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  • quillfish (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Ptilichthyidae (quillfish) Extremely elongated, body ending in a free fleshy point; pelvic fins absent; dorsal and anal fins like vanes of a feather. 1 species (Ptilichthys goodei), rare; North Pacific. Family Zaproridae (prowfish) A single species (Zaprora silenus) like a shorter, deeper-bodied prickleback; pelvic fins

  • Quills (film by Kaufman [2000])

    Philip Kaufman: Films in the 21st century: …Kaufman returned to directing with Quills (2000), an adaptation of the Broadway play about the Marquis de Sade. The film was a critical success, earning star Geoffrey Rush an Oscar nomination for his performance as the imprisoned de Sade. Kate Winslet provided able support as the prison laundress who helps…

  • quillwork (embroidery)

    Quillwork, type of embroidery done with the quills of a porcupine, or sometimes with bird feathers. This type of decoration was used by American Indians from Maine to Virginia and westward to the Rocky Mountains. For all practical purposes the art has died out. Quills were used on tobacco and

  • quillwort (plant)

    Quillwort, (family Isoetaceae), family of about 250 species of seedless vascular plants of the order Isoetales. Quillworts are the only extant members of the order and are usually placed in a single genus, Isoetes (also spelled Iso?tes). The plants are aquatic or semi-aquatic, and most are native

  • Quilmes (Argentina)

    Quilmes, cabecera (county seat) and partido (county), of Gran (Greater) Buenos Aires. It is located southeast of the city of Buenos Aires in Buenos Aires provincia (province), eastern Argentina, near the Río de la Plata estuary. Colonization of the area began with the second and permanent founding

  • quilombo (Brazilian slave settlement)

    Quilombo, in colonial Brazil, a community organized by fugitive slaves. Quilombos were located in inaccessible areas and usually consisted of fewer than 100 people who survived by farming and raiding. The largest and most famous was Palmares, which grew into an autonomous republic and by the 1690s

  • Quilon (India)

    Kollam, port city, southern Kerala state, southwestern India. It lies on the Malabar Coast of the Arabian Sea northwest of Thiruvananthapuram, the state capital. The city is situated next to Asthamudi Lake, an inlet of the sea, and is linked with Alappuzha and Kochi (Cochin) to the north by a

  • Quilp, Daniel (fictional character)

    Daniel Quilp, fictional character, the dwarfish villain of Charles Dickens’s novel The Old Curiosity Shop

  • quilt (soft furnishing)

    bedspread: …French word contrepoinct, meaning “stitched quilt,” was probably made of patched or applied pieces, quilted together. The quilts, or quilted bedspreads, in both appliqué and patchwork, that were made in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries have come to be considered an important type of American folk…

  • quilt contest (American competition)

    quilting: The quilt revival: National quilt contests of the 20th century, notably the 1933 World’s Fair quilt contest sponsored by Sears, Roebuck and Company and the 1977 Bicentennial contest sponsored by Good Housekeeping magazine, have contributed to interest in quilting and brought forward national teachers like Jinny Beyer.

  • Quilter’s Newsletter Magazine (American journal)

    quilting: The quilt revival: Bonnie Leman’s Quilter’s Newsletter Magazine, founded in 1969, was the first quilt-dominated magazine. Others soon followed, including Lady’s Circle Patchwork Quilts, Quilt World, and the American Quilter. The latter promotes the American Quilter’s Society, founded by William and Meredith Schroeder in 1984, with an annual contest and…

  • quilting (decorative arts)

    Quilting, sewing technique in which two layers of fabric, usually with an insulating interior layer, are sewn together with multiple rows of stitching. It has long been used for clothing in China, the Middle East, North Africa, and the colder areas of Europe but is now primarily associated with the

  • Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them (work by Webster)

    Marie Webster: In her 1915 best-seller, Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them, America’s first book dedicated to quilt history, Webster wrote, “The work of the old-time quilters possesses artistic merit to a very high degree.”

