You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Kshessinska, Mathilde (Russian ballerina)

    Mathilde Kschessinska, prima ballerina assoluta of the Imperial Russian Ballet and the first Russian dancer to master 32 consecutive fouettés en tournant (“whipped turns” done in place and on one leg), a feat previously performed only by Italian dancers and considered in that era the supreme

  • Kshitigarbha (Buddhism)

    Kshitigarbha, (Sanskrit: “Womb of the Earth”) bodhisattva (“buddha-to-be”) who, though known in India as early as the 4th century ce, became immensely popular in China as Dicang and in Japan as Jizō. He is the saviour of the oppressed, the dying, and the dreamer of evil dreams, for he has vowed not

  • Ksiegi Jakobowe (historical novel by Tokarczuk)

    Olga Tokarczuk: …2015 for her historical novel Ksi?gi Jakubowe (2014; “The Books of Jacob”), which was considered her masterpiece. Told through the perspectives of different characters, the narrative chronicles the life of Jacob Frank, the 18th-century Polish sect leader who encouraged his Jewish followers to convert to Islam and Catholicism. Tokarczuk’s willingness…

  • Ksi?gi narodu polskiego i pielgrzymstwa polskiego (work by Mickiewicz)

    Adam Mickiewicz: …wrote, in biblical prose, the Ksi?gi narodu polskiego i pielgrzymstwa polskiego (“Books of the Polish Nation and Its Pilgrimage”), a moral interpretation of the history of the Polish people.

  • Ksitigarbha (Buddhism)

    Kshitigarbha, (Sanskrit: “Womb of the Earth”) bodhisattva (“buddha-to-be”) who, though known in India as early as the 4th century ce, became immensely popular in China as Dicang and in Japan as Jizō. He is the saviour of the oppressed, the dying, and the dreamer of evil dreams, for he has vowed not

  • KSLV-1 (South Korean launch vehicles)

    Korea Space Launch Vehicle-1 (KSLV-1), series of South Korean launch vehicles that were designed to launch Earth-orbiting satellites and that brought South Korea into the club of space nations. The KSLV-1 is 33 metres (108 feet) tall and 3.9 metres (12.8 feet) in diameter. It has two stages: a

  • KSM (militant)

    Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Islamist militant who, as an operational planner for al-Qaeda, masterminded some of that organization’s highest-profile terrorist operations, most notably the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in 2001. Prior to his birth, Mohammed’s parents

  • ksour (village)

    Morocco: Traditional regions: …fortified adobe villages known as ksour (Arabic: qu?ūr, “castles”). Nomadic camel herding was once an important economic activity in the Saharan zone, but government policies, desert warfare, multiyear droughts, and other extenuating factors have caused this way of life to disappear almost completely.

  • Ktesibios of Alexandria (Greek physicist and inventor)

    Ctesibius Of Alexandria, Greek physicist and inventor, the first great figure of the ancient engineering tradition of Alexandria, Egypt. Ctesibius was the son of a barber. The discovery of the elasticity of air is attributed to Ctesibius, as is the invention of several devices using compressed

  • Kto vinovat? (work by Herzen)

    Aleksandr Ivanovich Herzen: Early life.: …a novel of social criticism, Kto vinovat? (“Who Is to Blame?”), in the new “naturalistic” manner of Russian fiction.

  • KTPI (political party, Suriname)

    Suriname: Political movements: …Hervormde Partij; VHP]) and the Indonesian Peasants’ Party (now the Party of National Unity and Solidarity [Kerukunan Tulodo Pranatan Inggil; KTPI]). Universal suffrage was instituted in 1948.

  • ku (musical instrument)

    Gu, any of several sizes and shapes of Chinese drum, with a body that is usually made of wood and a head that is usually made of animal skin. Two-headed gu may be barrel-shaped, cylindrical, or hourglass-shaped. Single-headed gu, such as the bangu, may be in the shape of a deep or shallow basin.

