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  • Quebec Liberal Party (political party, Canada)

    Jean Charest: …assume the leadership of the Quebec Liberal Party (QLP). His move into provincial politics was made in an effort to wrest political control of Quebec from the separatist Parti Québécois (PQ), headed by Lucien Bouchard, prior to a referendum on Quebec independence. Although Charest’s popularity in Quebec had been expected…

  • Quebec Movement (Canadian literary movement)

    Canadian literature: The literary movement of 1860: …Mouvement Littéraire de Québec (Literary Movement of Quebec). Often congregating at the bookstore of poet Octave Crémazie, its dozen members shared patriotic, conservative, and strongly Roman Catholic convictions about the survival of French Canada. Their spokesman, Henri-Raymond Casgrain, promoted a messianic view of the spiritual mission of French Canadians…

  • Quebec Nordiques (American hockey team)

    Colorado Avalanche, American professional ice hockey team based in Denver that plays in the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Avalanche have won two Stanley Cup championships (1996 and 2001). The franchise was originally based in Quebec, Canada, and was known as the Quebec

  • Quebec Party (political party, Canada)

    Parti Québécois, provincial Canadian political party founded in 1968 by journalist René Lévesque and other French Canadian separatists in the largely French-speaking province of Quebec. In 1968 Lévesque merged his Mouvement Souveraineté-Association (Sovereignty-Association Movement)—which advocated

  • Quebec referendum of 1995 (Canadian history)

    Quebec referendum of 1995, referendum held in the Canadian province of Quebec on October 30, 1995, that proposed sovereignty for the province within a new economic and political partnership between Quebec and the rest of Canada. The referendum was defeated by a margin of only 1 percent, or fewer

  • Quebec song (Canadian literature)

    Canadian literature: The Quiet Revolution: …as Gilles Vigneault, the “Quebec song” became the poetry of the people. Fusing elements of traditional Quebec folk music with politically charged lyrics, the Quebec song gained new importance at this time for its role in sustaining political fervour and national pride. Vigneault’s music incorporated many elements of traditional…

  • Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology

    assistive technology: Benefits of assistive technology: The Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) collects information about the benefits of assistive technology and attempts to measure individuals’ satisfaction with their devices. QUEST uses different types of variables to measure user satisfaction, including those that take into account the environment, pertinent…

  • Québec Values Charter (Canadian history)

    Québec Values Charter, statement of principles and subsequent legislation introduced in 2013 to Québec’s National Assembly by the ruling Parti Québécois government that sought the creation of a secular society—a society in which religion and the state would be completely separate. The result of

  • Quebec, Battle of (North America [1759])

    Battle of Quebec, (September 13, 1759), in the French and Indian War, decisive defeat of the French under the marquis de Montcalm by a British force led by Maj. Gen. James Wolfe. Both commanding officers died from wounds sustained during the battle, and within a year French Canada had capitulated

  • Quebec, Battle of (American Revolution [1775])

    Battle of Quebec, (December 31, 1775), in the American Revolution, unsuccessful American attack on the British stronghold. In the winter of 1775–76, American Revolutionary leaders detached some of their forces from the Siege of Boston to mount an expedition through Maine with the aim of capturing

  • Quebec, flag of (Canadian provincial flag)

    Canadian provincial flag consisting of a blue field (background) divided into quarters by a central white cross; within each quarter is a white fleur-de-lis.The origin of the provincial flag can be traced to France, which controlled vast areas of North America during colonial times. Since at least

  • Québécois (people)

    Canada: The Quebec question: …Canadian province where citizens of French origin are in the majority, has developed a distinctive culture that differs in many respects from that of the rest of Canada—and, indeed, from the rest of North America. Although there are many in Quebec who support the confederation with the English-speaking provinces, many…

  • quebrachales (forest)

    Gran Chaco: Plant life: The climax vegetation is called quebrachales, and consists of vast, low hardwood forests where various species of quebracho tree are dominant and economically important as sources of tannin and lumber. These forests cover extensive areas away from the rivers; nearer the rivers they occupy the higher, better-drained sites, giving rise…

  • quebracho (tree)

