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  • Limpopo River (river, Africa)

    Limpopo River, river in southeast Africa that rises as the Krokodil (Crocodile) River in the Witwatersrand, South Africa, and flows on a semicircular course first northeast and then east for about 1,100 miles (1,800 km) to the Indian Ocean. From its source the river flows northward to the

  • Limu Pools (tidal pools, Niue)

    Niue: Land and people: …and pools such as the Limu Pools on the northwest edge of the island.

  • Limulus (chelicerate genus)

    skeleton: Skeletomusculature of arthropods: In Limulus, the horseshoe crab, muscles from the anterior margin of the coxa (the leg segment nearest the body) are inserted on the endosternite, as are other muscles from the posterior margin.

  • Limulus amoebocyte lysate test (medicine)

    horseshoe crab: Biomedical applications: …Jack Levin, to develop the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test for the presence of gram-negative bacteria in injections during the 1960s. This test, which was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1973 and first licensed in 1977, protects people from much of the harmful bacteria that could…

  • Limulus polyphemus (chelicerate)

    horseshoe crab: Natural history: …is the single American species Limulus polyphemus, specimens of which can reach a length of more than 60 cm (2 feet), though males and females typically average lengths of 36.6–38.1 cm (14–15 inches) and 45.7–48.3 cm (18–19 inches) respectively. The other three species, Tachypleus tridentatus, T. gigas, and Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda,…

  • Lin (Chinese prince)

    Li Bai: …the military expedition of Prince Lin, the emperor’s 16th son. The prince was soon accused of intending to establish an independent kingdom and was executed; Li Bai was arrested and imprisoned at Jiujiang. In the summer of 758 he was banished to Yelang; before he arrived there, he benefited from…

  • Lin Biao (Chinese military leader)

    Lin Biao, Chinese military leader who, as a field commander of the Red Army, contributed to the communists’ 22-year struggle for power and held many high government and party posts. He played a prominent role in the first several years of the Cultural Revolution (1966–76), but in 1971 he allegedly

  • Lin Feng-mien (Chinese artist)

    Lin Fengmian, Chinese painter and art educator who sought to blend the best of both Eastern and Western art. The son of a painter, Lin learned traditional Chinese painting techniques as a child. After graduating from high school, he moved to France, where he studied European painting at the Dijon

  • Lin Fengmian (Chinese artist)

    Lin Fengmian, Chinese painter and art educator who sought to blend the best of both Eastern and Western art. The son of a painter, Lin learned traditional Chinese painting techniques as a child. After graduating from high school, he moved to France, where he studied European painting at the Dijon

  • Lin Hele (Chinese author)

    Lin Yutang, prolific writer of a wide variety of works in Chinese and English; in the 1930s he founded several Chinese magazines specializing in social satire and Western-style journalism. Lin, the son of a Chinese Presbyterian minister, was educated for the ministry but renounced Christianity in

  • Lin Liguo (Chinese politician)

    China: Struggle for the premiership: …1971 until Lin Biao’s son, Lin Liguo, evidently began to put together plans for a possible coup against Mao should this prove the only way to save his father’s position.

  • Lin Piao (Chinese military leader)

    Lin Biao, Chinese military leader who, as a field commander of the Red Army, contributed to the communists’ 22-year struggle for power and held many high government and party posts. He played a prominent role in the first several years of the Cultural Revolution (1966–76), but in 1971 he allegedly

  • Lin Qinnan (Chinese translator)

    Lin Shu, Chinese translator who first made available to Chinese readers more than 180 works of Western literature, even though he himself had no firsthand knowledge of any foreign language. Working through oral interpreters, Lin Shu translated fiction from England, the United States, France,

  • Lin Shaoqiong (Chinese artist)

    Lin Fengmian, Chinese painter and art educator who sought to blend the best of both Eastern and Western art. The son of a painter, Lin learned traditional Chinese painting techniques as a child. After graduating from high school, he moved to France, where he studied European painting at the Dijon

  • Lin Shu (Chinese translator)

    Lin Shu, Chinese translator who first made available to Chinese readers more than 180 works of Western literature, even though he himself had no firsthand knowledge of any foreign language. Working through oral interpreters, Lin Shu translated fiction from England, the United States, France,

  • Lin Tse-hsü (Chinese official)

