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  • Lower Dunstan (New Zealand)

    Alexandra, town, south-central South Island, New Zealand. It lies at the junction of the Clutha and Manuherikia rivers and is surrounded by three mountain ranges. Originally known as Lower Dunstan and Manuherikia, the settlement was named Alexandra South in 1863 to commemorate the marriage of the

  • Lower Ecca Series (geology)

    Africa: The Paleozoic Era: …divided into three groups: the Lower Ecca (containing almost 1,000 feet [300 metres] of shales), the Middle Ecca (some 1,650 feet [500 metres] of sandstone, seams of coal, and fossilized plants), and the Upper Ecca (about 650 feet [200 metres] of shales again).

  • Lower Egypt (geographical division, Egypt)

    Lower Egypt, geographic and cultural division of Egypt consisting primarily of the triangular Nile River delta region and bounded generally by the 30th parallel north in the south and by the Mediterranean Sea in the north. Characterized by broad expanses of fertile soil, Lower Egypt contrasts

  • Lower Engadin (region, Switzerland)

    Engadin: …Zernez Gorge) into Upper and Lower Engadin.

  • lower esophageal sphincter (anatomy)

    esophagus: …or lower, end is the lower esophageal sphincter.

  • Lower Formative Period (South American prehistory)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The Initial Period: The next epoch, called the Initial Period by the American scholar John H. Rowe, and the Lower Formative by the Peruvian archaeologist Luis G. Lumbreras, began with the introduction of pottery. The earliest ceramics have yielded radiocarbon dates of about 1800 bc, although…

  • Lower Ganga Canal (canal system, India)

    Ganges River: Irrigation: The Lower Ganga Canal, extending 5,120 miles (8,240 km) with its branches, begins at Naraura. The Sarda Canal irrigates land near Ayodhya, in Uttar Pradesh.

  • Lower Germany (Roman province, Europe)

    Battle of the Teutoburg Forest: Context: …regions which the Romans called Germania Inferior and Germania Superior, respectively. In 12 bce Drusus took the army of Germania Superior on an expedition to crush the Sicambri, Frisii, and Chauci tribes to the north. He was able to force the tribes to surrender before year’s end, and some sources…

  • Lower Guinea (physical region, Guinea)

    Guinea: Relief: Lower Guinea includes the coast and coastal plain. The coast has undergone recent marine submergence and is marked by rias, or drowned river valleys, that form inlets and tidal estuaries. Numerous offshore islands are remnants of former hills.

  • Lower Harz (region, Germany)

    Harz: The Unterharz has a milder climate, which supports grain agriculture and cattle herding; its forests are made up predominantly of beech, oak, and walnut. Among the wild-game animals, bear, lynx, and wolf have been hunted to extinction; deer, fox, wildcat, and badger remain, however. The Harz…

  • Lower Himalayas (mountains, Asia)

    Lesser Himalayas, middle section of the vast Himalayas mountain system in south-central Asia. The Lesser Himalayas extend for some 1,550 miles (2,500 km) northwest-southeast across the northern limit of the Indian subcontinent. Areas include the disputed Kashmir region (Gilgit-Baltistan,

  • Lower Huronian (geology)

    Bruce Series, division of Precambrian rocks in North America that is well-developed northeast of the Lake Huron region (the Precambrian began about 3.8 billion years ago and ended 540 million years ago). The Bruce Series is the lowermost of the three major divisions of the Huronian System; it

  • Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    Lower Hutt, city, southern North Island, New Zealand. It is located about 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Wellington. Lower Hutt is the major business centre for the highly urbanized Hutt River valley and is within the Wellington urban area. Its heavy-industrial facilities include auto-assembly plants

  • Lower Iraq (ancient region, Middle East)

    Iraq: Iraq from 1055 to 1534: …the area around Baghdad; and Lower Iraq, whose major centres were the towns of Al-?illah, Wā?it, and Basra. Upper Iraq had strong political ties to the provinces of Diyār Bakr and Diyār Rabī?ah in eastern Anatolia (now part of Turkey) and northern Syria as well as with Azerbaijan; Middle and…

  • lower jaw (anatomy)

    crustacean: Appendages: …the antennae can help the mandibles push food into the mouth. The mandibles of a nauplius have two branches with a chewing or compressing lobe at the base; they also may be used for swimming. In the adult the mandible loses one of the branches, sometimes retaining the other as…

