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  • Lind, Johanna Maria (Swedish singer)

    Jenny Lind, Swedish-born operatic and oratorio soprano admired for her vocal control and agility and for the purity and naturalness of her art. Lind made her debut in Der Freischütz at Stockholm in 1838 and in 1841 studied with Manuel García in Paris. Giacomo Meyerbeer wrote the part of Vielka for

  • Lind, Joseph Conrad (American entertainer)

    Peter Lind Hayes, American entertainer who was best known for his appearances with his wife, Mary Healy, in nightclub acts, in several television series, on radio, in films, and on Broadway (b. June 25, 1915, San Francisco, Calif.--d. April 21, 1998, Las Vegas,

  • Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice (film by Epstein and Friedman [2019])

    Linda Ronstadt: …about her life and career, Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice, was released in 2019.

  • Linda Vista (play by Letts)

    Tracy Letts: …the debut of his play Linda Vista, a comedy about a mid-life crisis. The production moved to Broadway in 2019.

  • Lindahl, Erik Robert (Swedish economist)

    Erik Robert Lindahl, Swedish economist who was one of the members of the Stockholm school of economics that developed during the late 1920s and early ’30s from the macroeconomic theory of Knut Wicksell. Lindahl held positions at the Universities of Lund, Gothenburg, and Uppsala (1942–60). His main

  • Lindahl, Tomas (Swedish biochemist)

    Tomas Lindahl, Swedish biochemist known for his discovery of base excision repair, a major mechanism of DNA repair, by which cells maintain their genetic integrity. Base excision repair corrects damage sustained by individual DNA bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine), which frequently

  • Lindahl, Tomas Robert (Swedish biochemist)

    Tomas Lindahl, Swedish biochemist known for his discovery of base excision repair, a major mechanism of DNA repair, by which cells maintain their genetic integrity. Base excision repair corrects damage sustained by individual DNA bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine), which frequently

  • lindane (chemical compound)

    benzene hexachloride: …isomers is an insecticide called lindane, or Gammexane.

  • lindane lotion (chemical compound)

    benzene hexachloride: …isomers is an insecticide called lindane, or Gammexane.

  • Lindau (Germany)

    Lindau, city, Bavaria Land (state), extreme southern Germany. It lies on an island in Lake Constance (Bodensee), connected to the mainland by two bridges, southeast of Friedrichshafen. It was the site of a Roman camp, Tiberii, and of a Benedictine abbey founded in 810. Fortified in the 12th

  • Lindbergh baby kidnapping (crime)

    Lindbergh baby kidnapping, crime involving the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., the 20-month-old son of aviator Charles Lindbergh. At about 9:00 pm on March 1, 1932, the kidnapper or kidnappers climbed by ladder into the second-story nursery of the Lindbergh home near Hopewell, New

  • Lindbergh Law (United States [1932])

    Lindbergh baby kidnapping: The murder investigation: Congress to pass the Federal Kidnapping Act (known as the Lindbergh Law) on June 22, 1932—the day that would have been Charles’s second birthday. The Lindbergh Law made kidnapping across state lines a federal crime and stipulated that such an offense could be punished by death.

  • Lindbergh Operation (medicine and technology [2001])

    robotic surgery: Historical developments: …telecommunication technologies enabled the 2001 Lindbergh Operation, in which French physician Jacques Marescaux and Canadian-born surgeon Michel Gagner performed a remote cholecystectomy (gallbladder removal) from New York City on a patient in Strasbourg, France. Despite the breakthrough, telesurgery failed to gain widespread popularity for multiple reasons, including time delays between…

  • Lindbergh, Anne Spencer Morrow (American writer and aviator)

    Anne Spencer Morrow Lindbergh, American writer and aviator (born June 22, 1906, Englewood, N.J.—died Feb. 7, 2001, Passumpsic, Vt.), was perhaps best known as the wife of Charles (“Lucky Lindy”) Lindbergh—the pilot who had made (1927) the first solo transatlantic flight—and the mother of the 2

