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  • life cycle (biology)

    Life cycle, in biology, the series of changes that the members of a species undergo as they pass from the beginning of a given developmental stage to the inception of that same developmental stage in a subsequent generation. In many simple organisms, including bacteria and various protists, the

  • life cycle development (computing)

    information system: Internal information systems development: …two broad methods is used: life-cycle development or rapid application development (RAD).

  • Life Divine, The (work by Aurobindo)

    Indian philosophy: 19th- and 20th-century philosophy in India and Pakistan: In his major work, The Life Divine, Sri Aurobindo starts from the fact of human aspiration for a kingdom of heaven on earth and proceeds to give a theoretical framework in which such an aspiration would be not a figment of imagination but a drive in nature, working through…

  • life estate (law)

    property law: Life estate and remainder: One of the possible temporal divisions of ownership in Anglo-American law, the life estate and the remainder in fee, has already been considered. In such an arrangement the life tenant has the right to possess the land for his natural life.…

  • life everlasting (plant)

    pussy-toes: Antennaria dioica has several cultivated varieties of white, wooly appearance and with small clusters of white to rose flowers. In some species, including smaller pussy-toes (A. neodioica), male flowers are rare. The plantain-leaved pussy-toes (A. plantaginifolia), also called ladies’ tobacco, has longer and broader basal…

  • life expectancy

    Life expectancy, estimate of the average number of additional years that a person of a given age can expect to live. The most common measure of life expectancy is life expectancy at birth. Life expectancy is a hypothetical measure. It assumes that the age-specific death rates for the year in

  • Life for the Tsar, A (opera by Glinka)

    opera: Russian opera: …Glinka: Zhizn za tsarya (A Life for the Tsar), also known as Ivan Susanin, (1836), and Ruslan i Lyudmila (1842; “Ruslan and Lyudmila”), both premiered in St. Petersburg. Basically Italianate operas, they—Ruslan in particular—determined the course of Russian opera, because of Glinka’s approximations of Slavic folk music, his modified…

  • Life Goes On (film by Datta [2009])

    Girish Karnad: …and acting in Iqbal (2005), Life Goes On (2009), and 24 (2016), among others.

  • Life Goes On (American television series)

    Patti LuPone: In the television series Life Goes On (1989–93), she played the mother of a child with Down syndrome. The mixed reviews of her performance as Norma Desmond in Lloyd Webber’s London production of Sunset Boulevard (1992) led him to replace her with Glenn Close in the Broadway production. LuPone…

  • life history (biology)

    population ecology: Life histories and the structure of populations: An organism’s life history is the sequence of events related to survival and reproduction that occur from birth through death. Populations from different parts of the geographic range that a species inhabits may exhibit marked variations in their…

  • Life History and the Historical Moment (work by Erikson)

    Erik Erikson: …in a collection of essays, Life History and the Historical Moment (1975), which links psychoanalysis to history, political science, philosophy, and theology. His later works include The Life Cycle Completed: A Review (1982) and Vital Involvement in Old Age (1986), written with his wife and Helen Q. Kivnik. A collection…

  • Life in a Bromeliad Pool

    Bromeliads comprise an entire order of flowering plants called Bromeliales. The pineapple is the most familiar member of this tropical American group, which also includes some of the most interesting plants of the rainforest—the tank bromeliads. Most bromeliads are epiphytes—that is, plants that

  • Life in Christ (work by Cabasilas)

    Nicholas Cabasilas: Cabasilas’ chief spiritual–ascetical writing, Life in Christ, proposed a program of Christian spirituality integrating divine and human activity in both individual and common liturgical prayer. By essays and political involvement he manifested a social consciousness relative to economic and institutional (including the church) inequities. The high intellectual level of…

  • Life in Hell (work by Groening)

    Matt Groening: …who created the comic strip Life in Hell (1980–2012) and the television series The Simpsons (1989– ) and Futurama (1999–2003, 2010–13).

  • Life in Pieces (American television series)

    Dianne Wiest: …cast member of the series Life in Pieces (2015–19).

