You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Langak, Lake (lake, China)

    Tibet: Drainage and soils: …both Buddhists and Hindus, and Lake La’nga.

  • Langan, Dorothy Veronica (American singer-songwriter and lyricist)

    Dory Previn, (Dorothy Veronica Langan), American singer-songwriter and lyricist (born Oct. 22, 1925, New Jersey—died Feb. 14, 2012, Southfield, Mass.), composed and performed intensely personal songs that drew on the pain of her troubled childhood, her marriage (1959–70) to composer-conductor André

  • langar (Sikh meeting place)

    Amar Das: …ate in the Sikhs’ casteless langar (communal refectory).

  • Langar, Mount (mountain, Asia)

    Hindu Kush: Physiography: …imposing mountains, which includes Mounts Langar (23,162 feet [7,060 metres]), Shachaur (23,346 feet [7,116 metres]), Udrem Zom (23,376 feet [7,125 metres]), and Nādīr Shāh Zhāra (23,376 feet [7,125 metres]), leads to the three giant mountains of the Hindu Kush, which are Mounts Noshaq (Nowshāk; 24,557 feet [7,485 metres]), Istoro Nal…

  • L?ngban (Sweden)

    arsenate mineral: At the mineralogically famous L?ngban iron and manganese mines in central Sweden, more than 50 species of arsenate minerals have been described, many peculiar to the locality. Such compounds occur in open cavities and resulted from the reaction of arsenic acid (H3AsO4) upon pyrochroite [manganese hydroxide; Mn(OH)2] at moderate…

  • Langbaurgh-on-Tees (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Redcar and Cleveland, unitary authority, geographic county of North Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, England. It lies on the south side of the River Tees between Middlesbrough and the rocky coastline of the North Sea and stretches southeastward along the coast past the highest cliffs of

  • Langbehn, Julius (German political theorist)

    fascism: Intellectual origins: …was shared by his contemporary Langbehn. As John Weiss remarked of Lagarde and Langbehn, “The two most influential and popular intellectuals of late nineteenth century Germany were indistinguishable from Nazi ideologists.” Weiss also noted that “the press and popular magazines of Germany and Central Europe had fed a steady diet…

  • Langdell, Christopher Columbus (American educator)

    Christopher Columbus Langdell, American educator, dean of the Harvard Law School (1870–95), who originated the case method of teaching law. Langdell studied law at Harvard (1851–54) and practiced in New York City until 1870, when he accepted a professorship and then the deanship of the Harvard Law

  • Langdon, Harry (American actor and director)

    Harry Langdon, American motion picture actor and director whom many rank among the top tier of silent film comedians. As a young boy, Langdon ran away from his home in Council Bluffs, Iowa, to join a traveling medicine show. Although he eventually returned, Langdon repeatedly left home to perform

  • Langdon, John (American politician)

    John Langdon, state legislator, governor, and U.S. senator during the Revolutionary and early national period (1775–1812). After an apprenticeship in a Portsmouth countinghouse and several years at sea, he became a prosperous shipowner and merchant. During the war he organized and financed John

  • Langdon, Mary (American novelist)

    Mary Hayden Green Pike, American novelist, best remembered for her popular books of the Civil War era on racial and slavery themes. Pike studied at the Female Seminary in Charlestown, Massachusetts (1840–43). Her first novel, Ida May (1854), was published under the pseudonym Mary Langdon. A

  • lange bryllaupsreisa, Den (play by ?rjasaeter)

    Tore ?rjas?ter: …dramas, including Christophoros (1948) and Den lange bryllaupsreisa (1949; “The Long Honeymoon”). The latter, whose action partly occurs after death, is an expressionistic play dealing with contemporary problems such as the atom bomb.

  • lange rejse, Den (work by Jensen)

    Johannes V. Jensen: (1908–22; The Long Journey, 3 vol., 1922–24). This story of the rise of man from the most primitive times to the discovery of America by Columbus exhibits both his imagination and his skill as an amateur anthropologist.