  • Ku (chemical element)

    Rutherfordium (Rf), an artificially produced radioactive transuranium element in Group IVb of the periodic table, atomic number 104. Soviet scientists at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at Dubna, Russia, U.S.S.R., announced in 1964 the discovery of element 104, which they named

  • ku (Chinese vessel)

    Gu, type of Chinese vessel, it was a tall wine beaker with a trumpet-shaped top, a restricted centre section, and a slightly flared base; the whole silhouette was unusually taut and graceful. Decoration found on the gu includes snakes, cicadas, the taotie, or monster mask, and the gui, or

  • Ku (Polynesian deity)

    Hawaiian: …had four principal gods—Kane, Kanaloa, Ku, and Lono—and innumerable lesser gods and tutelary deities. Animals, plants, places, professions, families, and all other objects and forces had their gods or spirits. Temples of stone and idols of wood abounded, and hardly anything was undertaken without religious ceremonies. Priests and sorcerers were…

  • Ku band (frequency band)

    satellite communication: How satellites work: …frequency) L-, S-, C-, X-, Ku-, Ka-, and V-bands. Signals in the lower range (L-, S-, and C-bands) of the satellite frequency spectrum are transmitted with low power, and thus larger antennas are needed to receive these signals. Signals in the higher end (X-, Ku-, Ka-, and V-bands) of this…

  • Ku K’ai-chih (Chinese painter)

    Gu Kaizhi, one of the earliest many-faceted artists in China, he probably set new standards for figure painting. Gu Kaizhi was an eccentric courtier who is most famous as a painter of portraits and figure subjects and as a poet. Gu Kaizhi’s art is known today from both written records and paintings

  • Ku Klux Klan (hate organization, United States)

    Ku Klux Klan, either of two distinct U.S. hate organizations that employed terror in pursuit of their white supremacist agenda. One group was founded immediately after the Civil War and lasted until the 1870s. The other began in 1915 and has continued to the present. The 19th-century Klan was

  • Ku Klux Klan Acts (United States [1870–1875])

    Force Acts, in U.S. history, series of four acts passed by Republican Reconstruction supporters in the Congress between May 31, 1870, and March 1, 1875, to protect the constitutional rights guaranteed to blacks by the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. The major provisions of the acts authorized

  • Ku Sang (Korean poet)

    Ku Sang, South Korean poet (born Sept. 16, 1919, Seoul, S.Kor.—died May 11, 2004, Seoul), first gained acclaim for his book Choto-ui shi (1956; Wastelands of Fire [1998]), which examined the suffering caused by the Korean War. The two 100-poem cycles Pat ilgi and Christopher ui gang (1967 and 19

  • Ku Yen-wu (Chinese philosopher)

    Gu Yanwu, one of the most famous of the Ming dynasty loyalists, whose rationalist critiques of the useless book learning and metaphysical speculations of neo-Confucian philosophy (which had been the underpinning of the Chinese empire for almost 1,000 years) started a new trend in scholarship during

  • ku yüeh hsüan ware (Chinese pottery)

    pottery: European influence and the export trade: …be seen in the “ancient moon pavilion” (guyuexuan) wares. These will sometimes have a European subject, for example, a Watteau shepherdess, but Chinese subjects were also used.

  • Ku’ara (ancient city, Iraq)

    Asalluhe: …Sumerian deity, city god of Ku’ara, near Eridu in the southern marshland region. Asalluhe was active with the god Enki (Akkadian: Ea) in rituals of lustration (purification) magic and was considered his son. He may have originally been a god of thundershowers and would thus have corresponded to the other…

  • Ku-kung Po-wu Yüan (museum, Beijing, China)

    Palace Museum, in Beijing, museum housed in the main buildings of the former Imperial Palaces (see also Forbidden City). It exhibits valuable objects from Chinese history. The palace consists of many separate halls and courtyards. The outer buildings of the palace became a museum in 1914, although

  • ku-wen (Chinese literature)

    Han Yu: Han advocated the adoption of guwen, the free, simple prose of these early philosophers, a style unencumbered by the mannerisms and elaborate verselike regularity of the pianwen (“parallel prose”) style that was prevalent in Han’s time. His own essays (e.g., “On the Way,” “On Man,” and “On Spirits”) are among…