    Lin Zexu, leading Chinese scholar and official of the Qing (Manchu) dynasty, known for his role in the events leading up to the first Opium War (1839–42) between Britain and China. He was a proponent of the revitalization of traditional Chinese thought and institutions, a movement that became known

  • Lin Tsung-yi (Taiwanese psychiatrist)

    Lin Tsung-yi, Taiwanese psychiatrist (born Sept. 19, 1920, Tainan, Taiwan—died July 20, 2010, Vancouver, B.C.), pioneered the mental health system in Taiwan and helped the field of psychiatry achieve global recognition by confirming that mental illness is a disorder that transcends cultural and

  • Lin Weilu (Chinese translator)

    Lin Shu, Chinese translator who first made available to Chinese readers more than 180 works of Western literature, even though he himself had no firsthand knowledge of any foreign language. Working through oral interpreters, Lin Shu translated fiction from England, the United States, France,

  • Lin Yaohua (Chinese anthropologist)

    anthropology: Anthropology in Asia: Fei Xiaotong and Lin Yaohua, who would become well known respectively for their Peasant Life in China: A Field Study of Country Life in the Yangtze Valley (1939; reissued 1980) and The Golden Wing: A Family Chronicle (1944; reissued in 1998 as The Golden Wing: A Sociological Study…

  • Lin Yü-t’ang (Chinese author)

    Lin Yutang, prolific writer of a wide variety of works in Chinese and English; in the 1930s he founded several Chinese magazines specializing in social satire and Western-style journalism. Lin, the son of a Chinese Presbyterian minister, was educated for the ministry but renounced Christianity in

  • Lin Yurong (Chinese military leader)

    Lin Biao, Chinese military leader who, as a field commander of the Red Army, contributed to the communists’ 22-year struggle for power and held many high government and party posts. He played a prominent role in the first several years of the Cultural Revolution (1966–76), but in 1971 he allegedly

  • Lin Yutang (Chinese author)

    Lin Yutang, prolific writer of a wide variety of works in Chinese and English; in the 1930s he founded several Chinese magazines specializing in social satire and Western-style journalism. Lin, the son of a Chinese Presbyterian minister, was educated for the ministry but renounced Christianity in

  • Lin Zexu (Chinese official)

    Lin Zexu, leading Chinese scholar and official of the Qing (Manchu) dynasty, known for his role in the events leading up to the first Opium War (1839–42) between Britain and China. He was a proponent of the revitalization of traditional Chinese thought and institutions, a movement that became known

  • Lin’an (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • Lin, Chia Chiao (American astronomer)

    Milky Way Galaxy: The spiral arms: The American astronomers Chia-Chiao Lin and Frank H. Shu showed that a spiral shape is a natural result of any large-scale disturbance of the density distribution of stars in a galactic disk. When the interaction of the stars with one another is calculated, it is found that the…

  • Lin, Jeremy (American basketball player)

    Jeremy Lin, In February 2012 “Linsanity” swept across the U.S. and much of Asia as basketball player Jeremy Lin, a Harvard University graduate and second-generation Asian American, led the NBA’s New York Knicks to a seven-game winning streak in which he scored an incredible 171 points overall,

  • Lin, Maya (American sculptor and architect)

    Maya Lin, American architect and sculptor concerned with environmental themes who is best known for her design of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. The daughter of intellectuals who had fled China in 1948, Lin received a bachelor’s degree in 1981 from Yale University in New Haven,

  • Lin-chi (Buddhist sect)

    Rinzai, one of two major Zen Buddhist sects in Japan; it stresses the abrupt awakening of transcendental wisdom, or enlightenment. Among the methods it practices are shouts (katsu) or blows delivered by the master on the disciple, question-and-answer sessions (mondo), and meditation on paradoxical

  • Lin-fen (China)

    Linfen, city, southern Shanxi sheng (province), China. It is situated on the east bank of the Fen River about 140 miles (220 km) south of Taiyuan, the provincial capital. The Fen River valley was one of the earliest centres of Chinese civilization, being the site of well-developed prehistoric

  • Lin-tzu (former town, Zibo, China)