  • Lower Lake (lake, Killarney, Ireland)

    Killarney: …lakes are Lough Leane (Lower Lake), Muckross (Middle) Lake, and Upper Lake. Lower Lake is the northernmost and, covering about 5,000 acres (2,023 hectares), is the largest of the Killarney lakes. Lower Lake’s 30 islands include Innisfallen, with a 9th-century abbey. Lower Lake is separated from Muckross Lake by…

  • lower limit of detection (measurement)

    chromatography: Detector characteristics: The first is the lower limit of detection, the smallest amount of solute measured in terms of moles (mass-sensitive detectors) or moles per litre (concentration-sensitive detectors) that can be detected; this entails distinguishing a signal from the random noise inherent in all electronic systems. A second is the sensitivity,…

  • Lower Lorraine (historical region, France)

    Lorraine: History: …Upper Lorraine and the northern Lower Lorraine, with their boundary running from a point on the Rhine north of Andernach westward and southwestward to a point on the Meuse north of Mézières. Lower Lorraine thus included most of the historic Netherlands belonging to the German kingdom between the Rhine, middle…

  • Lower Lough Erne (lake, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Lough Erne: …miles (19 km) long, and Lower Lough Erne, 18 miles (29 km) long, linked by a 10-mile (16-kilometre) strait that is part of the River Erne. The lakes lie in an almost level carboniferous limestone plateau. Although formed by the solution of limestone, their basins are blanketed with heavy boulder…

  • Lower Lusatia (historical region, Germany)

    Lusatia: …1815 it was partitioned, with Lower (i.e., southern) Lusatia being transferred to Prussia and Upper (northern) Lusatia remaining under the rule of Saxony. Lower Lusatia was subjected to an intensive Germanization campaign by Prussia, and its western section was completely Germanized and the number of Sorbian speakers greatly reduced. The…

  • lower mantle (Earth science)

    Earth: The interior: …(1,800 miles), consists of the lower mantle, which is composed chiefly of magnesium- and iron-bearing silicates, including the high-pressure equivalents of olivine and pyroxene.

  • Lower Marine Riser Package cap (geology)

    Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Leaking oil: …to an apparatus called the Lower Marine Riser Package (LMRP) cap. With the damaged riser shorn from the LMRP—the top segment of the BOP—the cap was lowered into place. Though fitted loosely over the BOP and allowing some oil to escape, the cap enabled BP to siphon approximately 15,000 barrels…

  • Lower Mekong Basin (region, southeast Asia)

    Mekong River: Physical features: The lower Mekong, below the point where it forms the border between Myanmar and Laos, is a stream 1,485 miles (2,390 km) in length draining the Khorat Plateau of northeastern Thailand, the western slopes of the Annamese Cordillera in Laos and Vietnam, and most of Cambodia,…

  • lower middle class (sociology)

    history of Europe: Modifications in social structure: A lower middle class, composed of salaried personnel who could boast a certain level of education—indeed, whose jobs depended on literacy—and who worked in conditions different from manufacturing labourers, added an important ingredient to European society and politics. Though their material conditions differed little from those…

  • Lower Midwest (region, United States)

    United States: The Midwest: …readily discerned, the Upper and Lower Midwest. They are separated by a line, roughly approximating the 41st parallel, that persists as far west as Colorado in terms of speech patterns and indicates differences in regional provenance in ethnic and religious terms as well. Much of the Upper Midwest retains a…

  • lower motor neuron disease (pathology)

    muscle disease: Lower motor neuron disease: Degeneration of the lower neuron produces a flaccid muscle weakness. Muscle wasting is a prominent feature because the shrinkage and eventual death of neurons lead to denervation of the muscle. Diseases of the motor neurons lying in the spinal cord are…

  • lower Niger bronze industry (African arts)

    African art: Edo peoples: …been tentatively classified as the lower-Niger bronze industries. They include pieces from Tada and Jebba in the region now inhabited by the Nupe people, who regard them as relics associated with their own mythical ancestor, and other pieces from various parts of the delta of the Niger River.

  • Lower Nubia (region and ancient settlement, Nubia)

    Nubia: …of Aswān; this was called Wawat.