    Anacardiaceae: The reddish brown wood of quebracho trees (genus Schinopsis, especially S. lorentzii) yields commercial tannin. The pepper tree (Schinus molle), Cotinus species, and several species of sumac (Rhus) are cultivated as ornamentals. Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac (all Toxicodendron

  • quebrada (geographical feature)

    Atacama Plateau: …as broader valleys known as quebradas, the latter historically important as colonial routes of penetration into the Argentine Andes. Peruvian and Chilean colonizers conducted expeditions through the Andean valleys in the latter half of the 16th century that led to the foundation of some of the oldest towns in Argentina…

  • Quechan (people)

    Quechan, California Indian people of the fertile Colorado River valley who, together with the Mojave and other groups of the region (collectively known as River Yumans), shared some of the traditions of the Southwest Indians. They lived in riverside hamlets, and among the structures they built were

  • Quechua

    Quechuan languages, the languages of the former Inca Empire in South America and the principal native languages of the central Andes today. According to archaeological and historical evidence, the original languages were probably spoken in a small area in the southern Peruvian highlands until

  • Quechua (people)

    Quechua, South American Indians living in the Andean highlands from Ecuador to Bolivia. They speak many regional varieties of Quechua, which was the language of the Inca empire (though it predates the Inca) and which later became the lingua franca of the Spanish and Indians throughout the Andes.

  • Quechua (Peru)

    Cuzco, city and Inca región, south-central Peru. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the Western Hemisphere. Formerly the capital of the extensive Inca empire, it retains much of its highly crafted early stone architecture, which is typically preserved in the foundations and

  • Quechua (Incan counting tool)

    Quipu, an Inca accounting apparatus in use from c. 1400 to 1532 ce and consisting of a long textile cord (called a top, or primary, cord) with a varying number of pendant cords. The pendant cords may also have cords (known as subsidiaries) attached. Experts believe that—in addition to the various

  • Quechuan languages

    Quechuan languages, the languages of the former Inca Empire in South America and the principal native languages of the central Andes today. According to archaeological and historical evidence, the original languages were probably spoken in a small area in the southern Peruvian highlands until

  • Quechumaran languages

    South American Indian languages: Quechumaran: Quechumaran, which is composed of the Quechuan and Aymaran families, is the stock with the largest number of speakers—7,000,000 for Quechuan and 1,000,000 for Aymaran—and is found mainly in the Andean highlands extending from southern Colombia to northern Argentina. The languages of this group…

  • Quedagh Merchant (ship)

    William Kidd: …valuable prize, the Armenian ship Quedagh Merchant, in January 1698 and scuttled his own unseaworthy Adventure Galley. When he reached Anguilla, in the West Indies (April 1699), he learned that he had been denounced as a pirate. He left the Quedagh Merchant at the island of Hispaniola (where the ship…

  • Quedens, Eunice (American actress)

    Eve Arden, American actress best known for her role as the title character of Our Miss Brooks on radio (1948–56) and television (1952–56). Arden began her theatre career with the Henry Duffy Stock Company in San Francisco (1928–29) and made her Broadway debut in the 1934 Ziegfeld Follies. Her film

  • Quedlinburg (Germany)

    Quedlinburg, city, Saxony-Anhalt Land (state), central Germany. It lies on the Bode River, in the northern foothills of the Lower Harz Mountains, southwest of Magdeburg. Founded in 922 as a fortress by Henry I (the Fowler), it became a favourite residence of the Saxon emperors, and in 968 Otto I

  • Queeg, Captain (fictional character)

    Captain Queeg, fictional character, the unstable skipper of the destroyer-minesweeper U.S.S. Caine in The Caine Mutiny (1951) by Herman Wouk. The character was memorably portrayed by Humphrey Bogart in a film also entitled The Caine Mutiny

  • queen (monarch)
  • Queen (album by Minaj)

    Nicki Minaj: Queen (2018) featured collaborations with such performers as Eminem and the Weeknd.

  • queen (playing card)

    old maid: …deck from which one black queen is discarded. The cards are then dealt around one at a time as far as they will go. It does not matter if some players have one more card than others. Each player starts by discarding any paired cards from in hand.

  • queen (chess)

    chess: Queen: Each player has one queen, which combines the powers of the rook and bishop and is thus the most mobile and powerful piece. The White queen begins at d1, the Black queen at d8.

