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  • Roscellinus Compen-diensis (French philosopher and theologian)

    Roscelin, French philosopher and theologian known as the originator of an extreme form of nominalism holding that universals are nothing more than verbal expressions. His only extant work seems to be a letter to the French philosopher Peter Abelard, who studied under him at Besan?on; the little

  • Roscher, Wilhelm (German economist)

    social science: Economics: Such figures as Wilhelm Roscher and Karl Knies in Germany tended to dismiss the assumptions of timelessness and universality regarding economic behaviour that were almost axiomatic among the followers of Smith, and they strongly insisted upon the developmental character of capitalism, evolving in a long series of stages…

  • Rosciad, The (poem by Churchill)

    Charles Churchill: …fame independently in 1761 with The Rosciad, a satire on the London stage that named every prominent actor of the day unfavourably, except David Garrick; the brilliant and immediate success of this poem brought recognition and money to the bankrupt parson, and Churchill launched himself on the town and indulged…

  • Roscius (Roman actor)

    Roscius, Roman comic actor of such celebrity that his name became an honorary epithet for any particularly successful actor. Born into slavery at Solonium, Roscius gained such renown on the stage that the dictator Sulla freed him from bondage and conferred upon him the gold ring, the emblem of e

  • Roscius, The Young (British actor)

    William Henry West Betty, English actor who won instant success as a child prodigy. Betty’s debut was in Belfast, before he was 12, in an English version of Voltaire’s Za?re. He was successful in Dublin, Glasgow, and Edinburgh. In 1804, when he first appeared at Covent Garden, London, troops were

  • Roscoe Wind Complex (wind farm, Texas, United States)
  • Roscoe, Henry Enfield (English chemist)

    vanadium: The English chemist Henry Enfield Roscoe first isolated the metal in 1867 by hydrogen reduction of vanadium dichloride, VCl2, and the American chemists John Wesley Marden and Malcolm N. Rich obtained it 99.7 percent pure in 1925 by reduction of vanadium pentoxide, V2O5, with calcium metal.

  • Roscoe, William (English author)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): …the Grasshopper’s Feast (1807), by William Roscoe, a learned member of Parliament and writer on statistics. The gay and fanciful nonsense of this rhymed satiric social skit enjoyed, despite the seeming dominance of the moral Barbaulds and Trimmers, a roaring success. Great nonsense verse, however, had to await the coming…

  • Roscoepoundia (fungus)

    Roscoe Pound: …lichen, which was subsequently named Roscopoundia.

  • Roscoff, Quiquer de (French lexicographer)

    Celtic literature: The three major periods of Breton literature: …dictionary printed in 1499, and Quiquer de Roscoff’s French–Breton dictionary and conversations (printed 1616).

  • Roscommon (Ireland)

    Roscommon, market and county town (seat), County Roscommon, Ireland, lying northwest of Dublin. A monastery and school were established on the site in the 7th century by St. Coman. In the town and its environs are the remains of a Dominican abbey founded in 1253 by Felim O’Connor, king of Connacht,

  • Roscommon (county, Ireland)

    Roscommon, county in the province of Connaught, north-central Ireland. It is bounded by Counties Sligo (north), Leitrim (northeast), Longford and Westmeath (east), Offaly (southeast), Galway (southwest), and Mayo (west). The town of Roscommon, in the central part of the county, is the county town

  • Roscopoundia (fungus)

    Roscoe Pound: …lichen, which was subsequently named Roscopoundia.

  • rose (plant)

    Rose, (genus Rosa), genus of some 100 species of perennial shrubs in the rose family (Rosaceae). Roses are native primarily to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Many roses are cultivated for their beautiful flowers, which range in colour from white through various tones of yellow

  • Rose and the Ring, The (work by Thackeray)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): …William Makepeace Thackeray’s “fireside pantomime” The Rose and the Ring (1855) were signs of a changing climate, even though the Grimm-like directness of the first is partly neutralized by Ruskin’s moralistic bent and the gaiety of the second is spoiled by a laborious, parodic slyness. More important than these fairy…

  • rose aphid (insect)

    aphid: Types of aphids: The rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosae) is large and green with black appendages and pink markings. It is common on its only host, the cultivated rose. Natural predators are ladybird larvae and aphidlions (lacewing larvae).

