You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Kraly, Hans (German film maker)
  • Kramá?, Karel (Czech statesman)

    Austria: World War I: Karel Kramá?, who had supported the Pan-Slav idea, was tried for high treason and found guilty on the basis of shaky evidence. German nationalism was riding high, but in fact the German Austrians had little influence left. In military matters they were practically reduced to…

  • Kramarenko, Alec (American inventor)

    spearfishing: In the mid-1930s, Alec Kramarenko patented an underwater gun in which the spear was propelled by a compressed spring. Shortly after, there appeared a spring-propulsion gun invented by a Frenchman, Maxime Forlot, and a popular spear gun designed by his compatriot Georges Beuchat that was propelled by a…

  • Kramatorsk (Ukraine)

    Kramatorsk, city, eastern Ukraine. It lies on the bank of the Kazenny Torets, which is a tributary of the north Donets River. The city developed from the end of the 19th century with the growth of its metallurgical industry, particularly the production of iron and steel. Kramatorsk eventually

  • Kramer vs. Kramer (film by Benton [1979])

    Kramer vs. Kramer, American dramatic film, released in 1979, that tells the wrenching story of a divorce and custody battle from the point of view of the adults. The movie, which starred Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep, won numerous awards, among them the Academy Award for best picture. Ted Kramer

  • Kramer, Dame Leonie Judith (Australian literary scholar)

    Dame Leonie Judith Kramer, Australian literary scholar and educator. Kramer studied at the University of Melbourne and at the University of Oxford and thereafter taught on Australian literature at various universities, serving as professor at the University of Sydney in 1968–89. She wrote several

  • Kramer, Hilton (American art critic)

    Hilton Kramer, American art critic (born March 25, 1928, Gloucester, Mass.—died March 27, 2012, Harpswell, Maine), made his name as a fervent champion of Modernism and a guardian of high culture, especially in reaction against the populist and postmodern impulses of the art world in the late 20th

  • Kr?mer, Ingrid (German diver)

    Rome 1960 Olympic Games: Ingrid Kr?mer of Germany won both of the women’s diving events. The U.S. basketball team took its fifth consecutive gold medal; the squad, which starred Oscar Robertson, Jerry West, Jerry Lucas, and Walt Bellamy, was considered by many at the time to be the best…

  • Kramer, Jack (American tennis player)

    Jack Kramer, American champion tennis player who became a successful promoter of professional tennis. Kramer was selected to represent the United States in the 1939 Davis Cup doubles against Australia. However, in spite of an excellent record in the United States, he was not considered a major

  • Kramer, Joey (American musician)

    Aerosmith: …Colorado Springs, Colorado), and drummer Joey Kramer (b. June 21, 1950, New York City).

  • Kramer, John Albert (American tennis player)

    Jack Kramer, American champion tennis player who became a successful promoter of professional tennis. Kramer was selected to represent the United States in the 1939 Davis Cup doubles against Australia. However, in spite of an excellent record in the United States, he was not considered a major

  • Kramer, Josef (Nazi commander)

    Josef Kramer, German commander of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp (1944–45), notorious for his cruelty. Joining the Nazi Party on Dec. 1, 1931, Kramer volunteered for the SS the following year. He served at various camps, including Auschwitz, Mauthausen, and Dachau, and commanded Birkenau

  • Kramer, Larry (American writer)

    Larry Kramer, American playwright, screenwriter, and gay rights activist whose confrontational style of advocacy, while divisive, was credited by many with catalyzing the response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in the United States. Kramer—the second son of a lawyer and his wife, a Red Cross official—spent

  • Kramer, Laurence David (American writer)

    Larry Kramer, American playwright, screenwriter, and gay rights activist whose confrontational style of advocacy, while divisive, was credited by many with catalyzing the response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in the United States. Kramer—the second son of a lawyer and his wife, a Red Cross official—spent

  • Kramer, Stanley (American film producer and director)

    Stanley Kramer, American film producer and director who created unconventional, socially conscious works on a variety of issues not usually addressed in mainstream Hollywood fare. Kramer graduated from high school at age 15 and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from New York

  • Kramer, Stanley Earl (American film producer and director)

    Stanley Kramer, American film producer and director who created unconventional, socially conscious works on a variety of issues not usually addressed in mainstream Hollywood fare. Kramer graduated from high school at age 15 and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from New York