  • kua (shrine)

    Kuala, in Finno-Ugric religion, a small, windowless, and floorless log shrine erected by the Udmurt people for the worship of their family ancestors. The term kuala is etymologically related to similar words in other Finno-Ugric languages, such as kola (Zyryan), kota (Finnish), and koda (Estonian),

  • Kuahuqiao (archaeological site, China)

    origins of agriculture: Early history: …about the same period is Kuahuqiao, located near Hangzhou Bay. The economy at Kuahuqiao was not strictly dependent on agriculture, emphasizing instead a balance of food production, hunting, gathering, and fishing. The site was occupied for only a few centuries, then abandoned because of rising sea levels. Evidence indicates that…

  • kuala (shrine)

    Kuala, in Finno-Ugric religion, a small, windowless, and floorless log shrine erected by the Udmurt people for the worship of their family ancestors. The term kuala is etymologically related to similar words in other Finno-Ugric languages, such as kola (Zyryan), kota (Finnish), and koda (Estonian),

  • Kuala Belait (Brunei)

    Kuala Belait, town and port, western Brunei. It is the capital of Belait district, located at the mouth of the Belait River near the South China Sea, west of Seria. Kuala Belait lies at the centre of an oil field with offshore wells. The town is on the coastal road that runs eastward to Seria and

  • Kuala Kangsar (Malaysia)

    Kuala Kangsar, town, northwestern Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies along the Perak River and the main west coast road and rail network. The town was the site (1897) of the first conference of rulers of the Federated Malay States. Now a collecting centre for a rice- and rubber-growing area (the

  • Kuala Kelawang (Malaysia)

    Malaysia: Climate: …(2,540 mm); the driest location, Kuala Kelawang (in the district of Jelebu), near Kuala Lumpur, receives about 65 inches (1,650 mm) of rain per year, while the wettest, Maxwell’s Hill, northwest of Ipoh, receives some 200 inches (5,000 mm) annually. Mean annual precipitation in Sabah varies from about 80 to…

  • Kuala Lipis (Malaysia)

    Kuala Lipis, town, central Peninsular (West) Malaysia, situated along the Jelai River. It is a commercial centre for nearby villages and the riverine indigenous people who inhabit the dense jungle to the north. Some of its residents live on the slopes of the surrounding hills, while many Malay

  • Kuala Lumpur (national capital, Malaysia)

    Kuala Lumpur, capital of Malaysia. The city is located in west-central Peninsular (West) Malaysia, midway along the west coast tin and rubber belt and about 25 miles (40 km) east of its ocean port, Port Kelang, on the Strait of Malacca. It is the country’s largest urban area and its cultural,

  • Kuala Terengganu (Malaysia)

    Kuala Terengganu, city and port, northeastern Peninsular (West) Malaysia, at the mouth of the Terengganu River, on the South China Sea. A sprawling city with wooden houses set on stilts amid trees, it is a collecting centre for the agricultural products of the river’s delta. Its port is engaged in

  • Kuala Trengganu (Malaysia)

    Kuala Terengganu, city and port, northeastern Peninsular (West) Malaysia, at the mouth of the Terengganu River, on the South China Sea. A sprawling city with wooden houses set on stilts amid trees, it is a collecting centre for the agricultural products of the river’s delta. Its port is engaged in

  • Kuamachi (South American mythology)

    Native American religions: Calendrical practices: …to ascend on high when Kuamachi, the evening star, sought to avenge the death of his mother. Kuamachi and his grandfather induced Wlaha and the other stars to climb into dewaka trees to gather the ripe fruit. When Kuamachi picked the fruit, it fell and broke open. Water spilled out…

  • kuan (public official)

    Mandarin, in imperial China, a public official of any of nine grades or classes that were filled by individuals from the ranks of lesser officeholders who passed examinations in Chinese literary classics. The word comes through the Portuguese mandarim from Malay mantri, a counselor or minister of

  • kuan (musical instrument)

