Kolmogorov, Russian mathematician whose work influenced many branches of modern mathematics, especially harmonic analysis, probability, set theory, information theory, and number theory. A man of broad culture, with interests in technology, history, and education, he played an

  • Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy (mathematics)

    Yakov Sinai: …was the development of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. In collaboration with Kolmogorov, he built upon the work of American engineer Claude Shannon, who developed a measure of the efficiency of a communications system, called the entropy, that is computed on the basis of the statistical properties of the message source. (In…

  • Kolmogory (Russia)

    Kholmogory, village, port, and administrative centre of Kholmogory rayon (sector), Arkhangelsk oblast (region), northwestern European Russia. It lies along the Northern Dvina River, 47 miles (75 km) southeast of the city of Arkhangelsk. The village has existed since 1355, when it served traders as

  • K?ln (Germany)

    Cologne, fourth largest city in Germany and largest city of the Land (state) of North Rhine–Westphalia. One of the key inland ports of Europe, it is the historic, cultural, and economic capital of the Rhineland. Cologne’s commercial importance grew out of its position at the point where the huge

  • K?ln, Universit?t zu (university, Cologne, Germany)

    University of Cologne, autonomous, state-supported coeducational institution of higher learning in Cologne, Ger., founded in 1388 as a municipal university. In spite of Protestant influences, the university became a centre of German Roman Catholicism. The University of Cologne was abolished by the

  • K?lner Dom (cathedral, Cologne, Germany)

    Cologne Cathedral, Roman Catholic cathedral church, located in the city of Cologne, Germany. It is the largest Gothic church in northern Europe and features immense twin towers that stand 515 feet (157 metres) tall. The cathedral was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. The site of

  • kolo (Balkan dance)

    Kolo, communal dance of some Balkan areas, the many variations of which are performed at weddings and other festive occasions. The name probably derives from the Old Slavic word for “wheel.” The dance may be performed in a closed circle, in a single chain, or in two parallel lines. In some

  • Ko?obrzeg (Poland)

    Ko?obrzeg, city, Zachodniopomorskie województwo (province), northwestern Poland. It lies at the mouth of the Pars?ta River on the Baltic Sea. It is a port and health spa, with its economy relying on fishing and tourism. Founded as a Slavic stronghold in the 8th century, Ko?obrzeg was incorporated

  • Kolodny, Annette (American literary critic)

    Annette Kolodny, American literary critic, one of the first to use feminist criticism to interpret American literary works and cultural history. Kolodny was educated at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York (B.A., 1962) and the University of California, Berkeley (M.A., 1965; Ph.D.,

  • Kolokol (Russian newspaper)

    Aleksandr Ivanovich Herzen: Life in exile.: …in 1856, and a newspaper, Kolokol (The Bell), created in 1857 with the aid of his old friend Ogaryov, now also an émigré. Herzen’s aim was to influence both the government and the public toward emancipation of the peasants, with generous allotments of land and the liberalization of Russian society.…

  • Kolokotrónis, Theódoros (Greek revolutionary)

    Theódoros Kolokotrónis, prominent Greek patriot in the War of Greek Independence (1821–30). As a member of the Greek revolutionary society Philikí Etaireía, Kolokotrónis led Moreot bands during the War of Independence. His most brilliant action was his part in the defeat of Mahmud Dramali’s Ottoman

  • Kololo (people)

    Lozi: …conquered in 1838 by the Kololo of South Africa; in Kololo speech “Aluyi” became “Barotse.” In 1864 the Aluyi defeated the Kololo, and “Barotse” has since become “Lozi” (“Malozi”), referring to both the dominant group and all its subjects. The dominant Lozi occupy the floodplain of the Zambezi River, and…

  • Koloman (king of Hungary)

    Coloman, king of Hungary from 1095 who pursued expansionist policies and stabilized and improved the internal order of Hungary. Coloman was the natural son of King Géza I by a Greek concubine. King Ladislas (László), his uncle, would have made him a monk, but Coloman refused and eventually escaped

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载