You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • lag screw (machine component)

    simple machine: The screw: Lag screws are large wood screws used to fasten heavy objects to wood. Heads are either square or hexagonal.

  • Lagaan (film by Gowariker [2001])

    A.R. Rahman: …followed, including the music for Lagaan (2001), the first Bollywood film nominated for an Academy Award. Rahman’s albums sold more than 100 million copies.

  • Lagadeuc, Jean (French lexicographer)

    Celtic literature: The three major periods of Breton literature: …there appeared the Catholicon of Jean Lagadeuc, a Breton–Latin–French dictionary printed in 1499, and Quiquer de Roscoff’s French–Breton dictionary and conversations (printed 1616).

  • Lagan, River (river, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    River Lagan, river, eastern Northern Ireland, rising on the western slopes of Slieve Croob and flowing for 45 miles (73 km) through the city of Belfast into Belfast Lough. The Lower Lagan Valley is one of the most intensively industrialized and urbanized regions of Northern

  • Lagar Velho (anthropological and archaeological site, Portugal)

    Lagar Velho, site near Leiria, central Portugal, where the buried skeleton of a four-year-old child, dating to 25,000 years ago, was found. The unusual remains, which combine features of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) and modern humans (H. sapiens), have led paleoanthropologists to speculate

  • Lagarde, Christine (French lawyer and politician)

    Christine Lagarde, French lawyer and politician who was the first woman to serve as France’s finance minister (2007–11), as the managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF; 2011–19), and as president of the European Central Bank (2019– ). Lagarde was educated in the United States and

  • Lagarde, Paul Anton de (German political scientist)

    Thomas Mann: World War I and political crisis: …German nationalistic and antidemocratic thinkers Paul Anton de Lagarde and Houston Stewart Chamberlain, the apostle of the superiority of the “Germanic” race, toward National Socialism; and Mann later was to repudiate these ideas.

  • Lagardère, Jean-Luc (French entrepreneur)

    Jean-Luc Lagardère, French entrepreneur (born Feb. 10, 1928, Aubiet, France—died March 14, 2003, Paris, France), created one of France’s largest industrial empires and was instrumental in the creation of the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Co. (EADS), the trans-European aerospace behemoth a

  • Lagarostrobos franklinii (tree)

    Huon pine, (Lagarostrobos franklinii), gray-barked conifer of the family Podocarpaceae. It is found along Tasmanian river systems at altitudes of 150 to 600 metres (500–2,000 feet). The tree is straight-trunked, pyramidal, 21 to 30 metres (70 to 100 feet) tall, and 0.7 to 1 metre (2 to 3 feet) in

  • Lagash (ancient city, Iraq)

    Lagash, one of the most important capital cities in ancient Sumer, located midway between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in southeastern Iraq. The ancient name of the mound of Telloh was actually Girsu, while Lagash originally denoted a site southeast of Girsu, later becoming the name of the whole

  • Lagasse, Emeril (American chef)

    Emeril Lagasse, American celebrity chef, author, and television personality who by the early 21st century was one of the most recognizable chefs in the United States, known as much for his cooking as for his energetic personality and catchphrases. As a child, Lagasse was fascinated with food. By

  • Lagatūrmān (Shāhi emperor)

    Shāhi Family: …line until the last king, Lagatūrmān, who reigned at the end of the 9th century and who was thrown in prison by his minister, a Brahman named Kallar. Kallar then usurped the throne and founded a new dynasty, the Hindu Shāhi, which ruled the area at the time of Ma?mūd’s…

  • Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England, Die (work by Engels)

    Marxism: The contributions of Engels: …arbeitenden Klassen in England (The Condition of the Working Class in England), published in 1845 in Leipzig. This work was an analysis of the evolution of industrial capitalism and its social consequences. He collaborated with Marx in the writing of The Holy Family, The German Ideology, and The Communist…

  • L?gen (river, southeastern Norway)