  • Queen (British rock group)

    Queen, British rock band whose fusion of heavy metal, glam rock, and camp theatrics made it one of the most popular groups of the 1970s. Although generally dismissed by critics, Queen crafted an elaborate blend of layered guitar work by virtuoso Brian May and overdubbed vocal harmonies enlivened by

  • queen (insect caste)

    ant: …or classes, within a colony: queens, males, and workers. Some species live in the nests of other species as parasites. In these species the parasite larvae are given food and nourishment by the host workers. Wheeleriella santschii is a parasite in the nests of Monomorium salomonis, the most common ant…

  • Queen & Country (film by Boorman [2014])

    John Boorman: The drama Queen & Country (2014) is a sequel to Hope and Glory. Boorman also cowrote the drama The Professor and the Madman (2019).

  • Queen Adelaide Province (historical colony, Southern Africa)

    Sir Benjamin D'Urban: …established a new colony called Queen Adelaide Province. This is noted as being the first time that the British had decided to attempt direct rule of Africans in Africa.

  • Queen Alexandra Range (mountains, Antarctica)

    Queen Alexandra Range, mountain range of Antarctica, located in Ross Dependency (New Zealand) along the western edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. The range reaches an elevation of 14,856 feet (4,528 m) in Mount Kirkpatrick. The mountain range rises between the Dry Valleys and Queen Maud Range of the

  • Queen and the Rebels, The (work by Betti)

    Ugo Betti: …tragedy of love and revenge; La regina e gli insorti (first performed 1951; Eng. trans., The Queen and the Rebels, 1956), a strong argument for compassion and self-sacrifice; and La fuggitiva (first performed 1953; Eng. trans., The Fugitive, 1964), a story presenting legal courts as a symbol of world salvation.…

  • queen angelfish (fish)

    angelfish: …of the Atlantic; and the queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris), a blue and yellow fish of the Atlantic.

  • Queen Anne Revival (architecture)

    Queen Anne style: The Queen Anne style of furniture design became extremely popular among the upper classes in Britain’s North American colonies.

  • Queen Anne style (art)

    Queen Anne style, style of decorative arts that began to evolve during the rule of King William III of England, reached its primacy during the reign of Queen Anne (1702–14), and persisted after George I ascended the throne. The period also has been called “the age of walnut” because that wood was

  • Queen Anne’s (county, Maryland, United States)

    Queen Anne’s, county, eastern Maryland, U.S., bordered by the Chester River to the north, Delaware to the east, and Chesapeake Bay to the west. It consists of a coastal lowland and includes Kent Island, which is linked across the bay to Anne Arundel county by the William Preston Lane, Jr., Memorial

  • Queen Anne’s gallon (measurement)

    measurement system: The United States Customary System: …United States still used “Queen Anne’s gallon” of 231 cubic inches, which the British had discarded in 1824. Construction of standards was undertaken by the Office of Standard Weights and Measures, under the Treasury Department. The standard for the yard was one imported from London some years earlier, which…

  • Queen Anne’s lace (plant)

    Queen Anne’s lace, (Daucus carota carota), biennial subspecies of plant in the parsley family (Apiaceae) that is an ancestor of the cultivated carrot. It grows to 1.5 metres (5 feet) tall and has bristly, divided leaves. It bears umbels (flat-topped clusters) of white or pink flowers with a single

  • Queen Anne’s Men (British theatrical group)

    Queen Anne’s Men, theatrical company in Jacobean England. Formed upon the accession of James I in 1603, it was an amalgamation of Oxford’s Men and Worcester’s Men. Christopher Beeston served as the troupe’s manager, and the playwright Thomas Heywood wrote works exclusively for Queen Anne’s Men. The

  • Queen Anne’s Revenge (warship)

    Blackbeard: …merchantman into a 40-gun warship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, and soon became notorious for outrages along the Virginia and Carolina coasts and in the Caribbean Sea. In 1718 Blackbeard established his base in a North Carolina inlet, forcibly collected tolls from shipping in Pamlico Sound, and made a prize-sharing agreement with…

  • Queen Anne’s War (North American history)