  • Lange, André (German bobsleigh driver)

    André Lange, German bobsled driver who captured more Olympic gold medals (four) than any other driver in history. Lange switched at age 19 to bobsled from another sliding sport, luge. After winning his World Cup bobsled debut, in 1998 at the four-man event in Calgary, Alberta., he finished his

  • Lange, Andrew E. (American astrophysicist)

    Andrew E. Lange, American astrophysicist (born July 23, 1957, Urbana, Ill.—died Jan. 22, 2010, Pasadena, Calif.), helped spearhead research to discover the large-scale geometric structure of the universe. Lange was coleader of an experiment called BOOMERANG (Balloon Observations of Millimetric

  • Lange, Antoni (Polish writer and translator)

    Antoni Lange, Polish poet, literary critic, and translator who was a pioneer of the Young Poland movement. Lange studied linguistics, philosophy, and literature in Paris (1886–90), and shortly after his return to Warsaw he became one of the leading personalities in literary circles. His

  • Lange, Christian Lous (Norwegian political scientist)

    Christian Lous Lange, Norwegian peace advocate, secretary-general of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (1909–33), and cowinner (with Karl Branting) of the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1921. Lange graduated in languages from the University of Oslo in 1893 and in 1919 received a doctorate for a thesis on the

  • Lange, David (prime minister of New Zealand)

    David Lange, New Zealand lawyer and politician, who was prime minister of New Zealand (1984–89). Strongly influenced by his father, a physician noted for his socialist views, Lange grew up in a working-class suburb of Auckland. After receiving a law degree from the University of Auckland, he chose

  • Lange, David Russell (prime minister of New Zealand)

    David Lange, New Zealand lawyer and politician, who was prime minister of New Zealand (1984–89). Strongly influenced by his father, a physician noted for his socialist views, Lange grew up in a working-class suburb of Auckland. After receiving a law degree from the University of Auckland, he chose

  • Lange, Dorothea (American photographer)

    Dorothea Lange, American documentary photographer whose portraits of displaced farmers during the Great Depression greatly influenced later documentary and journalistic photography. Lange studied photography at Columbia University in New York City under Clarence H. White, a member of the

  • Lange, Friedrich Albert (German philosopher)

    Friedrich Albert Lange, German philosopher and Socialist, important for his refutation of materialism and for establishing a lasting tradition of Neo-Kantianism at the University of Marburg. Lange was the son of theologian Johann Peter Lange and was educated at Cologne, Bonn, and Duisburg. In 1861

  • Lange, Hope Elise Ross (American actress)

    Hope Elise Ross Lange, American actress (born Nov. 28, 1931/33, Redding Ridge, Conn.—died Dec. 19, 2003, Santa Monica, Calif.), was already a veteran of stage and television when she made an impressive film debut in 1956 in Bus Stop, and the following year she earned an Academy Award nomination f

  • Lange, Jessica (American actress)

    Jessica Lange, American actress known for her versatility and intelligent performances. Lange attended the University of Minnesota on an art scholarship but dropped out to travel. She lived in Paris, where she studied mime, before settling in New York City. A sometime model, she caught the eye of

  • Lange, Joep (Dutch medical researcher)

    Joep Lange, (Joseph Marie Albert Lange), Dutch AIDS researcher (born Sept. 25, 1954, Nieuwenhagen, Neth.—died July 17, 2014, near Hrabove, Ukr.), advanced global collaboration in fighting against the AIDS epidemic; as a leading scientist and the president (2002–04) of the International AIDS Society

  • Lange, Joseph Marie Albert (Dutch medical researcher)

    Joep Lange, (Joseph Marie Albert Lange), Dutch AIDS researcher (born Sept. 25, 1954, Nieuwenhagen, Neth.—died July 17, 2014, near Hrabove, Ukr.), advanced global collaboration in fighting against the AIDS epidemic; as a leading scientist and the president (2002–04) of the International AIDS Society

  • Lange, Mutt (Zambian-born singer-songwriter and record producer)