    L?gen, river, southeastern Norway. Rising in the Hardanger Plateau, the L?gen flows generally east and north, then southeast through Numedalen, a valley in Buskerud fylke (county), past R?dberg and Kongsberg, through Vestfold fylke and into the Skagerrak (an arm of the North Sea) at Larvik. With a

  • L?gen (river, south-central Norway)

    L?gen, river, south-central Norway. The name L?gen is applied to the portion of the river in Oppland fylke (county); it rises in small lakes and streams in the Dovre Plateau at the northern end of Gudbrands Valley and flows southeast for 122 miles (199 km) through Gudbrands Valley to Lake Mj?sa at

  • Lagenaria siceraria

    Bottle gourd, (Lagenaria siceraria), running or climbing vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), native to tropical Africa but cultivated in warm climates around the world for its ornamental and useful hard-shelled fruits. The young fruits are edible and are usually cooked as a vegetable. The

  • Lagenismatales (chromist order)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Lagenismatales Found in marine environments, parasitic; filamentous; example genus is Lagenisma. Order Rozellopsidales Found in marine environments, parasitic on euglena, some are biotrophic with other Oomycota or algae; may have naked thalli; example genera include Pseudosphaerita and Rozellopsis.

  • Lageos

    geoid: The contribution of orbiting satellites: …geodetic purposes was Lageos (Laser Geodynamic Satellite), launched by the United States on May 4, 1976, into a nearly circular orbit at a height of approximately 6,000 kilometres. It consisted of an aluminum sphere 60 centimetres (23.6 inches) in diameter that carried 426 reflectors suitable for reflecting laser beams…

  • lager beer (alcoholic beverage)

    Lager beer, light-coloured, highly carbonated type of

  • Lagercrantz, David (Swedish author)

    Stieg Larsson: …was penned by Swedish author David Lagercrantz, who had been selected by Larsson’s father and brother. Gabrielsson publicly objected, claiming that Larsson would not have wanted another writer to continue the series. Det som inte d?dar oss (2015; “What Doesn’t Kill You”; Eng. trans. The Girl in the Spider’s Web)…

  • Lagerfeld, Karl (German fashion designer and photographer)

    Karl Lagerfeld, German fashion designer and photographer best known as the creative power behind the modern revival of Chanel, the legendary French fashion house founded by Coco Chanel in the early 20th century. Lagerfeld moved to Paris in 1952. In 1954 he won first prize for his coat design in the

  • Lagerfeld, Karl Otto (German fashion designer and photographer)

    Karl Lagerfeld, German fashion designer and photographer best known as the creative power behind the modern revival of Chanel, the legendary French fashion house founded by Coco Chanel in the early 20th century. Lagerfeld moved to Paris in 1952. In 1954 he won first prize for his coat design in the

  • Lagerkvist, P?r (Swedish author)

    P?r Lagerkvist, novelist, poet, dramatist, and one of the major Swedish literary figures of the first half of the 20th century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1951. Lagerkvist was reared in a traditional religious manner in a small town. The influence of his early years remained

  • Lagerkvist, P?r Fabian (Swedish author)

    P?r Lagerkvist, novelist, poet, dramatist, and one of the major Swedish literary figures of the first half of the 20th century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1951. Lagerkvist was reared in a traditional religious manner in a small town. The influence of his early years remained

  • Lagerl?f, Petrus (Swedish author)

    Sweden: The arts: …early 20th century, novelist Selma Lagerl?f became the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize. A favourite poet in Sweden is Harry Martinson, who, writing in the 1930s, cultivated themes and motifs ranging from the romantic Swedish countryside to those concerned with global and cosmic visions. Other poets such…

  • Lagerl?f, Selma (Swedish author)

    Selma Lagerl?f, novelist who in 1909 became the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. An illness left her lame for a time, but otherwise her childhood was happy. She was taught at home, then trained in Stockholm as a teacher, and in 1885 went to

