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  • Koro?ec, Anton (Slovene political leader)

    Anton Koro?ec, Slovene political leader who helped to found the Yugoslav nation after World War I and briefly served as prime minister in 1928. A Jesuit priest and a noted orator, he shared, and exploited politically, the Slovene fear of Italian expansion; his dislike of Italy outweighed his

  • Korosten (Ukraine)

    Korosten, city, north-central Ukraine. It lies along the west bank of the Uzh River about 80 miles (130 km) northwest of Kiev. The city, which was incorporated in 1926, is a small industrial centre, a railway junction, and an engineering centre. Industries have included the manufacture of equipment

  • K?rper (mathematics)

    algebra: Fields: A main question pursued by Dedekind was the precise identification of those subsets of the complex numbers for which some generalized version of the theorem made sense. The first step toward answering this question was the concept of a field, defined as any subset…

  • K?rperbau und Charakter (work by Kretschmer)

    Ernst Kretschmer: …work, K?rperbau und Charakter (1921; Physique and Character), advanced the theory that certain mental disorders were more common among people of specific physical types. Kretschmer posited three chief constitutional groups: the tall, thin asthenic type, the more muscular athletic type, and the rotund pyknic type. He suggested that the lanky…

  • Korravai (Tamil deity)

    Hinduism: Vernacular literatures: …mother, the fierce war goddess Korravai, with Durga. Varunan, a sea god who had adopted the name of an old Vedic god but otherwise had few Vedic features, and Mayon, a black god who was a rural divinity with many of the characteristics of Krishna in his pastoral aspect, also…

  • Kors, Michael (American designer)

    Michael Kors, When longtime American fashion designer Michael Kors presented his 2012 fall collection during New York Fashion Week in February, fashion writers raved about how Kors had combined ruggedness and elegance with his timeless aesthetic of functionality and luxury. Business writers,

  • Korsakoff disease (pathology)

    Korsakoff syndrome, neurological disorder characterized by severe amnesia (memory loss). Many cases result from severe chronic alcoholism, while others are due to a variety of brain disorders, severe head injury, or a thiamine deficiency. Patients with Korsakoff syndrome typically are unable to

  • Korsakoff psychosis (pathology)

    Korsakoff syndrome, neurological disorder characterized by severe amnesia (memory loss). Many cases result from severe chronic alcoholism, while others are due to a variety of brain disorders, severe head injury, or a thiamine deficiency. Patients with Korsakoff syndrome typically are unable to

  • Korsakoff syndrome (pathology)

    Korsakoff syndrome, neurological disorder characterized by severe amnesia (memory loss). Many cases result from severe chronic alcoholism, while others are due to a variety of brain disorders, severe head injury, or a thiamine deficiency. Patients with Korsakoff syndrome typically are unable to

  • Korsakoff, Sergey Sergeyevich (Russian psychiatrist)

    memory abnormality: A Russian psychiatrist, Sergey Sergeyevich Korsakov (Korsakoff), may have been the first to recognize that amnesia need not necessarily be associated with dementia (or loss of the ability to reason), as Ribot and many others had supposed. Korsakov described severe but relatively specific amnesia for recent and current…

  • Korsakov (Russia)

    Korsakov, city, Sakhalin oblast (region), far eastern Russia. It lies in the southern part of Sakhalin Island on the Aniva Gulf. Founded in 1853 as a fortified post, it was the first Russian military post on the island. Its port opened in 1909. The settlement was ruled by Japan from 1905 to 1945

  • Korsakov, Sergey Sergeyevich (Russian psychiatrist)

    memory abnormality: A Russian psychiatrist, Sergey Sergeyevich Korsakov (Korsakoff), may have been the first to recognize that amnesia need not necessarily be associated with dementia (or loss of the ability to reason), as Ribot and many others had supposed. Korsakov described severe but relatively specific amnesia for recent and current…

  • Korsch, Karl (German political scientist)

    Bertolt Brecht: … in the late 1920s was Karl Korsch, an eminent Marxist theoretician who had been a Communist member of the Reichstag but had been expelled from the German Communist Party in 1926.