    Linzi, former town, central Shandong sheng (province), eastern China. Since 1955 it has been a part of the city of Zibo, becoming a district of that city in 1969. Linzi district is situated on the west bank of the Zi River, a tributary of the Xiaoqing River, some 19 miles (30 km) east of Zhangdian

  • Lin-yi (ancient kingdom, Indochina)

    Champa, ancient Indochinese kingdom lasting from the 2nd to the 17th century ad and extending over the central and southern coastal region of Vietnam from roughly the 18th parallel in the north to Point Ke Ga (Cape Varella) in the south. Established by the Cham, a people of Malayo-Polynesian stock

  • linac (physics)

    Linear accelerator, type of particle accelerator (q.v.) that imparts a series of relatively small increases in energy to subatomic particles as they pass through a sequence of alternating electric fields set up in a linear structure. The small accelerations add together to give the particles a

  • Linaceae (plant family)

    Linaceae, the flax family, comprising about 14 genera of herbaceous plants and shrubs, in the order Malpighiales, of cosmopolitan distribution. The genus Linum includes flax, perhaps the most important member of the family, grown for linen fibre and linseed oil and as a garden ornamental.

  • Linacre, Thomas (British physician)

    Thomas Linacre, English physician, classical scholar, founder and first president of the Royal College of Physicians of London. Educated at the University of Oxford (1480–84), Linacre traveled extensively through Italy (1485–97), studying Greek and Latin classics under several noted scholars, and

  • Linaiuoli Altarpiece (painting by Angelico)

    Fra Angelico: San Domenico period: …Linaiuoli; hence its name, the Linaiuoli Altarpiece); it is dated July 11, 1433. Enclosed in a marble shrine designed by the Florentine sculptor Lorenzo Ghiberti, this altarpiece represents the Virgin and Son facing forward, monumentally, and, surrounding them in a minor key, charming angels, developing the motif of the “Madonna…

  • Linares (Chile)

    Linares, city, central Chile. It lies inland, 60 miles (100 km) from the Pacific coast, in the fertile Central Valley. Founded in 1755 as San Javier de Bella Isla, it was renamed San Ambrosio de Linares in 1794, and its present name became official in 1875. The city is a commercial and agricultural

  • Linares (Spain)

    Linares, town, north-central Jaén provincia (province), situated in the comunidad autonóma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain, in the southern foothills of the Sierra Morena just northwest of the Guadalimar River. The town is connected by branch railways with lead mines on its

  • Linaria (plant)

    Toadflax, (genus Linaria), genus of nearly 150 herbaceous plants in the family Plantaginaceae, native to the north temperate zone, particularly the Mediterranean region. The common name toadflax refers to their flaxlike leaves, and the flowers are two-lipped and spurred like snapdragons. Among the

  • Linaria bipartita (plant)

    toadflax: From North Africa come the cloven-lip toadflax (L. bipartita) and purple-net toadflax (L. reticulata), both of which have purple and orange bicoloured flowers.

  • Linaria canadensis (plant)

    toadflax: Blue, or old-field, toadflax (L. canadensis) is a delicate light blue flowering plant found throughout North America. From North Africa come the cloven-lip toadflax (L. bipartita) and purple-net toadflax (L. reticulata), both of which have purple and orange bicoloured flowers.

  • Linaria reticulata (plant)

    toadflax: bipartita) and purple-net toadflax (L. reticulata), both of which have purple and orange bicoloured flowers.

  • Linaria vulgaris (plant)

    Butter-and-eggs, (Linaria vulgaris), perennial herbaceous plant of the Plantaginaceae family, native to Eurasia and widely naturalized in North America. The plant grows up to 1 metre (3.3 feet) tall, bears narrow flaxlike leaves, and produces showy yellow and orange flowers that are two-lipped and

  • Linate Airport (airport, Milan, Italy)

    airport: Evolution of airports: …but the artificial lake at Linate Airport near Milan, Italy, is still to be found close to the present administration facilities.

  • Lincan Antai language

    Atacama: …of the Atacama was called Cunza, or Lincan Antai, of which a vocabulary of about 1,100 words has been recorded.

  • Lincecum, Tim (American baseball player)

    San Francisco Giants: …staff led by young star Tim Lincecum, returned to the postseason for the first time since 2003. The team then advanced to the World Series, where they defeated the Texas Rangers in five games to capture the franchise’s first championship since its move to California. In 2012 the Giants won…

  • Linckia (echinoderm genus)

    sea star: …of the chiefly Indo-Pacific genus Linckia can grow a new individual from a small piece of a single arm.