  • Lindbergh, Charles (American aviator)

    Charles Lindbergh, American aviator, one of the best-known figures in aeronautical history, remembered for the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, from New York City to Paris, on May 20–21, 1927. Lindbergh’s early years were spent chiefly in Little Falls, Minnesota, and in

  • Lindbergh, Charles A. (American aviator)

    Charles Lindbergh, American aviator, one of the best-known figures in aeronautical history, remembered for the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, from New York City to Paris, on May 20–21, 1927. Lindbergh’s early years were spent chiefly in Little Falls, Minnesota, and in

  • Lindbergh, Charles Augustus (American aviator)

    Charles Lindbergh, American aviator, one of the best-known figures in aeronautical history, remembered for the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, from New York City to Paris, on May 20–21, 1927. Lindbergh’s early years were spent chiefly in Little Falls, Minnesota, and in

  • Lindblad, Bertil (Swedish astronomer)

    Bertil Lindblad, Swedish astronomer who contributed greatly to the theory of galactic structure and motion and to the methods of determining the absolute magnitude (true brightness, disregarding distance) of distant stars. After serving as an assistant at the observatory in Uppsala, Swed., Lindblad

  • Lindblom, Charles E. (American political scientist)

    incrementalism: Incrementalism and the ideal of rational decision making: …by the American political scientist Charles E. Lindblom in response to the then-prevalent conception of policy making as a process of rational analysis culminating in a value-maximizing decision. Incrementalism emphasizes the plurality of actors involved in the policy-making process and predicts that policy makers will build on past policies, focusing…

  • Linde, Carl Paul Gottfried von (German engineer)

    Carl von Linde, German engineer whose invention of a continuous process of liquefying gases in large quantities formed a basis for the modern technology of refrigeration and provided both impetus and means for conducting scientific research at low temperatures and very high vacuums. While an

  • Lindegren, Erik Johan (Swedish poet)

    Erik Lindegren, Swedish modernist poet who made a major contribution to the development of a new Swedish poetry in the 1940s. Lindegren attended the University of Stockholm and established himself as a literary reviewer for a number of leading newspapers and magazines. The appearance of Lindegren’s

  • Lindeman Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Lindeman Island, island in the Cumberland Islands, across Whitsunday Passage from northeastern Queensland, Australia. A rocky, coral-fringed continental island of the Great Barrier Reef, it has an area of 6 square miles (16 square km) and rises to 800 feet (240 m) at Mount Oldfield. Lindeman was

  • Lindemann, Carl Louis Ferdinand von (German mathematician)

    Ferdinand von Lindemann, German mathematician who is mainly remembered for having proved that the number π is transcendental—i.e., it does not satisfy any algebraic equation with rational coefficients. This proof established that the classical Greek construction problem of squaring the circle

  • Lindemann, Ferdinand von (German mathematician)

    Ferdinand von Lindemann, German mathematician who is mainly remembered for having proved that the number π is transcendental—i.e., it does not satisfy any algebraic equation with rational coefficients. This proof established that the classical Greek construction problem of squaring the circle

  • Lindemann, Frederick Alexander, Viscount Cherwell (British physicist)

    Winston Churchill: Exclusion from office, 1929–39: Lindemann (later Lord Cherwell), who enabled him to build up at Chartwell a private intelligence centre the information of which was often superior to that of the government. When Baldwin became prime minister in 1935, he persisted in excluding Churchill from office but gave him the exceptional…

  • Lindemann, Hilde (American philosopher and educator)

    philosophical feminism: Feminist theories of agency: Hilde Lindemann urged that individuals articulate their sense of themselves by telling stories. Since the narrative form opens up the possibility of reinterpreting past events as well as of devising different continuations of a story in progress, it enables women to mobilize creative powers and…

  • Lindemann, L. A. (British scientist)