    Queen Anne’s War, (1702–13), second in a series of wars fought between Great Britain and France in North America for control of the continent. It was contemporaneous with the War of the Spanish Succession in Europe. British military aid to the colonists was devoted mainly to defense of the area

  • Queen Beth (motion picture)

    history of the motion picture: Pre-World War I American cinema: …three-and-one-half-reel La Reine Elisabeth (Queen Elizabeth, 1912), which starred Sarah Bernhardt and was imported by Zukor (who founded the independent Famous Players production company with its profits). In 1912 Enrico Guazzoni’s nine-reel Italian superspectacle Quo Vadis? (“Whither Are You Going?”) was road-shown in legitimate theatres across the country at…

  • queen butterfly (insect)

    reproductive behaviour: Insects: …of butterflies, such as the queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus), the males possess “hair pencils” that project from the end of the abdomen and emit a scent when swept over the female’s antennae during courtship behaviour. Copulation does not occur in the absence of this chemical display.

  • Queen Charlotte (painting by Gainsborough)

    Thomas Gainsborough: London period: Queen Charlotte is more restrained; the painting of the flounced white dress decorated with ribbons and laces makes her look particularly regal. It is significant that Gainsborough, unlike most of his contemporaries, did not generally use drapery painters. In 1784 he quarrelled with the Academy…

  • Queen Charlotte Islands (archipelago, Canada)

    Haida Gwaii, (Haida: “Islands of the People”) archipelago of western British Columbia, Canada, south of the Alaskan Panhandle. Extending in a north–south direction for roughly 175 miles (280 km) and with a land area of 3,705 square miles (9,596 square km), the islands (about 150 in number) are

  • Queen Charlotte Sound (inlet, Canada)

    Queen Charlotte Sound, broad, deep inlet of the eastern North Pacific indenting west-central British Columbia, Canada. Bounded on the north by Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands) and on the south by Vancouver Island, the sound feeds into a series of straits that once were avenues

  • Queen Charlotte Strait (strait, Canada)

    Queen Charlotte Sound: …south the sound tapers to Queen Charlotte Strait, a passage 60 miles (100 km) long by 16 miles (26 km) wide threading between Vancouver Island and the mainland to the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound. These interlocking channels constitute a portion of the Inside Passage from Washington state to…

  • Queen Christina (film by Mamoulian [1933])

    Greta Garbo: …in Mata Hari (1932) and Queen Christina (1933) were among her most popular, and they were mildly scandalous for their frank-as-the-times-would-permit treatment of eroticism and bisexuality, respectively. Garbo portrayed contemporary protagonists in As You Desire Me (1932) and The Painted Veil (1934), the latter film being highly reminiscent of the…

  • Queen City (Ohio, United States)

    Cincinnati, city, seat of Hamilton county, southwestern Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Ohio River opposite the suburbs of Covington and Newport, Kentucky, 15 miles (24 km) east of the Indiana border and about 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Dayton. Cincinnati is Ohio’s third largest city, after

  • queen conch (marine snail)

    conch: The queen conch (Strombus gigas), found from Florida to Brazil, has an attractive ornamental shell; the aperture, or opening into the first whorl in the shell, is pink and may be 30 cm (12 inches) long. Spider conchs, with prongs on the lip, belong to the…

  • Queen Elizabeth (British passenger ships)

    Queen Elizabeth, any one of three ships belonging to the British Cunard Line that successfully crossed over from the age of the transatlantic ocean liner to the age of the global cruise ship. The first Queen Elizabeth was one of the largest passenger liners ever built. Launched in 1938 and used as

  • Queen Elizabeth (motion picture)

    history of the motion picture: Pre-World War I American cinema: …three-and-one-half-reel La Reine Elisabeth (Queen Elizabeth, 1912), which starred Sarah Bernhardt and was imported by Zukor (who founded the independent Famous Players production company with its profits). In 1912 Enrico Guazzoni’s nine-reel Italian superspectacle Quo Vadis? (“Whither Are You Going?”) was road-shown in legitimate theatres across the country at…

  • Queen Elizabeth (World War I battleship)

    naval ship: Battleships: …a step further with HMS Queen Elizabeth, armed with 15-inch guns and capable, in theory, of 25 knots. World War I stopped the growth of British and German battleships, but the United States and Japan continued to build ships exceeding 30,000 tons displacement. In 1916 both countries adopted the 16-inch…