  • Lower Paleolithic Period (anthropology)

    Paleolithic Period: Paleolithic toolmaking: At sites dating from the Lower Paleolithic Period (2,580,000 to 200,000 years ago), simple pebble tools have been found in association with the remains of what may have been some of the earliest human ancestors. A somewhat more-sophisticated Lower Paleolithic tradition known as the Chopper chopping-tool industry is widely distributed…

  • Lower Peninsula (peninsula, Michigan, United States)

    Michigan: … and Michigan, and the mitten-shaped Lower Peninsula reaches northward from Indiana and Ohio. Indeed, for most Michigan residents, an upturned right hand serves as a ready-made map for roughly locating towns, routes, regions, parks, or any other feature of the Lower Peninsula. The two landmasses have been connected since 1957…

  • lower predicate calculus

    formal logic: The lower predicate calculus: A predicate calculus in which the only variables that occur in quantifiers are individual variables is known as a lower (or first-order) predicate calculus. Various lower predicate calculi have been constructed. In the most straightforward of these, to which the most…

  • lower predicate calculus with identity (logic)

    formal logic: Special systems of LPC: LPC-with-identity. The word “is” is not always used in the same way. In a proposition such as (1) “Socrates is snub-nosed,” the expression preceding the “is” names an individual and the expression following it stands for a property attributed to that individual. But, in a…

  • Lower Rhine (stream, Switzerland)

    Rhine River: Physiography: …to be joined by the Hinterrhein from the south at Reichenau above Chur. (The Hinterrhein rises about five miles west of San Bernardino Pass, near the Swiss–Italian border, and is joined by the Albula River below Thusis.) Below Chur, the Rhine leaves the Alps to form the boundary first between…

  • Lower Rhine River (river, Europe)

    Rhine River, river and waterway of western Europe, culturally and historically one of the great rivers of the continent and among the most important arteries of industrial transport in the world. It flows from two small headways in the Alps of east-central Switzerland north and west to the North

  • Lower Saxony (state, Germany)

    Lower Saxony, Land (state) of Germany. The country’s second largest state in size, Lower Saxony occupies an important band of territory across the northwestern part of the country. It is bordered by the North Sea and the German states of Schleswig-Holstein and Hamburg to the north and by the states

  • Lower Silesia (Poland)

    Wroc?aw, city, capital of Dolno?l?skie województwo (province), southwestern Poland. It lies along the Oder River at its confluence with the O?awa, ?l?za, Bystrzyca, and Widawa rivers. A large industrial centre situated in Dolny ?l?sk (Lower Silesia), Wroc?aw is the fourth largest city in Poland.

  • Lower Silurian Series (geochronology)

    Silurian Period: Ordovician-Silurian boundary: …with increasing deglaciation during the early Silurian, accounts for widespread stratigraphic unconformities at the Ordovician-Silurian boundary that usually omit the P. acuminatus biozone. In earliest Silurian time the Dob’s Linn locality was situated environmentally in marine waters deep enough to remain unaffected by these changes.

  • Lower Sonoran Zone (region, New Mexico, United States)

    New Mexico: Plant and animal life: The Lower Sonoran Zone, in the southern sections of the Rio Grande and Pecos valleys and in the state’s southwestern corner, usually occurs at elevations below 4,500 feet (1,400 metres). It includes nearly 20,000 square miles (52,000 square km) of New Mexico’s best grazing area and…

  • Lower Sorbian language

    Slavic languages: Sorbian: …used around Bautzen (Budy?in), and Lower Sorbian, used around Cottbus.

  • Lower South (region, United States)

    United States: The South: …(or Deep) South, Upland and Lowland South, or Yeoman and Plantation South.

  • Lower Southampton (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lower Southampton, township, Bucks county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., just northeast of Philadelphia. Many of the early settlers were English Quakers, who became known as the Friends of Southampton. The area was called Southampton township as early as 1685, but the township was not officially

  • Lower Tatras (mountain range, Slovakia)

    Carpathian Mountains: Physiography: …Spi? basins, run the parallel Lower Tatras, similar in geologic structure but lower (?umbier Peak, 6,703 feet) and with a less conspicuous glacial relief. Along the boundary line between the Outer and the Central Western Carpathians extends a narrow strip of klippen (limestone) rocks, which, north of the Tatras, has…

  • Lower Tauern (mountains, Austria)