    20th-century international relations: Science and technology in wartime: …a Scientific Advisory Committee under L.A. Lindemann. He and his rival Sir Henry Tizard helped to direct the research programs that discovered various means of jamming the German bombers’ radio navigation systems. By autumn 1940 the Germans countered with their X-Ger?t, which broadcast its signal on several frequencies, but this…

  • Linden (Guyana)

    Linden, city, northeastern Guyana, on the Demerara River upstream from Georgetown. The former towns of Mackenzie, Wismar, and Christianborg, which were unified as Linden (1971), grew up around the large mining camp that was established by the Aluminum Company of Canada, and later nationalized as

  • linden (plant)

    Linden, any of several trees of the genus Tilia of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae), native to the Northern Hemisphere. Of the approximately 30 species, a few are outstanding as ornamental and shade trees. They are among the most graceful of deciduous trees, with heart-shaped, coarsely

  • Linden, Pieter Cort van der (Dutch statesman)

    Pieter Cort van der Linden, Dutch Liberal statesman whose ministry (1913–18) settled controversies over state aid to denominational schools and extension of the franchise, central issues in Dutch politics since the mid-19th century. After having been employed as a solicitor in The Hague until 1881,

  • Linden, Pieter Wilhelm Adriaan Cort van der (Dutch statesman)

    Pieter Cort van der Linden, Dutch Liberal statesman whose ministry (1913–18) settled controversies over state aid to denominational schools and extension of the franchise, central issues in Dutch politics since the mid-19th century. After having been employed as a solicitor in The Hague until 1881,

  • Lindenbaum, Der (work by Schubert)

    vocal music: The 17th–20th centuries: …the modified-strophic setting of “Der Lindenbaum” (“The Linden Tree”), from the cycle Winterreise (“Winter Journey”), Schubert changes from major to minor for the stanza suggesting bitter recollections, gives a more dramatic interpretation to both the voice and piano for references to the chilling winter wind, and, finally, repeats the music…

  • Lindenberg, Hedwig (Romanian-born artist)

    Hedda Sterne, (Hedwig Lindenberg), Romanian-born artist (born Aug. 4, 1910, Bucharest, Rom.—died April 8, 2011, New York, N.Y.), was indelibly identified with the New York Abstract Expressionists owing to an iconic 1951 photograph dubbed The Irascibles, which appeared in Life magazine. In the photo

  • Lindenmann, Jean (Swiss microbiologist)

    Jean Lindenmann, Swiss microbiologist (born Sept. 18, 1924, Zagreb, Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes [now in Croatia]—died Jan. 15, 2015, Zürich, Switz.), was in 1957 the co-discoverer (with British bacteriologist Alick Isaacs) of interferons, small proteins (cytokines) that modulate the

  • Lindenmeier site (archaeological site, Colorado, United States)

    Native American: The Clovis and Folsom cultures: The Lindenmeier site, a Folsom campsite in northeastern Colorado, has yielded a wide variety of end and side scrapers, gravers (used to engrave bone or wood), and bone artifacts. The Folsom culture is thought to have lasted from approximately 9000 to 8000 bce. Related Paleo-Indian groups,…

  • Lindenstrauss, Elon (Israeli mathematician)

    Elon Lindenstrauss, Israeli mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 2010 for his work in ergodic theory. Lindenstrauss received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1991. He stayed at that university for graduate school, receiving a

  • Lindenthal, Gustav (American engineer)

    Gustav Lindenthal, Austrian-born American civil engineer known for designing Hell Gate Bridge across New York City’s East River. After gaining experience working on railways and bridges in Austria and Switzerland, Lindenthal immigrated to the United States (1871). He served as a construction

  • Linder, Max (French actor)

    history of the motion picture: Pre-World War I European cinema: …Kops, while the immensely popular Max Linder created a comic persona that would deeply influence the work of Charlie Chaplin. The episodic crime film was pioneered by Victorin Jasset in the Nick Carter series, produced for the small éclair Company, but it remained for Gaumont’s Louis Feuillade to bring the…

  • Lindera benzoin (plant)