  • Kortcha (Albania)

    Kor??, city, southeastern Albania. It began as a feudal estate in the 13th century, and in 1484 the local lord, Koja Mirahor ?lyas Bey, a Muslim convert active in the Ottoman siege of Constantinople (1453; now Istanbul), returned to the site and built the mosque that bears his name. In the 17th,

  • Kortchmar, Danny (American musician)

    James Taylor: …his brother Alex and friend Danny Kortchmar, Taylor traveled to England, where he released his largely unnoticed debut album in 1968 on the Beatles’ Apple label.

  • Korte Verhandeling van God, de Mensch en deszelf’s Welstand (work by Spinoza)

    Benedict de Spinoza: Rijnsburg and The Hague: …mensch en deszelfs welstand (Short Treatise on God, Man and His Well-Being), a brief survey of his overall philosophy. During this period he was also working on the Ethics, as his correspondence shows.

  • Kortner, Fritz (Austrian actor and director)

    Fritz Kortner, famous stage and film actor of the 1920s German avant-garde who, after his return from exile in 1949, revitalized German theatre with his innovative concepts in staging and direction. He was known particularly for his unconventional interpretations of the classics. Kortner graduated

  • Kortright, Elizabeth (American first lady)

    Elizabeth Monroe, American first lady (1817–25), the wife of James Monroe, fifth president of the United States. Although she was noted for her beauty and elegance, her aloofness made her unpopular. Elizabeth Kortright was the daughter of Lawrence Kortright, a wealthy merchant who lost much of his

  • Kortrijk (Belgium)

    Kortrijk, municipality, Flanders Region, western Belgium. It lies along the Leie (Lys) River and the Leie-Scheldt Canal. The Roman settlement of Cortracum was established there, and in the 7th century St. Eloi erected a chapel on the site of the present St. Martin’s Church. Chartered in 1190,

  • Kortrijk, Battle of (European history)

    Battle of the Golden Spurs, (July 11, 1302), military engagement on the outskirts of Kortrijk in Flanders (now in Belgium) in which an untrained Flemish infantry militia, consisting mainly of members of the craft guilds (notably that of the weavers) defeated a professional force of French and

  • koruna (currency)

    Slovakia: Finance: …republican monetary system, with the koruna as the national currency (replaced in 2009 by the euro). Following decentralization of the banking system, a number of commercial and joint-venture banks came into being. A stock exchange operates in Bratislava.

  • Korvald, Lars (prime minister of Norway)

    Lars Korvald, Norwegian politician (born April 29, 1916, near Nedre Eiker, Nor.—died July 4, 2006, Oslo, Nor.), was the first Christian Democratic prime minister of Norway, at the head of a three-party minority coalition from Oct. 18, 1972, until Oct. 16, 1973, when the opposition Socialist Party g

  • korvar (religious icon)

    Southeast Asian arts: Folk arts: …known by the Indonesian word korvar. It is a figure with an ancestral skull in place of a carved head. Such figures are especially common in the more easterly island cultures. The ghostly power of the deceased ancestor can thus become present and available to the descendants—to give oracular advice,…

  • Korvin János (son of Matthias I)

    János Corvin, illegitimate son of Matthias I, king of Hungary (1458–90). When it became clear to Matthias that his wife, Beatrice, was barren, the king made Corvin prince of Liptó (a region in northern Hungary; now in Slovakia) and baron of Hunyad (in Transylvania). Matthias also succeeded in

  • Korvin, János (son of Matthias I)

    János Corvin, illegitimate son of Matthias I, king of Hungary (1458–90). When it became clear to Matthias that his wife, Beatrice, was barren, the king made Corvin prince of Liptó (a region in northern Hungary; now in Slovakia) and baron of Hunyad (in Transylvania). Matthias also succeeded in

  • korwar style (carving)

    Korwar style, type of carving of northwest New Guinea, particularly the Geelvink Channel region, in which bold, angular lines contrast with delicate, curvilinear, organic forms in the same piece of sculpture. The korwar style is found on canoe prows, headrests, and bamboo quivers, but its most

  • Korwin-Piotrowska, Maria Gabriela (Polish author)