    Shania Twain: …the eye of another producer, Robert John (“Mutt”) Lange, who had a highly successful career producing albums for Def Leppard, Bryan Adams, and Michael Bolton. Twain and Lange, who immediately began writing songs together, also became romantically involved and married in 1993. Two years later Twain released her second album,…

  • Lange, Oskar Ryszard (Polish economist)

    Oskar Ryszard Lange, Polish-born economist who taught in the United States and Poland and was active in Polish politics. Lange’s belief that a state-run economy could be as efficient as (or more efficient than) a market economy prompted his return to Poland after World War II, where he worked for

  • Lange, Robert John (Zambian-born singer-songwriter and record producer)

    Shania Twain: …the eye of another producer, Robert John (“Mutt”) Lange, who had a highly successful career producing albums for Def Leppard, Bryan Adams, and Michael Bolton. Twain and Lange, who immediately began writing songs together, also became romantically involved and married in 1993. Two years later Twain released her second album,…

  • Langeais (France)

    Langeais, town, west-central France, Indre-et-Loire département, Centre région, on the right bank of Loire River. It has a 15th-century chateau, notable as a fine example of pre-Renaissance architecture. The ruins of a keep first built there by Fulk III Nerra, count of Anjou, still stand in the

  • Langeland (island, Denmark)

    Langeland, island belonging to Denmark, in the Baltic Sea between Funen and Lolland islands. Langeland’s castle of Tranek?r has been a royal residence since 1231 (rebuilt 1550), and its principal town, Rudk?bing, was chartered in 1287. The undulating, well-wooded land has fertile clay loams that

  • Langen, Eugen (German engineer)

    Eugen Langen, German engineer who pioneered in building internal-combustion engines. In 1864 Langen formed a partnership with Nikolaus A. Otto, with whom he collaborated for the rest of his life. In 1867 they designed their first internal-combustion engine. Later, recognizing the theoretical

  • Langer, Carl (British chemist)

    fuel cell: Development of fuel cells: …late 1880s two British chemists—Carl Langer and German-born Ludwig Mond—developed a fuel cell with a longer service life by employing a porous nonconductor to hold the electrolyte. It was subsequently found that a carbon base permitted the use of much less platinum, and the German chemist Wilhelm Ostwald proposed,…

  • Langer, Franti?ek (Czech writer)

    Franti?ek Langer, physician and writer, one of the outstanding Czech dramatists of the interwar period. Langer studied medicine in Prague and wrote a collection of short stories and a few plays before joining the Austrian army as a surgeon. Sent to the Galician front during World War I, he was

  • Langer, Susanne K. (American philosopher and educator)

    Susanne K. Langer, American philosopher and educator who wrote extensively on linguistic analysis and aesthetics. Langer studied with Alfred North Whitehead at Radcliffe College and, after graduate study at Harvard University and at the University of Vienna, received a Ph.D. (1926) from Harvard.

  • Langer, Susanne Knauth (American philosopher and educator)

    Susanne K. Langer, American philosopher and educator who wrote extensively on linguistic analysis and aesthetics. Langer studied with Alfred North Whitehead at Radcliffe College and, after graduate study at Harvard University and at the University of Vienna, received a Ph.D. (1926) from Harvard.

  • langerhans cell (anatomy)

    integument: Skin structure: …cell types: Merkel cells and Langerhans cells. Merkel cells form parts of sensory structures. Langerhans cells are dendritic but unpigmented and are found nearer the skin surface than melanocytes. After a century of question about their purpose, it is now clear that they have a vital immunologic function.

  • Langerhans, islets of (anatomy)

    Islets of Langerhans, irregularly shaped patches of endocrine tissue located within the pancreas of most vertebrates. They are named for the German physician Paul Langerhans, who first described them in 1869. The normal human pancreas contains about 1,000,000 islets. The islets consist of four

  • Langerhans, Paul (German physician)

    islets of Langerhans: …named for the German physician Paul Langerhans, who first described them in 1869. The normal human pancreas contains about 1,000,000 islets. The islets consist of four distinct cell types, of which three (alpha, beta, and delta cells) produce important hormones; the fourth component (C cells) has no known function.