    Spicebush, (Lindera benzoin), deciduous, dense shrub of the laurel family (Lauraceae), native to eastern North America. It occurs most often in damp woods and grows about 1.5–6 m (about 5–20 feet) tall. The alternate leaves are rather oblong, but wedge-shaped near the base, and 8–13 cm (3–5 inches)

  • Linderhof Palace (palace, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bavaria, Germany)

    Georg von Dollmann: The neo-Baroque or neo-Rococo Linderhof is especially incongruous in its mountainous setting. Neuschwanstein, which was begun for Ludwig by Eduard Riedel, was intended to suggest the medieval Teutonism of Richard Wagner’s opera Tannh?user (1845). Herrenchiemsee was planned as a replica of the French royal residence at Versailles.

  • Lindet, Jean-Baptiste-Robert (French revolutionary leader)

    Jean-Baptiste-Robert Lindet, member of the Committee of Public Safety that ruled Revolutionary France during the period of the Jacobin dictatorship (1793–94). He organized the provisioning of France’s armies and had charge of much of the central economic planning carried out by the committee. At

  • Lindfors, Elsa Viveca Torstensdotter (Swedish actress)

    Viveca Lindfors, (ELSA VIVECA TORSTENSDOTTER LINDFORS), Swedish-born actress who enjoyed successful stage and screen careers in both Sweden and the U.S. (b. Dec. 29, 1920--d. Oct. 25,

  • Lindfors, Viveca (Swedish actress)

    Viveca Lindfors, (ELSA VIVECA TORSTENSDOTTER LINDFORS), Swedish-born actress who enjoyed successful stage and screen careers in both Sweden and the U.S. (b. Dec. 29, 1920--d. Oct. 25,

  • Lindgren, Astrid (Swedish writer)

    Astrid Lindgren, influential Swedish writer of children’s books who created such memorable characters as Pippi Longstocking. Lindgren’s great popularity began in 1945 with the publication of Pippi L?ngstrump (Pippi Longstocking), the first of several books with Pippi as a main character. This

  • Lindgren, Torgny (Swedish writer)

    Swedish literature: Political writing: …has been the setting for Torgny Lindgren’s novels, such as Ormens v?g p? h?lleberget (1982; Way of a Serpent). He, however, was primarily interested in questions of power, oppression, and the nature of evil. Likewise, many of G?ran Tunstr?m’s novels are firmly anchored in his home region of V?rmland. Originally…

  • Lindgren, Waldemar (American geologist)

    Waldemar Lindgren, Swedish-born American economic geologist noted for a system of ore classification that he detailed in his book Mineral Deposits (1913). Lindgren graduated in 1882 as a mining engineer from the Freiberg Mining Academy in Germany. Following a year of postgraduate work at Freiberg,

  • Lindh, Anna (Swedish foreign minister)

    Sweden: The 21st century: …month the public stabbing of Anna Lindh, the popular minister of foreign affairs, shocked Swedes and again raised questions about the price of an open and egalitarian society.

  • Lindh, John Walker (American militant)

    John Walker Lindh, U.S. citizen who was captured along with Taliban fighters in Afghanistan during the Afghanistan War in 2001. In 2002 he agreed to a plea bargain and was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Lindh was released in 2019. The son of a corporate lawyer and a commercial photographer, Lindh

  • Líndhos (Greece)

    Lindos, town on the eastern coast of Rhodes and the site of one of the three city-states of Rhodes before their union (408 bc). Lindos was the site of Danish excavations (1902–24, resumed 1952) that uncovered the Doric Temple of Athena Lindia on the acropolis, propylaea (entrance gates), and a stoa

  • Lindinis (England, United Kingdom)

    Ilchester, town (parish), South Somerset district, administrative and historic county of Somerset, southwestern England. It lies along the River Yeo. Ilchester was known as Lindinis under Roman rule and was the northern tribal capital of the Durotriges, an early British people. A royal mint was

  • Lindisfarne (island, England, United Kingdom)

