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  • Lubich, Chiara (Italian Roman Catholic lay leader)

    Chiara Lubich, (Silvia Lubich), Italian Roman Catholic lay leader (born Jan. 22, 1920, Trento, Italy—died March 14, 2008, near Rome, Italy), founded (1943) the Focolare Movement, a lay organization dedicated to peace, spiritual renewal, and ecumenical dialogue. Lubich, who trained as a teacher,

  • Lubich, Silvia (Italian Roman Catholic lay leader)

    Chiara Lubich, (Silvia Lubich), Italian Roman Catholic lay leader (born Jan. 22, 1920, Trento, Italy—died March 14, 2008, near Rome, Italy), founded (1943) the Focolare Movement, a lay organization dedicated to peace, spiritual renewal, and ecumenical dialogue. Lubich, who trained as a teacher,

  • Lubilash River (river, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Sankuru River, main tributary of the Kasai River (itself a tributary of the Congo River) in Congo (Kinshasa), central Africa. About 750 miles (1,200 km) long, it begins in the western highlands of Katanga (Shaba), where it is known as the Lubilash River, and flows 285 miles (460 km) north and

  • Lubin (China)

    Manzhouli, city in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, China. It is situated on the border opposite the Russian town of Zabaykalsk and lies 100 miles (160 km) west of Hailar and 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Lake Hulun. Manzhouli was long a small Mongolian settlement in the Hulun Buir League. It

  • Lubin, Barbara Joan (American author)

    Barbara Goldsmith, (Barbara Joan Lubin), American author (born May 18, 1931, New York, N.Y.—died June 26, 2016, New York City), wrote Little Gloria…Happy at Last (1980) and other nonfiction page-turners, mostly about legal dramas playing out in the lives of the wealthy. Goldsmith was doing research

  • Lubin, David (American agriculturalist)

    David Lubin, Polish-born American merchant and agricultural reformer whose activities led to the founding (1905) of the International Institute of Agriculture as a world clearinghouse for data on crops, prices, and trade to protect the common interests of farmers of all nations. Migrating with his

  • Lubitsch, Ernst (American director)

    Ernst Lubitsch, German-born American motion-picture director who was best known for sophisticated comedies of manners and romantic comedies. Lubitsch was an anomaly as an active director who also served as the head of production at a major studio, as he did briefly at Paramount. While the lion’s

  • Lübke, Heinrich (German statesman)

    Heinrich Lübke, politician who served as president of the German Federal Republic (1959–69). After serving in World War I he was able to unify many small German farmers’ organizations into the German Farmers Federation, serving as the federation’s director from 1926 to 1933. Politically inactive

  • Lublin (Poland)

    Lublin, city, capital of Lubelskie województwo (province), eastern Poland, on the Bystrzyca River. Founded as a stronghold in the late 9th century, the settlement grew up around the castle and received town rights in 1317. It served as a joint meeting ground for Poland and Lithuania, and in 1569

  • Lublin Committee (Polish history)

    20th-century international relations: The final Allied agreements: …that he would reorganize the Lublin Committee and permit free elections among “non-Fascist elements” within a month after peace. But Stalin reserved the right to decide who was “Fascist” and rejected international supervision of the elections. Roosevelt proposed a Declaration on Liberated Europe, by which the Big Three promised to…

  • Lublin Uplands (region, Poland)

    Poland: The Little Poland Uplands: …Vistula, beyond which lie the Lublin (Lubelska) Uplands. In the south occur patches of loess on which fertile brown- and black-earth soils have developed.

  • Lublin, Union of (Poland-Lithuania [1569])

    Union of Lublin, (1569), pact between Poland and Lithuania that united the two countries into a single state. After 1385 (in the Union of Krewo) the two countries had been under the same sovereign. But Sigismund II Augustus had no heirs; and the Poles, fearing that when he died the personal union

  • Lublin-Majdanek (concentration camp, Poland)

    Majdanek, Nazi German concentration and extermination camp on the southeastern outskirts of the city of Lublin, Poland. In October 1941 it received its first prisoners, mainly Soviet prisoners of war, virtually all of whom died of hunger and exposure. Within a year, however, it was converted into a

  • Lubnān

    Lebanon, country located on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea; it consists of a narrow strip of territory and is one of the world’s smaller sovereign states. The capital is Beirut. Though Lebanon, particularly its coastal region, was the site of some of the oldest human settlements in the

  • Lubnān ash-Sharqī (mountains, Asia)

    Anti-Lebanon Mountains, mountain range that runs northeast-southwest along the Syrian-Lebanese border parallel to the Lebanon Mountains, from which they are separated by the al-Biqā? Valley. The range averages 6,500 feet (2,000 m) above sea level, with several peaks exceeding 8,000 feet (2,400 m).