  • Langey, Guillaume du Bellay, seigneur de (French soldier, writer, and diplomat)

    Guillaume du Bellay, seigneur de Langey, French soldier and writer known for his diplomatic exploits during the reign of King Francis I of France. The eldest of six brothers of a noble Angevin family, du Bellay was educated at the Sorbonne. He fought in Flanders and in Italy and was eventually,

  • Langfjella (mountains, Norway)

    Lang Mountains, mountainous area lying south and west of the Dovre Mountains in west-central Norway. The Lang Mountains include the Jotunheim Mountains, the Jostedals Glacier, the Hardanger Ice Cap, the Hardanger Plateau, the Bykle Hills, and many lesser features. The highest mountains in

  • Langfjellene (mountains, Norway)

    Lang Mountains, mountainous area lying south and west of the Dovre Mountains in west-central Norway. The Lang Mountains include the Jotunheim Mountains, the Jostedals Glacier, the Hardanger Ice Cap, the Hardanger Plateau, the Bykle Hills, and many lesser features. The highest mountains in

  • Langford, Frances (American singer and actress)

    Frances Langford, (Frances Newbern), American singer and actress (born April 4, 1914, Lakeland, Fla.—died July 11, 2005, Jensen Beach, Fla.), acted in some 30 motion pictures and, with Don Ameche, starred as the combative wife, Blanche, in the 1940s radio series The Bickersons. She gained her g

  • Langford, Jon (Welsh musician)

    the Mekons: Principal members were Jon Langford (b. October 11, 1957, Newport, Gwent [now in Newport], Wales), Tom Greenhalgh (b. November 4, 1956, Stockholm, Sweden), Sally Timms (b. November 29, 1959, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England), Susie Honeyman, Steve Goulding, Sarah Corina, Lu Edmonds, and

  • Langford, Nathaniel P. (American explorer and conservationist)

    Yellowstone National Park: Development of the park: The park’s first superintendent (1872–77), Nathaniel P. Langford (who had been a member of the 1870 expedition), was largely ineffectual, primarily because Congress allotted no administrative funds, and he had to find other work and thus was rarely there. His successor, Philetus W. Norris (1877–82), however, undertook considerable scientific study…

  • Langham, Michael (British-born theatre director)

    Michael Seymour Langham, British-born theatre director (born Aug. 22, 1919, Bridgwater, Somerset, Eng.—died Jan. 15, 2011, Cranbrook, Kent, Eng.), transformed the environs of the Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ont., from a large circus tent to a permanent 2,000-seat theatre as the festival’s

  • Langhanke, Lucille Vasconcellos (American actress)

    Mary Astor, American motion-picture and stage actress noted for her delicate, classic beauty and a renowned profile that earned her the nickname “The Cameo Girl.” With the ability to play a variety of characters ranging from villains to heroines to matrons, Astor worked in film from the silent era

  • Langhans’ giant cell (pathology)

    Giant cell, large cell characterized by an arc of nuclei toward the outer membrane. The cell is formed by the fusion of epithelioid cells, which are derived from immune cells called macrophages. Once fused, these cells share the same cytoplasm, and their nuclei become arranged in an arc near the

  • Langhans, Carl Gotthard (German architect)

    Western architecture: Germany: …he called to Berlin were Carl Gotthard Langhans and David Gilly, who, with Heinrich Gentz, created a severe but inventive style in the 1790s that was indebted to Ledoux as well as to Johann Winckelmann’s call for a return to the spirit of ancient Greek architecture. The great early monument…

  • Langhian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Langhian Stage, third of the six divisions (in ascending order) of Miocene rocks, representing all rocks deposited worldwide during the Langhian Age (16 million to 13.8 million years ago) of the Neogene Period (23 million to 2.6 million years ago). The Langhian Stage is named for the region of