    Holy Island, historic small island (2 sq mi [5 sq km]) in the west North Sea, 2 mi (3 km) from the English Northumberland coast (in which county it is included), linked to the mainland by a causeway at low tide. It is administratively part of Berwick-upon-Tweed district. Holy Island’s importance as

  • Lindisfarne Gospels (medieval manuscript)

    Lindisfarne Gospels, manuscript (MS. Cotton Nero D.IV.; British Museum, London) illuminated in the late 7th or 8th century in the Hiberno-Saxon style. The book was probably made for Eadfrith, the bishop of Lindisfarne from 698 to 721. Attributed to the Northumbrian school, the Lindisfarne Gospels

  • Lindisfarne Raid (English history)

    Lindisfarne raid, Viking assault in 793 on the island of Lindisfarne (Holy Island) off the coast of what is now Northumberland. The monastery at Lindisfarne was the preeminent centre of Christianity in the kingdom of Northumbria. The event sent tremors throughout English Christendom and marked the

  • Lindley, David (American musician)

    Jackson Browne: …for the Sky, featured instrumentalist David Lindley—Browne had million-selling hits with The Pretender (1976) and the live album Running on Empty (1978); the title tracks from both recordings are among his best-known songs. His musical style ranged from romantic folk-rock ballads to up-tempo rock and reggae.

  • Lindley, John (British botanist)

    John Lindley, British botanist whose attempts to formulate a natural system of plant classification greatly aided the transition from the artificial (considering the characters of single parts) to the natural system (considering all characters of a plant). In 1819 Lindley arrived in London where,

  • Lindley, William (British engineer)

    William Lindley, British civil engineer who helped renovate the German city of Hamburg after a major fire. Lindley engaged in railway work on the European continent and settled in Hamburg as engineer in chief to the Hamburg-Bergedorf Railway (1838–60). On May 5, 1842, a fire broke out in Hamburg,

  • Lindman, Arvid (Swedish statesman)

    Sweden: Political reform: …government under the leadership of Arvid Lindman. The motion granted a universal and equal franchise for the second chamber, a certain democratization of the first chamber, and proportional representation for elections to both chambers of the Riksdag. The elections to the second chamber in 1911 produced a landslide victory for…

  • Lindo, Allan Pineda (American musician)

    Black Eyed Peas: ) and apl.de.ap (byname of Allan Pineda Lindo; b. November 28, 1974, Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines) recruited MC and dancer Taboo (byname of Jaime Luis Gomez; b. July 14, 1975, East Los Angeles, California) to form the Black Eyed Peas. The group’s debut recording, Behind the Front…

  • Lindon, Jér?me (French publisher)

    Jér?me Lindon, French publisher (born June 9, 1925, Paris, France—died April 9, 2001, Paris), took control of the small independent publishing house Les éditions de Minuit in 1948, at age 23, and thereafter was a central figure in the nouveau roman (“new novel,” or antinovel) literary movement of t

  • Lindon, Lionel (American cinematographer)
  • Lindos (Greece)

    Lindos, town on the eastern coast of Rhodes and the site of one of the three city-states of Rhodes before their union (408 bc). Lindos was the site of Danish excavations (1902–24, resumed 1952) that uncovered the Doric Temple of Athena Lindia on the acropolis, propylaea (entrance gates), and a stoa

  • Lindquist, Susan L. (American molecular biologist)

    Susan L. Lindquist, American molecular biologist who made key discoveries concerning protein folding and who was among the first to discover that in yeast inherited traits can be passed to offspring via misfolded proteins known as prions. Lindquist received a bachelor’s degree (1971) in

  • Lindquist, Susan Lee (American molecular biologist)

    Susan L. Lindquist, American molecular biologist who made key discoveries concerning protein folding and who was among the first to discover that in yeast inherited traits can be passed to offspring via misfolded proteins known as prions. Lindquist received a bachelor’s degree (1971) in

  • Lindqvist, John Ajvide (Swedish author)

    vampire: History: …the Right One In) by John Ajvide Lindqvist, in which the main characters are a perpetually childlike vampire and a young boy she befriends and helps fend off bullies. The book was adapted for film in Sweden in 2008 and in the United States as Let Me In in 2010.