  • Life in the Argentine Republic in the Days of the Tyrants; or, Civilization and Barbarism (work by Sarmiento)

    caudillismo: Domingo Faustino Sarmiento’s 1845 book Facundo provided the classical interpretation of caudillismo in Latin America in the 1800s, framing it as the expression of political barbarism and the antithesis of a government that ensures security, freedom, and ownership rights for a country’s inhabitants. Sarmiento’s book is a portrait of Juan…

  • Life in the Garden (work by Lively)

    Penelope Lively: Life in the Garden (2017) was described as a “horticultural memoir.” Her novels during this time included Consequences (2007), which follows the lives of three generations of women; Family Album (2009); and How It All Began (2011). The Purple Swamp Hen, and Other Stories was…

  • Life in the Theatre, A (play by Mamet)

    David Mamet: …1996) concerns dishonest business practices; A Life in the Theatre (produced 1977) explores the teacher-student relationship; and Speed-the-Plow (produced 1988) is a black comedy about avaricious Hollywood scriptwriters.

  • Life in the Tomb (work by Myrivilis)

    Greek literature: Literature after 1922: … I zoí en tafo (1930; Life in the Tomb), a journal of life in the trenches in World War I; Argo (2 vol., 1933 and 1936) by Yórgos Theotokás, about a group of students attempting to find their way through life in the turbulent 1920s; and Eroica (1937) by Kosmás…

  • life instinct (psychology)

    Libido, concept originated by Sigmund Freud to signify the instinctual physiological or psychic energy associated with sexual urges and, in his later writings, with all constructive human activity. In the latter sense of eros, or life instinct, libido was opposed by thanatos, the death instinct

  • life insurance

    Life insurance, method by which large groups of individuals equalize the burden of financial loss from death by distributing funds to the beneficiaries of those who die. Life insurance is most developed in wealthy countries, where it has become a major channel of saving and investment. Upon the

  • Life Is a Dream (play by Calderón)

    comedy: Divine comedies in the West and East: …Pedro Calderón de la Barca’s Life Is a Dream (1635) is an example; on the operatic stage, so is Mozart’s Magic Flute (1791), in spirit and form so like Shakespeare’s Tempest, to which it has often been compared. In later drama, Henrik Ibsen’s Little Eyolf (1894) and August Strindberg’s To…

  • Life Is a Dream (work by Durcan)

    Paul Durcan: Life Is a Dream (2009) is a wide-ranging collection of poems that Durcan published between 1967 and 2007.

  • Life Is a Miracle (film by Kusturica [2004])

    Emir Kusturica: The 21st century: …decades: ?ivot je ?udo (2004; Life Is a Miracle) and Zavet (2007; Promise Me This). The former deals with life in a small Bosnian town as the war approaches, and the latter concerns the vow given by a grandfather to his grandson. Though both films are typically heartwarming, they are…

  • Life Is Beautiful (film by Benigni [1997])

    Roberto Benigni: Life Is Beautiful, however, established Benigni as an international star. The movie—which he wrote, directed, and acted in—was released in the United States in 1998 and became one of the highest-grossing non-English-language films in American box-office history. At the 1999 Academy Awards ceremony, Benigni became…

  • Life Is Elsewhere (novel by Kundera)

    Milan Kundera: …novel, ?ivot je jinde (1969; Life Is Elsewhere), about a hapless, romantic-minded hero who thoroughly embraces the Communist takeover of 1948, was forbidden Czech publication. Kundera had participated in the brief but heady liberalization of Czechoslovakia in 1967–68, and after the Soviet occupation of the country he refused to admit…

  • Life Is Ours (film by Renoir)

    Jean Renoir: Early years: …codirected the communist propaganda film La Vie est à nous (The People of France). The same year, he recaptured the flavour of his early works with a short film, Une Partie de campagne (released 1946; A Day in the Country), which he finished with great difficulty. A masterpiece of impressionist…

  • Life Is Rising from the Ruins (film by Kadár)

    Ján Kadár: …he made the outstanding documentary Life Is Rising from the Ruins (1945). In 1950 Kadár directed the comedy Katka (U.S. title, Katya), his first independent feature and a milestone in the postwar Czechoslovak cinema. It was followed by a series of films codirected with Elmar Klos. They include únos (1952;…

  • Life Is Sweet (film by Leigh [1990])

    Mike Leigh: …themes in the poignant comedy Life Is Sweet (1990), about the ordeals of a suburban London family. It was followed by Naked (1993), a stark portrait of a disaffected loner that earned Leigh the best director prize at the Cannes film festival.