    Guan, double-reed Chinese wind instrument, having a cylindrical body with seven frontal finger holes and one thumb hole. The northern version is made of wood, and the southern of bamboo. The instrument’s range is about two and one-half octaves. The length of the guan varies from 7 to about 13

  • Kuan Han-ch’ing (Chinese dramatist)

    Guan Hanqing, dramatist who was considered by many critics to be the greatest playwright of the Chinese classical theatre. Guan Hanqing, probably a scholar, belonged to a writers’ guild that specialized in writing plays for performing groups. Fourteen of his plays (from more than 60 with known

  • Kuan Mountain (mountain, Taiwan)

    T'ai-tung: …over most of the area; Kuan Mountain, rising to 12,028 feet (3,666 m), is the highest peak on the northwestern border of the hsien. A hydroelectric plant, located 3 miles (5 km) northwest of T’ai-tung city on the Pei-nan River, provides electric power and irrigation facilities for the surrounding region.…

  • Kuan Ti (Chinese deity)

    Guandi, Chinese god of war whose immense popularity with the common people rests on the firm belief that his control over evil spirits is so great that even actors who play his part in dramas share his power over demons. Guandi is not only a natural favourite of soldiers but has been chosen patron

  • kuan yao (pottery)

    Guan kilns, Chinese kilns known for creating an imperial variety of stoneware during the Song dynasty (ad 960–1279). After the Song royal court moved to the south, Guan kilns produced ware from about 1127 at Hangzhou, Zhejiang province. One of the official kilns, Jiaotan, has been located by

  • Kuan-hsiu (Chinese painter)

    Guanxiu, Tang dynasty Chan (in Japanese, Zen) painter known for his paintings of lohans (arhats). The best known of the lohan paintings that are attributed to him are a series of 16 in the Tokyo National Museum. Guanxiu eventually settled in the Shu-Han capital of Chengdu. His family name of Jiang

  • kuan-hua

    Mandarin language, the most widely spoken form of Chinese. Mandarin Chinese is spoken in all of China north of the Yangtze River and in much of the rest of the country and is the native language of two-thirds of the population. Mandarin Chinese is often divided into four subgroups: Northern

  • Kuan-wu liang-shou ching (Buddhist text)

    Amitāyur-dhyāna-sūtra, (Sanskrit: “Discourse Concerning Meditation on Amitāyus”), one of three texts basic to Pure Land Buddhism. Together with the larger and smaller Sukhāvatī-vyūha-sūtras (Sanskrit: “Description of the Western Paradise Sutras”), this text envisions rebirth in the celestial Pure

  • Kuan-yin (bodhisattva)

    Avalokiteshvara, (Sanskrit: avalokita, “looking on”; ishivara, “lord”) in Buddhism, and primarily in Mahayana (“Greater Vehicle”) Buddhism, the bodhisattva (“buddha-to-be”) of infinite compassion and mercy, possibly the most popular of all figures in Buddhist legend. Avalokiteshvara is beloved

  • Kuan-yin Hall (ancient hall, China)

    Chinese architecture: The Song (960–1279), Liao (907–1125), and Jin (1115–1234) dynasties: …century is exemplified in the Guanyin Hall of the Dule Temple at Jixian, Hebei province, built in 984 in Liao territory. A two-story structure with a mezzanine that projects to an outer balcony, the hall is effectively constructed of three tiers of supporting brackets. It houses a 16-metre- (52-foot-) high,…

  • Kuang-hsi Chuang-tsu Tzu-chih-ch’ü (autonomous region, China)

    Guangxi, autonomous region located in southern China. It is bounded by the Chinese provinces of Yunnan to the west, Guizhou to the north, Hunan to the northeast, and Guangdong to the southeast; the Gulf of Tonkin (Beibu Gulf) and Vietnam border it to the south and southwest. Nanning, the capital,

  • Kuang-hsü (emperor of Qing dynasty)

    Guangxu, reign name (nianhao) of the ninth emperor (reigned 1874/75–1908) of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), during whose reign the empress dowager Cixi (1835–1908) totally dominated the government and thereby prevented the young emperor from modernizing and reforming the deteriorating imperial