  • Lagerl?f, Selma Ottiliana Lovisa (Swedish author)

    Selma Lagerl?f, novelist who in 1909 became the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. An illness left her lame for a time, but otherwise her childhood was happy. She was taught at home, then trained in Stockholm as a teacher, and in 1885 went to

  • Lagerstroemia indica (plant)

    Crape myrtle, Shrub (Lagerstroemia indica) of the loosestrife family, native to China and other tropical and subtropical countries and widely grown in warm regions for its flowers. About 25 varieties are cultivated, known primarily by the color of their clustered flowers, which range from white to

  • Lages (Brazil)

    Lajes, city, east-central Santa Catarina estado (state), southern Brazil, lying north of the Caveiras River in the Paraná Mountains, at 3,000 feet (900 metres) above sea level. Formed as a municipality in 1800, it was settled chiefly by Germans and in 1866 was elevated to city status. Livestock

  • lagging indicator (economics)

    economic indicator: …direction after the economy does (“lagging indicator”). Many types of sales are examples of coincident indicators because they peak or bottom out as the economy does. Lagging indicators are useless for prediction; the value of construction completed, for example, is outdated, for the main economic effects of the construction occurred…

  • Laghamon (English poet)

    Lawamon, early Middle English poet, author of the romance-chronicle the Brut (c. 1200), one of the most notable English poems of the 12th century. It is the first work in English to treat of the “matter of Britain”—i.e., the legends surrounding Arthur and the knights of the Round Table—and was

  • Laghouat (Algeria)

    Laghouat, town and oasis, north-central Algeria. It is located where the northern fringe of the Sahara meets the southern edge of the Saharan Atlas Mountains, on the route linking Algiers with central Africa. The oasis (625 acres [253 hectares]) was probably settled in the 11th century after the

  • Lagidium (rodent)

    viscacha: The three species of mountain viscachas (genus Lagidium) live in the Andes Mountains from central Peru southward to Chile and Argentina, usually at altitudes between 4,000 and 5,000 metres (13,000 and 16,000 feet). They have very long ears and resemble long-tailed rabbits. Mountain viscachas weigh up to 3 kg…

  • Lago de Chapala (lake, Mexico)

    Lake Chapala, lake, west-central Mexico. It lies on the Mexican Plateau at 6,000 feet (1,800 metres) above sea level in the states of Jalisco and Michoacán. Chapala is Mexico’s largest lake, measuring approximately 48 miles (77 km) east-west by 10 miles (16 km) north-south and covering an area of

  • Lago de Cuitzeo (lake, Mexico)

    Lake Cuitzeo, lake located in Michoacán state, south-central Mexico. It is on the Mesa Central at 5,974 feet (1,821 metres) above sea level and is about 31 miles (50 km) long. The lake level rises and falls depending upon rainfall, but it generally covers an area of approximately 160 square miles

  • Lago de Ilopango (lake, El Salvador)

    Lake Ilopango, lake, south central El Salvador, on the borders of San Salvador, La Paz, and Cuscatlán departments. Occupying the crater of an extinct volcano, at an altitude of 1,450 ft (442 m), it has an area of 40 sq mi (100 sq km). In 1880 the water level rose, a natural channel (Río Jiboa) was

  • Lago de Izabal (lake, Guatemala)

    Lake Izabal, lake in northeastern Guatemala. The country’s largest lake, Izabal occupies part of the lowlands between the Santa Cruz Mountains to the northwest and the Minas and San Isidro mountains to the southwest and southeast. It is fed by the Polochic River and is drained by the Dulce River

  • Lago de Managua (lake, Nicaragua)

    Lake Managua, lake in western Nicaragua, in a rift valley at an elevation of 128 feet (39 m) above sea level. The lake, 65 feet (20 m) in depth, is 36 miles (58 km) from east to west and 16 miles (25 km) from north to south; its area is 400 square miles (1,035 square km). Also known by its Indian

  • Lago de Maracaibo (inlet, Caribbean Sea)