  • Life Itself (film by Fogelman [2018])

    Antonio Banderas: …appeared in the multigenerational drama Life Itself (2018) and in The Laundromat (2019), Soderbergh’s farce about the Panama Papers scandal. Banderas reteamed with Almodóvar in Dolor y gloria (2019; Pain and Glory), starring as a director contemplating his life. For his performance, Banderas received his first Academy Award nomination.

  • Life Itself: A Memoir (book by Ebert [2011])

    Roger Ebert: …Ebert published the engagingly reflective Life Itself: A Memoir. A documentary of the same name was released in 2014; it depicted Ebert’s life and featured commentary from a range of film industry luminaries. His other books included I Hated, Hated, Hated This Movie (2000), which collected some of his sharpest…

  • Life Less Ordinary, A (film by Boyle [1997])

    Holly Hunter: …Holidays (both 1995), Danny Boyle’s A Life Less Ordinary (1997), and the romance Living Out Loud (1998).

  • life line (X-ray style)

    Korean art: The formative period: …the animals have a “life line” drawn from the mouth to the anus in the so-called X-ray style of Siberian rock art. A shaman, hunters, and a fisherman are also depicted.

  • Life Line (American foundation)

    H. L. Hunt: …he revived the foundation as Life Line, to distribute a daily 15-minute radio program carried by more than 400 stations.

  • Life Line, The (painting by Homer)

    Winslow Homer: The move to Prouts Neck: …impressive, and immediately popular painting The Life Line (1884), one of several he did at that time on the rescue theme, depicting the dramatic transfer of an unconscious woman from a wrecked ship to shore.

  • life mask (sculpture)

    death mask: In contrast to death masks, life masks are made from molds taken from living faces. The features of such persons as Henry Clay and James Madison have been preserved in life masks.

  • Life of an American Fireman, The (film by Porter)

    Edwin S. Porter: A revolution in filmmaking: …continuity form,” which resulted in The Life of an American Fireman (six minutes, produced in late 1902 and released in January 1903). This film, which was also influenced by James Williamson’s Fire! (1901), combined archival footage with staged scenes to create a nine-shot narrative of a dramatic rescue from a…

  • Life of an Amorous Man, The (novel by Saikaku)

    Ihara Saikaku: Kōshoku ichidai otoko (1682; The Life of an Amorous Man), the first of Saikaku’s many novels concerned with the pleasure quarters, relates the erotic adventures of its hero, Yonosuke, from his precocious experiences at the age of 6 to his departure at 60 for an island of women. Of…

  • Life of Anselm (work by Eadmer)

    Edmer: …and clerical authorities, and the Vita Anselmi (c. 1124), an authoritative biography of Anselm’s private life. Edmer’s importance in historiography rests on his powers of critical observation and description, a novel emphasis on psychological factors in biographical writing, and a clear recognition of the implications of the Investiture Controversy.

  • Life of Arsenev, The (novel by Bunin)

    Ivan Bunin: …autobiographical novel Zhizn Arsenyeva (The Life of Arsenev)—which Bunin began writing during the 1920s and of which he published parts in the 1930s and 1950s—were recognized by critics and Russian readers abroad as testimony of the independence of Russian émigré culture.

  • Life of Brian (film by Jones [1979])

    John Cleese: …and the Holy Grail (1975), Life of Brian (1979), and Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life (1983).

  • Life of Castruccio Castracani of Lucca, The (work by Machiavelli)

    Niccolò Machiavelli: Early life and political career: …government and to compose his The Life of Castruccio Castracani of Lucca (1520; La vita di Castruccio Castracani da Lucca). Later that year the cardinal agreed to have Machiavelli elected official historian of the republic, a post to which he was appointed in November 1520 with a salary of 57…

  • Life of Charlemagne (work by Einhard)

    Einhard: Einhard probably wrote his Vita Karoli Magni (“Life of Charles the Great”) about 830–833, after he had left Aachen and was living in Seligenstadt. Based on 23 years of service to Charlemagne and research in the royal annals, the book was expressly intended to convey Einhard’s gratitude for Charlemagne’s…

  • Life of Charles Brockden Brown (work by Prescott)

    William H. Prescott: Life and works: His “Life of Charles Brockden Brown” (1834) in Jared Sparks’s Library of American Biography served notice of Prescott’s high abilities as a writer. Largely on the advice of his friend the teacher and writer George Ticknor and the later encouragement from the miscellaneous writer Washington Irving,…

  • Life of Christ (work by Aleni)

    Giulio Aleni: …of Fukien and wrote the Life of Christ, 8 vol. (1635–37). Often reprinted, it was used by Protestant missionaries. He also wrote a six-volume cosmography that was translated into Manchu.