  • Kuang-tung (province, China)

    Guangdong, sheng (province) of South China. It is the southernmost of the mainland provinces and constitutes the region through which South China’s trade is primarily channeled. Guangdong has one of the longest coastlines of any province, fronting the South China Sea to the southeast and south

  • Kuang-wu-ti (emperor of Han dynasty)

    Guangwudi, posthumous name (shi) of the Chinese emperor (reigned ad 25–57) who restored the Han dynasty after the usurpation of Wang Mang, a former Han minister who established the Xin dynasty (ad 9–25). The restored Han dynasty is sometimes referred to as the Dong (Eastern), or the Hou (Later),

  • Kuang-yün (Chinese dictionary)

    Chinese languages: Qin dynasty standardization: The Guangyun dictionary of 1008 had 26,194 characters (representing 3,877 different syllables in pronunciation). The Kangxi zidian, a dictionary of 1716, contains 40,545 characters, of which, however, fewer than one-fourth were in actual use at the time. The number of absolutely necessary characters has probably never…

  • Kuangchou (China)

    Guangzhou, city, capital of Guangdong sheng (province), southern China. Its city centre lies near the head of the Pearl River (Zhu Jiang) Delta, more than 90 miles (145 km) inland from the South China Sea. Because of its position at the meeting point of inland rivers and the sea, it has long been

  • Kuangren riji (work by Lu Xun)

    Chinese literature: May Fourth period: … of such stories as “Kuangren riji” (“The Diary of a Madman”), a Gogol-inspired piece about a “madman” who suspects that he alone is sane and the rest of the world is mad, and “Yao” (“Medicine”), both by Zhou Shuren. Known by the pseudonym Lu Xun, Zhou had studied in…

  • Kuantan (Malaysia)

    Kuantan, city situated on the eastern coast of the Malay Peninsula, Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies at the mouth of the Kuantan River, on the South China Sea. Situated on a wide alluvial plain north of the fertile Pahang River delta, Kuantan is Malaysia’s most important east-coast port,

  • Kuanua language

    Melanesian languages: …on Santa Isabel (Ysabel Island); Tolai, a widely used missionary language in New Britain and New Ireland; Yabêm and Graged, lingua francas of the Lutheran Mission in the Madang region of Papua New Guinea; and Mota, a widely used lingua franca and literary language of the Melanesian Mission in northern…

  • Kuanza River (river, Angola)

    Cuanza River, river in central Angola, rising about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Chitembo on the Bié Plateau at an elevation of 5,000 feet (1,500 metres). It flows northward for about 320 miles (510 km) and then curves westward to enter the Atlantic Ocean 30 miles (50 km) south of Luanda after a

  • Kuay language

    Souei language, language of northeastern Thailand, northern Cambodia, and parts of southern Laos. It belongs to the Katuic branch of the Mon-Khmer language family, itself a part of the Austroasiatic stock. Spoken by some 630,000 people, Souei is—after Vietnamese, Khmer, and Mon—one of the most

  • kub-kob (shoe)

    dress: The Middle East from the 6th century: …wore decorative wooden pattens called kub-kobs to walk about in muddy unpaved streets.

  • Kuba (historical kingdom, Africa)

    Kuba, former African kingdom in the interior of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, bounded to the southwest by the Kasai and Lulua rivers and to the north by the Sankuru River, a tributary of the Kasai. Founded about 1600 by migrants from the lower Kasai River, it was actually a federation of

  • Kuba (people)

    Kuba, a cluster of about 16 Bantu-speaking groups in southeastern Congo (Kinshasa), living between the Kasai and Sankuru rivers east of their confluence. Kuba cultivate corn (maize), cassava, millet, peanuts (groundnuts), and beans as staples. They grow raffia and oil palms, raise corn as a cash

  • Kuba (Azerbaijan)

    Quba, city in northeastern Azerbaijan. It is situated on the eastern slopes of the Greater Caucasus, on the right bank of the Kudial River. In the 18th century a khanate was founded with Quba as the capital. The khanate was occupied by Russian troops in 1806 and ceded to Russia by Iran in 1813. The