    Gabriela Zapolska, Polish novelist and playwright of the Naturalist school. Having tried unsuccessfully to pursue an acting career in Paris, Zapolska started writing cheap, sensationalist novels full of bitterness toward middle-class values, morality, and hypocrisy. Of her several novels written

  • Koryak (former okrug, Russia)

    Koryak, former autonomous okrug (district), far eastern Russia. In 2007 Koryak was merged with Kamchatka oblast (region) to form Kamchatka kray (territory). The Koryak area occupies the northern half of the Kamchatka Peninsula, the southern end of the Koryak Mountains, and the Penzhina Basin. The

  • Koryak (people)

    Koryak, indigenous people of the Russian Far East, numbering about 7,900 in the late 20th century and living mostly in the Koryak autonomous okrug (district) of the northern Kamchatka Peninsula. The Koryak languages belong to the Luorawetlan language family of the Paleosiberian group. The Koryak

  • Koryak language

    Paleo-Siberian languages: Yeniseian, Luorawetlan, and Nivkh: …of Siberian Yupik (Eskimo), (2) Koryak, also called Nymylan, with approximately 3,500 speakers, spoken on northern Kamchatka and northward to the Anadyr River basin, (3) the strongly divergent but probably related Itelmen (or Kamchadal), with a bare remnant of 500 speakers on the central west coast of Kamchatka, (4) Aliutor,…

  • Koryak Mountains (mountains, Russia)

    Asia: The mountain belts: …years) folding extends from the Koryak Mountains of the Kamchatka-Koryak arc along the Sredinny (Central) range on the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia. The marginal seas of the western Pacific Ocean are bordered by the East Asian islands, which form the line of arcs running from the Kamchatka Peninsula in the…

  • Koryak, The (work by Jochelson)

    Vladimir Ilich Jochelson: …1900–01 and produced his study The Koryak in 1908. From 1912 to 1922 he was associate curator of the Anthropological and Ethnographical Museum at Petrograd (now St. Petersburg). He emigrated to the United States in 1922 and was associated with the American Museum of Natural History and later with the…

  • Kory? dynasty (Korean history)

    Kory? dynasty, in Korean history, dynasty that ruled the Korean peninsula as the Kory? kingdom from 935 to 1392 ce. During this period the country began to form its own cultural tradition distinct from the rest of East Asia. It is from the name Kory? that the Western name Korea is derived. The

  • Koryu (floral art)

    Ko, one of the four major schools of floral art in Japan. Dating from the Tokugawa period (1603–1868), the Ko school developed the shōka style of the earlier Ikenobō school into a more naturalistic type of arrangement. Calling the arrangements seika rather than shōka, the Ko school retained the t

  • Korzeniowski, Apollo Nal?cz (Polish poet and patriot)

    Joseph Conrad: Early years: Conrad’s father, Apollo Nal?cz Korzeniowski, a poet and an ardent Polish patriot, was one of the organizers of the committee that went on in 1863 to direct the Polish insurrection against Russian rule. He was arrested in late 1861 and was sent into exile at Vologda in…

  • Korzeniowski, Józef Teodor Konrad (British writer)

    Joseph Conrad, English novelist and short-story writer of Polish descent, whose works include the novels Lord Jim (1900), Nostromo (1904), and The Secret Agent (1907) and the short story “Heart of Darkness” (1902). During his lifetime Conrad was admired for the richness of his prose and his

  • Korzybski, Alfred (American philosopher)

    Alfred Korzybski, Polish-born American scientist and philosopher. During World War I, Korzybski served in the intelligence department of the Russian army general staff and in 1915 was sent on a military mission to the United States and Canada. With the collapse of the tsarist regime in 1917, he

  • Korzybski, Alfred Habdank Skarbek (American philosopher)

    Alfred Korzybski, Polish-born American scientist and philosopher. During World War I, Korzybski served in the intelligence department of the Russian army general staff and in 1915 was sent on a military mission to the United States and Canada. With the collapse of the tsarist regime in 1917, he

  • Kos (island, Greece)