  • Lubnān, Jabal (mountain range, Lebanon)

    Lebanon Mountains, mountain range, extending almost the entire length of Lebanon, paralleling the Mediterranean coast for about 150 mi (240 km), with northern outliers extending into Syria. The northern section, north of the saddle, or pass, of ?ahr al-Baydar (through which the Beirut–Damascus

  • Lubni (Ukraine)

    Lubny, city and port, east-central Ukraine, on the Sula River. Lubny was established in the late 10th century as a fortified Rus town. It was destroyed by the Mongols in 1239 and was not rebuilt until the 16th century. From the mid-17th century to 1781, it was a regimental centre in the

  • Lubny (Ukraine)

    Lubny, city and port, east-central Ukraine, on the Sula River. Lubny was established in the late 10th century as a fortified Rus town. It was destroyed by the Mongols in 1239 and was not rebuilt until the 16th century. From the mid-17th century to 1781, it was a regimental centre in the

  • Lubombo Hills (mountains, Africa)

    Lebombo Mountains, long, narrow mountain range in South Africa, Swaziland, and Mozambique, southeastern Africa. It is about 500 miles (800 km) long and consists of volcanic rocks. The name is derived from a Zulu word, Ubombo, that means “big nose.” In South Africa the mountains extend from south of

  • Lubombo Mountains (mountains, Africa)

    Lebombo Mountains, long, narrow mountain range in South Africa, Swaziland, and Mozambique, southeastern Africa. It is about 500 miles (800 km) long and consists of volcanic rocks. The name is derived from a Zulu word, Ubombo, that means “big nose.” In South Africa the mountains extend from south of

  • Lubomirski, Jerzy (Polish rebel)

    Poland: Political stagnation: … in 1665–66 led by Marshal Jerzy Lubomirski. Two years later the frustrated John Casimir abdicated and settled in France, having prophetically warned the Sejm that Poland would fall victim to its rapacious neighbours unless it reformed its ways.

  • Lubosi (South African king)

    Lewanika, Southern African king of the Lozi, from the Luyana lineage, one of a restored line of Lozi kings that recovered control of Barotseland (Bulozi) in the decades following the 1851 death of the Kololo conqueror, Sebetwane. Fearful of attack from the Portuguese (in Angola to the west) and

  • lubricating oil

    petroleum refining: Lubricating oils: At one time the suitability of petroleum fractions for use as lubricants depended entirely on the crude oils from which they were derived. Those from Pennsylvania crude, which were largely paraffinic in nature, were recognized as having superior properties. But, with the advent…

  • lubrication (technology)

    Lubrication, introduction of any of various substances between sliding surfaces to reduce wear and friction. Nature has been applying lubrication since the evolution of synovial fluid, which lubricates the joints and bursas of vertebrate animals. Prehistoric people used mud and reeds to lubricate

  • Lubumbashi (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Lubumbashi, second largest city in Democratic Republic of the Congo. The main industrial centre of the mining district of southeastern Congo, it lies 110 miles (180 km) northwest of Ndola, Zambia. Lubumbashi is the name of a small local river. The town was established by Belgian colonists in 1910

  • Lubuskie (province, Poland)

    Lubuskie, województwo (province), west-central Poland. One of the smallest and least-populous Polish provinces, it is bordered by the provinces of Zachodniopomorskie to the north, Wielkopolskie to the east, and Dolno?l?skie to the south and by Germany to the west. It was formed in 1999 when the 49

  • luc-bat (Vietnamese poetry couplet)

    Vietnamese literature: …and thematic possibilities, including the luc-bat (“six-eight,” referring to a basic couplet of six syllables in the first line and eight in the second) prosody of the oral tradition. While concurring on the prestige of Chinese writing, Vietnamese literati were intent on establishing the independence of Vietnamese writing, even as…