    Niedere Tauern, range of the Eastern Alps in central Austria; lying between the Enns and Mur rivers, it extends 75 miles (120 km) westward to the headstreams of the two rivers. The scenic, well-forested mountains rise to their highest elevation at Hochgolling (9,393 feet [2,863 m]), and a road

  • Lower Tunguska River (river, Russia)

    Nizhnyaya Tunguska River, river in western Siberia that is a right-bank tributary of the Yenisey River, flowing through Irkutsk oblast (province) and Krasnoyarsk kray (region) of Russia. Its length is 1,857 miles (2,989 km), and the area of its basin is 187,900 square miles (471,300 square km). The

  • lower vascular plant (botany)

    Lower vascular plant, any of the spore-bearing vascular plants, including the ferns, club mosses, spike mosses, quillworts, horsetails, and whisk ferns. Once considered of the same evolutionary line, these plants were formerly placed in the single group Pteridophyta and were known as the ferns and

  • Lower Yangtze variant (Mandarin dialect)

    China: Sino-Tibetan: The third is the southern variant, also known as the Nanjing or Lower Yangtze variant, which is spoken in northern Jiangsu and in southern and central Anhui. Some authorities also recognize a fourth variant, Northwestern, which is used in most of northwestern China. Related to Mandarin are the Hunan,…

  • Lower Zlichov Event (mass extinction)

    Devonian extinctions: The Lower Zlichov Event, which occurred at the beginning of the Emsian Stage about 407.6 million years ago, is associated with the extinction of the graptoloids (a type of graptolite) and the appearance of the coiled cephalopod goniatites. Three events are very significant extinction episodes: the…

  • Lower, Arthur Reginald Marsden (Canadian historian)

    Arthur Reginald Marsden Lower, Canadian historian known for his promotion of Canadian national identity. Lower was educated at the University of Toronto and at Harvard University, where he earned a Ph.D. in 1929. He served as professor at United College, University of Manitoba (1929–46), and as

  • Lower, Richard (English physician)

    pharmaceutical industry: Improvement in drug administration: …middle of the 17th century, Richard Lower and Christopher Wren, working at the University of Oxford, demonstrated that drugs could be injected into the bloodstream of dogs using a hollow quill. In 1853 the French surgeon Charles Gabriel Pravaz invented the hollow hypodermic needle, which was first used in the…

  • lower-order central place (geography)

    central-place theory: Lower-order central places have small market areas and provide goods and services that are purchased more frequently than higher-order goods and services. Higher-order places are more widely distributed and fewer in number than lower-order places.

  • lowercase letter (calligraphy)

    Minuscule, in calligraphy, lowercase letters in most alphabets, in contrast to majuscule (uppercase or capital) letters. Minuscule letters cannot be fully contained between two real or imaginary parallel lines, since they have ascending stems (ascenders) on the letters b, d, f, h, k, and l, and

  • Lowering the voting age to 18 years (United States Constitution)

    Twenty-sixth Amendment, amendment (1971) to the Constitution of the United States that extended voting rights (suffrage) to citizens aged 18 years or older. Traditionally, the voting age in most states was 21, though in the 1950s Pres. Dwight D. Eisenhower signaled his support for lowering it.

  • Lowes, John Livingston (American scholar)

    John Livingston Lowes, American scholar of English literature and persuasive teacher, known for his scholarly method in tracing authors’ sources and his allusive style of speaking and writing. Lowes received his A.B. degree from Washington and Jefferson College (Washington, Pa.) in 1888 and taught

  • lowest unfilled molecular orbital

    chemical bonding: Organometallic compounds: However, the lowest unfilled molecular orbital, the LUMO, has π symmetry and can accept electrons from an appropriate d orbital of the metal, and thus it can help the ligand to act as a Lewis acid. It is this ability of the ligand to act as both…

  • Lowestoft (England, United Kingdom)

    Lowestoft, town, Waveney district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, eastern England. It originated as a Danish settlement on Lowestoft Ness, the most easterly point in the United Kingdom. From 1757 until 1802 Lowestoft china, a soft-paste porcelain, was manufactured in the town. The

  • Lowestoft porcelain

    Lowestoft porcelain, English phosphatic soft-paste ware, resembling Bow porcelain, produced in Lowestoft, Suffolk, from 1757 to 1802; the wares are of a domestic kind, such as pots, teapots, and jugs. Generally on a small scale and light in weight, they are decorated in white and blue or in a