  • Quimbaya (people)

    Native American art: Colombia, Ecuador, and Brazil: …does the work of the Quimbaya, whose skill in creating polished metal flasks is remarkable. Notable also is Sinú casting, which could execute works weighing several pounds. In Ecuador the goldwork found at La Tolita is legendary and shows a skill in casting and overlay that did not seem to…

  • Quimby Manuscripts, The (essays by Quimby)

    Phineas Parkhurst Quimby: The Quimby Manuscripts (1921, ed. by H.W. Dresser) include his philosophy. The first edition contains a number of Eddy’s letters to Quimby and others not found in later editions.

  • Quimby, Harriet (American aviator)

    Harriet Quimby, American aviator, the first female pilot to fly across the English Channel. Quimby’s birth date and place are not well attested. (She sometimes claimed 1884 in Arroyo Grande, California.) By 1902, however, it is known that she and her family were living in California, and in that

  • Quimby, Phineas Parkhurst (American cult leader)

    Phineas Parkhurst Quimby, American exponent of mental healing who is generally regarded as the founder of the New Thought movement, a religio-metaphysical healing cult. Quimby employed hypnosis as a means of healing but discovered that he could also heal by suggestion. He held that all illness is

  • Quimper (France)

    Quimper, town, capital of Finistère département, Brittany région, western France. Quimper is a port at the estuarine confluence of the Odet and Steir rivers. Once the ancient capital of the countship Cornouaille, it is associated with the legendary (5th century) king Gradlon, who came from Cornwall

  • Quimper faience (pottery)

    Quimper faience, tin-enamelled earthenware produced by a factory at Loc Maria, a suburb of Quimper in Brittany, Fr. The factory was founded in 1690 by Jean-Baptiste Bosquet, a potter from Marseille who had settled there. Both Pierre Caussy, who took over in 1743, and de la Hubeaudière, who bought

  • Quin, Henry (Scottish physician)

    James Tassie: …he developed with a physician, Henry Quin.

  • Quin, James (English actor)

    James Quin, English actor whose Falstaff was considered the finest of his time. Quin made his first stage appearance at the Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin, in 1712. He was engaged for small parts at London’s Drury Lane Theatre, where his remarkable memory enabled him to fill in at short notice as

  • quinacridone (pigment)

    dye: Quinacridone compounds: A second group of pigments developed in the 20th century were the quinacridone compounds. Quinacridone itself was introduced in 1958. Its seven crystalline forms range in colour from yellowish-red to violet; the violet β and red γ forms are used as pigments, both…

  • quinacrine (drug)

    history of medicine: Tropical medicine: …become available, in 1934, was quinacrine (known as mepacrine, Atabrine, or Atebrin). In World War II it amply fulfilled the highest expectations and helped to reduce disease among Allied troops in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Far East. A number of other effective antimalarial drugs subsequently became available.

  • quinacrine banding (cytogenetics)

    cytogenetics: …such as Giemsa banding (G-banding), quinacrine banding (Q-banding), reverse banding (R-banding), constitutive heterochromatin (or centromere) banding (C-banding), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). G-banding is one of the most-used chromosomal staining methods. In this approach, chromosomes are first treated with an enzyme known as trypsin and then with Giemsa stain.

  • Quinará (region, Guinea-Bissau)

    Quinará, region located on the Atlantic coast in southwestern Guinea-Bissau. The Rio Grande de Buba flows east-west through the centre of the region and empties into the Atlantic; most of the oil palms in the region are grown along the river. Rice is produced throughout Quinará, as are subsistence

  • quinarius (ancient coin)

    coin: Introduction of the denarius: …of 10 asses; the silver quinarius (now of eight asses and with the types of the victoriate) became rare; and the silver sesterce (now equal to four asses) virtually disappeared. After about 80 bc the striking of bronze was discontinued until the time of Caesar.

  • quinary number system (mathematics)

    numerals and numeral systems: Number bases: The quinary scale, or number system with base five, is very old, but in pure form it seems to be used at present only by speakers of Saraveca, a South American Arawakan language; elsewhere it is combined with the decimal or the vigesimal system, where the…

  • quinary scale (mathematics)

    numerals and numeral systems: Number bases: The quinary scale, or number system with base five, is very old, but in pure form it seems to be used at present only by speakers of Saraveca, a South American Arawakan language; elsewhere it is combined with the decimal or the vigesimal system, where the…

  • Quinault, Philippe (French author)

    Jean-Baptiste Lully: …he worked with the librettist Philippe Quinault on operatic and ballet works varying from the classical Atys (1676) and Isis (1677) to the heroic Roland (1685) and the pastoral Le Temple de la paix (1685). He died of an infected wound in his foot caused by his long conducting stick.