    Cos, island off the southwestern coast of Turkey, the third largest of the Dodecanese Islands, Greece. A ragged limestone ridge runs along the southern coast. The highest point of the island, Mount Dhíkaios (2,776 feet [846 metres]), divides the island near its centre. A fertile lowland stretches

  • Kosach-Kvitka, Larisa Petrovna (Ukrainian poet)

    Lesya Ukrainka, poet, dramatist, short-story writer, essayist, and critic who was the foremost woman writer in Ukrainian literature and a leading figure in its modernist movement. The daughter of intellectuals, Ukrainka was stricken with tuberculosis in 1881 and traveled widely thereafter in search

  • Kosala (ancient kingdom, India)

    Kosala, ancient kingdom of northern India, roughly corresponding to the historical region of Oudh, in what is now south-central Uttar Pradesh state. Kosala extended across both banks of the Sarayu (modern Ghaghara) River and north into what is now Nepal. According to the Hindu epic the Ramayana,

  • Kosar, Bernie (American football player)

    Cleveland Browns: Quarterback and Ohio native Bernie Kosar was drafted in 1985 and led the Browns to five appearances in the playoffs in his first five years in the league. The Browns lost two memorable AFC championship games to John Elway and the Denver Broncos during this span, each of which…

  • Kosba, Simeon bar (Jewish leader)

    Bar Kokhba, Jewish leader who led a bitter but unsuccessful revolt (132–135 ce) against Roman dominion in Judaea. During his tour of the Eastern Empire in 131, the Roman emperor Hadrian decided upon a policy of Hellenization to integrate the Jews into the empire. Circumcision was proscribed, a

  • Koscak (Japanese composer)

    Japanese music: Composers in Western styles: Yamada Kōsaku was training in Germany when the Meiji era ended (1912) and returned to Japan with a new name, Koscak, and a strong interest in the founding of opera companies and symphony orchestras, as well as in the teaching of Western music. His opera…

  • Koschevnikov’s bee (insect)

    honeybee: Apis species: koschevnikovi, or Koschevnikov’s bee, which is found only on Borneo and several other islands in Southeast Asia and on the Malay Peninsula. A. nigrocincta is native to Indonesia and Mindanao island in the Philippines. There are also a number of subspecies and strains of Apis.

  • Ko?ció? Mariacki (church, Kraków, Poland)

    Kraków: The contemporary city: …are the many churches, including St. Mary’s Church (Ko?ció? Mariacki), the main section of which dates from 1497. It contains a stained-glass window from 1370 and a magnificent altar (1477–89) by Veit Stoss (Wit Stosz). Wawel Cathedral houses several ornate chapels and burial chambers, along with a collection of ecclesiastical…

  • Kosciuscola tristis (insect)

    orthopteran: Camouflage: …colour change occurs in an Australian alpine grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis), which lives at above 5,000 feet elevation. The adult male, bright greenish blue on the upper part of its body at temperatures above 25 °C (77 °F), is dull and blackish below 15 °C (59 °F). At intermediate temperatures, correspondingly…

  • Kosciusko National Park (national park, New South Wales, Australia)

    Australian Capital Territory: Settlement patterns: …territory and adjoins the large Kosciuszko National Park in New South Wales. Including smaller nature parks in and around Canberra, Tidbinbilla and Jervis Bay nature reserves, and Namadgi, conservation areas cover roughly half of the area of the Australian Capital Territory.

  • Kosciusko, Mount (mountain, New South Wales, Australia)

    Mount Kosciuszko, Australia’s highest peak, rising to an elevation of 7,310 feet (2,228 metres) in the Snowy Mountains of the Australian Alps, southeastern New South Wales. Located 240 miles (390 km) southwest of Sydney, the mountain is situated in Kosciuszko National Park (2,498 square miles

  • Kosciusko, Thaddeus (Polish general and statesman)

    Tadeusz Ko?ciuszko, Polish army officer and statesman who gained fame both for his role in the American Revolution and for his leadership of a national insurrection in his homeland. Ko?ciuszko was born to a family of noble origin and was educated at the Piarist college in Lubieszów and the military

  • Kosciuszko National Park (national park, New South Wales, Australia)

    Australian Capital Territory: Settlement patterns: …territory and adjoins the large Kosciuszko National Park in New South Wales. Including smaller nature parks in and around Canberra, Tidbinbilla and Jervis Bay nature reserves, and Namadgi, conservation areas cover roughly half of the area of the Australian Capital Territory.