  • Lincoln (county, Nevada, United States)

    Lincoln, county, southeastern Nevada, U.S., bordering on Utah and Arizona and sited immediately north of Clark county (and the city of Las Vegas). A region of mountains (including the Pahroc, Groom, and Wilson Creek ranges) and desert, Lincoln county contains a large segment of Nellis Air Force

  • Lincoln (England, United Kingdom)

    United Kingdom: Administration: By the year 98 Lincoln and Gloucester had joined Camulodunum as coloniae, and by 237 York had become a fourth. Coloniae of Roman citizens enjoyed autonomy with a constitution based on that of republican Rome, and Roman citizens had various privileges before the law. It is likely that Verulamium…

  • Lincoln (film by Spielberg [2012])

    Daniel Day-Lewis: Lincoln in Steven Spielberg’s biographical Lincoln (2012). For his nuanced performance in the latter film, he won an unprecedented third best-actor Oscar. Day-Lewis next starred as a fashion designer whose pursuit of perfection begets tension in his romantic relationships in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread (2017). For this role, which…

  • Lincoln (Illinois, United States)

    Lincoln, city, seat (1853) of Logan county, central Illinois, U.S. It lies about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Springfield. Founded in 1853, the city was named for Abraham Lincoln, then a Springfield attorney, who handled the legalities of its founding and christened it with the juice of a

  • Lincoln (county, Maine, United States)

    Lincoln, county, southern Maine, U.S. It is located in a coastal region bounded on the south by Sheepscot and Muscongus bays and includes several islands in the Atlantic Ocean; the coastline is deeply indented. The county is drained by the Eastern, Sheepscot, Damariscotta, and Medomak rivers.

  • Lincoln (Nebraska, United States)

    Lincoln, city, capital and second largest city of Nebraska, U.S., and seat (1869) of Lancaster county, in the southeastern part of the state, about 60 miles (95 km) southwest of Omaha. Oto and Pawnee Indians were early inhabitants in the area. Settlers were drawn in the 1850s by the salt flats

  • Lincoln (county, New Mexico, United States)

    Lincoln, county, south central New Mexico, U.S. It is a rugged region in the Basin and Range Province, with green hills and large plains surrounding and separating high mountain ranges. The plains are eroded, with canyons and the beds of dry streams; the tree-covered mountains include the Sierra

  • Lincoln (New Mexico, United States)

    Lincoln: …the county also includes the Lincoln and Cibola national forests, White Mountain Wilderness, Lincoln State Monument, and Smokey Bear Capitan Historical State Park.

  • Lincoln (work by Vidal)

    Gore Vidal: …American history—Burr (1973), 1876 (1976), Lincoln (1984), Empire (1987), Hollywood (1990), and The Golden Age (2000). Lincoln, a compelling portrait of Pres. Abraham Lincoln’s complex personality as viewed through the eyes of some of his closest associates during the American Civil War, is particularly notable. Another success was the comedy…

  • Lincoln (Oregon, United States)

    Tillamook, city, seat (1873) of Tillamook county, northwestern Oregon, U.S., on the Trask River, at the head of Tillamook Bay, an inlet of the Pacific Ocean. Founded in 1851, the settlement was known successively as Lincoln and Hoquarton before being named in 1885 for the local Tillamook Indians.

  • Lincoln (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Lincoln, city (district), administrative and historic county of Lincolnshire, England. It stands 200 feet (60 metres) above sea level on an impressive site at the point where the River Witham cuts a deep gap through the limestone escarpment of the Lincoln Edge. Lincoln is the market centre for a

  • Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America (work by Wills)

    Garry Wills: …Circle Award for his book Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America (1992), a study of the enduring power and influence of Abraham Lincoln’s prose.

  • Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial (memorial site, Indiana, United States)

    Santa Claus: The Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, to the west of town, commemorates the childhood farm home of Abraham Lincoln and is the burial site of his mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln. Lincoln State Park and Lincoln City are nearby. Inc. town, 1967. Pop. (2000) 2,041; (2010) 2,481.