  • quinazoline (chemistry)

    mimicry: The chemical basis for repulsion: …secrete a bitter substance (a quinazoline) that repels birds; similar substances, differing only slightly in molecular structure, are found in palms. The fact that a certain chemical substance is restricted to a specific function, such as sex attraction, does not necessarily mean that it was evolved solely for that purpose.…

  • quince (celebration)

    Quincea?era, (Spanish: “15 years [feminine form]”) the celebration of a girl’s 15th birthday, marking her passage from girlhood to womanhood; the term is also used for the celebrant herself. The quincea?era is both a religious and a social event that emphasizes the importance of family and society

  • quince (plant)

    Quince, (Cydonia oblonga), a small tree or shrub of the rose family (Rosaceae), grown for its edible fruit. Quince is the only member of the genus Cydonia and is native to Iran, Turkey, and possibly Greece and the Crimean Peninsula. The fruit has a strong aroma and is astringent in the raw state

  • quincea?era (celebration)

    Quincea?era, (Spanish: “15 years [feminine form]”) the celebration of a girl’s 15th birthday, marking her passage from girlhood to womanhood; the term is also used for the celebrant herself. The quincea?era is both a religious and a social event that emphasizes the importance of family and society

  • quincea?os (celebration)

    Quincea?era, (Spanish: “15 years [feminine form]”) the celebration of a girl’s 15th birthday, marking her passage from girlhood to womanhood; the term is also used for the celebrant herself. The quincea?era is both a religious and a social event that emphasizes the importance of family and society

  • quincunx (architecture)

    Western architecture: The middle Byzantine period (843–1204): …producing a type called the quincunx. These domes were usually comparatively small and were set on drums, which tended to become narrower and taller with the progress of time. The eastern extremities of the side aisles formed chapels which played an important part in the liturgy, that to the north…

  • quincunx (mechanical device)

    probability and statistics: Biometry: …model, now known as the Galton board, that he employed to explain the normal distribution of inherited characteristics; in particular, he used his model to explain the tendency of progeny to have the same variance as their parents, a process he called reversion, subsequently known as regression to the mean.…

  • Quincy (film by Jones and Hicks [2018])

    Quincy Jones: The documentary Quincy (2018) chronicled his life and career and was directed by his daughter, actress and screenwriter Rashida Jones, and filmmaker Alan Hicks.

  • Quincy (Massachusetts, United States)

    Quincy, city, Norfolk county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S., on Boston Harbor, just southeast of Boston. In 1625 the site, which was settled by Captain Wollaston, was given the name Mount Wollaston, and a short time afterward, under the leadership of Thomas Morton, it was renamed Merry Mount; in 1627

  • Quincy (Illinois, United States)

    Quincy, city, seat (1825) of Adams county, western Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Mississippi River, there bridged to Missouri, about 140 miles (225 km) northwest of St. Louis. Sauk, Fox, and Kickapoo Indians were early inhabitants of the area. Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet stopped at what

  • Quincy Jones

    Quincy Jones’s enormous success in the 1980s was the culmination of an extraordinary career. A classically trained musician who grew up in Seattle, Washington, he was a gospel singer at age 12, a jazz arranger in New York City in his early 20s, and musical director of Barclay Records in France soon

  • Quincy Market (market, Boston, Massachusetts, United States)

    Alexander Parris: …district brought attention to Parris’s Quincy Market (1825), which was reopened as a farmers’ market. The structure is notable for its monumentally simplified geometric forms and its system of post-and-lintel supports built of granite.

  • Quincy Plan (educational method)

    Quincy Plan, experimental, progressive, child-centred approach to education introduced in 1875 in Quincy, Mass., U.S., by superintendent of schools Francis W. Parker. Parker eliminated the rigid formalities of traditional school routine, arranged interrelated subjects around a central core, and

  • Quincy, M.E. (American television program)

    Jack Klugman: …Los Angeles medical examiner in Quincy, M.E. The popular drama ran until 1983, earning him several Emmy nominations.