  • Kramer, Sven (Dutch skater)

    Sven Kramer, Dutch speed skater who excelled in long-distance events, most notably the 5,000 and 10,000 metres, and who won four speed-skating Olympic gold medals. Sven, the son of former Olympic speed skater Yep Kramer, was raised in the Dutch speed-skating town of Heerenveen; his younger sister,

  • Kramer, Wayne (American musician)

    the MC5: …Royal Oak, Michigan), lead guitarist Wayne Kramer (original name Wayne Kambes; b. April 30, 1948, Detroit), rhythm guitarist Fred (“Sonic”) Smith (b. August 14, 1948, West Virginia—d. November 4, 1994, Detroit), drummer Dennis Thompson (original name Dennis Tomich; b. September 7, 1948), and bassist Michael Davis (b. June 5, 1943,…

  • Krameriaceae (plant family)

    Zygophyllales: Krameriaceae: Krameriaceae is composed of 1 genus (Krameria) and 18 species of hemiparasite annuals or small shrubs to herbs restricted to the New World from the southwestern United States to Chile. Leaves are alternate and almost always simple. Flowers are showy, irregular, and pealike. The…

  • Kramers, Hendrik Anthony (Dutch physicist)

    Hendrik Anthony Kramers, Dutch physicist who, with Ralph de Laer Kronig, derived important equations relating the absorption to the dispersion of light. He also predicted (1924) the existence of the Raman effect, an inelastic scattering of light, and showed (1927) that the complex form of the

  • Kramnik, Vladimir (Russian chess player)

    Vladimir Kramnik, Russian international chess grandmaster who defeated his countryman Garry Kasparov to win the Professional Chess Association world championship. The match was held in London from October 8 to November 2, 2000, with Kramnik winning 2 games, drawing 13, and losing none. Kramnik’s

  • Kramp-Karrenbauer, Annegret (German politician)

    Ursula von der Leyen: Road to the European Commission presidency: …eventually filled by Merkel protégé Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer. That von der Leyen, who had once been regarded as Merkel’s heir apparent, did not even present herself as a candidate was seen by some as evidence that the defense portfolio continued to be a poisoned chalice. With her domestic political career apparently…

  • Krampe, Hugh Charles (American actor)

    Hugh O’Brian, (Hugh Charles Krampe), American actor (born April 19, 1925, Rochester, N.Y.—died Sept. 5, 2016, Beverly Hills, Calif.), embodied the rugged, scrupulously honourable western hero Wyatt Earp in the first TV western aimed at adults, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp (1955–61). O’Brian’s

  • Krampus (legend)

    Krampus, in central European popular legend, a half-goat, half-demon monster that punishes misbehaving children at Christmastime. He is the devilish companion of St. Nicholas. Krampus is believed to have originated in Germany, and his name derives from the German word Krampen, which means “claw.”

  • Krampus (film by Dougherty [2015])

    Toni Collette: …holidays in the horror comedy Krampus (2015). She appeared in several low-rated films throughout 2017, but her movies from 2018, which included the horror flick Hereditary and the feel-good drama Hearts Beat Loud, garnered more-favourable reviews. Collette was then cast in Velvet Buzzsaw (2019), a horror parody wherein artworks seemingly…

  • Kramskoy, Ivan Nikolayevich (Russian painter)

    Russia: The 19th century: …Levitan, the expressive portraits of Ivan Kramskoy and Ilya Repin, and the socially oriented genre paintings of Vladimir Makovsky, Vasily Perov, and Repin arguably deserve an international reputation.

  • Kramuon-Sa (Vietnam)

    Rach Gia, port city, northern Ca Mau Peninsula, southwestern Vietnam. It lies at the head of Rach Gia Bay on the Gulf of Thailand, at the north bank of the Cai Lon estuary, 120 miles (195 km) southwest of Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon). Formerly Cambodian territory, in 1715 the flat

  • Krancke, Theodor (German naval officer)

    Theodor Krancke, German naval commander during World War II. Krancke joined the German navy in 1912 and served on a torpedo boat during World War I, rising to the rank of lieutenant. He remained in the navy after the war, commanding minesweepers and torpedo boats. He rose steadily through the

  • Kranjska (region, Slovenia)

    Carniola, western region of Slovenia, which in the 19th century was a centre of Slovenian nationalist and independence activities within the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary. It was part of the Roman province of Pannonia in ancient times and was occupied by the Slovenes in the 6th century ad.