    Lake Maracaibo, large inlet of the Caribbean Sea, lying in the Maracaibo Basin of northwestern Venezuela. Some sources consider the water body to be the largest natural lake in South America, covering an area of about 5,130 square miles (13,280 square km), extending southward for 130 miles (210 km)

  • Lago de Texcoco (lake, Mexico)

    Lake Texcoco, lake in central Mexico. Originally one of the five lakes contained in Anáhuac, or the Valley of Mexico, Texcoco has been drained via channels and a tunnel to the Pánuco River since the early 17th century, until it now occupies only a small area surrounded by salt marshes 2 12 mi (4

  • Lago de Valencia (lake, Venezuela)

    Lake Valencia, lake in Carabobo and Aragua estados (states), central Venezuela. Lying in a basin in the Cordillera de la Costa (Maritime Andes) of the central highlands at an elevation of 1,362 ft (415 m) above sea level, Lake Valencia measures approximately 18 mi (29 km) from east to west and 10

  • Lago de Yojoa (lake, Honduras)

    Lake Yojoa, lake in northwestern Honduras. The nation’s largest inland lake, Yojoa has an area of 110 square miles (285 square km). It is volcanic in origin and nestles at an elevation of 2,133 feet (650 m) amid forested mountains. The region is a popular tourist resort, with fishing and duck

  • Lago del Fusaro (lagoon, Italy)

    Lake of Fusaro, coastal lagoon in Napoli provincia, Campania regione, southern Italy, west of Naples. The lagoon is separated from the sea on the west by sand dunes. As the ancient Palus Acherusia (“Acherusian Swamp”), it may have been the harbour of nearby Cumae in antiquity. In the first century

  • Lago Gatún (lake, Panama)

    Gatun Lake, long artificial lake in Panama, constituting part of the Panama Canal system; its area is 166 square miles (430 square km). It was formed by damming the Chagres River and its smaller affluents at Gatun at the north end of the lake. Its dam (completed 1912) and spillway, a key structure

  • Lago Lauricocha (lake, Peru)

    Lake Lauricocha, northernmost of a chain of glacier-fed lakes in the Andes Mountains, central Peru, about 100 miles (160 km) north-northeast of Lima. It lies at an elevation of 12,615 feet (3,845 m). The Mara?ón River, the main stream of the Amazon River, issues from the lake; hence, it was once

  • Lago Llanquihue (lake, Chile)

    Lake Llanquihue, lake in southern Chile. The largest and, with neighbouring Todos los Santos, the best known of Chilean lakes, Llanquihue has an area of about 330 square miles (860 square km) and is 22 miles (35 km) long and 25 miles (40 km) wide with depths of 5,000 feet (1,500 m). Its western

  • Lago Petén Itzá (lake, Guatemala)

    Lake Petén Itzá, lake, northern Guatemala, 160 miles (260 km) northeast of Guatemala City. A depression in the low limestone plateau at an elevation of 262 feet (80 metres) above sea level, it measures about 22 miles (35 km) from east to west and 10 miles (16 km) from north to south and is 165 feet

  • Lago Poopó (lake, Bolivia)

    Lake Poopó, lake in west-central Bolivia, occupying a shallow depression in the Altiplano, or high plateau, at 12,090 feet (3,686 metres) above sea level. Historically the country’s second largest lake, it covered 977 square miles (2,530 square km) at low stage and was about 56 miles (90 km) long

  • Lago Titicaca (lake, South America)

    Lake Titicaca, the world’s highest lake navigable to large vessels, lying at 12,500 feet (3,810 metres) above sea level in the Andes Mountains of South America, astride the border between Peru to the west and Bolivia to the east. Titicaca is the second largest lake of South America (after

  • Lagoa dos Patos (lagoon, Brazil)