  • Quincy, Quatremère de (French archaeologist)

    Jacques-Louis David: Formative years: In the company of Quatremère de Quincy, a young French sculptor who was a strong partisan of the return to antiquity, he visited the ruins of Herculaneum, the Doric temples at Paestum, and the Pompeian collections at Naples. In front of the ancient vases and columns, he felt, he…

  • Quindaro (Kansas, United States)

    Kansas City: Absorbed earlier was Quindaro, which had been founded by antislavery leaders as a free port on the Missouri. The entire metropolitan area is subject to episodic flooding; during the 20th century, floods in 1903, 1951, 1977, and 1993 inflicted severe damage on the city.

  • Quindío (department, Colombia)

    Quindío, departamento, west-central Colombia, on the western slopes of the Andean Cordillera Central. The smallest department in the nation, it is located in one of Colombia’s leading coffee-producing regions. Bananas, corn (maize), sugarcane, and beans are among the other crops, and livestock

  • Quindlen, Anna (American writer)

    Anna Quindlen, American columnist and novelist who in 1992 became the third woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for commentary. Quindlen began her newspaper career as a part-time reporter for the New York Post when she was still a student at Barnard College, New York City. She received a B.A. degree in

  • Quine’s criterion of ontological commitment (logic)

    philosophy of logic: Existence and ontology: …of existence” just mentioned recalls Quine’s criterion of ontological commitment: “To be is to be a value of a bound variable”—i.e., of the x in (?x) or in (?x). According to Quine, a theory is committed to those and only those entities that in the last analysis serve as the…

  • Quine, Richard (American television and film director)

    Richard Quine , American television and film director who was perhaps best known for his comedic movies from the 1950s and ’60s. The son of an actor, Quine began performing on the vaudeville stage as a child. He worked his way up from radio to films, taking his first screen role in Mervyn LeRoy’s

  • Quine, Robert (American musician)

    Robert Quine, American guitarist (born Dec. 30, 1942, Akron, Ohio—found dead May 31, 2004, New York, N.Y.), was a distinctive stylist best remembered for his contribution as a member of the protopunk band the Voidoids (led by Richard Hell), particularly on Blank Generation, and for his work on a

  • Quine, Willard Van Orman (American philosopher)

    Willard Van Orman Quine, American logician and philosopher, widely considered one of the dominant figures in Anglo-American philosophy in the last half of the 20th century. After studying mathematics and logic at Oberlin College (1926–30), Quine won a scholarship to Harvard University, where he

  • quinella (gambling)

    horse racing: Wagers: …in order in one race), quiniela (as in the perfecta but not in order), and trifecta (win, place, and show winners in order in one race). Other specialty wagers, sometimes offering extremely high payouts, require the bettor to select multiple trifectas, the winners of several races, or the first four…

  • Quinet, Edgar (French historian and poet)

    Edgar Quinet, French poet, historian, and political philosopher who made a significant contribution to the developing tradition of liberalism in France. After moving to Paris in 1820, Quinet forsook the faith of his Protestant mother, became greatly attracted to German philosophy, and published in

  • Quinhámel (city, Biombo, Guinea-Bissau)

    Biombo: …regional capital is located at Quinhámel.

  • quinhydrone electrode (chemistry)

    quinone: The so-called quinhydrone electrode, containing equivalent amounts of p-benzoquinone and hydroquinone, is used to determine hydrogen ion concentrations of unknown solutions. Hydroquinone is used principally as a photographic developing agent.

  • quinidine (drug)

    Quinidine, drug used in the treatment of abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmia) and malaria. Obtained from the bark of the Cinchona tree, quinidine shares many of the pharmacological actions of quinine; i.e., both have antimalarial and fever-reducing activity. The main use of quinidine, however,

  • quiniela wager (gambling)

    horse racing: Wagers: …in order in one race), quiniela (as in the perfecta but not in order), and trifecta (win, place, and show winners in order in one race). Other specialty wagers, sometimes offering extremely high payouts, require the bettor to select multiple trifectas, the winners of several races, or the first four…

  • quinine (drug)

    Quinine, drug obtained from cinchona bark that is used chiefly in the treatment of malaria, an infection caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, which is transmitted to humans by the bite of various species of mosquitoes. During the 300 years between its introduction into Western medicine and