  • Langhorne, John (English poet)

    John Langhorne, poet and English translator of the 1st-century Greek biographer Plutarch; his work anticipates that of George Crabbe in its description of the problems facing the poor. He was a country rector after 1766. His best work is perhaps The Country Justice (3 parts, 1774–77). His

  • Langhorne, Nancy Witcher (British politician)

    Nancy Witcher Astor, Viscountess Astor, first woman to sit in the British House of Commons, known in public and private life for her great energy and wit. In 1897 she married Robert Gould Shaw of Boston, from whom she was divorced in 1903, and in 1906 she married Waldorf Astor, great-great-grandson

  • Langie Bey (Polish soldier and patriot)

    Marian Langiewicz, Polish soldier and patriot who played a key role in the Polish insurrection of 1863. After a year in the Prussian army as a lieutenant of artillery, Langiewicz took a teaching position at the Polish military school in Paris (1860), but in the same year he joined Garibaldi’s

  • Langiewicz, Marian (Polish soldier and patriot)

    Marian Langiewicz, Polish soldier and patriot who played a key role in the Polish insurrection of 1863. After a year in the Prussian army as a lieutenant of artillery, Langiewicz took a teaching position at the Polish military school in Paris (1860), but in the same year he joined Garibaldi’s

  • Langiewicz, Marian Melchior (Polish soldier and patriot)

    Marian Langiewicz, Polish soldier and patriot who played a key role in the Polish insurrection of 1863. After a year in the Prussian army as a lieutenant of artillery, Langiewicz took a teaching position at the Polish military school in Paris (1860), but in the same year he joined Garibaldi’s

  • Langj?kull (glacier, Iceland)

    Langj?kull, (Icelandic: “Long Glacier”) large ice field, west-central Iceland. Langj?kull is 40 miles (64 km) long and 15 miles (24 km) wide and covers an area of 395 square miles (1,025 square km). It rises to 4,757 feet (1,450 metres) above sea level in the centre and feeds several rivers,

  • Langkawi Island (island, Malaysia)

    Langkawi Island, main island of the Langkawi group, in the Strait of Malacca, Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies just south of the Thai island of Tarutao. Langkawi, 18 miles (29 km) long and 10 miles (16 km) wide, rises to 2,887 feet (880 metres) at Raya Mountain. Though most of its inhabitants

  • Langkawi, Pulau (island, Malaysia)

    Langkawi Island, main island of the Langkawi group, in the Strait of Malacca, Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies just south of the Thai island of Tarutao. Langkawi, 18 miles (29 km) long and 10 miles (16 km) wide, rises to 2,887 feet (880 metres) at Raya Mountain. Though most of its inhabitants

  • Langlade (island, Saint Pierre and Miquelon)

    Saint-Pierre and Miquelon: …in the Miquelons (Miquelon and Langlade, sometimes known as Great and Little Miquelon, connected by the slim, sandy Isthmus of Langlade). But the island of Saint-Pierre, only 10 square miles (26 square km) in area, has almost 90 percent of the total population and is the administrative and commercial centre.

  • Langland, William (English poet)

    William Langland, presumed author of one of the greatest examples of Middle English alliterative poetry, generally known as Piers Plowman, an allegorical work with a complex variety of religious themes. One of the major achievements of Piers Plowman is that it translates the language and

  • Langlands conjectures (number theory)

    Laurent Lafforgue: The Langlands conjectures, or Langlands Program, grew out of a 1967 letter that Robert Langlands wrote to André Weil, who was widely regarded as the leading number theorist of his generation. Langlands suggested a far-reaching generalization of what was already known concerning a deep connection between…

  • Langlands Program (number theory)

    Laurent Lafforgue: The Langlands conjectures, or Langlands Program, grew out of a 1967 letter that Robert Langlands wrote to André Weil, who was widely regarded as the leading number theorist of his generation. Langlands suggested a far-reaching generalization of what was already known concerning a deep connection between…

  • Langlands, Robert (Canadian mathematician)