  • Luca (Italy)

    Lucca, city, Toscana (Tuscany) regione, north-central Italy. It lies in the valley of the Serchio River and is almost surrounded by hills, with the Apuan Alps to the north and west. Lucca was a Ligurian and later an Etruscan town, and the Romans probably established a colony there in 180 bc

  • Luca de Tena y Alvarez-Ossorio, Torcuato (Spanish journalist)

    ABC: …weekly in 1903 by journalist Torcuato Luca de Tena y Alvarez-Ossorio, who later (1929) was made the marqués de Luca de Tena by King Alfonso XIII in recognition of his accomplishments with ABC. The paper became a daily in 1905 and after 1929 published a Seville edition.

  • Luca Fa Presto (Italian painter)

    Luca Giordano, the most celebrated and prolific Neapolitan painter of the late 17th century. His nickname Luca Fa Presto (“Luca, Work Quickly”) is said to derive from his painter-copyist father’s admonitions, which were certainly heeded. His other nickname, Proteus, was acquired as a result of his

  • Lucala River (river, Africa)

    Cuanza River: …tributary of the Cuanza, the Lucala, is also navigable and is noted for a 330-foot (100-metre) waterfall along its course. Cambambe Dam (1963) supplies electricity to the Angolan capital of Luanda and provides irrigation water for the valley of the Cuanza in its lower course.

  • Lucan (Roman author)

    Lucan, Roman poet and republican patriot whose historical epic, the Bellum civile, better known as the Pharsalia because of its vivid account of that battle, is remarkable as the single major Latin epic poem that eschewed the intervention of the gods. Lucan was the nephew of the

  • Lucan’s First Book (translation by Marlowe)

    English literature: Other poetic styles: …Marlowe’s blank verse rendering of Lucan’s First Book (published 1600), probably the finest Elizabethan translation.

  • Lucan, George Charles Bingham, 3rd earl of (British soldier)

    George Charles Bingham, 3rd earl of Lucan, British soldier who commanded the cavalry division, including the famous Light Brigade, at the Battle of Balaklava (q.v.) in the Crimean War. The eldest son of the 2nd Earl of Lucan, Lord Bingham was educated at Westminster and was commissioned an ensign

  • Lucania (ancient region, Italy)

    Lucania, ancient territorial division of southern Italy corresponding to most of the modern region of Basilicata, with much of the province of Salerno and part of that of Cosenza. Before its conquest by the Lucanians, a Samnite tribe, about the mid-5th century bc, it formed part of the

  • Lucania, Salvatore (American crime boss)

    Lucky Luciano, the most powerful chief of American organized crime in the early 1930s and a major influence even from prison in 1936–45 and after deportation to Italy in 1946. Luciano emigrated with his parents from Sicily to New York City in 1906 and at the age of 10 was already involved in

  • Lucanian (people)

    Manius Curius Dentatus: …the year he conquered the Lucanians. During his term as censor, 272, he began to build an aqueduct to carry the waters of the Anio River into the city but died before its completion. Later writers idealized Dentatus as a model of old Roman simplicity and frugality.

  • Lucanian Apennines (mountain range, Italy)

    Apennine Range: Physiography: …feet at Mount Meta; the Lucanian Apennines, 7,438 feet at Mount Pollino; the Calabrian Apennines, 6,414 feet at Mount Alto; and, finally, the Sicilian Range, 10,902 feet at Mount Etna. The ranges in Puglia (the “boot heel” of the peninsula) and southeastern Sicily are formed by low, horizontal limestone plateaus,…

  • Lucanidae (insect)

    Stag beetle, (family Lucanidae), any of some 900 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) in which the mandibles (jaws) are greatly developed in the male and resemble the antlers of a stag. In many species the elaborately branched and toothed mandibles may be as long as the beetle itself. If

  • Lucanus capreolus (insect)

    stag beetle: …occurring in North America include Lucanus capreolus and L. placidus, which are common in the east, and L. mazama (cottonwood stag beetle), which occurs in the southwest. L capreolus is distinguished by its shiny reddish brown colour, whereas L. placidus and L. mazama are usually very dark brown or black.…