  • Rose Atoll (atoll, American Samoa)

    Rose Atoll, most easterly coral atoll of the Samoan archipelago, part of American Samoa, southwestern Pacific Ocean. It has a total land area of 0.1 square mile (0.3 square km), and neither of its two constituent islands (Sand and Rose) rises more than 10 feet (3 metres) above sea level. Discovered

  • Rose Bowl (stadium, Pasadena, California, United States)

    stadium: Modern stadiums: …several other stadiums, including the Rose Bowl and Michigan Stadium. Because the bowl is entirely unsuited to the other principal American sport, baseball, another type of American stadium has evolved for baseball, in which the aim is to supply maximum roofed-seating capacity to protect spectators from the sunlight. A notable…

  • Rose Bowl (football game)

    Rose Bowl, oldest American postseason college gridiron football contest, held annually in Pasadena, California. Each Rose Bowl game is preceded by a Tournament of Roses Parade, or Rose Parade, which is one of the world’s most elaborate and famous annual parades. In 2014 the Rose Bowl began

  • Rose Bowl Parade (festival)

    pageant: The Rose Bowl Parade in Pasadena, Calif., one of the most famous parades in the world, precedes the annual Rose Bowl college football game.

  • rose chafer (insect)

    chafer: …well-known, destructive chafer is the rose chafer (M. subspinosus), a tan, long-legged beetle that feeds on the flowers and foliage of grapes, roses, and other plants. Poultry that eat rose chafer grubs may be poisoned. Other scarab subfamilies also include species called chafers (see also flower chafer; shining leaf chafer).

  • Rose Chamber, Noble Edict of the (Ottoman Empire [1839])

    Abdülmecid I: …Hatt-? ?erif of Gülhane (Noble Edict of the Rose Chamber) in 1839 and the Hatt-? Hümayun (Imperial Edict) in 1856, heralding the new era of Tanzimat (“Reorganization”).

  • rose coral (invertebrate)

    cnidarian: Annotated classification: Worldwide; includes precious red coral, Corallium. Order Trachylina Medusa dominant; reduced or no polyp stage. Statocysts and special sensory structures (tentaculocysts). Differ from other hydromedusae by having tentacles inserted above umbrellar margin. Oceanic, mostly warmer waters. Suborder Laingiomedusae Medusae with

  • rose cut (gem cut)

    Rose cut, method of faceting gemstones so that the base of the stone is wide, flat, and unfaceted, whereas the top of the stone is domed and covered with triangular facets. Often in two rows, the facets are grouped so that the very highest part of the stone terminates in a point. Once used

  • rose family (plant family)

    Rosaceae, the rose family of flowering plants (order Rosales), composed of some 2,500 species in more than 90 genera. The family is primarily found in the north temperate zone and occurs in a wide variety of habitats. A number of species are of economic importance as food crops, including apples,

  • Rose family (German family)

    Rose family, a distinguished family of German chemists. Valentine Rose, the elder (b. Aug. 16, 1736, Neuruppin, Brandenburg, Prussia—d. April 28, 1771, Berlin), was an apothecary in Berlin and, for a short time, assessor of the Ober Collegium Medicum. He was the discoverer of “Rose’s fusible

  • rose fever (pathology)

    Hay fever, seasonally recurrent bouts of sneezing, nasal congestion, and tearing and itching of the eyes caused by allergy to the pollen of certain plants, chiefly those depending upon the wind for cross-fertilization, such as ragweed in North America and timothy grass in Great Britain. In allergic

  • Rose Garden, The (work by Sa?dī)

    Sa?dī: …Orchard) and the Gulistān (1258; The Rose Garden). The Būstān is entirely in verse (epic metre) and consists of stories aptly illustrating the standard virtues recommended to Muslims (justice, liberality, modesty, contentment) as well as of reflections on the behaviour of dervishes and their ecstatic practices. The Gulistān is mainly…

  • Rose Gold (novel by Mosley)

    Walter Mosley: …books in the series included Rose Gold (2014) and Charcoal Joe (2016).

  • Rose Hill (New South Wales, Australia)

    Parramatta, city within the Sydney metropolitan area, eastern New South Wales, Australia. It lies along the 15-mile- (24-km-) long Parramatta River (which enters Port Jackson harbour). The second European settlement in Australia, it was founded in 1788 by Governor Arthur Phillip as a western

  • Rose Hill (hill, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest: Buda: Rózsa (Rose) Hill, the third hill near the river, lies north of Castle Hill. It is the most fashionable district of Budapest, where Hungary’s elite have houses. The Lukács (Lucas) Bath at the foot of the hill is frequented by Budapest’s literati.

  • rose hip (plant anatomy)

    rose: Major species and hybrids: rugosa), produce edible rose hips, which are a rich source of vitamin C and are sometimes used in preserves.