  • krankhaften Geschwülste, Die (work by Virchow)

    Rudolf Virchow: Medical investigations: …work on that subject (Die krankhaften Geschwülste, 1863–67) was somewhat marred by his erroneous conception that malignancy results from a conversion (metaplasia) of connective tissue. His work on the role of animal parasites, especially trichina, in causing disease in humans was fundamental and led to his own public interest…

  • Krapf, Johann Ludwig (German explorer and missionary)

    eastern Africa: Missionary activity: Johann Ludwig Krapf and Johannes Rebmann of the Church Missionary Society, who had worked inland from Mombasa and had, in the 1840s and ’50s, journeyed to the foothills of Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro, were followed by a British Methodist mission. Roman Catholic missionaries reached Zanzibar…

  • Krapina remains (fossil Neanderthal remains, Croatia)

    Krapina remains, fossilized remains of at least 24 early Neanderthal adults and children, consisting of skulls, teeth, and other skeletal parts found in a rock shelter near the city of Krapina, northern Croatia, between 1899 and 1905. The remains date to about 130,000 years ago, and the skulls have

  • Krapp’s Last Tape (play by Beckett)

    Krapp’s Last Tape, one-act monodrama by Samuel Beckett, written in English, produced in 1958, and published in 1959. Krapp sits at a cluttered desk and listens to tape recordings he made decades earlier when he was in the prime of life, leaving only occasionally to imbibe liquor offstage. To Krapp,

  • Krapp, Katherine (wife of Melanchthon)

    Philipp Melanchthon: Luther and the Reformation: …he found time to court Katherine Krapp, whom he married in 1520 and who bore him four children—Anna, Philipp, Georg, and Magdalen.

  • krar (musical instrument)

    stringed instrument: Lyres: The smaller lyre, krar (the ancient Greek lyra), has a bowl-shaped resonator and is emphatically secular in its use and connotations; indeed, Ethiopian and Eritrean tradition casts it as the instrument of Satan. The construction of this six-stringed instrument illustrates the sort of change that is of wide…

  • Kras (region, Europe)

    Bosnia and Herzegovina: Relief: …south and southwest is the Karst, a region of arid limestone plateaus that contain caves, potholes, and underground drainage. The uplands there are often bare and denuded (the result of deforestation and thin soils), but, between the ridges, depressions known as poljes are covered with alluvial soil that is suitable…

  • Kras Plateau (region, Europe)

    Bosnia and Herzegovina: Relief: …south and southwest is the Karst, a region of arid limestone plateaus that contain caves, potholes, and underground drainage. The uplands there are often bare and denuded (the result of deforestation and thin soils), but, between the ridges, depressions known as poljes are covered with alluvial soil that is suitable…

  • Krasicki, Ignacy (Polish poet)

    Ignacy Krasicki, a major Polish poet, satirist, and prose writer of the Enlightenment. Born to an aristocratic but impoverished family, Krasicki was educated at the Warsaw Catholic Seminary and became bishop of Warmia (Ermeland) at age 32. He served as one of the closest cultural counselors to King

  • Krasinski, John (American actor and director)

    Emily Blunt: Her husband, John Krasinski, whom she married in 2010, costarred in and directed the film. In Mary Poppins Returns (2018) Blunt took on the mantle of the eponymous nanny, garnering reviews that declared her performance “practically perfect in every way.”

  • Krasiński, Napoleon Stanislaw Adam Ludwik Zygmunt (Polish poet and dramatist)

    Zygmunt Krasiński, Polish Romantic poet and dramatist whose works dealt prophetically with the class conflict that would engender Russia’s October Revolution. The son of a leading aristocratic family, Krasiński studied law at Warsaw University before taking up studies in Geneva in 1829. He lived

  • Krasiński, Zygmunt (Polish poet and dramatist)

    Zygmunt Krasiński, Polish Romantic poet and dramatist whose works dealt prophetically with the class conflict that would engender Russia’s October Revolution. The son of a leading aristocratic family, Krasiński studied law at Warsaw University before taking up studies in Geneva in 1829. He lived

  • Krasker, Robert (Australian cinematographer)
  • Krasko, Ivan (Slovak author)

    Slovak literature: Another notable poet was Ivan Krasko (the pseudonym of Ján Botto), whose volumes of verse, Nox et solitudo (1909) and Ver?e (1912), were among the finest achievements of Slovak literature.