  • Life of Clement of Ochrida (work by Theophylactus)

    Theophylactus Of Ochrida: …Slavic people, Theophylactus wrote the Life of Clement of Ochrida, the first Slavonic bishop, lavishing praise on Cyril and Methodius, the apostles to the Slavs and creators of the Slavic alphabet.

  • Life of Constantine (work by Eusebius)

    Eusebius of Caesarea: …in 337, he wrote his Life of Constantine, a panegyric that possesses some historical value, chiefly because of its use of primary sources. Throughout his life Eusebius also wrote apologetic works, commentaries on the Bible, and works explaining the parallels and discrepancies in the Gospels.

  • Life of Dante (work by Boccaccio)

    Giovanni Boccaccio: Petrarch and Boccaccio’s mature years.: His Vita di Dante Alighieri, or Trattatello in laude di Dante (“Little Tractate in Praise of Dante”), and the two abridged editions of it that he made show his devotion to Dante’s memory.

  • Life of David Hume, Esquire, Written by Himself, The (work by Hume)

    David Hume: Morals and historical writing: His curiously detached autobiography, The Life of David Hume, Esquire, Written by Himself (1777; the title is his own), is dated April 18, 1776. He died in his Edinburgh house after a long illness and was buried on Calton Hill.

  • Life of Dickens, The (work by Forster)

    John Forster: …of Charles Dickens, he wrote The Life of Dickens (1872–74).

  • Life of Edward Bouverie Pusey (work by Liddon)

    Henry Parry Liddon: …authorized biography, published posthumously as Life of Edward Bouverie Pusey (1893–97).

  • Life of Emile Zola, The (film by Dieterle [1937])

    William Dieterle: Warner Brothers: …then landed the prestige property The Life of Emile Zola (1937). Muni played the outspoken writer who protested the unjust charge of treason that had been leveled against Jewish officer Alfred Dreyfus. The film was a box-office success, and it won the Academy Award for best picture—Warner Brothers’ first win…

  • Life of Francis North, The (work by North)

    Roger North: …his brother Francis, he wrote The Life of Francis North; this was followed by biographies of Sir Dudley North and John North. Neither the biographies nor his autobiography was published until after his death.

  • Life of Galileo, The (play by Brecht)

    Bertolt Brecht: …War; Leben des Galilei (1943; The Life of Galileo); Der gute Mensch von Sezuan (1943; The Good Woman of Setzuan), a parable play set in prewar China; Der Aufhaltsame Aufstieg des Arturo Ui (1957; The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui), a parable play of Hitler’s rise to power set in…

  • Life of George Washington, The (work by Marshall)

    John Marshall: Chief justice of the United States: …1807 he completed the five-volume The Life of George Washington. He also served (1812) as chair of a commission charged with finding a land and water route to link eastern and western Virginia, and in 1829 he was part of the Virginia state constitutional convention.

  • Life of Glückel of Hameln, The (work by Glikl of Hameln)

    Glikl of Hameln: …seven books of memoirs (Zikhroynes), written in Yiddish with passages in Hebrew, reveal much about the history, culture, and everyday life of contemporary Jews in central Europe. Written not for publication but as a family chronicle and legacy for her children and their descendants, the diaries were begun in…

  • Life of Henri Brulard, The (work by Stendhal)

    The Life of Henry Brulard, unfinished autobiography by Stendhal, which he began writing in November 1835 and abandoned in March 1836. The scribbled manuscript, including the author’s sketches and diagrams, was deciphered and published as Vie de Henry Brulard in 1890, 48 years after its author’s

  • Life of Henry Brulard, The (work by Stendhal)

    The Life of Henry Brulard, unfinished autobiography by Stendhal, which he began writing in November 1835 and abandoned in March 1836. The scribbled manuscript, including the author’s sketches and diagrams, was deciphered and published as Vie de Henry Brulard in 1890, 48 years after its author’s

  • Life of Her Own, A (film by Cukor [1950])

    George Cukor: Films of the 1950s: …direction of Lana Turner in A Life of Her Own (1950) created few sparks, but he guided Judy Holliday to a best actress Academy Award for her performance of a role that she had played on Broadway in Born Yesterday (also 1950), which also earned a nomination for best picture…