  • Rose Hobart (film by Cornell [1936])

    Joseph Cornell: His best-known early film is Rose Hobart (1936), a short reedited version of the B-movie East of Borneo (1931). As Cornell’s title suggests, his film focused entirely on the original film’s star, Rose Hobart, whom he expertly extracted from the plot into 19 minutes of dramatic shots in which she…

  • rose leafhopper (insect)

    leafhopper: The rose leafhopper (Edwardsiana rosae) is a serious rose and apple pest. It is creamy white to light yellow in colour and is about 3 mm long. It overwinters in the egg stage and produces two generations per year. It does not cause hopperburn.

  • rose mallow (plant)

    Hibiscus, (genus Hibiscus), genus of numerous species of herbs, shrubs, and trees in the mallow family (Malvaceae) that are native to warm temperate and tropical regions. Several are cultivated as ornamentals for their showy flowers, and a number are useful as fibre plants. The leaves are often

  • Rose Marie (work by Friml and Hammerstein II)

    Rudolf Friml: Rose Marie (1924; book and lyrics by Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II), best remembered for the song “Indian Love Call,” was followed in 1925 by The Vagabond King (book and lyrics by Brian Hooker and W.H. Post), with its popular songs “Only a Rose” and…

  • rose midge (insect)

    gall midge: The rose midge (Dasyneura rhodophaga) infests the young buds and shoots of roses and is a serious pest in greenhouses but rarely outside. Some other serious pests are the wheat midge, sorghum midge, rice midge, clover midge, and pear midge. Tobacco fumigation and dust on soil…

  • rose moss (plant, Rhodobryum roseum)

    Rose moss, (Rhodobryum roseum; formerly Bryum roseum), moss of the subclass Bryidae, found throughout most of the world in woods or sheltered grassy places. Rose moss seldom forms sporophytes and capsules (spore cases); it reproduces primarily by stolons (horizontal stems that root at the nodes).

  • rose moss (plant, Portulaca grandiflora)

    purslane: Rose moss (P. grandiflora), a trailing fleshy species, is cultivated as a garden ornamental for its brightly coloured, sometimes doubled flowers. All plants of the genus are known for their persistence; they grow well even in dry waste soil and can retain enough moisture to…

  • rose Natal grass (plant)

    Natal grass, (Melinis repens), tufted grass of the family Poaceae, native to southern Africa. Natal grass is cultivated as a forage and ornamental grass and is considered an invasive species in some areas outside its native range, particularly in Australia and parts of the Americas. Natal grass

  • rose noble (English coin)

    coin: Gold coinage: …rose on the ship (rose noble, or ryal) and raised its value to 10 shillings, while a new gold coin, the angel, was introduced to replace the old value of the noble; the penny was reduced to 12 grains. The angel is so called from its type of St.…

  • Rose of Dutcher’s Coolly (work by Garland)

    Hamlin Garland: His next novel, Rose of Dutcher’s Coolly (1895), tells the story of a sensitive young woman who rebels against the drudgery of farm life and goes to Chicago to pursue her talent for literature. Garland’s critical theory of “veritism,” set forth in the essay collection Crumbling Idols (1894),…

  • rose of Jericho (plant)

    Rose of Jericho, either of two species of unrelated plants known for their ability to survive dessication. The true rose of Jericho (Anastatica hierochuntica) is native to western Asia and is the only species of the genus Anastatica of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The small gray plant curls

  • Rose of Lima, Saint (Peruvian saint)

    St. Rose of Lima, ; canonized April 12, 1671; feast day August 23, formerly August 30), patron saint of Peru and of all South America. St. Rose of Lima was the first person born in the Western Hemisphere to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church. Born into a noble family, Rosa (the name by which

  • Rose of Persia, The (work by Sullivan)

    Ellen Beach Yaw: …Sir Arthur Sullivan’s comic opera The Rose of Persia; the soprano role had been written especially for her. The opera was a great success, and it won Yaw an admiring patroness who sponsored her study with Mathilde Marchesi in Paris. While there, Yaw sang at the Opéra-Comique, and after a…

  • rose of Sharon (plant)

    Saint-John's-wort: Creeping Saint-John’s-wort (H. calycinum), sometimes known as rose of Sharon or Aaron’s-beard, and goldencup Saint-John’s-wort (H. patulum) are both shrubby East Asian species. Creeping Saint-John’s-wort bears pale yellow flowers with orange stamens on 30-cm- (1-foot-) tall plants, while goldencup Saint-John’s-wort has slightly smaller deep yellow…

  • rose of Sharon (plant, Hibiscus species)

    Rose of Sharon, (Hibiscus syriacus, or Althaea syriaca), shrub or small tree, in the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae), native to eastern Asia but widely planted as an ornamental for its showy flowers. It can attain a height of 3 metres (10 feet) and generally assumes a low-branching