  • Quinisext Council (Christianity)

    Quinisext Council, council that was convened in 692 by the Byzantine emperor Justinian II to issue disciplinary decrees related to the second and third councils of Constantinople (held in 553 and 680–681). They were the fifth and sixth ecumenical councils—hence the name Quinisext. The two

  • Quinisextum, Council of (Christianity)

    Quinisext Council, council that was convened in 692 by the Byzantine emperor Justinian II to issue disciplinary decrees related to the second and third councils of Constantinople (held in 553 and 680–681). They were the fifth and sixth ecumenical councils—hence the name Quinisext. The two

  • Quinlan, Joseph (American right-to-die advocate)

    Joseph Quinlan, U.S. "right-to-die" advocate who spearheaded the movement that tackled the ethical, legal, theological, and medical issues in prolonging the lives of the terminally ill after his daughter Karen Ann slipped into a coma in 1975; his daughter, who was removed from a respirator in 1976

  • Quinlan, Karen Ann (American medical patient)

    health law: Relationship of law and ethics: …in the landmark case of Karen Ann Quinlan. Her parents requested that physicians remove the mechanical ventilator in order to let their daughter die a natural death. The doctors refused, relying primarily on medical ethics, which they believed prohibited taking an action that might lead to the death of the…

  • Quinn, Anthony (Mexican American actor)

    Anthony Quinn, Mexican-born American actor who appeared in more than 150 films but was universally identified with one role especially—the earthy, full-of-life title character in Zorba the Greek (1964), whom he inhabited so completely and comfortably that many of his later parts seemed also to be

  • Quinn, Anthony Rudolph Oaxaca (Mexican American actor)

    Anthony Quinn, Mexican-born American actor who appeared in more than 150 films but was universally identified with one role especially—the earthy, full-of-life title character in Zorba the Greek (1964), whom he inhabited so completely and comfortably that many of his later parts seemed also to be

  • Quinn, Geoffrey Anthony (British entertainment mogul)

    Paul Raymond, (Geoffrey Anthony Quinn), British entertainment mogul (born Nov. 15, 1925, Liverpool, Eng.—died March 2, 2008, London, Eng.), opened (1958) the U.K.’s first private striptease club, the Raymond Revuebar, in London’s Soho district, making it and himself mainstays of the swinging London

  • Quinn, John Brian Patrick (Canadian ice hockey player and coach)

    Pat Quinn, (John Brian Patrick Quinn), Canadian ice hockey player and coach (born Jan. 29, 1943, Hamilton, Ont.—died Nov. 23, 2014, Vancouver, B.C.), was hailed as a national hero in 2002 when he guided Canada to its first Olympic men’s ice hockey gold medal in 50 years as the team skated to a 5–2

  • Quinn, Pat (Canadian ice hockey player and coach)

    Pat Quinn, (John Brian Patrick Quinn), Canadian ice hockey player and coach (born Jan. 29, 1943, Hamilton, Ont.—died Nov. 23, 2014, Vancouver, B.C.), was hailed as a national hero in 2002 when he guided Canada to its first Olympic men’s ice hockey gold medal in 50 years as the team skated to a 5–2

  • Quinn, Pat (American politician)

    Harris v. Quinn: Pat Quinn of Illinois (in his capacity as governor), the Service Employees International Union Healthcare Illinois & Indiana (SEIU-HII), SEIU Local 73, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Council 31. The personal assistants alleged that their freedoms of association and…

  • quinnat (fish)

    Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) prized North Pacific food and sport fish of the family Salmonidae. It weighs up to 60 kg (130 pounds) and is silvery with round black spots. Spawning runs occur in spring, adults swimming as far as 3,200 km (2,000 miles) up the Yukon. Young chinook salmon

  • Quinney, Richard (American philosopher and criminologist)

    Richard Quinney, American philosopher and criminologist known for his critical philosophical approach to criminal justice research. Quinney followed a Marxist approach in citing social inequities as the root of crime. Criminal behaviour, he asserted, is a natural occurrence in a society that

  • quinoa (plant)

    Quinoa, (Chenopodium quinoa), plant species grown for its tiny edible seeds. As a member of the Amaranthaceae family, quinoa is not a true cereal. Its seeds are high in protein and fibre, and its young leaves are also nutritious and can be eaten as a vegetable similar to spinach (to which it is