    Vladimir Drinfeld: Alexandre Grothendieck, Pierre Deligne, and Robert P. Langlands. Drinfeld also conducted research in mathematical physics, developing a classification theorem for quantum groups (a subclass of Hopf algebras). He also introduced the ideas of the Poisson-Lie group and Poisson-Lie actions in his work on Yang-Baxter equations, work also related to the…

  • langlauf (sport)

    Cross-country skiing, skiing in open country over rolling, hilly terrain as found in Scandinavian countries, where the sport originated as a means of travel as well as recreation and where it remains popular. In its noncompetitive form the sport is also known as ski touring. The skis used are

  • langleik (musical instrument)

    zither: …Austrian zither and the Norwegian langleik, in which the pitch of the drone strings is determined by movable bridges. A French form that died out in the 19th century is the miniature épinette des Vosges. With some of these instruments the melody strings are stopped by pressing them against the…

  • Langley (ship)

    aircraft carrier: …converted collier renamed the USS Langley, joined the fleet in March 1922. A Japanese carrier, the Hosyo, which entered service in December 1922, was the first carrier designed as such from the keel up.

  • Langley (British Columbia, Canada)

    Langley, city and township (“district municipality”), southwestern British Columbia, Canada, located about 25 miles (40 km) east-southeast of Vancouver and near the U.S. (Washington) border. A historic Hudson’s Bay Company post, Fort Langley (named for Thomas Langley, a company director), was

  • Langley aerodrome No. 5 (aircraft)

    Langley aerodrome No. 5, aircraft designed and built by Samuel Pierpont Langley in 1896, the first powered heavier-than-air machine to attain sustained flight. Langley reached the peak of his aeronautical career with the successful flight of his aerodrome No. 5 on the afternoon of May 6, 1896. On

  • Langley aerodrome No. 6 (aircraft)

    Langley aerodrome No. 5: …the Smithsonian crew launched the Langley aerodrome No. 6 on a flight lasting more than a minute. Two days later, No. 6 remained aloft for a record 1 minute 45 seconds. Langley ultimately failed in his attempt to achieve successful flight with a full-scale piloted flying machine. Nevertheless, the Langley…

  • Langley aerodrome of 1903 (aircraft)

    Samuel Pierpont Langley: Completed in 1903, the machine was powered by a radial engine developing 52 horsepower. Two attempts were made to launch the machine by catapult into the air from the roof of a large houseboat moored in the Potomac in October and December 1903. On both occasions, the…

  • Langley, Deo (American musician)

    Native American music: Indigenous trends from 1800: …Canada, while the Coushatta fiddler Deo Langley won a regional Cajun music contest in Louisiana during the 1980s. By the 1860s, O’odham fiddlers were playing music for the mazurka, schottische, and polka at public dances in Tucson, Ariz.; they developed a repertory known as waila that has become an important…

  • Langley, Noel (South African-born novelist and playwright)

    Noel Langley, South African-born novelist and playwright who was the author of witty comedies and the creator of many successful film scripts, including The Wizard of Oz (1939), Trio (1950), Tom Brown’s Schooldays (1951), and The Search for Bridey Murphy (1956). Langley graduated from the

  • Langley, Samuel Pierpont (American engineer)

    Samuel Pierpont Langley, American astrophysicist and aeronautical pioneer who developed new instruments with which to study the Sun and built the first powered heavier-than-air machine of significant size to achieve sustained flight. Following his education at the Boston Latin School, Langley

  • Langlie, Arthur (American politician)

    The Family: Origins: …its members, the Seattle lawyer Arthur Langlie, as mayor of the city in 1938 and as governor of Washington state in 1940. Langlie, who declared at a movement retreat that he had been called by God to political office, was described by Vereide as “the spearhead of a return to…

  • Langlois, Charles-Victor (French scholar)

    Charles-Victor Langlois, one of the leading French scholars of the late 19th century, who is best known for his bibliographic and historical studies of medieval France. Langlois received his doctorate in 1887 and was named lecturer at the faculty of letters of Douai. In 1909 he became a professor