  • Kosciuszko, Mount (mountain, New South Wales, Australia)

    Mount Kosciuszko, Australia’s highest peak, rising to an elevation of 7,310 feet (2,228 metres) in the Snowy Mountains of the Australian Alps, southeastern New South Wales. Located 240 miles (390 km) southwest of Sydney, the mountain is situated in Kosciuszko National Park (2,498 square miles

  • Ko?ciuszko, Tadeusz (Polish general and statesman)

    Tadeusz Ko?ciuszko, Polish army officer and statesman who gained fame both for his role in the American Revolution and for his leadership of a national insurrection in his homeland. Ko?ciuszko was born to a family of noble origin and was educated at the Piarist college in Lubieszów and the military

  • Ko?ciuszko, Tadeusz Andrzej Bonawentura (Polish general and statesman)

    Tadeusz Ko?ciuszko, Polish army officer and statesman who gained fame both for his role in the American Revolution and for his leadership of a national insurrection in his homeland. Ko?ciuszko was born to a family of noble origin and was educated at the Piarist college in Lubieszów and the military

  • K?se Da?, battle of (Anatolian history)

    Seljuq: At the Battle of K?se Dagh in 1243, Seljuq autonomy was lost forever. For a time the Seljuq sultanate continued as a Mongol province, although some Turkmen emirs maintained small principalities of their own in distant mountainous districts. The Seljuq dynasty died out at last early in…

  • Kose Kanaoka (Japanese painter)

    Kose Kanaoka, first major secular artist in Japan. Information concerning his life and works is sketchy, and his last documented painting was destroyed by fire in the 17th century. Active during the formative days of the aristocratic culture of the Heian period (794–1185), he was reputed to have

  • Koseba, Simeon bar (Jewish leader)

    Bar Kokhba, Jewish leader who led a bitter but unsuccessful revolt (132–135 ce) against Roman dominion in Judaea. During his tour of the Eastern Empire in 131, the Roman emperor Hadrian decided upon a policy of Hellenization to integrate the Jews into the empire. Circumcision was proscribed, a

  • K?sem Sultan (Ottoman sultana)

    K?sem Sultan, Ottoman sultana who exercised a strong influence on Ottoman politics for several decades at a time when the women of the palace enjoyed significant, even formalized authority within the palace. K?sem entered palace influence through her marriage to Sultan Ahmed I. Like many royal

  • Kosen (Japanese politician)

    Sakai Toshihiko, socialist leader and one of the founders of the Japan Communist Party. Originally a schoolteacher, Sakai became a reporter and in 1903, together with Kōtoku Shūsui, started a weekly paper, the Heimin shimbun (“Peoples News”). Arrested for the espousal of pacifist beliefs shortly b

  • kōsen-ga (painting style)

    Kobayashi Kiyochika: …Western techniques, which he named kōsen-ga, or “pictures of sunbeams.” Chiefly landscapes of Tokyo, they are notable for their subtle interplay of lights and shadows. After about 1882 he stopped Western painting as he came under the influence of Japanese nationalistic currents and produced educational cartoons and prints based on…

  • Kōshaku Inoue Kaoru (Japanese statesman)

    Inoue Kaoru, one of the elder statesmen (genro) who ruled Japan during the Meiji period (1868–1912). Inoue was born to a samurai family of the Chōshū clan of western Japan and was a close boyhood friend of Itō Hirobumi, who later became Japan’s first prime minister. Both wished to rid Japan of

  • Kōshaku Itō Hirobumi (prime minister of Japan)

    Itō Hirobumi, Japanese elder statesman (genro) and premier (1885–88, 1892–96, 1898, 1900–01), who played a crucial role in building modern Japan. He helped draft the Meiji constitution (1889) and brought about the establishment of a bicameral national Diet (1890). He was created a marquess in 1884