  • Lucanus mazama (insect)

    stag beetle: mazama (cottonwood stag beetle), which occurs in the southwest. L capreolus is distinguished by its shiny reddish brown colour, whereas L. placidus and L. mazama are usually very dark brown or black. Most stag beetles live around rotting logs on which the larvae feed. Adults feed…

  • Lucanus placidus (insect)

    stag beetle: …America include Lucanus capreolus and L. placidus, which are common in the east, and L. mazama (cottonwood stag beetle), which occurs in the southwest. L capreolus is distinguished by its shiny reddish brown colour, whereas L. placidus and L. mazama are usually very dark brown or black. Most stag beetles…

  • Lucanus, Marcus Annaeus (Roman author)

    Lucan, Roman poet and republican patriot whose historical epic, the Bellum civile, better known as the Pharsalia because of its vivid account of that battle, is remarkable as the single major Latin epic poem that eschewed the intervention of the gods. Lucan was the nephew of the

  • Lucaris, Cyril (patriarch of Constantinople)

    Cyril Lucaris, patriarch of Constantinople who strove for reforms along Protestant Calvinist lines. His efforts generated broad opposition both from his own communion and from the Jesuits. Lucaris pursued theological studies in Venice and Padua, and while studying further in Wittenberg and Geneva

  • lucarne (architecture)

    dormer: …a spire is called a lucarne.

  • Lucas Brotherhood (German art society)

    Nazarene, one of an association formed by a number of young German painters in 1809 to return to the medieval spirit in art. Reacting particularly against 18th-century Neoclassicism, the brotherhood was the first effective antiacademic movement in European painting. The Nazarenes believed that all

  • Lucas critique (work by Lucas)

    optimum currency area: The political renaissance of OCAs: According to the so-called Lucas critique (developed by the American economist Robert Lucas), rational economic agents anticipate and respond to policies; their behaviour, and therefore the “structure” of markets, cannot be taken as given. This implies that the OCA criteria will change with monetary integration itself and cannot be…

  • Lucas García, Fernando Romeo (president of Guatemala)

    Fernando Romeo Lucas García, army general who was president of Guatemala from 1978 to 1982. Lucas García attended the Escuela Politécnica, the country’s military academy, from which he graduated in 1949. From 1960 to 1963 he served as a congressman from Alta Verapaz. He rose steadily in the

  • Lucas sequence (mathematics)

    number game: Fibonacci numbers: …the parentheses are the so-called Lucas sequence: 1, 3, 4, 7, 11, 18. The Lucas sequence shares the recursive relation of the Fibonacci sequence; that is, xn = xn ? 1 + xn ? 2.

  • Lucas van Leyden (Dutch artist)

    Lucas van Leyden, northern Renaissance painter and one of the greatest engravers of his time. Lucas was first trained by his father, Huygh Jacobszoon; later, he entered the workshop of Cornelis Engelbrechtsz(oon), a painter of Leiden. His paintings, as well as his prints, reveal his unique approach

  • Lucas’ Puzzle (mathematical puzzle)

    number game: Puzzles involving configurations: …specified alignment or configuration was Lucas’ Puzzle: in a row of seven squares, each of the three squares at the left end is occupied by a black counter, each of the three squares at the right end is occupied by a white counter, and the centre square is vacant. The…

  • Lucas, édouard (French mathematician)

    number game: 18th and 19th centuries: …in the outstanding contributions of édouard Lucas, C.L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), and others at the turn of the century. Lucas’ four-volume Récréations mathématiques (1882–94) became a classic. The mathematical recreations of Dodgson included Symbolic Logic and The Game of Logic; Pillow Problems and A Tangled Tale, 2 vol. (1885–95).

  • Lucas, Elizabeth (British-American plantation manager)

    Elizabeth Pinckney, British-American plantation manager known for the first successful cultivation of indigo in the United States, an accomplishment that subsequently helped to sustain the Carolina economy for 30 years. When her father, George Lucas, was called to military duty in Antigua in the

  • Lucas, George (American director, producer, and screenwriter)

    George Lucas, American motion-picture director, producer, and screenwriter who created several of the most popular films in history. The son of a small-town stationer and a mother who was often hospitalized for long periods for ill health, Lucas was an early reader of classic adventure stories such

  • Lucas, George Walton, Jr. (American director, producer, and screenwriter)