  • Langlois, Henri (French director)

    Georges Franju: Franju met Henri Langlois in 1934. In that year the two men directed the short Le Métro, and in 1935 they started a film magazine and founded Le Cercle du Cinéma, a film club. Franju and Langlois founded the Cinémathèque Fran?aise (the French film archives) in 1937,…

  • Langlois, Jean (French explorer)

    Akaroa: …1838 a French whaler, Captain Jean Langlois, agreed with the local Maori chiefs to buy 30,000 acres (12,000 hectares) of the peninsula. He returned to France to organize the Nanto-Bordelaise Company (1839), which, backed by a warship, dispatched a settlement force. Arriving in 1840, the settlers found that the British…

  • Langmann, Claude Berel (French filmmaker)

    Claude Berri, (Claude Berel Langmann), French filmmaker (born July 1, 1934, Paris, France—died Jan. 12, 2009, Paris), was involved—as an actor, writer, director, or producer—in more than 125 motion pictures over a 55-year career, but he was best known as the director of Jean de Florette (1986) and

  • Langmann, Thomas (French film producer and actor)
  • Langmuir circulation (lake hydraulics)

    lake: Internal waves and Langmuir circulation: …considerable attention on lakes is Langmuir circulation. On windy days, parallel “streaks” can be observed to develop on the water surface and exhibit continuity for some distance. These streaks may be caused by convergence zones where surface froth and debris collect. Langmuir circulation thus appears to be a relatively organized…

  • Langmuir, Alexander (American epidemiologist)

    Alexander Langmuir, U.S. epidemiologist (born Sept. 12, 1910, Santa Monica, Calif.—died Nov. 22, 1993, Baltimore, Md.), created and led the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) for the U.S. government and was credited with saving thousands of lives with his revolutionary work. Langmuir received h

  • Langmuir, Irving (American chemist)

    Irving Langmuir, American physical chemist who was awarded the 1932 Nobel Prize for Chemistry “for his discoveries and investigations in surface chemistry.” He was the second American and the first industrial chemist to receive this honour. Besides surface chemistry, his scientific research,

  • Langmuir-Child equation (physics)

    electron tube: Thermionic emission: …in the 1920s, and the Langmuir-Child equation, formulated shortly thereafter. The former states that the current per unit of area, J, is given by

  • Lango (people)

    Lango, people inhabiting the marshy lowlands northeast of Lakes Kwania and Kyoga in northern Uganda and speaking an Eastern Sudanic language of the Nilo-Saharan language family. The Lango cultivate millet for food and for making beer and also grow numerous vegetables. Men and women share the

  • Langobardas (people)

    Lombard, member of a Germanic people who from 568 to 774 ruled a kingdom in Italy. The Lombards were one of the Germanic tribes that formed the Suebi, and during the 1st century ad their home was in northwestern Germany. Though they occasionally fought with the Romans and with neighbouring t

  • Langobardi (people)

    Lombard, member of a Germanic people who from 568 to 774 ruled a kingdom in Italy. The Lombards were one of the Germanic tribes that formed the Suebi, and during the 1st century ad their home was in northwestern Germany. Though they occasionally fought with the Romans and with neighbouring t

  • Langobardus (people)

    Lombard, member of a Germanic people who from 568 to 774 ruled a kingdom in Italy. The Lombards were one of the Germanic tribes that formed the Suebi, and during the 1st century ad their home was in northwestern Germany. Though they occasionally fought with the Romans and with neighbouring t

  • langostino (lobster)

    Scampi, (Nephrops norvegicus), edible lobster of the order Decapoda (class Crustacea). It is widespread in the Mediterranean and northeastern Atlantic, from North Africa to Norway and Iceland, and as a gastronomic delicacy it is commercially exploited over much of its range, particularly by Great

  • langoustine (lobster)