  • Life of Insects, The (novel by Pelevin)

    Viktor Pelevin: Zhizn nasekomykh (1993; The Life of Insects) was set in a decaying resort on the Black Sea. In the novel two Russians and an American live alternately as humans and insects—for example, as dung beetles—and thereby learn valuable lessons about how to manage in life. Among Pelevin’s other…

  • Life of Jesus (work by Renan)

    rationalism: Four waves of religious rationalism: Renan’s Vie de Jésus (1863; Life of Jesus) did for France what Strauss’s book had done for Germany, though the two differed greatly in character. Whereas Strauss’s work had been an intellectual exercise in destructive criticism, Renan’s was an attempt to reconstruct the mind of Jesus as a wholly human…

  • Life of Jesus Critically Examined, The (work by Strauss)

    Jesus: The 19th century: …orthodox Christology: one was the Life of Jesus, first published in 1835 by David Friedrich Strauss, and the other, bearing the same title, was first published by Ernest Renan in 1863. Strauss’s work paid more attention to the growth of Christian ideas—he called them “myths”—about Jesus as the basis for…

  • Life of Jimmy Dolan, The (film by Mayo [1933])

    Archie Mayo: Films of the 1930s: The Life of Jimmy Dolan featured Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as a boxer fleeing a murder rap who finds himself helping a group of disabled children, and The Mayor of Hell starred Cagney as a mobster who replaces the brutal warden of a reform school. In…

  • Life of John Buncle, The (work by Amory)

    Thomas Amory: …known for his extravagant “autobiography,” The Life of John Buncle, 2 vol. (1756 and 1766), in which the hero marries seven wives in succession, each wife embodying one of Amory’s ideals of womanhood. Rich, racy, and eccentric, his works contain something of the spirit of both Charles Dickens and Fran?ois…

  • Life of John Marshall, The (work by Beveridge)

    Albert J. Beveridge: His The Life of John Marshall, 4 vol. (1916–19), was widely acclaimed and won a Pulitzer Prize. At the time of his death he had completed two volumes of a biography of Abraham Lincoln, published in 1928.

  • Life of Johnson (work by Boswell)

    The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., generally regarded as the greatest of English biographies, written by James Boswell and published in two volumes in 1791. Boswell, a 22-year-old lawyer from Scotland, first met the 53-year-old Samuel Johnson in 1763, and they were friends for the 21 remaining

  • Life of King Alfred (work by Asser)

    Asser: Asser’s Life of King Alfred follows Alfred’s career from his birth to his accession in 871, and describes in detail his reign and his wars, stopping abruptly in 887, 12 years before Alfred’s death. For historical events, it draws largely on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Some scholars…

  • Life of Larry, The (film by MacFarlane [1995])

    Seth MacFarlane: His student film The Life of Larry (1995), an animated short, was seen by executives at Hanna-Barbera Productions, and in 1995 he was offered a job with the studio. There he worked on shows such as Dexter’s Laboratory and Johnny Bravo. In 1996 MacFarlane created a short sequel…

  • Life of Lycurgus (work by Plutarch)

    Lycurgus: In his Life of Lycurgus, the Greek biographer Plutarch pieced together popular accounts of Lycurgus’ career. Plutarch described Lycurgus’ journey to Egypt and claimed that the reformer had introduced the poems of Homer to Sparta.

  • Life of Man, The (work by Andreyev)

    stagecraft: Costume of the 20th century and beyond: …production of Leonid Andreyev’s play The Life of Man, with expressionistic costumes designed by Theodore Komisarjevsky, was purely mechanical in its design. German advocates reasoned that, since the actor is enclosed in the space of the stage, either the stage must be arranged according to the illusion of reality so…

  • Life of Man, The (work by Arden)

    John Arden: …professionally was a radio drama, The Life of Man (1956). Waters of Babylon (1957), a play with a roguish but unjudged central character, revealed a moral ambiguity that troubled critics and audiences. His next play, Live Like Pigs (1958), was set on a housing estate. This was followed by his…

  • Life of Milton (work by Toland)

    John Toland: Almost immediately, Toland wrote his Life of Milton (1698), which incurred further wrath for a passage in it that appeared to question the authenticity of the New Testament. This was followed the next year by Amyntor, or a Defence of Milton’s Life, in which Toland sought to defend himself by…

  • Life of Moses (work by Gregory of Nyssa)