  • Lindqvist, Sven (Swedish author)

    Swedish literature: Political writing: Sven Lindqvist went through a similar process; after a period of committed writing, he returned in En ?lskares dagbok (1981; “A Lover’s Diary”) to a more or less autobiographical novel of his own youth. Lars Gyllensten, a skeptical intellectual and experimenter, voiced through his novels…

  • Lindros, Eric (Canadian hockey player)

    Philadelphia Flyers: …1992 the team acquired centre Eric Lindros, who became one of the biggest stars in the NHL in his eight seasons in Philadelphia. In 1996–97 Lindros, along with winger John LeClair, propelled the Flyers to the seventh Stanley Cup finals in team history, which, like the previous four appearances, ended…

  • Lindsaea (fern genus)

    fern: Chromosome numbers and polyploidy: …from 27 to 36, or Lindsaea, with x numbers from 34 to about 50. So much variation in the chromosome base number suggests that the “genus” concerned may be unnatural or that it may be very ancient, with intermediate numbers having disappeared (e.g., Dennstaedtia), or that it is in a…

  • Lindsay (town, Ontario, Canada)

    Kawartha Lakes, city, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It was formed in 2001 by the merger of the former town of Lindsay and the other communities constituting what until the amalgamation had been Victoria county. It was named for the Kawartha Lakes, a chain of lakes in the region. It lies along the

  • Lindsay and Crouse (American dramatists)

    Lindsay and Crouse, American duo responsible for coauthoring humorous plays and collaborating on theatrical productions. Howard Lindsay (b. March 29, 1889, Waterford, New York, U.S.—d. February 11, 1968, New York, New York) and Russel Crouse (b. February 20, 1893, Findlay, Ohio, U.S.—d. April 3,

  • Lindsay Hill (mountain, Barbuda)

    Antigua and Barbuda: Land: …143 feet (44 metres) at Lindsay Hill in the northeast, it is 62 square miles (161 square km) in area. Barbuda is without streams or lakes and receives less rainfall than Antigua. Codrington, the only settlement, lies on a lagoon to the west. The climate is similar to that of…

  • Lindsay, Howard (American playwright)

    Lindsay and Crouse: Howard Lindsay (b. March 29, 1889, Waterford, New York, U.S.—d. February 11, 1968, New York, New York) and Russel Crouse (b. February 20, 1893, Findlay, Ohio, U.S.—d. April 3, 1966, New York, New York) were notable both for their continual successes and for the way…

  • Lindsay, John V. (American politician)

    John Vliet Lindsay, American politician (born Nov. 24, 1921, New York, N.Y.—died Dec. 19, 2000, Hilton Head Island, S.C.), served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1959 to 1965 and as mayor of New York City from 1966 to 1973, first as a Republican but from 1971 as a Democrat; in 1972 he w

  • Lindsay, Lady Anne (Scottish author)

    Lady Anne Barnard, author of the popular ballad “Auld Robin Gray” (1771). In 1763 she married Sir Andrew Barnard and accompanied him to the Cape of Good Hope when he became colonial secretary there in 1797. When the Cape was ceded to Holland (1802), they settled permanently in London. “Auld Robin

  • Lindsay, Nicholas Vachel (American poet)

    Vachel Lindsay, American poet who—in an attempt to revive poetry as an oral art form of the common people—wrote and read to audiences compositions with powerful rhythms that had an immediate appeal. After three years at Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio, Lindsay left in 1900 to study art in Chicago and

  • Lindsay, Norman (Australian artist and author)

    Norman Lindsay, Australian artist and novelist especially known for his political cartoons and sensual book illustrations. At 16 Lindsay began to draw for a Melbourne newspaper, and in 1901 he moved to New South Wales. He was for many years the chief cartoonist of the Sydney Bulletin. His major