    Scampi, (Nephrops norvegicus), edible lobster of the order Decapoda (class Crustacea). It is widespread in the Mediterranean and northeastern Atlantic, from North Africa to Norway and Iceland, and as a gastronomic delicacy it is commercially exploited over much of its range, particularly by Great

  • Langport (England, United Kingdom)

    Langport, town (parish), South Somerset district, administrative and historic county of Somerset, southwestern England. It lies at the head of the Somerset marshes and for centuries was the main crossing point of the River Parrett. Founded as a royal borough in Saxon times, by 1086 the town had 34

  • Langqên Kanbab (river, Asia)

    Sutlej River, longest of the five tributaries of the Indus River that give the Punjab (meaning “Five Rivers”) its name. It rises on the north slope of the Himalayas in Lake La’nga in southwestern Tibet, at an elevation above 15,000 feet (4,600 metres). Flowing northwestward and then

  • Langrée, Louis (French conductor)

    Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra: …(1986–2001), Paavo J?rvi (2001–11), and Louis Langrée (2013– ). Resident conductors have included Erich Kunzel (1969–70) and Carmon DeLeone (1977–78). Walter Susskind was music adviser from 1978 to 1980. Under Reiner’s tenure, with its emphasis on the central European repertoire, the orchestra achieved an international reputation for excellence.

  • langrenn (sport)

    Cross-country skiing, skiing in open country over rolling, hilly terrain as found in Scandinavian countries, where the sport originated as a means of travel as well as recreation and where it remains popular. In its noncompetitive form the sport is also known as ski touring. The skis used are

  • Langres (France)

    Langres, town, eastern France, Haute-Marne département, Grand Est région, north-northeast of Dijon. A medieval fortified city, it is situated 1,529 feet (466 metres) above sea level on a promontory at the northern end of the Langres Plateau. The walls encompassing the town contain a 2nd-century

  • Langres Plateau (plateau, France)

    Champagne-Ardenne: …of the region lies the Langres Plateau, which reaches elevations of more than 1,500 feet (450 metres). This and other limestone highlands in Haute-Marne are among the most heavily forested areas of France. Farther west, the dry chalk platform is traversed (southeast-northwest) by the converging Aube and Seine river valleys,…

  • Langridge, Philip Gordon (British tenor)

    Philip Gordon Langridge, British tenor (born Dec. 16, 1939, Hawkhurst, Kent, Eng.—died March 5, 2010, England), was known for his strong musicianship, his versatility, and the eloquence of his interpretation of a wide variety of roles, particularly those of the late 20th century. He was especially

  • langsat (plant)

    Meliaceae: Langsat (Lansium domesticum) is native to western Southeast Asia and is cultivated for its edible fruit. The chinaberry (Melia azedarach), also called bead tree and Persian lilac, is an ornamental Asian tree with round yellow fruits, often cultivated in many tropical and warm temperate areas.

  • Langsdorff, Hans (German captain)

    Graf Spee: …Uruguay, where its commander, Captain Hans Langsdorff, obtained permission to stay for four days to repair damage. The British devoted the period to intense diplomatic and intelligence activity in order to keep the Graf Spee in harbour while they brought up heavy reinforcements. On December 17, however, when the Graf…

  • Langsdorffia (plant genus)

    Balanophoraceae: …of the genera Balanophora and Langsdorffia contain an inflammable waxy material, and the stems have been used as candles in South America. The rhizomes of these plants are sometimes processed to produce wax, but the plants are not abundant enough for commercial wax production.

  • Langston University (university, Langston, Oklahoma, United States)

    Langston University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Langston, Oklahoma, U.S. It is Oklahoma’s only historically black institution of higher learning and has land-grant status. It includes schools of Arts and Sciences, Business, Education and Behavioral Sciences,

  • Langston, John Mercer (American politician)

    John Mercer Langston, black leader, educator, and diplomat, who is believed to have been the first black ever elected to public office in the United States. The son of a Virginia planter and a slave mother, Langston was emancipated at the age of five, attended school in Ohio, and graduated from

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载