    Saint Gregory of Nyssa: …are crowned by the mystical Life of Moses, which treats the 13th-century-bc journey of the Hebrews from Egypt to Mount Sinai as a pattern of the progress of the soul through the temptations of the world to a vision of God. A notable emphasis of Gregory’s teaching is the principle…

  • Life of Mr. Jonathan Wild the Great, The (work by Fielding)

    Henry Fielding: Maturity.: …far the most important is The Life of Mr. Jonathan Wild the Great. Here, narrating the life of a notorious criminal of the day, Fielding satirizes human greatness, or rather human greatness confused with power over others. Permanently topical, Jonathan Wild, with the exception of some passages by his older…

  • Life of Mrs. Godolphin (work by Evelyn)

    John Evelyn: …a child in 1678; Evelyn’s Life of Mrs. Godolphin (1847; ed. H. Sampson, 1939), is one of the most moving of 17th-century biographies.

  • Life of Mu?ammad, The (work by Ibn Is?āq)

    Ibn Is?āq: Guillaume, The Life of Mu?ammad, 1955, and partial trans. by Edward Rehatsek as edited by Michael Edwardes, The Life of Muhammad Apostle of Allah, 1964). This extensive biography covers Mu?ammad’s genealogy and birth, the beginning of his mission and of the revelation of the Qur?ān, his…

  • Life of Oharu, The (film by Mizoguchi)

    history of the motion picture: Japan: …were Saikaku ichidai onna (1952; The Life of Oharu), the biography of a 17th-century courtesan, and Ugetsu (1953), the story of two men who abandon their wives for fame and glory during the 16th-century civil wars. Both were masterworks that clearly demonstrated Mizoguchi’s expressive use of luminous decor, extended long…

  • Life of P.T. Barnum, Written by Himself, The (work by Barnum)

    P.T. Barnum: …1855 he published his autobiography, The Life of P.T. Barnum, Written by Himself; and because he frankly revealed some of the deceits he had employed, he was harshly taken to task by the majority of critics. Stung, Barnum continually modified the book in many revised versions, which, he claimed, sold…

  • Life of Pablo, The (album by West)

    Kanye West: …of his eighth studio album, The Life of Pablo (2016); in fact, he debuted tracks from the album at his showcase of YEEZY Season 3 at Madison Square Garden in New York. The gospel-tinged album further demonstrated West’s inventiveness as a producer, but critics found it disjointed. In addition, the…

  • Life of Pi (novel by Martel)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: Yann Martel’s Life of Pi (2001), winner of the Booker Prize, depicts the fantastic voyage of 16-year-old Pi, who, en route to Canada from India, is shipwrecked and left adrift on the Pacific with several zoo animals.

  • Life of Pi (film by Lee [2012])

    Ang Lee: He returned in 2012 with Life of Pi, an adaptation of Yann Martel’s fablelike novel (2001) in which an Indian boy, having survived a shipwreck in the Pacific Ocean, becomes trapped on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger. The visually sumptuous film earned Lee a second Academy Award for best…

  • Life of Pope, The (work by Johnson)

    Samuel Johnson: The Lives of the Poets: The Life of Pope is at once the longest and best. Pope’s life and career were fresh enough and public enough to provide ample biographical material. Johnson found Pope’s poetry highly congenial. His moving, unsentimental account of Pope’s life is sensitive to his physical sufferings…

  • Life of Reason, The (work by Santayana)

    George Santayana: Early life and career: The Life of Reason (1905–06) was a major theoretical work consisting of five volumes. Conceived in his student days after a reading of G.W.F. Hegel’s Phenomenology of Mind, it was described by Santayana as “a presumptive biography of the human intellect.” The life of reason,…

  • Life of Riley (film by Resnais [2014])

    Alain Resnais: …Aimer, boire et chanter (2014; Life of Riley), were also praised by critics.

  • Life of Riley, The (American radio and television program)

    radio: Situation comedy: The Life of Riley, starring William Bendix as a well-meaning if somewhat overprotective husband and father, was a long-running success in both radio and television, as was The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, which starred former bandleader Ozzie Nelson, his real-life wife, Harriet Hilliard Nelson,…

  • Life of Robert Rogers, The (work by Nevins)

    Allan Nevins: …he wrote his first book, The Life of Robert Rogers (1914), about the Colonial American frontier soldier who fought on the loyalist side. After graduation Nevins joined the New York Evening Post as an editorial writer and for nearly 20 years worked as a journalist. During this period he also…

  • Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., The (work by Boswell)

    The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., generally regarded as the greatest of English biographies, written by James Boswell and published in two volumes in 1791. Boswell, a 22-year-old lawyer from Scotland, first met the 53-year-old Samuel Johnson in 1763, and they were friends for the 21 remaining

  • Life of Shelley (work by Dowden)

    Edward Dowden: …is also remembered for his Life of Shelley (1886) and was among the first to appreciate Walt Whitman, becoming his good friend.