  • quinoline (chemical compound)

    Quinoline, any of a class of organic compounds of the aromatic heterocyclic series characterized by a double-ring structure composed of a benzene and a pyridine ring fused at two adjacent carbon atoms. The benzene ring contains six carbon atoms, while the pyridine ring contains five carbon atoms

  • quinolone (drug)

    antibiotic: The first antibiotics: …class of antibiotics known as quinolones. Quinolones interrupt the replication of DNA—a crucial step in bacterial reproduction—and have proven useful in treating urinary tract infections, infectious diarrhea, and various other infections involving elements such as bones and white blood cells.

  • quinone (chemical compound)

    Quinone, any member of a class of cyclic organic compounds containing two carbonyl groups, > C = O, either adjacent or separated by a vinylene group, ―CH = CH―, in a six-membered unsaturated ring. In a few quinones, the carbonyl groups are located in different rings. The term quinone also denotes

  • Quinquae Viae (philosophy)

    The Five Ways, in the philosophy of religion, the five arguments proposed by St. Thomas Aquinas (1224/25–1274) as demonstrations of the existence of God. Aquinas developed a theological system that synthesized Western Christian (and predominantly Roman Catholic) theology with the philosophy of the

  • Quinquagesima (Christianity)

    Carnival: …generally, the commencement date is Quinquagesima Sunday (the Sunday before Ash Wednesday), and the termination is Shrove Tuesday. In some parts of Spain, Ash Wednesday also is included in the Carnival celebrations, an observance that stems from a time when Ash Wednesday was not an integral part of Lent.

  • Quinque compilationes antiquae (canon law)

    canon law: The Corpus Juris Canonici (c. 1140–c. 1500): …the best known are the Quinque compilationes antiquae (“Five Ancient Compilations”). The first, the Breviarium extravagantium (“Compendium of Decretals Circulating Outside”; i.e., not yet collected) of Bernard of Pavia, introduced a system inspired by the codification of Justinian, a division of the material into five books, briefly summarized in the…

  • Quinque Ecclesiae (Hungary)

    Pécs, (“Five Churches”), city of county status and seat of Baranya megye (county), southwestern Hungary. It lies at the southern foot of the wooded Mecsek Mountains, 135 miles (220 km) south-southwest of Budapest. The site was occupied by the Roman town of Sopianae, the capital of the province of

  • Quinsai (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • Quinsay (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • quinsy (medicine)

    Quinsy, also called Peritonsillar Abscess, pus-filled swelling in the throat that develops infrequently as a complication of acute tonsillitis. It extends through the tonsillar capsule into the loose connective tissue of the neck and displaces the involved tonsil toward the midline of the throat.

  • Quintana Roo (state, Mexico)

    Quintana Roo, estado (state), southeastern Mexico, on the eastern side of the Yucatán Peninsula. Its northern shore is on the Yucatán Channel, a passage between the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea; it is also bounded by the Caribbean to the east, by Belize and Guatemala to the south, by the

  • Quintana, Manuel (president of Argentina)

    Argentina: The rise of radicalism: …finally put into the presidency, Manuel Quintana, was not one of Roca’s staunchest supporters. Quintana was forced to quell a radical revolution in 1905, and he died the following year. His death opened the way to the presidency for José Figueroa Alcorta, a Cordoban who turned immediately to the task…

  • Quintana, Manuel José (Spanish poet)

    Manuel José Quintana, Spanish patriot and Neoclassical poet, esteemed by his countrymen for poems, pamphlets, and proclamations written during the War of Independence from Napoleon. Although he was once regarded as a great poet, Quintana’s reputation has since steadily declined. After studying law

  • Quintanilla Perez, Selena (American singer)

    Selena , (SELENA QUINTANILLA PEREZ), U.S.-born Hispanic singer (born April 16, 1971, Lake Jackson, Texas—died March 31, 1995, Corpus Christi, Texas), was dubbed the Latin Madonna and was poised to achieve crossover success with the release of her first English-language album before being m

  • Quinte West (Ontario, Canada)
  • Quinte, Bay of (bay, Ontario, Canada)