    George Lucas, American motion-picture director, producer, and screenwriter who created several of the most popular films in history. The son of a small-town stationer and a mother who was often hospitalized for long periods for ill health, Lucas was an early reader of classic adventure stories such

  • Lucas, J. R. (British philosopher)

    materialism: Logic, intentionality, and psychical research: …such as the British philosopher J.R. Lucas, tried to produce positive arguments against a mechanistic theory of mind by employing certain discoveries in mathematical logic, especially Kurt G?del’s first incompleteness theorem, which implies that no axiomatic theory could possibly capture all arithmetical truths. In general, however, philosophers have not found

  • Lucas, Jerry (American basketball player)

    Jerry Lucas, American basketball player who was one of the best rebounders in the sport’s history and who in 1996 was named one of the 50 greatest National Basketball Association (NBA) players of all time. Lucas was a tall, intelligent youth with dexterous hands and 20/10 eyesight that made him a

  • Lucas, Jerry Ray (American basketball player)

    Jerry Lucas, American basketball player who was one of the best rebounders in the sport’s history and who in 1996 was named one of the 50 greatest National Basketball Association (NBA) players of all time. Lucas was a tall, intelligent youth with dexterous hands and 20/10 eyesight that made him a

  • Lucas, Matt (British actor and singer)

    David Walliams: …he and his frequent collaborator, Matt Lucas, starred in and wrote. Walliams later became a successful children’s book author.

  • Lucas, Maurice (American baseball player)

    Portland Trail Blazers: …line of Bill Walton and Maurice Lucas, along with guard Lionel Hollins, and guided by first-year head coach Jack Ramsay—beat the Chicago Bulls, Denver Nuggets, and Los Angeles Lakers in the postseason to advance to the NBA finals. There they faced the Philadelphia 76ers, who won the first two

  • Lucas, Robert E., Jr. (American economist)

    Robert E. Lucas, Jr., American economist who won the 1995 Nobel Prize for Economics for developing and applying the theory of rational expectations, an econometric hypothesis. Lucas found that individuals will offset the intended results of national fiscal and monetary policy by making private

  • Lucas, Robert Emerson, Jr. (American economist)

    Robert E. Lucas, Jr., American economist who won the 1995 Nobel Prize for Economics for developing and applying the theory of rational expectations, an econometric hypothesis. Lucas found that individuals will offset the intended results of national fiscal and monetary policy by making private

  • Lucas, Sarah (British artist)

    Tracey Emin: Like Damien Hirst and Sarah Lucas, she was considered one of the YBAs (Young British Artists; also known as the BritArtists) who came to prominence in the 1990s.

  • Lucas, Victoria (American author)

    Sylvia Plath, American poet whose best-known works, such as the poems “Daddy” and “Lady Lazarus” and the novel The Bell Jar, starkly express a sense of alienation and self-destruction closely tied to her personal experiences and, by extension, the situation of women in mid-20th-century America.

  • Lucas, Vrain-Denis (French forger)

    forgery: Detection of literary forgeries: …that of the French forger Vrain-Denis Lucas, who sold a collection of forgeries including a letter of St. Mary Magdalene, written in French on paper made in France.

  • Lucasfilm, Ltd. (American company)

    George Lucas: The growth of Lucasfilm Ltd.: With Star Wars in the theatres, Lucas quietly announced his intention to retire from directing and make Lucasfilm an incubator for films to be directed by others under his tutelage. He added, however, that he could envision returning to directing “about 20 years…

  • LucasVarity PLC (British company)

    TRW Inc.: …1999 the company acquired England’s LucasVarity PLC, a designer and manufacturer of advanced-technology products and systems for the automotive and aerospace industries. LucasVarity had been created in 1996 through the merger of Lucas Industries PLC (founded as a lamp-making firm in 1875 in Birmingham, England) and the American firm Varity…

  • Lucayan (people)

    Turks and Caicos Islands: History: …an indigenous people, the Arawakan-speaking Lucayan Taino. Within a generation of European contact, the Lucayan Taino had died off from the ill effects of colonization, including introduced diseases and enslavement by the Spanish. Alternatively, some historians maintain that the islands had been uninhabited up to the time when the Spanish…

  • Lucca (Italy)