  • Lincoln Castle (castle, Lincoln, England, United Kingdom)

    Lincoln: Lincoln Castle, standing on the Lincoln Edge opposite the cathedral, dates from 1068 and contains Norman fragments. The castle keep dates from the 12th century. The cathedral, also Norman, stands on an elevated site overlooking the city. Built of local limestone, it is severely weathered…

  • Lincoln Cathedral (cathedral, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom)

    Gothic art: Early Gothic: …the nave and choir of Lincoln Cathedral (begun in 1192).

  • Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (building complex, New York City, New York, United States)

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, travertine-clad cultural complex on the western side of Manhattan (1962–68), built by a board of architects headed by Wallace K. Harrison. The buildings, situated around a plaza with a fountain, are the home of the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Opera,

  • Lincoln County War (United States history)

    Lincoln: …was the centre of the Lincoln County War (1878), fought between rival merchants for economic domination. It began with accusations of cattle rustling and escalated to murder and a five-day gun battle at the courthouse. The teen-aged killer Billy the Kid (William Bonney) figured prominently in the carnage, killing a…

  • Lincoln Edge (ridge, England, United Kingdom)

    West Lindsey: …(30 metres) split by the Lincoln Edge, a narrow limestone ridge 200 feet (60 metres) high that extends north from low hills. On the northeast, this overwhelmingly rural area edges into the chalk hills of the Wolds.

  • Lincoln Home National Historic Site (historical site, Springfield, Illinois, United States)

    Springfield: Lincoln’s unpretentious house at Eighth and Jackson streets has been restored. This home, along with the four-block area surrounding it, was designated a national historic site in 1972. In Oak Ridge Cemetery, in the northwestern part of the city, is the Lincoln Tomb (another state…

  • Lincoln Institute (university, Jefferson City, Missouri, United States)

    Lincoln University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Jefferson City, Mo., U.S. A historically black institution, Lincoln University (now integrated) offers associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees through colleges of agriculture, applied sciences and technology, arts and

  • Lincoln Judgment (religious code)

    Edward White Benson: …archbishop of Canterbury (1883–96), whose Lincoln Judgment (1890), a code of liturgical ritual, helped resolve the Church of England’s century-old dispute over proper forms of worship.

  • Lincoln Lawyer, The (film by Furman [2011])

    Matthew McConaughey: …returned to more-substantial fare with The Lincoln Lawyer (2011), a legal drama in which he was featured as a lawyer who does business out of the backseat of a car. He then chewed up the screen as a viperous hit man in Killer Joe (2011), based on the stage play…

  • Lincoln Memorial (monument, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Lincoln Memorial, stately monument in Washington, D.C., honouring Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, and “the virtues of tolerance, honesty, and constancy in the human spirit.” Designed by Henry Bacon on a plan similar to that of the Parthenon in Athens, the structure was

  • Lincoln Motion Picture Company (American company)

    history of the motion picture: D.W. Griffith: The Lincoln Motion Picture Company (run by George P. Johnson and Noble Johnson) and the writer and entrepreneur Oscar Micheaux were among those who launched what became known as the genre of “race pictures,” produced in and for the black community.

  • Lincoln Motor Company (American company)

    Ford Motor Company: Early history: Model T and assembly line: …1922 Ford had acquired the Lincoln Motor Company (founded 1917), which would produce Ford’s luxury Lincolns and Continentals. In 1938 Ford introduced the first Mercury, a car in the medium-priced range.

  • Lincoln Normal School (university, Montgomery, Alabama, United States)

    Alabama State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. It is a historically black school, and its enrollment is predominantly African American. Alabama State offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in the schools of Music and Graduate

  • Lincoln Park Zoo (zoo, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Lincoln Park Zoo, zoo located in the city of Chicago, Illinois, U.S. It is noted for its excellent collection of great apes living together in family groups and its successful gorilla breeding program. Established in 1868, Lincoln Park Zoo is among the oldest zoos in the United States. Its marine

  • Lincoln Tomb (tomb, Springfield, Illinois, United States)

    Springfield: …of the city, is the Lincoln Tomb (another state historic site), which holds the bodies of Lincoln, his wife, Mary, and their sons Edward, William, and Tad. The memorial is 117 feet (36 metres) tall and is surmounted by a granite shaft. The First Presbyterian Church contains the Lincoln family…