  • Queen Elizabeth 2 (ship)

    Queen Elizabeth: Its successor, the Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2), was launched in 1967 and made its maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York in 1969. The ship, 963 feet (294 metres) long and displacing 70,327 tons, was slightly smaller than its predecessor so that it could pass through the…

  • Queen Elizabeth II (ship)

    Queen Elizabeth: Its successor, the Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2), was launched in 1967 and made its maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York in 1969. The ship, 963 feet (294 metres) long and displacing 70,327 tons, was slightly smaller than its predecessor so that it could pass through the…

  • Queen Elizabeth II Great Court (public square, London, United Kingdom)

    London: Museums: Christened the Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, it was formally opened to the public in December 2000. The library holdings, established as the British Library in 1972, were moved to St. Pancras in 1998. Other collections also had outgrown the space available at Bloomsbury.

  • Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee

    On Feb. 6, 2012, Queen Elizabeth II reached the 60th anniversary of her accession to the British throne, a milestone that was followed in June (to coincide with her June 2, 1953, coronation) by four days of national celebration, including two days’ public holiday, to formally commemorate her

  • Queen Elizabeth Islands (islands, Canada)

    Queen Elizabeth Islands, part of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, comprising all the islands north of latitude 74°30′ N, including the Parry and Sverdrup island groups. The islands, the largest of which are Ellesmere, Melville, Devon, and Axel Heiberg, have a total land area of more than 150,000

  • Queen Elizabeth National Park (national park, Uganda)

    Queen Elizabeth National Park, national park located in southwestern Uganda. It occupies an area of 764 square miles (1,978 square km) in a region of rolling plains east of Lake Edward and foothills south of the Ruwenzori Mountains. The park is located within the Western Rift Valley, and its

  • Queen Elizabeth Way (expressway, Canada)

    Ontario: Transportation and telecommunications: The Queen Elizabeth Way, opened in 1939 as the first divided expressway in Canada, runs from Toronto to the U.S. border at Buffalo. The Ontario section of the Trans-Canada Highway runs from Montreal through Ottawa across vast stretches of Ontario’s northland to the Manitoba border. Capital…

  • Queen Elizabeth’s Virginal Book (music collection)

    Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, an early 17th-century English manuscript collection of 297 pieces for keyboard by many of the major composers of the period, including William Byrd, who is represented by 67 pieces; John Bull (44); Giles Farnaby (52); and Peter Philips (19). In his preface to the 1899

  • Queen Is Dead, The (album by the Smiths)

    the Smiths: ” After 1986’s The Queen Is Dead, their most perfect balance of private angst and public anger, the Smiths—frustrated at the failure of their singles to hit the top 10—abandoned Rough Trade for the marketing muscle of the major label EMI (in the United States they remained with…

  • Queen Latifah (American musician and actress)

    Queen Latifah, American musician and actress whose success in the late 1980s launched a wave of female rappers and helped redefine the traditionally male genre. She later became a notable actress. Owens was given the nickname Latifah (Arabic for “delicate” or “sensitive”) as a child and later

  • Queen Mab (poem by Shelley)

    Queen Mab, poem in nine cantos by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published in 1813. Shelley’s first major poem—written in blank verse—is a utopian political epic that exposes as social evils such institutions as monarchy, commerce, and religion and that describes a visionary future in which humanity is

  • Queen Mab (English folklore)

    Mab, in English folklore, the queen of the fairies. Mab is a mischievous but basically benevolent figure. In William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, she is referred to as the fairies’ midwife, who delivers sleeping men of their innermost wishes in the form of dreams. In Michael Drayton’s mock-epic

  • Queen Mab, a Philosophical Poem: With Notes (poem by Shelley)

    Queen Mab, poem in nine cantos by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published in 1813. Shelley’s first major poem—written in blank verse—is a utopian political epic that exposes as social evils such institutions as monarchy, commerce, and religion and that describes a visionary future in which humanity is

  • Queen Mary (ship)

    Sir Percy Elly Bates, 4th Baronet: …ships in the world, the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth.