  • Lowestoft, Battle of (European history [1665])

    Battle of Lowestoft, (13 June 1665). Early in the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the Dutch navy suffered a bloody defeat in a savage battle fought off Lowestoft, eastern England. Yet this catastrophe only stirred the Dutch to greater efforts in the war, and the English failed to draw any lasting advantage

  • Lowie, Robert H. (American anthropologist)

    Robert H. Lowie, Austrian-born American anthropologist whose extensive studies of North American Plains Indians include exemplary research on the Crow. He also influenced anthropological theory through such works as Culture and Ethnology (1917), Primitive Society (1920), and Social Organization

  • Lowie, Robert Harry (American anthropologist)

    Robert H. Lowie, Austrian-born American anthropologist whose extensive studies of North American Plains Indians include exemplary research on the Crow. He also influenced anthropological theory through such works as Culture and Ethnology (1917), Primitive Society (1920), and Social Organization

  • Lowin, John (English actor)

    John Lowin, English actor, a colleague of William Shakespeare. Lowin was the son of a carpenter. He worked as a goldsmith’s apprentice for eight years and then joined the Earl of Worcester’s Men as an actor in 1602. By 1603 he was a member of the King’s Men. He is known to have specialized in the

  • Lowine, John (English actor)

    John Lowin, English actor, a colleague of William Shakespeare. Lowin was the son of a carpenter. He worked as a goldsmith’s apprentice for eight years and then joined the Earl of Worcester’s Men as an actor in 1602. By 1603 he was a member of the King’s Men. He is known to have specialized in the

  • lowland bongo (mammal)

    bongo: The lowland bongo (T. eurycerus eurycerus) inhabits lowland rainforests from western Africa and the Congo basin to southwestern Sudan. The lowland bongo’s habitat could be more accurately described as a forest-savanna mosaic, as it depends on openings where sunlight penetrates to the forest floor. Two herds…

  • Lowland Chontal

    Tequistlatecan languages: Huamelultec (also called Lowland Chontal) is spoken today by fewer than 100 elderly persons in San Pedro Huamelula and Santiago Astata near the coast in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. Tequistlatec (Tequistlatec proper) was formerly spoken in Tequisistlán, Oaxaca, but now has no speakers. Highland…

  • Lowland East Cushitic languages

    Cushitic languages: …Burji, Sidamo, Kambata, and Hadiyya; Lowland East Cushitic, including Dasenech, Arbore, Saho-Afar, and Oromo and its close relatives such as Konso; and the Omo-Tana group, with languages such as Somali, Rendille, and Boni.

  • lowland gorilla (mammal)

    Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden: …for the most births of lowland gorillas in captivity; other species, including Komodo dragons, Asian elephants, and black rhinoceroses, have also been bred successfully at the zoo. Other outstanding exhibits include those featuring the white Bengal tiger and many species of insects. The zoo’s Center for Research of Endangered Wildlife…

  • Lowland Scots (language)

    Scots language, the historic language of the people of Lowland Scotland, and one closely related to English. The word Lallans, which was originated by the Scottish poet Robert Burns, is usually used for a literary variety of the language, especially that used by the writers of the mid-20th-century

  • Lowland South (region, United States)

    United States: The South: …(or Deep) South, Upland and Lowland South, or Yeoman and Plantation South.

  • lowland tapir (mammal)

    tapir: kabomani), and the South American lowland tapir (T. terrestris). This geographic distribution, with four species in Central and South America and one in Southeast Asia, is peculiar. Fossil remains from Europe, China, and North America show that tapirs were once widespread, but the extinction of intermediate forms has isolated the…

  • Lowland, The (novel by Lahiri)

    Jhumpa Lahiri: Her novel The Lowland (2013) chronicles the divergent paths of two Bengali brothers. The tale was nominated for both the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Award and earned Lahiri the 2015 DSC Prize for South Asian Literature, a prize established in 2010 by infrastructure developers…

  • Lowlands (region, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lowlands, cultural and historical region of Scotland, comprising the portion of the country southeast of a line drawn from Dumbarton to Stonehaven; northwest of the line are the Highlands. Traditionally, the Lowlands were distinguished by the use of the Scots language (considered a dialect or close

  • Lown, Bernard (American physician)