  • Lincoln Trail (trail, Illinois, United States)

    Illinois: Cultural institutions: Throughout central Illinois the Lincoln Trail joins places associated with the president, including his home in Springfield and the sites of his 1858 senatorial campaign debates with Sen. Stephen A. Douglas (see Lincoln-Douglas debates). Oak Park, home of the pioneering modern architect Frank Lloyd Wright, contains much of his…

  • Lincoln Tunnel (tunnel, New Jersey-New York, United States)

    Lincoln Tunnel, vehicular tunnel under the Hudson River, from Manhattan Island (39th Street), New York, to Weehawken, New Jersey. It is 8,200 feet (2,500 metres) long and lies about 100 ft below the river’s surface. The first tube was opened in 1937, the second in 1954, and the third in 1957. It is

  • Lincoln University (university, Christchurch, New Zealand)

    Christchurch: …principal educational centres, it has Lincoln University (1990; originally established in 1878 as a constituent agricultural college of the University of Canterbury), Christ’s College, and the University of Canterbury (1873). Other notable institutions are the botanical gardens, the planetarium, Canterbury Museum, and Yaldhurst Museum of Transport and Science, as well…

  • Lincoln University (university, Jefferson City, Missouri, United States)

    Lincoln University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Jefferson City, Mo., U.S. A historically black institution, Lincoln University (now integrated) offers associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees through colleges of agriculture, applied sciences and technology, arts and

  • Lincoln University (university, Pennsylvania, United States)

    historically black colleges and universities: It became Lincoln University in 1866 in honour of U.S. Pres. Abraham Lincoln and was private until 1972. The oldest private HBCU in the U.S. was founded in 1856, when the Methodist Episcopal Church opened Wilberforce University in Tawawa Springs (present-day Wilberforce), Ohio, as a coeducational institution…

  • Lincoln’s Inn Fields Theatre (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    afterpiece: …primarily by John Rich at Lincoln’s Inn Fields in order to compete with the Drury Lane. The addition of afterpieces to the regular program may also have been an attempt to attract working citizens, who often missed the early opening production and paid a reduced charge to be admitted later,…

  • Lincoln, Abbey (American vocalist, songwriter, and actress)

    Abbey Lincoln, (Anna Marie Wooldridge; Gaby Lee; Aminata; Moseka), American vocalist, songwriter, and actress (born Aug. 6, 1930, Chicago, Ill.—died Aug. 14, 2010, New York, N.Y.), wrote songs about black culture and civil rights and sang them in a dramatic, evocative style. She grew up in southern

  • Lincoln, Abe (president of United States)

    Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–65), who preserved the Union during the American Civil War and brought about the emancipation of the slaves. Among American heroes, Lincoln continues to have a unique appeal for his fellow countrymen and also for people of other lands. This

  • Lincoln, Abraham (president of United States)

    Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–65), who preserved the Union during the American Civil War and brought about the emancipation of the slaves. Among American heroes, Lincoln continues to have a unique appeal for his fellow countrymen and also for people of other lands. This

  • Lincoln, assassination of Abraham (United States history)

    Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, murderous attack on Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C., on the evening of April 14, 1865. Shot in the head by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth, Lincoln died the next morning. The assassination

  • Lincoln, Benjamin (United States military officer)

    Benjamin Lincoln, Continental army officer in the American Revolution who rendered distinguished service in the northern campaigns early in the war, but was forced to surrender with about 7,000 troops at Charleston, S.C., May 12, 1780. A small-town farmer, Lincoln held local offices and was a

  • Lincoln, Blanche (United States senator)

    John Boozman: …the Republican candidate against Democrat Blanche Lincoln for a U.S. Senate seat but was defeated by a large margin. John, who had won a special election for the U.S. House of Representatives in 2001, then ran against Lincoln in 2010 and won. He entered the Senate in 2011.