  • Krasna, Norman (American writer, producer, and director)
  • Krasnaya Armiya (Soviet history)

    Red Army, Soviet army created by the Communist government after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The name Red Army was abandoned in 1946. The Russian imperial army and navy, together with other imperial institutions of tsarist Russia, disintegrated after the outbreak of the Russian Revolution of

  • Krasnaya Ploshchad (square, Moscow, Russia)

    Red Square, open square in Moscow adjoining the historic fortress and centre of government known as the Kremlin (Russian: Kreml). The Kremlin and Red Square were added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1990. Dating from the late 15th century, just after the Kremlin walls were completed, Red Square

  • Krasner, Lee (American painter)

    Lee Krasner, American painter recognized for her unique contribution to Abstract Expressionism. Krasner was the sixth of seven children of Jewish emigrants from Odessa, Russia (now Ukraine). When she was 13 she decided to become an artist and was admitted on her second application to Washington

  • Krasner, Lenore (American painter)

    Lee Krasner, American painter recognized for her unique contribution to Abstract Expressionism. Krasner was the sixth of seven children of Jewish emigrants from Odessa, Russia (now Ukraine). When she was 13 she decided to become an artist and was admitted on her second application to Washington

  • Krasner, Louis (American musician)

    Louis Krasner, Ukrainian-born U.S. violinist and music teacher who was best remembered for having commissioned Alban Berg to write his 1934 Violin Concerto (b. June 21, 1903--d. May 4,

  • Krasner, Milton (American cinematographer)
  • Krasnitsky, Vladimir (Russian priest)

    Renovated Church: …priests, notably Aleksandr Vvedensky and Vladimir Krasnitsky, organized a Temporary Higher Church Administration, which rapidly evolved into a general movement aimed at deposing the patriarch and introducing radical church reforms. The Temporary Administration found support among some bishops, but it was particularly popular with the “white,” or married, clergy, who…

  • Krasnoarmeysk (Ukraine)

    Krasnoarmiysk, city, eastern Ukraine. It is an old coal-mining centre of the Donets Basin coalfield, and mining began there in 1884. Other industries have included railway servicing and the production of construction materials. It is the centre of a significant agricultural area. Pop. (2001)

  • krasnoarmiich (Soviet soldier)

    Red Army: …was subsequently called simply a ryadovoy (“ranker”). Discipline in the Soviet forces was always strict and punishments severe; during World War II, penal battalions were given suicidal tasks. In 1960, however, new regulations were introduced making discipline, and certainly punishments, less severe. Officers were to use more persuasion and were…

  • Krasnoarmiysk (Ukraine)

    Krasnoarmiysk, city, eastern Ukraine. It is an old coal-mining centre of the Donets Basin coalfield, and mining began there in 1884. Other industries have included railway servicing and the production of construction materials. It is the centre of a significant agricultural area. Pop. (2001)

  • Krasnodar (Russia)

    Krasnodar, city and administrative centre of Krasnodar kray (territory), southwestern Russia, lying along the Kuban River. Founded about 1793 as a Cossack guardpost on the Kuban frontier, it developed as a military town. In 1867, after the Caucasian wars, it became a city and centre of the fertile

  • Krasnodar (kray, Russia)

    Krasnodar, kray (territory), southwestern Russia, extending northward from the crest line of the Caucasus Mountains across the plains east of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov as far as the Gulf of Taganrog. The plains, crossed by the Kuban and other rivers flowing to the Sea of Azov, form

  • Krasnodon (Ukraine)

    Krasnodon, coal-mining city, eastern Ukraine. It lies on the Great (Bilsha) Kam’yanka River. Krasnodon was established in 1914 and incorporated in 1938. Historically, it has been important for the mining of bituminous coal. A local museum commemorates the defense of the city during World War II by

  • Krasnoe koleso (work by Solzhenitsyn)

    Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn: …part of a projected series, Krasnoe koleso (The Red Wheel); other volumes (or uzly [“knots”]) in the series were Oktyabr 1916 (“October 1916”), Mart 1917 (“March 1917”), and Aprel 1917 (“April 1917”).