  • Lindsay, Norman Alfred William (Australian artist and author)

    Norman Lindsay, Australian artist and novelist especially known for his political cartoons and sensual book illustrations. At 16 Lindsay began to draw for a Melbourne newspaper, and in 1901 he moved to New South Wales. He was for many years the chief cartoonist of the Sydney Bulletin. His major

  • Lindsay, Sir David (Scottish poet)

    Sir David Lyndsay, Scottish poet of the pre-Reformation period who satirized the corruption of the Roman Catholic church and contemporary government. He was one of the company of gifted courtly poets (makaris) who flourished in the golden age of Scottish literature. His didactic writings in

  • Lindsay, Vachel (American poet)

    Vachel Lindsay, American poet who—in an attempt to revive poetry as an oral art form of the common people—wrote and read to audiences compositions with powerful rhythms that had an immediate appeal. After three years at Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio, Lindsay left in 1900 to study art in Chicago and

  • Lindsborg (Kansas, United States)

    Kansas: Cultural life: …museum, the small community of Lindsborg has a biennial folk festival, the Svensk Hyllningsfest, which honours the Swedish pioneers who settled the town. It features Swedish costumes, traditional food, folk dances, and displays of the arts and crafts of local artisans. Wilson has a Czech festival each year. Examples of…

  • Lindsey (former division, England, United Kingdom)

    Parts of Lindsey, formerly one of three administrative divisions of the historic county of Lincolnshire, England, and approximately coterminous with the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Lindsey. It now forms the unitary authorities of North East Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire and the districts of West

  • Lindsey (Anglo-Saxon kingdom and bishopric)

    Lindsey, an early Anglo-Saxon kingdom and bishopric, probably coterminous with the modern districts of East Lindsey and West Lindsey, in Lincolnshire. It was an area of early settlement by the Angles and was ruled by its own kings until the late 8th century. In the mid-7th century Northumbria had

  • Lindsey, Alton A. (American ecologist)

    Alton A. Lindsey, American ecologist and conservationist who was credited with having helped to preserve the Indiana shore of Lake Michigan, which became the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, and who studied the animal life in Antarctica as part of Adm. Richard E. Byrd’s second trip (1933–35) to

  • Lindsey, Ben B. (American jurist)

    Ben B. Lindsey, American judge, international authority on juvenile delinquency, and reformer of legal procedures concerning offenses by youths and domestic-relations problems. His controversial advocacy of “companionate marriage” was sometimes confused with the “trial marriage” idea of the

  • Lindsey, Benjamin Barr (American jurist)

    Ben B. Lindsey, American judge, international authority on juvenile delinquency, and reformer of legal procedures concerning offenses by youths and domestic-relations problems. His controversial advocacy of “companionate marriage” was sometimes confused with the “trial marriage” idea of the

  • Lindsey, George (American actor)

    George Smith Lindsey, American actor (born Dec. 17, 1928, Fairfield, Ala.—died May 6, 2012, Nashville, Tenn.), portrayed the grinning Goober, the affable but dimwitted gas-station attendant and mechanic who appeared with his trademark beanie on three television series, The Andy Griffith Show

  • Lindsey, George Smith (American actor)

    George Smith Lindsey, American actor (born Dec. 17, 1928, Fairfield, Ala.—died May 6, 2012, Nashville, Tenn.), portrayed the grinning Goober, the affable but dimwitted gas-station attendant and mechanic who appeared with his trademark beanie on three television series, The Andy Griffith Show

  • Lindsey, Parts of (former division, England, United Kingdom)

    Parts of Lindsey, formerly one of three administrative divisions of the historic county of Lincolnshire, England, and approximately coterminous with the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Lindsey. It now forms the unitary authorities of North East Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire and the districts of West

  • Lindstrand, Per (Swedish aeronaut)

    balloon flight: Long-distance ballooning: Richard Branson and Swedish aeronaut Per Lindstrand, aboard the Virgin Atlantic Flyer, made the first transatlantic flight in a hot-air balloon. And in 1991, aboard the Otsuka Flyer, they made the first transpacific flight in a hot-air balloon. In 1984 American aviator Joseph W. Kittinger, aboard the helium-filled Rosie O’Grady’s…

  • Lindstr?m’s theorem (logic)

    metalogic: Elementary logic: Although Lindstr?m’s theorem does not settle satisfactorily whether or not elementary logic is the right logic, it does seem to suggest that mathematical findings can help the logician to clarify his concepts of logic and of logical truth.