    Patos Lagoon, shallow lagoon in Rio Grande do Sul estado (state), extreme southeastern Brazil. It is the largest lagoon in Brazil and the second largest in South America. The lagoon is 180 miles (290 km) long and up to 40 miles (64 km) wide, with an area of more than 3,900 square miles (10,100

  • Lagoa Santa (work by Warming)

    Johannes Eugenius Bülow Warming: His famous work, Lagoa Santa . . . (1892; “Lagoa Santa, a Contribution to Biological Phytogeography”), together with his other books, provided a thorough survey of the vegetation of temperate, tropical, and arctic zones. This work prepared him for his most significant contribution to plant ecology, Plantesamfund (1895;…

  • Lagodon rhomboides (fish)

    Pinfish, either of two species of fishes in the family Sparidae (order Perciformes). The name pinfish refers specifically to Lagodon rhomboides; Diplodus holbrooki is called spottail pinfish. The name is derived from the presence of numerous spines on the front portion of the dorsal fin. The

  • lagomorph (mammal)

    Lagomorph, (order Lagomorpha), any member of the mammalian order made up of the relatively well-known rabbits and hares (family Leporidae) and also the less frequently encountered pikas (family Ochotonidae). Rabbits and hares characteristically have long ears, a short tail, and strong hind limbs

  • Lagomorpha (mammal)

    Lagomorph, (order Lagomorpha), any member of the mammalian order made up of the relatively well-known rabbits and hares (family Leporidae) and also the less frequently encountered pikas (family Ochotonidae). Rabbits and hares characteristically have long ears, a short tail, and strong hind limbs

  • Lagona (California, United States)

    Laguna Beach, city, Orange county, southwestern California, U.S. Lying along the Pacific Ocean, Laguna Beach is about 50 miles (80 km) south of Los Angeles. Part of the Mexican land grant (1837) called Rancho San Joaquin, it was named Lagona, a corruption of the Spanish word meaning “lagoon,” for

  • Lagonas (California, United States)

    Laguna Beach, city, Orange county, southwestern California, U.S. Lying along the Pacific Ocean, Laguna Beach is about 50 miles (80 km) south of Los Angeles. Part of the Mexican land grant (1837) called Rancho San Joaquin, it was named Lagona, a corruption of the Spanish word meaning “lagoon,” for

  • Lagonosticta (bird)

    Fire finch, any of several red-and-brown or red-and-black birds of Africa that usually have fine white dots on their undersides. Fire finches belong to the family Estrildidae (order Passeriformes). Perhaps the commonest and tamest bird in Africa is the 8-centimetre (3-inch) red-billed, or Senegal,

  • lagoon (sanitation engineering)

    wastewater treatment: Oxidation pond: Oxidation ponds, also called lagoons or stabilization ponds, are large, shallow ponds designed to treat wastewater through the interaction of sunlight, bacteria, and algae. Algae grow using energy from the sun and carbon dioxide and inorganic compounds released by bacteria in water. During…

  • lagoon (geography)

    Lagoon, area of relatively shallow, quiet water situated in a coastal environment and having access to the sea but separated from the open marine conditions by a barrier. The barrier may be either a sandy or shingly wave-built feature (such as a sandbar or a barrier island), or it may be a coral

  • lagoon (waste storage)

    hazardous-waste management: Surface storage and land disposal: …or holding pond, called a lagoon. New lagoons must be lined with impervious clay soils and flexible membrane liners in order to protect groundwater. Leachate collection systems must be installed between the liners, and groundwater monitoring wells are required. Except for some sedimentation, evaporation of volatile organics, and possibly some…

  • Lagoon dos Patos (lagoon, Brazil)

    Patos Lagoon, shallow lagoon in Rio Grande do Sul estado (state), extreme southeastern Brazil. It is the largest lagoon in Brazil and the second largest in South America. The lagoon is 180 miles (290 km) long and up to 40 miles (64 km) wide, with an area of more than 3,900 square miles (10,100

  • Lagoon Nebula (astronomy)