  • Kōshaku Matsukata Masayoshi (prime minister of Japan)

    Matsukata Masayoshi, statesman whose financial reforms stabilized and restored Japanese government finances in the 1880s, giving Japan the capital with which to modernize. Matsukata was a high-ranking official in the Satsuma domain when the Tokugawa family was overthrown and ruling authority was

  • Kōshaku ōkuma Shigenobu (prime minister of Japan)

    ōkuma Shigenobu, politician who twice served as prime minister of Japan (1898; 1914–16). He organized the Rikken Kaishintō (“Progressive Party”) and founded Waseda University. After receiving a conventional education, ōkuma turned to Western studies and took the then-unusual step of learning

  • Kōshaku Saionji Kimmochi (prime minister of Japan)

    Saionji Kimmochi, the longest-surviving member of the oligarchy that governed Japan after the Meiji Restoration (1868), which had brought an end to the Edo (Tokugawa) period and formally (if nominally) reestablished the authority of the emperor. As prime minister and elder statesman (genro), he

  • Kōshaku Sanjō Sanetomi (Japanese politician)

    Sanjō Sanetomi, radical court noble who was instrumental in the Meiji Restoration (1868), which ended the 264-year domination of Japan by the Tokugawa family and reestablished ruling authority with the emperor. After the restoration Sanjō became an important leader of the new government. In his

  • Kōshaku Shimazu Hisamitsu (Japanese feudal lord)

    Shimazu Hisamitsu, noted Japanese lord who in 1867–68 led his clan in the overthrow of the Tokugawa shogunate, the military dictatorship that had dominated Japan since the early 17th century. He then helped organize the newly restored imperial government. In 1858 Hisamitsu succeeded as daimyo

  • Kōshaku Tōgō Heihachirō (Japanese admiral)

    Tōgō Heihachirō, admiral who led the Japanese fleet to victory in the Russo-Japanese War (1904–05). In the process, he developed new tactics for engaging an advancing enemy fleet. Tōgō studied naval science in England from 1871 to 1878. After returning to Japan, he served in a number of naval posts

  • Kōshaku Yamagata Aritomo (prime minister of Japan)

    Yamagata Aritomo, Japanese soldier and statesman who exerted a strong influence in Japan’s emergence as a formidable military power at the beginning of the 20th century. He was the first prime minister under the parliamentary regime, serving in 1889–91 and 1898–1900. Yamagata was from a family of

  • Koshala (ancient kingdom, India)

    Kosala, ancient kingdom of northern India, roughly corresponding to the historical region of Oudh, in what is now south-central Uttar Pradesh state. Kosala extended across both banks of the Sarayu (modern Ghaghara) River and north into what is now Nepal. According to the Hindu epic the Ramayana,

  • kosher (Judaism)

    Kosher, (“fit,” or “proper”), in Judaism, the fitness of an object for ritual purposes. Though generally applied to foods that meet the requirements of the dietary laws (kashruth), kosher is also used to describe, for instance, such objects as a Torah scroll, water for ritual bathing (mikvah), a

  • Koshi tsu (work by Arai)

    Arai Hakuseki: …9th to the 16th century; Koshitsū (“The Understanding of Ancient History”), a critical study of the earliest documentary sources; and his autobiography, Oritaku shiba no ki (Told Round a Brushwood Fire; 1979).

  • Koshiba Masatoshi (Japanese physicist)

    Koshiba Masatoshi, Japanese physicist who, with Raymond Davis, Jr., won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2002 for their detection of neutrinos. Riccardo Giacconi also won a share of the award for his work on the cosmic sources of X rays. Koshiba earned a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester in New

  • Koshigaya (Japan)

    Koshigaya, city, Saitama ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan. It lies in the Kantō Plain on the alluvial land of the Naka and Edo rivers. The city adjoins Sōka to the south and Saitama city to the west, and it is about 20 miles (32 km) north of central Tokyo. Koshigaya was a post town and marketplace

  • Koshk River (river, Asia)

    Kushk River, river in Afghanistan and Turkmenistan, formed by the confluence of two headstreams, the āq Robā? and the Galleh Chaghar, which rise in northwestern Afghanistan. The river flows northwestward, passing the town of Koshk-e Kohneh (Kushk), where it turns north and receives the waters of