  • Kuba carpet

    Kuba carpet, floor covering from the Caucasus woven in the vicinity of Kuba (now Quba) in northern Azerbaijan. Kuba carpets of the last century and a half of several major types were woven in villages centred around the towns of Perepedil, Divichi, Konaghend, Zejwa, Karagashli, and Kusary. They are

  • Kubaba (Anatolian deity)

    Kubaba, goddess of the ancient Syrian city of Carchemish. In religious texts of the Hittite empire (c. 1400–c. 1190 bc), she played a minor part and appeared mainly in a context of Hurrian deities and rituals. After the downfall of the empire her cult spread westward and northward, and she became

  • Kubachi ware (Persian pottery)

    pottery: Later Persian: …16th century are known as Kubachi wares because large numbers of them survived above ground in this town in the Caucasus. They have a very soft body, a brilliant crackled glaze, and rhythmical and spontaneous designs. The later Kubachi blue-and-white is closer to the Chinese originals.

  • Kuban culture (prehistoric Asian culture)

    history of Transcaucasia: …3rd millennium bc by the Kuban culture, which left its remains in many thousands of burial mounds, or kurgans, on the steppes of Ciscaucasia. This Kuban culture, which lasted through the Late Bronze Age into Early Iron Age times, was undoubtedly stimulated by contact with the higher civilization of Mesopotamia.…

  • Kuban Plain (plain, Russia)

    Russia: The Russian Plain: The large Kuban and Kuma plains of the North Caucasus are separated by the Stavropol Upland at elevations of 1,000 to 2,000 feet (300 to 600 metres).

  • Kuban River (river, Russia)

    Kuban River, river in southwestern Russia, 563 miles (906 km) in length and draining 23,600 square miles (61,000 square km). It rises from glaciers on Mount Elbrus in the Greater Caucasus and flows north through narrow gorges, with many rapids, to the Stavropol Upland, where it turns westward in a

  • Kubango River (river, Africa)

    Okavango River, fourth longest river system in southern Africa, running basically southeastward for 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from central Angola, where it is known as the Kubango, to the Kalahari (desert) in northern Botswana, where the river terminates in an immense inland delta known as the

  • Kubano-Priazovskaya Plain (plain, Russia)

    Russia: The Russian Plain: The large Kuban and Kuma plains of the North Caucasus are separated by the Stavropol Upland at elevations of 1,000 to 2,000 feet (300 to 600 metres).

  • Kubasov, Valery (Russian cosmonaut)

    Valery Kubasov, Russian cosmonaut who performed the first welding experiments in space. Upon graduating from the Moscow Aviation Institute in 1958, Kubasov worked for the design bureau of Soviet spacecraft designer Sergey Korolyov and was the author of studies on spaceship trajectories. In 1966 he

  • Kubasov, Valery Nikolayevich (Russian cosmonaut)

    Valery Kubasov, Russian cosmonaut who performed the first welding experiments in space. Upon graduating from the Moscow Aviation Institute in 1958, Kubasov worked for the design bureau of Soviet spacecraft designer Sergey Korolyov and was the author of studies on spaceship trajectories. In 1966 he

  • Kubelík, Jeronym Rafael (Swiss conductor)

    Rafael Kubelík, Bohemian-born Swiss conductor, musical director, and composer, who was noted for his frequent guest appearances with major orchestras throughout the world. He was a son of the violinist Jan Kubelík and studied composition and conducting at the Prague Conservatory. He conducted the

  • Kubelík, Rafael (Swiss conductor)

    Rafael Kubelík, Bohemian-born Swiss conductor, musical director, and composer, who was noted for his frequent guest appearances with major orchestras throughout the world. He was a son of the violinist Jan Kubelík and studied composition and conducting at the Prague Conservatory. He conducted the

  • Kubelsky, Benjamin (American comedian)

    Jack Benny, entertainer whose unusual comedic method and expert timing made him a legendary success in U.S. radio and television for more than 30 years. Benny Kubelsky was reared in Waukegan, Illinois, a small city north of Chicago, where his father operated a saloon and later a dry goods store. As