  • Krasnogorsk (Russia)

    Krasnogorsk, city and centre of a rayon (sector), Moscow oblast (region), western Russia, a few miles west of Moscow. Situated in the Moscow greenbelt, it was known as Banki before its incorporation as a town in 1940. It now produces cameras and is important for building machinery and plasterwork.

  • Krasnogvardeysk (Russia)

    Gatchina, city, Leningrad oblast (province), northwestern Russia, lying about 28 miles (45 km) southwest of St. Petersburg. The first mention of Khotchino dates from 1499, when it was a possession of Novgorod. Later it belonged to Livonia and Sweden. After 1721 it was returned to Russia and in the

  • Krasnoiarsk (Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, city and administrative centre of Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), south-central Siberia, Russia. The city stands on both banks of the Yenisey River where the river is crossed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. One of the earliest Russian settlements in Siberia, it was founded as the fort of

  • Krasnoiarsk (kray, Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, kray (territory), east-central Russia. It occupies an area of Central Siberia and extends from the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago in the Arctic Ocean to the Sayan Mountains in the south. In 2007 the autonomous okruga (districts) of Evenk and Taymyr (Dolgano-Nenets) were merged with

  • Krasnojarsk (kray, Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, kray (territory), east-central Russia. It occupies an area of Central Siberia and extends from the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago in the Arctic Ocean to the Sayan Mountains in the south. In 2007 the autonomous okruga (districts) of Evenk and Taymyr (Dolgano-Nenets) were merged with

  • Krasnojarsk (Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, city and administrative centre of Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), south-central Siberia, Russia. The city stands on both banks of the Yenisey River where the river is crossed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. One of the earliest Russian settlements in Siberia, it was founded as the fort of

  • Krasnokamsk (Russia)

    Krasnokamsk, city, Perm kray (territory), western Russia. Krasnokamsk lies along the Kama River. Founded in 1929 as a settlement in connection with the development of a pulp and paper mill, it became a town in 1938 and is now a satellite of Perm city. Oil was discovered nearby in 1934, and a small

  • Krasnoperekopsk (Ukraine)

    Syvash: …the local chemical industries of Krasnoperekopsk, a city in northwestern Crimea.

  • Krasnoturinsk (Russia)

    Krasnoturinsk, town, Sverdlovsk oblast (region), western Russia. The town lies along the Turya River in the eastern foothills of the Northern Ural Mountains. Founded in 1758, it was called Turinskiye Rudniki (“Turinsky Mines”) until 1944, when it became the town of Krasnoturinsk. Now a centre of

  • Krasnoturjinsk (Russia)

    Krasnoturinsk, town, Sverdlovsk oblast (region), western Russia. The town lies along the Turya River in the eastern foothills of the Northern Ural Mountains. Founded in 1758, it was called Turinskiye Rudniki (“Turinsky Mines”) until 1944, when it became the town of Krasnoturinsk. Now a centre of

  • Krasnoturyinsk (Russia)

    Krasnoturinsk, town, Sverdlovsk oblast (region), western Russia. The town lies along the Turya River in the eastern foothills of the Northern Ural Mountains. Founded in 1758, it was called Turinskiye Rudniki (“Turinsky Mines”) until 1944, when it became the town of Krasnoturinsk. Now a centre of

  • Krasnov, Pyotr Nikolayevich (Russian officer)

    Pyotr Nikolayevich Krasnov, imperial Russian army officer and a commander of anti-Bolshevik forces during the Russian Civil War. During World War II he helped organize anti-Soviet Cossack units for the Germans and urged the creation of a Cossack state under German protection. The son of a Cossack

  • Krasnovodsk (Turkmenistan)

    Turkmenbashi, port city, western Turkmenistan. The city was renamed in 1993 by Turkmenistan’s dictator-president, Saparmurad Niyazov, who patterned the new name after his own formal title of Turkmenbashi (“Head of the Turkmen”). The city lies on the eastern shore of the Caspian Sea, at the foot of