    International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War: …physicians under the leadership of Bernard Lown and Yevgeny I. Chazov, respectively. The organization promotes research on the medical, psychological, and biospheric effects that a nuclear war would have. At the time that it was awarded the prize, the group had more than 135,000 members in 41 countries, with about…

  • Lowndes County (county, Alabama, United States)
  • Lowndes County Freedom Organization (political party, United States)
  • Lowndes, Marie Adelaide (British novelist)

    Marie Adelaide Lowndes, English novelist and playwright best known for murder mysteries that were often based on actual murder cases. The sister of the poet and essayist Hilaire Belloc, she received little formal education, but, because of the prominence of her family in intellectual circles, she

  • Lowndes, Mrs. Belloc (British novelist)

    Marie Adelaide Lowndes, English novelist and playwright best known for murder mysteries that were often based on actual murder cases. The sister of the poet and essayist Hilaire Belloc, she received little formal education, but, because of the prominence of her family in intellectual circles, she

  • Lowry, Clarence Malcolm (British novelist)

    Malcolm Lowry, English novelist, short-story writer, and poet whose masterwork was Under the Volcano (1947; reissued 1962). It was begun in 1936 and is redolent of that period, when the world itself seemed to be lurching toward self-destruction. Lowry was the son of a prosperous cotton broker who

  • Lowry, Kyle (American basketball player)

    Toronto Raptors: …Toronto, led by All-Star guards Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, won 56 games and advanced to the Eastern Conference finals for the first time in team history, where the Raptors were eliminated by the Cleveland Cavaliers. The Raptors earned a franchise-record fourth straight playoff appearance in 2016–17 but were swept…

  • Lowry, L. S. (British painter)

    L.S. Lowry, English painter noted for his industrial landscapes that express the bleakness and loneliness of modern urban life. Lowry studied intermittently at art schools in Manchester and Salford, England, from 1905 to 1925. He painted in his free time while working at a Manchester real-estate

  • Lowry, Laurence Stephen (British painter)

    L.S. Lowry, English painter noted for his industrial landscapes that express the bleakness and loneliness of modern urban life. Lowry studied intermittently at art schools in Manchester and Salford, England, from 1905 to 1925. He painted in his free time while working at a Manchester real-estate

  • Lowry, Lois (American author)

    Veronica Roth: …of the works of writer Lois Lowry, especially of Lowry’s The Giver (1993), often cited as the original young-adult dystopian novel. When Roth reached high school, she became a practicing Christian. Her path to religion was a theme that she often referenced in her novels. Prior to graduating (2010) from…

  • Lowry, Malcolm (British novelist)

    Malcolm Lowry, English novelist, short-story writer, and poet whose masterwork was Under the Volcano (1947; reissued 1962). It was begun in 1936 and is redolent of that period, when the world itself seemed to be lurching toward self-destruction. Lowry was the son of a prosperous cotton broker who

  • Lowry, Thomas Martin (English chemist)

    Br?nsted–Lowry theory: …Br?nsted and the English chemist Thomas Martin Lowry, stating that any compound that can transfer a proton to any other compound is an acid, and the compound that accepts the proton is a base. A proton is a nuclear particle with a unit positive electrical charge; it is represented by…

  • Lowth, Robert (English bishop)

    Robert Lowth, Church of England bishop of London (appointed 1777) and literary scholar. During his Oxford professorship (1741–50) he was noted for his analyses and commentaries on Hebrew poetry, later published as De sacra poesi Hebraeorum (1753; Eng. trans., Lectures on Hebrew Poetry, 1787). As

  • Lowveld (region, Africa)

    veld: Physiography: The Lowveld is the name given to two areas that lie at an elevation of between 500 and 2,000 feet (150 and 600 metres) above sea level. One area is in the South African provinces of Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal and parts of Swaziland, and the other…

  • Lowy, Mina (British poet)

    Mina Loy, modernist poet whose strongly feminist work portrayed unflinchingly the intimate aspects of female sexuality and emotional life. Loy began studying art in 1897 at St. John’s Wood School in London. In 1899 she left England to study painting in Munich, Germany, returned to London in 1901,

  • Lowyn, John (English actor)