    Lucca, city, Toscana (Tuscany) regione, north-central Italy. It lies in the valley of the Serchio River and is almost surrounded by hills, with the Apuan Alps to the north and west. Lucca was a Ligurian and later an Etruscan town, and the Romans probably established a colony there in 180 bc

  • Lucca, Republic of (historical republic, Italy)

    Republic of Lucca, republic established by Napoleon Bonaparte in Lucca and its environs on Dec. 27, 1801, after his second successful conquest of Italy, driving out the Austrians. It lasted less than four years; in June 1805 he granted Lucca to his sister élisa Bonaparte as a principality, part of

  • Luccheni, Luigi (Italian anarchist)

    Elisabeth: …stabbed by an Italian anarchist, Luigi Luccheni.

  • Luce (film by Onah [2019])

    Octavia Spencer: …high-school teacher in the drama Luce. The following year she lent her voice to Dolittle and Onward and starred in Self Made, a Netflix miniseries that was inspired by the life of Madam C.J. Walker, who was one of the first African American female millionaires in the United States.

  • Luce, Bijah’s (American poet and activist)

    Lucy Terry, poet, storyteller, and activist of colonial and postcolonial America. Terry was taken from Africa to Rhode Island by slave traders at a very young age. She was baptized a Christian at age five, with the approval of her owner, Ebenezer Wells of Deerfield, Massachusetts; she became a full

  • Luce, Clare Boothe (American playwright and statesman)

    Clare Boothe Luce, American playwright, politician, and celebrity, noted for her satiric sense of humour and for her role in American politics. Luce was born into poverty and an unstable home life; her father, William Franklin Boothe, left the family when she was eight years old. Through sacrifices

  • Luce, Henry (American publisher)

    Henry Luce, American magazine publisher who built a publishing empire on Time, Fortune, and Life magazines, becoming one of the most powerful figures in the history of American journalism. Luce’s publications, founded as a means of educating what he considered a poorly informed American public, had

  • Luce, Henry Robinson (American publisher)

    Henry Luce, American magazine publisher who built a publishing empire on Time, Fortune, and Life magazines, becoming one of the most powerful figures in the history of American journalism. Luce’s publications, founded as a means of educating what he considered a poorly informed American public, had

  • Luce, Stephen Bleecker (United States Navy admiral)

    Stephen Bleecker Luce, principal founder and first president of the Naval War College for postgraduate studies, the world’s first such institution. Starting his career in 1841 as a midshipman, Luce rose through the ranks to become a rear admiral (1886). From the beginning of his naval life, he

  • Lucea (Jamaica)

    Lucea, town and Caribbean port, far northwestern Jamaica, northwest of Kingston. The harbour is well sheltered. Bananas and yams are exported, and there are phosphate deposits nearby. Noteworthy sites are Fort Charlotte (18th century), overlooking the harbour; the Hanover Parish Church (1725),

  • Lucebert (Dutch artist)

    COBRA: …(Nieuwenhuis), Pierre Alechinsky, Lucebert (Lubertus Jacobus Swaanswijk), and Jean Atlan. Influenced by poetry, film, folk art, children’s art, and primitive art, the semiabstract canvases by these artists display brilliant colour and spontaneous, violent brushwork that is akin to American Action painting. The human figure, treated in a wildly distorted,…

  • Lucembursky, Jan (king of Bohemia)

    John, king of Bohemia from 1310 until his death, and one of the more popular heroic figures of his day, who campaigned across Europe from Toulouse to Prussia. He was born the son of the future Holy Roman emperor Henry VII of the house of Luxembourg and was made count of Luxembourg in 1310. At about

  • Lucena (Philippines)

    Lucena, city, south-central Luzon, Philippines. Situated near the head of Tayabas Bay of the Sibuyan Sea, its importance as a settlement predated the arrival of the Spaniards. It is a major fishing port and a regional wholesale distributing point and has food-processing plants (particularly for

  • Lucena (city, Spain)

    Lucena, city, Córdoba provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain. It lies southeast of Córdoba city on the Madrid-Algeciras railway. Founded in Roman times, Lucena was an important Jewish community during the Middle Ages. After the city’s

  • Lucena, Jo?o de (Portuguese writer)

    Portuguese literature: The literature of discovery and conquest: …of Father Francis Xavier”) by Jo?o de Lucena. Important both as history and as human documents were the cartas (“letters”) written by Jesuits in India, China, and Japan. The anonymous Descobrimento da Florida (1577; “Discovery of Florida”) and Gabriel Soares de Sousa’s Tratado descritivo do Brasil em 1587 (1587; “Descriptive…

  • Lucent Technologies Inc. (American company)

    AT&T Corporation: A second company, Lucent Technologies Inc., made and marketed telephones, network switching equipment, computer chips, and other hardware and also picked up most of the Bell Laboratories. The third company was the NCR Corporation. AT&T’s self-imposed dismantling was the largest corporate breakup in history.