  • Krasnoyarsk (kray, Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, kray (territory), east-central Russia. It occupies an area of Central Siberia and extends from the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago in the Arctic Ocean to the Sayan Mountains in the south. In 2007 the autonomous okruga (districts) of Evenk and Taymyr (Dolgano-Nenets) were merged with

  • Krasnoyarsk (Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, city and administrative centre of Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), south-central Siberia, Russia. The city stands on both banks of the Yenisey River where the river is crossed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. One of the earliest Russian settlements in Siberia, it was founded as the fort of

  • Krasnoyarsk Reservoir (reservoir, Russia)

    Yenisey River: Physiography: …and the long and narrow Krasnoyarsk Reservoir, contained on the east by northwestern spurs of the Eastern Sayan, begins. The reservoir stretches some 240 miles (390 km) downstream to Divnogorsk. Downstream from the reservoir and slightly above Krasnoyarsk, the river valley broadens, as does the bed. Rapids are common there,…

  • Krasnoyarskoye Reservoir (reservoir, Russia)

    Yenisey River: Physiography: …and the long and narrow Krasnoyarsk Reservoir, contained on the east by northwestern spurs of the Eastern Sayan, begins. The reservoir stretches some 240 miles (390 km) downstream to Divnogorsk. Downstream from the reservoir and slightly above Krasnoyarsk, the river valley broadens, as does the bed. Rapids are common there,…

  • Krasnoye Selo (sector, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    Krasnoye Selo, rayon (sector), St. Petersburg, northwestern Russia. The name Krasnoye Selo, meaning “beautiful village,” has been in use since 1730, when it described three settlements located southwest of St. Petersburg. Krasnoye Selo was the site of one of the summer residences for the tsars and

  • krasnozem (soil)

    Africa: Red tropical soils and laterites: The majority of tropical soils have shades of colour varying from yellow and brown to red. The reddish colour reflects the presence of iron oxides that form as a result of chemical weathering. At one time all tropical red earths…

  • Krasny Luch (Ukraine)

    Krasnyy Luch, city, eastern Ukraine, on the southern slopes of the Donets Hills. Originally established as a mining site in the 1880s, it was incorporated as a city in 1926. Krasnyy Luch historically has been an important anthracite-mining centre of the Donets Basin coalfield. The city also has

  • Krasny Yar (Russia)

    Krasnoyarsk, city and administrative centre of Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), south-central Siberia, Russia. The city stands on both banks of the Yenisey River where the river is crossed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. One of the earliest Russian settlements in Siberia, it was founded as the fort of

  • Krasnyy Luch (Ukraine)

    Krasnyy Luch, city, eastern Ukraine, on the southern slopes of the Donets Hills. Originally established as a mining site in the 1880s, it was incorporated as a city in 1926. Krasnyy Luch historically has been an important anthracite-mining centre of the Donets Basin coalfield. The city also has

  • Kraszewski, Józef Ignacy (Polish writer)

    Józef Ignacy Kraszewski, Polish novelist, poet, literary critic, dramatist, historian, and journalist who was the dominant prose writer of Poland’s Romantic period. Kraszewski attended the University of Wilno (now V. Kapsukas State University), was imprisoned in 1830 on a charge of conspiracy

  • krater (wine vessel)

    Krater, ancient Greek vessel used for diluting wine with water. It usually stood on a tripod in the dining room, where wine was mixed. Kraters were made of metal or pottery and were often painted or elaborately ornamented. In Homer’s Iliad the prize offered by Achilles for the footrace at

  • Krater, Die (German art group)

    Rudolf Bauer: …Rebay and artist Otto Nebel, Die Krater (1920). The latter was formed out of the conviction that painting should be nonrepresentational and the visual expression of the artistic experience. In 1920 Bauer’s first works appeared in America by way of artist and collector Katherine Dreier, who introduced Americans to many…

  • Kratie (Cambodia)

    Krachéh, town, northeastern Cambodia. Krachéh is located on the eastern bank of the Mekong River, at the head of Mekong navigation. It has a port and is linked to Phnom Penh, the national capital, and to neighbouring areas by a national highway. There are slate quarries near the town, and the

  • Kratochvilova, Jarmila (Czechoslovak athlete)

    athletics: The sprints: Jarmila Kratochvilova (Czechoslovakia) won a rare double victory in the women’s 400- and 800-metre events at the 1983 World Championships.