  • Kubera (Buddhist and Hindu mythology)

    Kubera, in Hindu mythology, the king of the yakshas (nature spirits) and the god of wealth. He is associated with the earth, mountains, all treasures such as minerals and jewels that lie underground, and riches in general. According to most accounts, he first lived in Lanka (Sri Lanka), but his

  • Kubert, Joe (American comic book artist and graphic novelist)

    Joe Kubert, (Yosaif Kubert), American comic book artist and graphic novelist (born Sept. 18, 1926, Ozeryany, Pol. [now in Ukraine]—died Aug. 12, 2012, Morristown, N.J.), was widely regarded as a legend in the field and became best known for his work on war comics, as well as for his interpretations

  • Kubert, Yosaif (American comic book artist and graphic novelist)

    Joe Kubert, (Yosaif Kubert), American comic book artist and graphic novelist (born Sept. 18, 1926, Ozeryany, Pol. [now in Ukraine]—died Aug. 12, 2012, Morristown, N.J.), was widely regarded as a legend in the field and became best known for his work on war comics, as well as for his interpretations

  • Kubi (stream, Tibet, China)

    Brahmaputra River: Physiography: …that arise there are the Kubi, the Angsi, and the Chemayungdung. From its source the river runs for nearly 700 miles (1,100 km) in a generally easterly direction between the Great Himalayas range to the south and the Kailas Range to the north. Throughout its upper course the river is…

  • Kubin, Alfred (Austrian artist)

    Alfred Kubin, Austrian graphic artist known for his drawings and paintings of dreamlike, often morbid, subjects. In 1898 Kubin went to Munich, Bavaria, in the German Empire (now Germany), to study art. As a student, he discovered the works that would become his major influences: the fantastic and

  • Kubinec, Mark (American computer engineer)

    quantum computer: …Institute of Technology (MIT), and Mark Kubinec of the University of California at Berkeley created the first quantum computer (2-qubit) that could be loaded with data and output a solution. Although their system was coherent for only a few nanoseconds and trivial from the perspective of solving meaningful problems, it…

  • Kubitschek de Oliveira, Juscelino (president of Brazil)

    Juscelino Kubitschek, president of Brazil (1956–61) noted for his ambitious public works, especially the construction of the new capital, Brasília. Kubitschek attended the Diamantina Seminary, worked his way through medical school at the University of Minas Gerais (graduated 1927), and did

  • Kubitschek, Juscelino (president of Brazil)

    Juscelino Kubitschek, president of Brazil (1956–61) noted for his ambitious public works, especially the construction of the new capital, Brasília. Kubitschek attended the Diamantina Seminary, worked his way through medical school at the University of Minas Gerais (graduated 1927), and did

  • Kubla Khan (emperor of Yuan dynasty)

    Kublai Khan, Mongolian general and statesman, who was the grandson and greatest successor of Genghis Khan. As the fifth emperor (reigned 1260–94) of the Yuan, or Mongol, dynasty (1206–1368), he completed the conquest of China (1279) started by Genghis Khan in 1211 and thus became the first Yuan

  • Kubla Khan (poem by Coleridge)

    Kubla Khan, poetic fragment by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, published in 1816. According to Coleridge, he composed the 54-line work while under the influence of laudanum, a form of opium. Coleridge believed that several hundred lines of the poem had come to him in a dream, but he was able to remember

  • Kubla Khan; or, a Vision in a Dream (poem by Coleridge)

    Kubla Khan, poetic fragment by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, published in 1816. According to Coleridge, he composed the 54-line work while under the influence of laudanum, a form of opium. Coleridge believed that several hundred lines of the poem had come to him in a dream, but he was able to remember

  • Kublai Khan (emperor of Yuan dynasty)

    Kublai Khan, Mongolian general and statesman, who was the grandson and greatest successor of Genghis Khan. As the fifth emperor (reigned 1260–94) of the Yuan, or Mongol, dynasty (1206–1368), he completed the conquest of China (1279) started by Genghis Khan in 1211 and thus became the first Yuan