    Lagoon Nebula, (catalog numbers NGC 6523 and M8), ionized-hydrogen region located in the constellation Sagittarius at 1,250 parsecs (4,080 light-years) from the solar system. The nebula is a cloud of interstellar gas and dust approximately 10 parsecs (33 light-years) in diameter. A group of young,

  • Lagoon, The (short stories by Frame)

    Janet Frame: …a patient, Frame’s first book, The Lagoon, was published. A collection of short stories, it expresses the sense of isolation and insecurity of those who feel they do not fit into a normal world. She was scheduled to have a lobotomy until hospital officials learned that she had won a…

  • Lagopus (bird)

    Ptarmigan, any of three or four species of partridgelike grouse of cold regions, belonging to the genus Lagopus of the grouse family, Tetraonidae. They undergo seasonal changes of plumage, from white against winter snowfields to gray or brown, with barring, in spring and summer against tundra

  • Lagopus lagopus (bird)

    ptarmigan: Also distributed circumpolarly is the willow ptarmigan, or willow grouse (L. lagopus), a more northerly bird of lowlands. On Rocky Mountain tundra south to New Mexico is the white-tailed ptarmigan.

  • Lagopus leucurus (bird)

    ptarmigan: …to New Mexico is the white-tailed ptarmigan.

  • Lagopus mutus (bird)

    ptarmigan: The common ptarmigan (L. mutus) ranges in the British Isles, Europe, and North America, where it is called rock ptarmigan. Also distributed circumpolarly is the willow ptarmigan, or willow grouse (L. lagopus), a more northerly bird of lowlands. On Rocky Mountain tundra south to New Mexico…

  • Lagorchestes (marsupial)

    wallaby: …species of hare wallabies (Lagorchestes) are small animals that have the movements and some of the habits of hares. Often called pademelons, the three species of scrub wallabies (Thylogale) of New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and Tasmania are small and stocky, with short hind limbs and pointy noses. They…

  • Lagos (state, Nigeria)

    Lagos, state, southwestern Nigeria, on the coast of the Bight of Benin. It is bounded by the state of Ogun to the north and east, by the Bight of Benin to the south, and by the Republic of Benin to the west. From 1914 to 1954 the area included in the state was administered by the British as part of

  • Lagos (Nigeria)

    Lagos, city and chief port, Lagos state, Nigeria. Until 1975 it was the capital of Lagos state, and until December 1991 it was the federal capital of Nigeria. Ikeja replaced Lagos as the state capital, and Abuja replaced Lagos as the federal capital. Lagos, however, remained the unofficial seat of

  • Lagos ebony (wood)

    ebony: …and hard heartwood known as black ebony, as billetwood, or as Gabon, Lagos, Calabar, or Niger ebony.

  • Lagos Island (island, Nigeria)

    Lagos: …city’s population is centred on Lagos Island, in Lagos Lagoon, on the Bight of Benin in the Gulf of Guinea. Lagos is Nigeria’s largest city and one of the largest in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Lagos spinach (plant)

    Celosia: Lagos spinach, or silver cockscomb (C. argentea), is an important food crop in West Africa, where it is grown for its nutritious leafy greens.

  • Lagos, Ricardo (president of Chile)

    Ricardo Lagos, Chilean economist and politician who served as president of Chile (2000–06). Lagos earned a law degree from the University of Chile in 1960 and then attended Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, U.S., where he received a Ph.D. in economics in 1966. Lagos returned to Chile and

  • Lagos, University of (university, Lagos, Nigeria)

    Nigeria: Education: …University) in the north; and University of Lagos (1962) in the south. In the 1970s and ’80s the government attempted to found a university in every state, but, with the ever-increasing number of states, this practice was abandoned. Numerous federal and state universities have since been established, especially during the…

  • Lagostomus maximus (rodent)

    viscacha: The plains viscacha (Lagostomus maximus) lives on sparse grasslands, or Pampas, in Argentina, Paraguay, and southeastern Bolivia at altitudes up to nearly 3,000 metres. It resembles a huge guinea pig, with a large, blunt head, a body length of 47 to 66 cm, and a short…