    Bay of Quinte, arm of Lake Ontario, southeastern Ontario, Canada, extending for 75 miles (121 km) from its entrance near Amherst Island to Murray Canal at the western end. It is a narrow bay, ranging from one to six miles in width. The bay is scenic, having many small inlets; and it receives

  • Quintero, Joaquín álvarez (Spanish writer)

    álvarez Quintero brothers: brothers who collaborated in almost 200 dramas depicting the life, manners, and speech of Andalusia. Serafín álvarez Quintero (b. March 26, 1871, Utrera, Sevilla, Spain—d. April 12, 1938, Madrid) and Joaquín álvarez Quintero (b. Jan. 20, 1873, Utrera, Sevilla, Spain—d. June 14, 1944, Madrid) produced…

  • Quintero, José (American theatrical director)

    José Quintero, theatrical director and cofounder of Circle in the Square Theatre in New York City’s Greenwich Village, the theatre whose productions sparked the growth of off Broadway into a nationally important theatre movement. Quintero’s stagings of the plays of Eugene O’Neill brought about a

  • Quintero, José Benjamin (American theatrical director)

    José Quintero, theatrical director and cofounder of Circle in the Square Theatre in New York City’s Greenwich Village, the theatre whose productions sparked the growth of off Broadway into a nationally important theatre movement. Quintero’s stagings of the plays of Eugene O’Neill brought about a

  • Quintero, Serafín álvarez (Spanish writer)

    álvarez Quintero brothers: Spanish brothers who collaborated in almost 200 dramas depicting the life, manners, and speech of Andalusia. Serafín álvarez Quintero (b. March 26, 1871, Utrera, Sevilla, Spain—d. April 12, 1938, Madrid) and Joaquín álvarez Quintero (b. Jan. 20, 1873, Utrera, Sevilla, Spain—d. June 14, 1944, Madrid)…

  • quintessence (astronomy and physics)

    dark energy: Known as “quintessence,” this form of dark energy would vary in space and time, thus providing a possible way to distinguish it from a cosmological constant. It is also similar in mechanism (though vastly different in scale) to the scalar field energy invoked in the inflationary theory…

  • Quintet (film by Altman [1979])

    Paul Newman: Later roles: …and again in the controversial Quintet (1979), a futuristic saga. Newman also maintained his star status by appearing in such popular films as The Towering Inferno (1974), an action thriller that starred Steve McQueen and William Holden; Slap Shot (1977), a comedy about a hapless minor-league hockey team that is…

  • quintet (music)

    Quintet, a musical composition for five instruments or voices; also, a group of five musicians performing such a composition. The string quintet normally includes two violins, two violas, and a cello. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s six works for this medium are considered among his greatest achievements

  • Quintet for Piano and Strings (work by Bloch)

    Ernest Bloch: 1 (1925) and his Quintet for piano and strings (1923), which utilizes quarter tones to colour and heighten the emotional intensity of the music. His other notable works include an “epic rhapsody” for orchestra (America, 1926), the Suite for viola and piano (1919), and five string quartets (1916, 1945,…

  • quintic equation (mathematics)

    évariste Galois: …impossibility of solving the general quintic equation by radicals. Ruffini’s effort was not wholly successful, but in 1824 the Norwegian mathematician Niels Abel gave a correct proof.

  • Quintilian (Roman rhetorician)

    Quintilian, Latin teacher and writer whose work on rhetoric, Institutio oratoria, is a major contribution to educational theory and literary criticism. Quintilian was born in northern Spain, but he was probably educated in Rome, where he afterward received some practical training from the leading o

  • Quintilianus, Marcus Fabius (Roman rhetorician)

    Quintilian, Latin teacher and writer whose work on rhetoric, Institutio oratoria, is a major contribution to educational theory and literary criticism. Quintilian was born in northern Spain, but he was probably educated in Rome, where he afterward received some practical training from the leading o

  • Quintilis (month)

    July, seventh month of the Gregorian calendar. It was named after Julius Caesar in 44 bce. Its original name was Quintilis, Latin for the “fifth month,” indicating its position in the early Roman

  • Quintillus (Roman emperor)

    Quintillus, Roman emperor in ad 270, who died or was killed a few weeks after being proclaimed

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