  • Life of Shelley, The (work by Hogg)

    Thomas Jefferson Hogg: …in 1858 under the title The Life of Shelley. This work throws much light on the poet’s character through the use of anecdotes and letters and contains a good deal of material relating to Hogg himself. It was to have been in four volumes; but the Shelley family, objecting to…

  • Life of Sir Walter Scott (work by Lockhart)

    John Gibson Lockhart: …biographer, best remembered for his Life of Sir Walter Scott (1837–38; enlarged 1839), one of the great biographies in English.

  • Life of Sir William Osler (work by Cushing)

    Harvey Williams Cushing: …Prize in 1926 for his Life of Sir William Osler (1925).

  • Life of St. Antony (work by Athanasius)

    St. Athanasius: Other works: …the Holy Spirit and The Life of St. Antony, which was soon translated into Latin and did much to spread the ascetic ideal in East and West. Only fragments remain of sermons and biblical commentaries. Several briefer theological treatises are preserved, however, and a number of letters, mainly administrative and…

  • Life of St. Bruno (paintings by Le Sueur)

    Eustache Le Sueur: …of 22 paintings of the Life of St. Bruno, executed in the cloister of the Chartreux. Stylistically dominated by the art of Nicolas Poussin, Raphael, and Vouet, Le Sueur had a graceful facility in drawing and was always restrained in composition by a fastidious taste.

  • Life of St. Francis of Assisi (work by Bonaventure)

    Saint Bonaventure: …wrote for it a new Life of St. Francis of Assisi (1263), and protected it (1269) from an assault by Gerard of Abbeville, a teacher of theology at Paris, who renewed the charge of William of Saint-Amour. He also protected the church during the period 1267–73 by upholding the Christian…

  • Life of St. Gerald of Aurillac (work by Odo)

    Saint Odo of Cluny: Abbot of Cluny: …De vita sancti Gerardi (Life of St. Gerald of Aurillac). The Collationes is both a commentary on the virtues and vices of men in society and a spiritual meditation modeled on a work of the same name by the monk and theologian John Cassian (360–435). De vita sancti Gerardi…

  • Life of St. John the Baptist, The (work by Giovanni di Paolo)

    Giovanni di Paolo: … (1447–49) and six scenes from The Life of St. John the Baptist. The brooding Madonna Altarpiece of 1463 in the Pienza Cathedral marks the beginning of Giovanni’s late period, of which the coarse Assumption polyptych of 1475 from Staggia constitutes the last important work.

  • Life of St. Martin of Tours (work by Severus)

    patristic literature: Monastic literature: …5th century he wrote his Life of St. Martin of Tours, the first Western biography of a monastic hero and the pattern of a long line of medieval lives of saints. But it was Palladius (c. 363–before 431), a pupil of Evagrius Ponticus, who proved to be the principal historian…

  • Life of St. Wilfrid (work by Aedde)

    United Kingdom: The supremacy of Northumbria and the rise of Mercia: …Kentish monk Aedde, in his Life of St. Wilfrid, said Wulfhere roused all the southern peoples in an attack on Ecgfrith of Northumbria in 674 but was defeated and died soon after.

  • Life of the Archpriest Avvakum, by Himself, The (Avvakum Petrovich)

    Avvakum Petrovich: …is considered to be his Zhitiye (“Life”), the first Russian autobiography. Distinguished for its lively description and for its original, colourful style, the Zhitiye is one of the great works of early Russian literature. A council of 1682 against the Old Believers condemned Avvakum to be burned at the stake,…

  • Life of the Bee, The (work by Maeterlinck)

    Maurice Maeterlinck: …La Vie des abeilles (1901; The Life of the Bee) and L’Intelligence des fleurs (1907; The Intelligence of Flowers), in which Maeterlinck sets out his philosophy of the human condition. Maeterlinck was made a count by the Belgian king in 1932.

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