  • Queen Mary Psalter (Gothic manuscript)

    Western painting: High Gothic: …large psalters, such as the Queen Mary Psalter (in the British Museum), survive from the first half of the 14th century, many of them done for East Anglian patrons and almost all laying heavy emphasis on marginal decoration. Although some books with elaborate border decorations date from as early as…

  • Queen Mary’s Psalter (Gothic manuscript)

    Western painting: High Gothic: …large psalters, such as the Queen Mary Psalter (in the British Museum), survive from the first half of the 14th century, many of them done for East Anglian patrons and almost all laying heavy emphasis on marginal decoration. Although some books with elaborate border decorations date from as early as…

  • Queen Maud Land (region, Antarctica)

    Queen Maud Land, region of Antarctica south of Africa, extending from Coats Land (west) to Enderby Land (east) and including the Princess Martha, Princess Astrid, Princess Ragnhild, Prince Harold, and Prince Olav coasts. A barren plateau covered by an ice sheet up to 1.5 miles (2.4 km) thick, it

  • Queen Maud Mountains (mountains, Antarctica)

    Queen Maud Mountains, subdivision of the Transantarctic Mountains of central Antarctica, extending southeastward for 500 miles (800 km) from the head of Ross Ice Shelf. Discovered in 1911 by the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, it was named for the queen of Norway. The rugged, glacier-studded

  • Queen Mother, The (queen consort of United Kingdom)

    Elizabeth, queen consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1936–52), wife of King George VI. She was credited with sustaining the monarchy through numerous crises, including the abdication of Edward VIII and the death of Princess Diana. The Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon was the

  • Queen Mum (queen consort of United Kingdom)

    Elizabeth, queen consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1936–52), wife of King George VI. She was credited with sustaining the monarchy through numerous crises, including the abdication of Edward VIII and the death of Princess Diana. The Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon was the

  • Queen of Hearts (fictional character)

    Queen of Hearts, fictional character, the tyrannical monarch in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) by Lewis

  • Queen of Jazz (British singer)

    Cleo Laine, British singer and actress who mastered a variety of styles but was best known as the “Queen of Jazz.” Laine was born to a Jamaican father and an English mother. She quit school at age 14 and took a variety of jobs while auditioning for singing jobs. Her first break came in 1951, when

  • Queen of Katwe (film by Nair [2016])

    Mira Nair: The biopic Queen of Katwe (2016) depicts the life of Ugandan chess prodigy Phiona Mutesi, who overcame extreme poverty to become a grandmaster.

  • Queen of Salsa Music (Cuban American singer)

    Celia Cruz, Cuban American singer who reigned for decades as the “Queen of Salsa Music,” electrifying audiences with her wide-ranging soulful voice and rhythmically compelling style. Cruz grew up in Santos Suárez, a district of Havana, in an extended family of 14. After high school she attended the

  • Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: …extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle extends across the Asian deserts to China, though its population is greatly reduced in numbers. A sixth…

  • Queen of Soul (American singer)

    Aretha Franklin, American singer who defined the golden age of soul music of the 1960s. Franklin’s mother, Barbara, was a gospel singer and pianist. Her father, C.L. Franklin, presided over the New Bethel Baptist Church of Detroit, Michigan, and was a minister of national influence. A singer

  • Queen of Spades, The (short story by Pushkin)

    The Queen of Spades, classic short story by Aleksandr Pushkin, published in 1834 as “Pikovaya dama.” In the story a Russian officer of German ancestry named Hermann learns that a fellow officer’s grandmother, an old countess, possesses the secret of winning at faro, a high-stakes card game. Hermann

  • Queen of Spades, The (opera by Tchaikovsky)

    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Final years: …on his third Pushkin opera, The Queen of Spades, which was written in just 44 days and is considered one of his finest. Later that year Tchaikovsky was informed by Nadezhda von Meck that she was close to ruin and could not continue his allowance. This was followed by the…

  • Queen of the Air, The (work by Ruskin)

    John Ruskin: Cultural criticism: In The Queen of the Air (1869) he attempted to express his old concept of a divine power in Nature in new terms calculated for an age in which assent to the Christian faith was no longer automatic or universal. Through an account of the Greek…

  • Queen of the Blues (American singer)