  • Lagosuchus (fossil reptile genus)

    dinosaur: Dinosaur ancestors: …South America; these include Lagerpeton, Lagosuchus, Pseudolagosuchus, and Lewisuchus. Other forms, such as Nyasasaurus and Asilisaurus, date from the Middle Triassic of East Africa; Nyasasaurus is considered by some to be the oldest known member of Dinosauria. Other South American forms such as Eoraptor and Herrerasaurus are particularly dinosaurian in

  • Lagothrix (mammal)

    Woolly monkey, any of five species of densely furred South American primates found in rainforests of the western Amazon River basin. Woolly monkeys average 40–60 cm (16–24 inches) in length, excluding the thick and somewhat longer prehensile tail. Females weigh 7 kg (15.5 pounds) on average, males

  • Lagothrix lagotricha (primate)

    woolly monkey: The common, or Humboldt’s, woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha and related species) have short fur that, depending on the species, is tan, gray, reddish, or black; some have darker heads. The head itself is large and round, with a bare black or brown face. Their bodies are…

  • Lagovirus (virus genus)

    calicivirus: Caliciviridae contains four genera: Lagovirus, Vesivirus, Sapovirus, and Norovirus (Norwalk-like viruses). Type species of this family include Vesicular exanthema of swine virus, Norwalk virus, and Sapporo virus. Species of Norovirus frequently give rise to outbreaks of foodborne and waterborne

  • LaGrange (Georgia, United States)

    LaGrange, city, seat (1828) of Troup county, western Georgia, U.S. It lies just east of West Point Lake (impounded on the Chattahoochee River), about 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. The site was settled in 1826, and the town soon developed as an important trading centre in a cotton-growing

  • Lagrange planetary equations (astronomy)

    celestial mechanics: Perturbations of elliptical motion: …equations are sometimes called the Lagrange planetary equations after their derivation by the great Italian-French mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1736–1813). As long as the forces are conservative and do not depend on the velocities—i.e., there is no loss of mechanical energy through such processes as friction—they can be derived from partial…

  • Lagrange’s equations (mathematics)

    mechanics: Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations: Elegant and powerful methods have also been devised for solving dynamic problems with constraints. One of the best known is called Lagrange’s equations. The Lagrangian L is defined as L = T ? V, where T is the kinetic energy and…

  • Lagrange’s four-square theorem (mathematics)

    Lagrange’s four-square theorem, in number theory, theorem that every positive integer can be expressed as the sum of the squares of four integers. For example, 23 = 12 + 22 + 32 + 32. The four-square theorem was first proposed by the Greek mathematician Diophantus of Alexandria in his treatise

  • Lagrange’s theorem (mathematics)

    Lagrange’s four-square theorem, in number theory, theorem that every positive integer can be expressed as the sum of the squares of four integers. For example, 23 = 12 + 22 + 32 + 32. The four-square theorem was first proposed by the Greek mathematician Diophantus of Alexandria in his treatise

  • Lagrange’s theorem on finite groups (mathematics)

    optics: Magnification: the optical invariant: This theorem has been named after the French scientist Joseph-Louis Lagrange, although it is sometimes called the Smith-Helmholtz theorem, after Robert Smith, an English scientist, and Hermann Helmholtz, a German scientist; the product (hnu) is often known as the optical invariant. As it is easy to…

  • Lagrange, Joseph-Louis, comte de l’Empire (French mathematician)

    Joseph-Louis Lagrange, comte de l’Empire, Italian French mathematician who made great contributions to number theory and to analytic and celestial mechanics. His most important book, Mécanique analytique (1788; “Analytic Mechanics”), was the basis for all later work in this field. Lagrange was from

  • Lagrange, Marie-Joseph (French theologian)