  • Lindstr?m, Per (Swedish logician)

    metalogic: Elementary logic: …that enabled the Swedish logician Per Lindstr?m to prove in 1969 a general theorem to the effect that, roughly speaking, within a broad class of possible logics, elementary logic is the only one that satisfies the requirements of axiomatizability and of the L?wenheim-Skolem theorem. Although Lindstr?m’s theorem does not settle…

  • Lindt, Auguste Rudolph (Swiss diplomat)

    Auguste Rudolph Lindt, Swiss diplomat (born Aug. 5, 1905, Bern, Switz.—died April 15/16, 2000, Switzerland), as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (1956–60) provided assistance for refugees fleeing Hungary after Soviet intervention there in 1956 and for Algerian refugees in North A

  • Lindum (England, United Kingdom)

    United Kingdom: Administration: By the year 98 Lincoln and Gloucester had joined Camulodunum as coloniae, and by 237 York had become a fourth. Coloniae of Roman citizens enjoyed autonomy with a constitution based on that of republican Rome, and Roman citizens had various privileges before the law. It is likely that Verulamium…

  • Lindus (Greece)

    Lindos, town on the eastern coast of Rhodes and the site of one of the three city-states of Rhodes before their union (408 bc). Lindos was the site of Danish excavations (1902–24, resumed 1952) that uncovered the Doric Temple of Athena Lindia on the acropolis, propylaea (entrance gates), and a stoa

  • Lindwall, Raymond Russell (Australian athlete)

    Raymond Russell Lindwall, Australian cricketer (born Oct. 3, 1921, Mascot, N.S.W., Australia—died June 23, 1996, Brisbane, Australia), was one of the most admired fast bowlers of the post-World War II era; between 1946 and 1962 he took 794 first-class wickets (average 21.36), including 228 in 61 T

  • lindy (dance)

    dance: Social dance: The lindy and rock and roll brought back contact between the dancers, but it was of a very acrobatic and individualistic kind. The influence of African dance could still be seen in disco and other popular forms, particularly in the characteristic swaying of the hips and…

  • lindy hop (dance)

    dance: Social dance: The lindy and rock and roll brought back contact between the dancers, but it was of a very acrobatic and individualistic kind. The influence of African dance could still be seen in disco and other popular forms, particularly in the characteristic swaying of the hips and…

  • line (military formation)

    tactics: Linear formation: Meanwhile, the improvement of firearms caused armour to be discarded. Infantry ceased wearing it almost completely after 1660, and the armour carried by cavalrymen grew steadily shorter until all that remained were the breastplates worn by heavy cavalry—the cuirassiers—as late as the 20th…

  • line (prosody)

    prosody: Scansion: …units are the foot, the line, and the stanza. The recurrence of similar feet in a line determines the metre; here there are three lines consisting of four iambic feet (i.e., of four units in which the common pattern is the iamb—an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable), which…

  • line (mathematics)

    Line, Basic element of Euclidean geometry. Euclid defined a line as an interval between two points and claimed it could be extended indefinitely in either direction. Such an extension in both directions is now thought of as a line, while Euclid’s original definition is considered a line segment. A

  • line (fishing tackle)

    fishing: Early history: Horsehair fishing lines gave way to lines made of silk, cotton, or linen. The average angler could cast three times farther with these lines, and this increased distance helped spur the development of artificial lures. With longer casting capabilities and more line, a considerable tangle (called an…

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