    John Lowin, English actor, a colleague of William Shakespeare. Lowin was the son of a carpenter. He worked as a goldsmith’s apprentice for eight years and then joined the Earl of Worcester’s Men as an actor in 1602. By 1603 he was a member of the King’s Men. He is known to have specialized in the

  • LOX (explosive)

    explosive: Liquid oxygen explosives: In 1895 the German Carl von Linde introduced carbon black packed in porous bags and dipped in liquid oxygen. This, which was a Sprengel-type explosive, came to be known as LOX. Because of the shortage of nitrates, LOX was widely used in…

  • Loxia (bird genus)

    Crossbill, (genus Loxia), any of several species of birds of the finch family, Fringillidae (order Passeriformes), known for their crossed mandibles. The crossed bill tips are inserted between the scales of cones so that the tongue can lift the seed out. Because conifers produce seed unpredictably,

  • Loxia curvirostra (bird)

    crossbill: …eight different varieties of the red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) may actually be different species. Each has a slightly different call note, a variant of the hard “kip-kip” given in flight. There are also differences in diet and bill size, with different forms feeding on specific conifers; for example, the larger-billed…

  • Loxia leucoptera (bird)

    crossbill: The spruce-loving white-winged crossbill (L. leucoptera) occurs throughout the colder regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It wanders widely, but when it finds a good crop of cones, it may nest there, even in midwinter. An isolated variety of the species lives in the pine forests of Hispaniola.…

  • Loxioides bailleui (bird)

    conservation: Secondary extinctions: …a seed-eating species called the palila (Loxioides bailleui), is endangered because it depends almost exclusively on the seeds of one tree, the mamane (Sophora chrysophylla), which is grazed by introduced goats and sheep.

  • Loxocemus bicolor (snake)

    python: The only New World python (Loxocemus bicolor) is classified as the sole member of the family Loxocemidae. It is an egg layer found in forests from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. Usually less than 1 metre (3.3 feet) long, it is reported to reach nearly 1.5 metres…

  • Loxodonta africana (mammal)

    proboscidean: …related to one another than African elephants (genus Loxodonta) are to either. Molecular studies have corroborated the morphological studies that have long suggested this. A 2010 study using mitochondrial DNA suggests that African elephants diverged from the Asian elephant-mammoth line between 4.2 million and 9 million years ago and then…

  • Loxodonta cyclotis (mammal)

    elephant: The African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), which lives in rainforests, was recognized as a separate species in 2000 and is smaller than the savanna elephant. It has slender, downward-pointing tusks. The common belief that there existed “pygmy” and “water” elephants has no basis; they are probably…

  • loxodrome (cartography)

    Loxodrome, curve cutting the meridians of a sphere at a constant nonright angle. Thus, it may be seen as the path of a ship sailing always oblique to the meridian and directed always to the same point of the compass. Pedro Nunes, who first conceived the curve (1550), mistakenly believed it to be

  • Loxomataceae (plant family)

    Loxsomataceae, small family of primitive ferns (order Cyatheales) comprising two monotypic genera. Loxsoma cunninghamii grows only in northern New Zealand, whereas Loxsomopsis pearcei occurs along the Andean mountain range from Bolivia northward to Costa Rica. The family is considered to have a

  • Loxommatoidea (amphibian superfamily)

    amphibian: Annotated classification: ?Order Microsauria (microsaurs) Lower Pennsylvanian to Middle Permian. Lepospondylous vertebrae, i.e., spool-shaped bony cylinder around the notochord. ?Subclass Temnospondyli (temnospondyls) Upper Mississippian to Middle Cretaceous. Vertebral centrum of large intercentrum and pair of small

  • Loxonema (fossil genus of gastropods)

    Loxonema, genus of extinct gastropods (snails) found as fossils in rocks of Ordovician to Early Carboniferous age (488 million to 318 million years ago). Loxonema has a distinctive high-spired, slender shell with fine axial ornamentational lines. A distinct lip is present at the base of the

  • Loxops virens (bird)

    Amakihi, (Loxops virens), perhaps the most common native songbird in Hawaii, a member of the Hawaiian honeycreeper family, Drepanididae (order Passeriformes). It is 12 cm (5 inches) long, with yellow body, black eye-mark, and rather short, slightly curved bill. It feeds on insects and small fruits

  • Loxorhynchus (crab genus)

    spider crab: …spider crabs include the genera Loxorhynchus, Pugettia, and Epialtus.

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