  • Koshland, Daniel Edward, Jr. (American biochemist and editor)

    Daniel Edward Koshland, Jr., American biochemist and editor (born March 30, 1920, New York, N.Y.—died July 23, 2007, Walnut Creek, Calif.), investigated the function of enzymes in the human body and set forth the theory known as “induced fit,” which held that enzymes sometimes change their shape in

  • Kōshō (Japanese sculptor)

    Japanese art: Sculpture: The sculpture by Unkei’s son Kōshō (died 1237) of Kūya, the rugged old mendicant who advocated the unceasing repetition of the nembutsu prayer, is depicted realistically as determined and gnarly but with the fantastic grace note of a string of small Amida figures emerging from his mouth—a literal representation of…

  • Kōshoku gonin onna (work by Ihara Saikaku)

    Five Women Who Loved Love, story collection written by Ihara Saikaku, published in Japanese in 1686 as Kōshoku gonin onna and considered a masterwork of the Tokugawa period (1603–1867). Five Women Who Loved Love is composed of five separate tales, each divided into five individually titled

  • Kōshoku ichidai otoko (novel by Saikaku)

    Ihara Saikaku: Kōshoku ichidai otoko (1682; The Life of an Amorous Man), the first of Saikaku’s many novels concerned with the pleasure quarters, relates the erotic adventures of its hero, Yonosuke, from his precocious experiences at the age of 6 to his departure at 60 for an island of women. Of…

  • Kosi River (river, Asia)

    Kosi River, river in Nepal and northern India. With its tributaries, the Kosi drains the eastern third of Nepal and part of Tibet, including the country around Mount Everest. Some of its headstreams rise beyond the Nepalese border in Tibet. About 30 miles (48 km) north of the Indian-Nepalese

  • Ko?ice (Slovakia)

    Ko?ice, city, eastern Slovakia. It lies on the Hornád River, south of Pre?ov. Ko?ice originated in the 9th century and was chartered in 1241. In the late Middle Ages it was one of the 24 trading settlements of the Polish-Slovak frontier, in which immigrant German merchants were prominent. In 1660

  • Ko?ice government (Czech history)

    Ko?ice government, pro-Soviet Czechoslovak provisional government that inaugurated far-reaching socialist programs during the single year of its rule after World War II and made way for the eventual Communist domination of Czechoslovakia. Appointed by Edvard Bene?, the former president of prewar

  • Kosice, Gyula (Argentine artist)

    Concrete Invention: …the artists Carmelo Arden Quin, Gyula Kosice, Rhod Rothfuss, Tomás Maldonado, and others collectively produced the first and only issue of the illustrated magazine Arturo, with texts and reproductions of work by many artists, including Joaquín Torres García, Lidy Prati, Wassily Kandinsky, and Piet Mondrian. The appearance of Arturo

  • Ko?ice, Pact of (Poland [1374])

    Pact of Koszyce, agreement made between the Polish nobility and their king, Louis I (ruled 1370–82), in which the nobles promised to accept the King’s choice of successor in exchange for a charter that guaranteed their basic rights and privileges. The last Piast king of Poland, Casimir III the

  • Kosinski, Jerzy (American writer)

    Jerzy Kosinski, Polish-born American writer whose novels were sociological studies of individuals in controlling and bureaucratic societies. At the age of six, upon the outbreak of World War II, Kosinski, a Jew, was separated from his parents and wandered through Poland and Russia, living by his

  • Kosinski, Jerzy Nikodem (American writer)

    Jerzy Kosinski, Polish-born American writer whose novels were sociological studies of individuals in controlling and bureaucratic societies. At the age of six, upon the outbreak of World War II, Kosinski, a Jew, was separated from his parents and wandered through Poland and Russia, living by his

  • Kosior, Stanislav (Soviet political leader)

    Ukraine: Russification: …party chief was taken by Stanislav Kosior, who was joined in 1933 by Pavel Postyshev as second secretary, who was sent from Moscow with a large contingent of Russian cadres. A series of purges from 1929 to 1934 largely eliminated from the party the generation of revolutionaries, supporters of Ukrainization,…