    Marie-Joseph Lagrange, French theologian and outstanding Roman Catholic biblical scholar. Lagrange became a Dominican in 1879 and was ordained in 1883. After teaching church history at Toulouse (1884–88), he studied Oriental languages at the University of Vienna before his order sent him to

  • Lagrangia, Giuseppe Luigi (French mathematician)

    Joseph-Louis Lagrange, comte de l’Empire, Italian French mathematician who made great contributions to number theory and to analytic and celestial mechanics. His most important book, Mécanique analytique (1788; “Analytic Mechanics”), was the basis for all later work in this field. Lagrange was from

  • Lagrangian (physics)

    Lagrangian function, quantity that characterizes the state of a physical system. In mechanics, the Lagrangian function is just the kinetic energy (energy of motion) minus the potential energy (energy of position). One may think of a physical system, changing as time goes on from one state or

  • Lagrangian equilibrium point (astronomy)

    Lagrangian point, in astronomy, a point in space at which a small body, under the gravitational influence of two large ones, will remain approximately at rest relative to them. The existence of such points was deduced by the French mathematician and astronomer Joseph-Louis Lagrange in 1772. In 1906

  • Lagrangian function (physics)

    Lagrangian function, quantity that characterizes the state of a physical system. In mechanics, the Lagrangian function is just the kinetic energy (energy of motion) minus the potential energy (energy of position). One may think of a physical system, changing as time goes on from one state or

  • Lagrangian point (astronomy)

    Lagrangian point, in astronomy, a point in space at which a small body, under the gravitational influence of two large ones, will remain approximately at rest relative to them. The existence of such points was deduced by the French mathematician and astronomer Joseph-Louis Lagrange in 1772. In 1906

  • lágrimas de Angélica, Las (work by Barahona de Soto)

    Luis Barahona de Soto: …Angelica”), more commonly known as Las lágrimas de Angélica (“The Tears of Angelica”), a continuation of the Angelica and Medoro episode in Ludovico Ariosto’s Orlando furioso.

  • lagting (Scandinavian political assembly)

    Thing, in medieval Scandinavia, the local, provincial, and, in Iceland, national assemblies of freemen that formed the fundamental unit of government and law. Meeting at fixed intervals, the things, in which democratic practices were influenced by male heads of households, legislated at all

  • Lagting (Norwegian government)

    Norway: Constitutional framework: …were chosen to constitute the Lagting, or upper house, while the remaining members constituted the Odelsting, or lower house. Bills had to be passed by both houses in succession. In 2009 the Lagting was dissolved, and the Storting became permanently unicameral.

  • Lagu, Joseph (Sudanese rebel leader)

    Sudan: The Addis Ababa Agreement: …commands, were united under General Joseph Lagu, who combined under his authority both the fighting units of the Anya Nya and its political wing, the Southern Sudan Liberation Movement (SSLM). Thereafter throughout 1971 the SSLM, representing General Lagu, maintained a dialogue with the Sudanese government over proposals for regional autonomy…

  • Laguerre polynomial (mathematics)

    special function: …polynomials, the Jacobi polynomials, the Laguerre polynomials, the Whittaker functions, and the parabolic cylinder functions. As with the Bessel functions, one can study their infinite series, recursion formulas, generating functions, asymptotic series, integral representations, and other properties. Attempts have been made to unify this rich topic, but not one has…

  • Laguerre, Andre (journalist and editor)

    Sports Illustrated: After 1960, when Andre Laguerre took over as managing editor, Sports Illustrated focused on premier sporting events, allowing people to read more about what they had seen on television or read about in newspapers. Laguerre was thus able to gain millions of new readers and generate billions of…

  • Laguna (people)

    Ancestral Pueblo culture: Acoma, and Laguna. As farmers, Ancestral Pueblo peoples and their nomadic neighbours were often mutually hostile; this is the source of the term Anasazi, a Navajo word meaning “ancestors of the enemy,” which once served as the customary scientific name for this group.

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载