  • Lincoln, Elmo (American actor)

    Tarzan: …film in 1918, with lantern-jawed Elmo Lincoln as the first movie ape-man. More than a dozen actors have since swung through the trees as Tarzan, the most popular having been Johnny Weissmuller, a former Olympic swimming champion. Tarzan has also been the hero of a popular American comic strip and…

  • Lincoln, Evelyn Norton (American secretary)

    Evelyn Norton Lincoln, U.S. personal secretary to and confidante of Pres. John F. Kennedy (b. June 25, 1909--d. May 11,

  • Lincoln, Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of (Anglo-Norman lord)

    Denbigh: …king Edward I conquered Wales, Henry de Lacy, 3rd earl of Lincoln, founded a borough there in 1283 and built a castle, which withstood attack in 1402 by the rebel Welsh leader Owain Glyn D?r, though the town itself was razed. In the 15th and 16th centuries Denbigh was one…

  • Lincoln, John de la Pole, earl of (English noble)

    Henry VII: Yorkist plots: …had the formidable support of John de la Pole, earl of Lincoln, Richard III’s heir designate, of many Irish chieftains, and of 2,000 German mercenaries paid for by Margaret of Burgundy. The rebels were defeated (June 1487) in a hard-fought battle at Stoke (East Stoke, near Newark in Nottinghamshire), where…

  • Lincoln, Mary Todd (American first lady)

    Mary Todd Lincoln, American first lady (1861–65), the wife of Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States. Happy and energetic in her youth, she suffered subsequent ill health and personal tragedies and behaved erratically in her later years. Mary Todd was the daughter of Robert Smith

  • Lincoln, Mount (mountain, United States)

    Park Range: …14,000 feet (4,300 m), with Mount Lincoln (14,286 feet [4,354 m]) the highest point. Major highways cut through Vail (10,603 feet [3,232 m]) and Rabbit Ears (9,426 feet [2,873 m]) passes, leading to popular winter-sports areas. The headstreams of the North and South Platte rivers rise in the range.

  • Lincoln, Ranulf de Blundeville, Earl of (English noble)

    Ranulf de Blundeville, 6th earl of Chester, most celebrated of the early earls of Chester, with whom the family fortunes reached their peak. Ranulf succeeded his father Hugh de Kevelioc (1147–81), son of Ranulf, the 4th earl, in 1181 and was created Earl of Lincoln in 1217. He married Constance,

  • Lincoln, Robert Todd (American lawyer and politician)

    Robert Todd Lincoln, eldest and sole surviving child of Abraham Lincoln, who became a millionaire corporation attorney and served as U.S. secretary of war and minister to Great Britain during Republican administrations. Raised in Springfield, Ill., as his father rose from local to national

  • Lincoln, Thomas (American pioneer)

    Abraham Lincoln: Life: His father, Thomas Lincoln, was the descendant of a weaver’s apprentice who had migrated from England to Massachusetts in 1637. Though much less prosperous than some of his Lincoln forebears, Thomas was a sturdy pioneer. On June 12, 1806, he married Nancy Hanks. The Hanks genealogy is…

  • Lincoln-Douglas debates (United States history)

    Lincoln-Douglas debates, series of seven debates between the Democratic senator Stephen A. Douglas and Republican challenger Abraham Lincoln during the 1858 Illinois senatorial campaign, largely concerning the issue of slavery extension into the territories. The slavery extension question had

  • Lincolnshire (county, England, United Kingdom)

    Lincolnshire, administrative, geographic, and historic county in eastern England, extending along the North Sea coast from the Humber estuary to The Wash. The administrative, geographic, and historic counties cover slightly different areas. The administrative county comprises seven districts: East

  • lincosamide (drug)

    Lincosamide, any agent in a class of antibiotics that are derived from the compound lincomycin and that inhibit the growth of bacteria by blocking bacterial protein synthesis. Lincomycin, the first lincosamide, was isolated in 1962 from a soil bacterium (Streptomyces lincolnensis). Clindamycin is a

  • Lind, James (British physician)

    James Lind, physician, “founder of naval hygiene in England,” whose recommendation that fresh citrus fruit and lemon juice be included in the diet of seamen eventually resulted in the eradication of scurvy from the British Navy. A British naval surgeon (1739–48) and a physician at the Haslar

  • Lind, Jenny (Swedish singer)

    Jenny Lind, Swedish-born operatic and oratorio soprano admired for her vocal control and agility and for the purity and naturalness of her art. Lind made her debut in Der Freischütz at Stockholm in 1838 and in 1841 studied with Manuel García in Paris. Giacomo Meyerbeer wrote the part of Vielka for

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