  • Kübler-Ross, Elisabeth (American psychologist)

    Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, Swiss-born American psychiatrist and author (born July 8, 1926, Zürich, Switz.—died Aug. 24, 2004, Scottsdale, Ariz.), was a pioneer in the study of death and dying whose work helped revolutionize the care of the terminally ill and helped change attitudes toward pain c

  • Kubna (ancient city, Lebanon)

    Byblos, ancient seaport, the site of which is located on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, about 20 miles (30 km) north of the modern city of Beirut, Lebanon. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited towns in the world. The name Byblos is Greek; papyrus received its early Greek name

  • Kubo and the Two Strings (film by Knight [2016])

    Ralph Fiennes: …The Prince of Egypt (1998), Kubo and the Two Strings (2016), The LEGO Batman Movie (2017), and The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part (2019). He also appeared in numerous other theatrical productions.

  • Kubovy, Aryeh Leon (Israeli lawyer and diplomat)

    Aryeh Leon Kubovy, Israeli lawyer, diplomat, and Zionist. He was a founder (1936) and general secretary (1945–48) of the World Jewish Congress. After settling in Israel (1948), Kubovy served that country in diplomatic posts in Czechoslovakia, Poland, and several South American countries. He was

  • Kubowitzki, Aryeh Leon (Israeli lawyer and diplomat)

    Aryeh Leon Kubovy, Israeli lawyer, diplomat, and Zionist. He was a founder (1936) and general secretary (1945–48) of the World Jewish Congress. After settling in Israel (1948), Kubovy served that country in diplomatic posts in Czechoslovakia, Poland, and several South American countries. He was

  • Kubrat (Bulgar khan)

    Bulgaria: Arrival of the Bulgars: …century, but in 635 Khan Kubrat led a successful revolt and organized an independent tribal confederation known as Great Bulgaria. After Kubrat’s death in 642, the Bulgars were attacked by the Khazars and dispersed. According to Byzantine sources, the Bulgars split into five groups, each under one of Kubrat’s sons.…

  • Kubrāwiyyah (Sufi order)

    al-Hamadānī: …for the propagation of the Kubrāwīyah order of Sufis (Islamic mystics) in Kashmir.

  • Kubrick, Christiane (German actress)

    Paths of Glory: Christiane Harlan, credited as Susanne Christian, played a German captive forced to serenade French soldiers in the film’s moving conclusion; she married Kubrick after the production.

  • Kubrick, Stanley (American director)

    Stanley Kubrick, American motion-picture director and writer whose films are characterized by his dramatic visual style, meticulous attention to detail, and a detached, often ironic or pessimistic perspective. An expatriate, Kubrick was nearly as well known for his reclusive lifestyle in the

  • Kubu (people)

    Kubu, indigenous seminomadic forest dwellers found primarily in swampy areas near watercourses in southeastern Sumatra, Indonesia. Late 20th-century population estimates indicated some 10,000 individuals of Kubu ancestry. Contact of the Kubu with their neighbours had traditionally been primarily

  • Ku?an, Milan (president of Slovenia)

    Slovenia: The communist era: …free, multiparty elections in which Milan Ku?an, a former communist official, was elected president, and in December a referendum calling for a sovereign, independent Slovenia was endorsed by more than 90 percent of the voters. The Belgrade government—by then dominated by Serbia’s nationalist strongman, Slobodan Milo?evi?, and by the Serb-led…

  • Kuch Bihar (India)

    Koch Bihar, town, eastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies just east of the Torsa River. The town is an agricultural market centre, has major road and rail connections, and is linked by air with Kolkata (Calcutta). Leather-goods manufacture is an important industry. Koch Bihar

  • Kucha (China)

    Kucha, oasis town, northwestern Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, China. It lies at the foot of the southern slope of the Tien Shan (“Celestial Mountains”) on the northern rim of the Tarim Basin. The oasis is watered by the Kucha (Kuqa) and Muzart rivers, which during rainy spells flow into the

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载