  • Kratochwila, Franz (Austrian chemist)

    history of photography: Development of the daguerreotype: That same month another Viennese, Franz Kratochwila, freely published a chemical acceleration process in which the combined vapours of chlorine and bromine increased the sensitivity of the plate by five times.

  • Kraus Trujillo, Alfredo (Spanish singer)

    Alfredo Kraus , Spanish opera singer who, throughout an incredible 40-year career, was admired as one of the century’s finest lyric tenors, notably in the bel canto repertoire, which perfectly suited his clear, warm voice, elegant stage presence, and immaculate vocal technique (b. Sept. 24, 1927,

  • Kraus, Karl (Austrian writer)

    Karl Kraus, Austrian journalist, critic, playwright, and poet who has been compared with Juvenal and Jonathan Swift for his satiric vision and command of language. In German literature he ranks as an outstanding writer of the World War I era, but, because his work is almost untranslatably

  • Kraus-Boelté, Maria (German-American educator)

    Maria Kraus-Boelté, German American educator, one of the early exponents of kindergarten, who trained many teachers for that specialization. Maria Boelté was of a prominent family and was privately educated. As a young woman she became interested in the work of Friedrich Froebel in the education of

  • Krause end bulb (anatomy)

    human sensory reception: Nerve function: …Pacinian corpuscles, Meissner’s corpuscles, and Krause end bulbs.

  • Krause, Karl Christian Friedrich (German philosopher)

    Karl Christian Friedrich Krause, German philosopher who attracted a considerable following, especially in Spain, where his disciples, known as krausistas, greatly influenced the direction of Spanish education in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Krause’s system of philosophy, which he called

  • krausen (industrial process)

    beer: Maturation and packaging: …of actively fermenting wort (called krausen) generates carbon dioxide, which is vented and purges the green beer of undesirable volatile compounds. Continued yeast activity also removes strong flavouring compounds such as diacetyl. Allowing pressure to build up in the sealed vessel then increases the level of carbonation, giving the beer…

  • Kraushaar-Pielach, Silke (German luger)

    Tatjana Hüfner: …and teammates Sylke Otto and Silke Kraushaar-Pielach swept the women’s singles bracket, with Otto taking the gold medal, Kraushaar-Pielach the silver, and Hüfner the bronze.

  • Krauss, Alison (American musician)

    Alison Krauss , American bluegrass fiddler and singer who—alone and in collaboration with her band, Union Station—performed folk, gospel, country, pop, and rock songs in the unamplified bluegrass style and played a major role in the early 21st-century revival of interest in bluegrass music. Krauss

  • Krauss, Lawrence (theoretical physicist)

    Star Trek and Our Nuclear World: …humanity possessed the tools for its own annihilation.

  • Krauss, Leo (American art dealer)

    Leo Castelli, art dealer of Hungarian and Italian descent whose promotion of American painters helped contemporary American art gain acceptance in Europe. Castelli was brought up in an affluent Jewish family in Trieste. During World War I the family moved to Vienna. After the war they moved back to

  • Krauss, Rosalind E. (American art critic and historian)

    Rosalind E. Krauss, American art critic and historian of 20th-century art who first came to prominence when she accused the art critic Clement Greenberg of mishandling the estate of sculptor David Smith. Krauss first became interested in 20th-century art criticism as an undergraduate at Wellesley

  • Krausz, Leo (American art dealer)

    Leo Castelli, art dealer of Hungarian and Italian descent whose promotion of American painters helped contemporary American art gain acceptance in Europe. Castelli was brought up in an affluent Jewish family in Trieste. During World War I the family moved to Vienna. After the war they moved back to

  • Krautrock (popular music)

    Kraftwerk: The movement, dubbed “Krautrock” by British journalists, also included innovative bands such as Can, Faust, and Neu!, but Kraftwerk became the best known.

  • Kravanh Mountains (mountains, Cambodia)

    Kravanh Mountains, range of high hills in southwestern Cambodia that is situated on a southeast-northwest axis and continues westward into the highland area around Chanthaburi, Thailand. The Kravanh Mountains extend (some discontinuously) for about 100 miles (160 km) southeast and east to the

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载