  • Lucentini, Franco (Italian author)

    Franco Lucentini, Italian novelist (born Dec. 24, 1920, Rome, Italy—died Aug. 5, 2002, Turin, Italy), achieved fame with Carlo Fruttero in a remarkable, if unconventional, literary partnership. After being imprisoned in 1941 for distributing anti-Fascist leaflets, Lucentini began his literary c

  • Lucentio (fictional character)

    The Taming of the Shrew: The only serious candidate is Lucentio, the son of a wealthy Florentine gentleman. He is so smitten with Bianca’s charms that he exchanges places with his clever servant, Tranio, in order to gain access to the woman he loves. He does so disguised as a tutor. So does the less-successful…

  • Lucentum (Spain)

    Alicante, port city, capital of Alicante provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Valencia, southeastern Spain. It is located on Alicante Bay of the Mediterranean Sea. Founded as Akra Leuke (“White Summit”) by Phocaean Greeks (from the west coast of Asia Minor) in

  • lucerne (plant)

    Alfalfa, (Medicago sativa), perennial, cloverlike, leguminous plant of the pea family (Fabaceae), widely grown primarily for hay, pasturage, and silage. Alfalfa is known for its tolerance of drought, heat, and cold and for the remarkable productivity and quality of its herbage. The plant is also

  • Lucerne (canton, Switzerland)

    Lucerne, canton, central Switzerland. Lucerne is drained by the Reuss and Kleine Emme rivers and occupies the northern foothills of the Alps, which rise to 7,710 feet (2,350 metres) at the Brienzer Rothorn. Comprising the territories acquired by its capital, the city of Lucerne, it was part of the

  • Lucerne (Switzerland)

    Lucerne, city, capital of Lucerne canton, central Switzerland, lying on the Reuss River where it issues from the northwestern branch of Lake Lucerne (German: Vierwaldst?tter See; French: Lac des Quatre Cantons), southwest of Zürich. The city’s name was derived from the Benedictine monastery of St.

  • lucerne flea (arthropod)

    springtail: …small (2 mm long), green-coloured lucerne flea (Sminthurus viridis), one of the most common species, is a serious pest to crops in Australia. When necessary, insecticides are used to control springtails. Fossil springtails are among the oldest insect fossils known.

  • Lucerne, Lac (lake, Switzerland)

    Lake Lucerne, principal lake of central Switzerland, surrounded by the cantons of Lucerne, Nidwalden, Uri, and Schwyz. The lake is named after the city of Lucerne, which lies at its western end. The lake is most beautifully situated between steep limestone mountains, the best-known being the Rigi

  • Lucerne, Lake (lake, Switzerland)

    Lake Lucerne, principal lake of central Switzerland, surrounded by the cantons of Lucerne, Nidwalden, Uri, and Schwyz. The lake is named after the city of Lucerne, which lies at its western end. The lake is most beautifully situated between steep limestone mountains, the best-known being the Rigi

  • Lucerne, Lake of (lake, Switzerland)

    Lake Lucerne, principal lake of central Switzerland, surrounded by the cantons of Lucerne, Nidwalden, Uri, and Schwyz. The lake is named after the city of Lucerne, which lies at its western end. The lake is most beautifully situated between steep limestone mountains, the best-known being the Rigi

  • Lucero, Lake (lake, New Mexico, United States)

    White Sands National Monument: …corner of the monument is Lake Lucero, a usually dry marsh (playa) encrusted with selenite crystals created by the evaporation of gypsum-laden runoff water. The gypsum is the product of decomposed limestone, which is the predominant rock type of the surrounding region. The extensive Alkali Flat area, to the north…

  • Luces de Bohemia (play by Valle-Inclán)

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