    Dinah Washington, black American blues singer noted for her excellent voice control and unique gospel-influenced delivery. As a child, Ruth Jones moved with her family to Chicago. She sang in and played the piano for her church choir and in 1939 began to sing and play piano in various Chicago

  • Queen of the Damned, The (novel by Rice)

    Anne Rice: …included The Vampire Lestat (1985), The Queen of the Damned (1988), The Tale of the Body Thief (1992), Memnoch the Devil (1995), The Vampire Armand (1998), Merrick (2000), Blood and Gold (2001), Blackwood Farm (2002), Blood Canticle (2003),

  • Queen of the Desert (film by Herzog [2015])

    Werner Herzog: …gambling addictions, and the biopic Queen of the Desert (2015), in which Nicole Kidman portrayed Gertrude Bell.

  • Queen of the Prisons of Greece, The (work by Lins)

    Osman Lins: Avalovara), a novel; and A rainha dos cárceres da Grécia (1976; The Queen of the Prisons of Greece). These works subject fictional narrative to an order determined by external elements of “literary architecture.” Several narratives of Nine, Novena parallel signs of the zodiac and geometric ideograms. The Queen of…

  • Queen of the Underworld (novel by Godwin)

    Gail Godwin: Queen of the Underworld (2006), about an ambitious young woman working as a reporter, is semiautobiographical. Flora (2013) and Grief Cottage (2017) both feature child protagonists. In 2006 Godwin published her journals from 1961–63 as The Making of a Writer.

  • Queen of the West (Ohio, United States)

    Cincinnati, city, seat of Hamilton county, southwestern Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Ohio River opposite the suburbs of Covington and Newport, Kentucky, 15 miles (24 km) east of the Indiana border and about 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Dayton. Cincinnati is Ohio’s third largest city, after

  • Queen Square (square, Bath, England, United Kingdom)

    Bath: …that grace the city are Queen Square, built by John Wood the Elder between 1728 and 1735; the Circus, begun by Wood in 1754 and completed by his son; the Royal Crescent, 1767–75, likewise designed by the father and completed by the son; the Guildhall, 1775; Lansdown Crescent, built by…

  • Queen Street (street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

    Toronto: City layout: …the central business district, following Queen Street W, is West Queen West, once a trendy bohemian section, now a more mainstream shopping district. Northeast of this area are two of Toronto’s best-known neighbourhoods, Chinatown and Kensington Market, the latter of which features an eclectic mix of shops and restaurants that…

  • queen substance (entomology)

    chemoreception: Primer pheromones: Queen honeybees secrete “queen substance” from their mandibular glands. When an unfertilized queen leaves the colony, queen substance acts as an olfactory attractant for males. The same compound within the colony modifies the behaviour of workers, preventing them from rearing more queens, and also affects their physiology, disrupting…

  • queen triggerfish (fish)

    triggerfish: Common species include the queen triggerfish (Balistes vetula), a tropical Atlantic fish brightly striped with blue, and Rhinecanthus aculeatus, a grayish, Indo-Pacific fish patterned with bands of blue, black, orange, and white.

  • Queen Victoria Hospital (hospital, East Grinstead, West Sussex, England, United Kingdom)

    East Grinstead: The Queen Victoria Hospital (founded 1889) became, after 1939, a world-renowned centre for plastic surgery. At nearby New Chapel, the first Mormon temple in Great Britain was completed in 1958. Pop. (2001) 23,942; (2011) 26,383.

  • Queen Victoria’s riflebird (bird)

    bird-of-paradise: …attributed to the calls of Queen Victoria’s riflebird (P. victoriae) and the paradise riflebird (P. paradiseus)—prolonged hisses, like the passage of bullets through the air.

  • Queen’s Bench Division (British law)

    Queen’s Bench Division, in England and Wales, one of three divisions of the High Court of Justice, the others being the Chancery Division (formerly the Court of Chancery) and the Family Division. Formerly one of the superior courts of common law in England, Queen’s or (during a kingship) King’s

  • Queen’s Bench, Court of (British law)

    Queen’s Bench Division, in England and Wales, one of three divisions of the High Court of Justice, the others being the Chancery Division (formerly the Court of Chancery) and the Family Division. Formerly one of the superior courts of common law in England, Queen’s or (during a kingship) King’s

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