  • Kosko (Peru)

    Cuzco, city and Inca región, south-central Peru. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the Western Hemisphere. Formerly the capital of the extensive Inca empire, it retains much of its highly crafted early stone architecture, which is typically preserved in the foundations and

  • K?slin (Poland)

    Koszalin, city, Zachodniopomorskie województwo (province), northwestern Poland, on the Dzier??cinka River. Koszalin is a resort and manufacturing city; local industry includes timber milling and woodworking, food processing, and machine works. First chronicled in 1214, Koszalin received municipal

  • Koslov’s pika (mammal)

    pika: One of these, Koslov’s pika (O. koslowi) from China, was originally collected by the Russian explorer Nikolai Przewalski in 1884, and approximately 100 years passed before it was seen again. Not only is this species apparently rare, but it may be in danger of being poisoned as part…

  • Koslowski, Pinchas (Israeli politician)

    Pinhas Sapir, influential Israeli politician who was noted for securing funds and military aid for Israel. At age 20 Sapir moved to Palestine, where he joined the Israel Labour Party, organized demonstrations and strikes during the period of British rule, and was imprisoned for four months (1933).

  • Koslowski, Pinhas (Israeli politician)

    Pinhas Sapir, influential Israeli politician who was noted for securing funds and military aid for Israel. At age 20 Sapir moved to Palestine, where he joined the Israel Labour Party, organized demonstrations and strikes during the period of British rule, and was imprisoned for four months (1933).

  • Kosmet (self-declared independent country)

    Kosovo, self-declared independent country in the Balkans region of Europe. Although the United States and most members of the European Union (EU) recognized Kosovo’s declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008, Serbia, Russia, and a significant number of other countries—including several EU

  • Kosminski, Aaron (Jack the Ripper suspect)

    Jack the Ripper: …of his homicidal tendencies; and Aaron Kosminski, a Polish Jew and a resident of Whitechapel who was known to have a great animus toward women (particularly prostitutes) and who was hospitalized in an asylum several months after the last murder. Several notable Londoners of the era, such as the painter…

  • Kosmoceratops (dinosaur)

    ceratopsian: Kosmoceratops, with its broad frill and hooks projecting forward from the top of its skull, and Utahceratops, characterized by a large horn rising from the top of its nose, were close relatives of Triceratops. The skull of Kosmoceratops is considered by many paleontologists to be…

  • kosmochlor (mineral)

    pyroxene: Chemical composition: include johannsenite [CaMnSi2O6], and kosmochlor (ureyite) [NaCrSi2O6]. Johannsenite involves the substitution of manganese for iron in hedenbergite. Kosmochlor has chromium (Cr) in place of iron or aluminum in a sodic pyroxene.

  • Kosmos (satellite)

    Kosmos, any of a series of uncrewed Soviet and then Russian satellites launched from the early 1960s to the present day. As of 2020 there were 2,544 satellites in the series. The first was launched on March 16, 1962. Kosmos satellites were used for a wide variety of purposes, including scientific

  • kosmos (ancient Greek magistrate)

    ancient Greek civilization: The early tyrannies: …tenure of the office of kosmos—a local magistracy—until 10 years had elapsed since a man’s last tenure.) That is a refreshing approach and surely contains some truth. Nonetheless, the qualification “as far as is known” is important: with regard to many places there is no better reason for saying that…

  • Kosmos (work by Humboldt)

    Alexander von Humboldt: Later years: …was chiefly occupied with writing Kosmos, one of the most ambitious scientific works ever published. Four volumes appeared during his lifetime. Written in a pleasant, literary style, Kosmos gives a generally comprehensible account of the structure of the universe as then known, at the same time communicating the scientist’s excitement…

  • Kosmos 2251 (Russian satellite)

    Kosmos: …on February 10, 2009, when Kosmos 2251, an inactive Russian military communications satellite, collided with Iridium 33, a communications satellite owned by the American company Motorola, about 760 km (470 miles) above northern Siberia, shattering both satellites.

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