  • rose oil (essential oil)

    Attar of roses, fragrant, colourless or pale-yellow liquid essential oil distilled from fresh petals of Rosa damascena and R. gallica and other species of the rose family Rosaceae. Rose oils are a valuable ingredient of fine perfumes and liqueurs. They are also used for flavouring lozenges and

  • rose order (plant order)

    Rosales, the rose order of dicotyledonous flowering plants, containing 9 families, 261 genera, and more than 7,700 species. Rosales, which is in the Rosid I group among the core eudicots, is related to other orders with members that can undergo nitrogen fixation (for example the legumes of the

  • rose paprika (seasoning)

    paprika: The rose paprika of Hungary is generally considered the finest variety. It is made from choice dark red pods that have a sweet flavour and aroma. A sharper Hungarian variety, Koenigspaprika, or king’s paprika, is made from the whole pepper.

  • Rose Parade (festival)

    pageant: The Rose Bowl Parade in Pasadena, Calif., one of the most famous parades in the world, precedes the annual Rose Bowl college football game.

  • Rose Period (art)

    Pablo Picasso: The move to Paris and the Rose Period: …to 1906 in the so-called Rose Period by those of pottery, of flesh, and of the earth itself (The Harem [1906]). Picasso seems to have been working with colour in an attempt to come closer to sculptural form, especially in 1906 (Two Nudes; La Toilette). His Portrait of Gertrude Stein…

  • rose pogonia (plant)

    Pogonia: Snakemouth (P. ophioglossoides), also known as rose pogonia and adder’s mouth, is common in bogs and swamps of eastern North America. The plant is about 8 to 53 cm (3 to 21 inches) tall. The Asian pogonia (P. japonica) grows in moist open areas of…

  • rose point (lace)

    Venetian needle lace: Rose point (point de rose) was less grandiose than gros point but even more ornamented with many little loops (picots) and rosettes; lace with more light bars of thread (brides) worked with such motifs as picots and stars like snowflakes was called point de neige…

  • rose quartz (mineral)

    Rose quartz, translucent, usually turbid, very coarse-grained variety of the silica mineral quartz found in pegmatites. Rose quartz is valued for its pale- to rich-pink colour, which may be due to titanium. It has been carved since early times and has been faceted to provide gems of good

  • rose subfamily (plant subfamily)

    Rosales: Evolution: In the subfamily Rosoideae, fruits of Potentilla and Rubus are known from the Pliocene Epoch (about 5.3 to 2.6 million years ago) and the Oligocene Epoch (33.9 to 23.1 million years ago) of western Europe, respectively. Leaves, thorns, branchlets, calyx fragments, and fruits of Rosa (rose genus) are…

  • Rose Tattoo, The (play by Williams)

    Marisa Tomei: …Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams’s The Rose Tattoo.

  • Rose Tattoo, The (film by Mann [1955])

    Daniel Mann: In 1955 Mann helmed The Rose Tattoo, with a screenplay by Williams. It featured Italian actress Anna Magnani, in her Hollywood debut, as a grieving widow; Lancaster was the truck driver who revives her passion. The film received an Academy Award nomination for best picture, and Magnani and cinematographer…

  • Rose Theatre (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    Rose Theatre, London playhouse built by Philip Henslowe and in active use from 1587 until about 1605. Henslowe and his partner, John Cholmley, had the theatre constructed on a leased rose garden on the South Bank of the Thames. The building was octagonal in shape, partly thatched, and made of

  • rose window (architecture)

    Rose window, in Gothic architecture, decorated circular window, often glazed with stained glass. Scattered examples of decorated circular windows existed in the Romanesque period (Santa Maria in Pomposa, Italy, 10th century). Only toward the middle of the 12th century, however, did the idea appear

  • Rose, Axl (American musician)

    AC/DC: …Guns N’ Roses front man Axl Rose. In 2016, after the Rock or Bust tour was completed, Williams announced his retirement. AC/DC was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003.

  • Rose, Barbara (American critic)

    art criticism: Art criticism at the turn of the 21st century: American critic Barbara Rose, who rose to prominence in the 1960s for her formalist criticism—in “One-Dimensional Criticism” (1966) she wrote that she thought it “was developed in order to place art criticism on a less impressionistic, more abstract plane of discussion”—opted out of it after realizing that…

  • Rose, Billy (American composer)

    Billy Rose, American theatrical impresario and composer of more than 50 song hits. Rose became an expert at taking shorthand dictation and during World War I was the chief stenographer for the financier Bernard Baruch, head of the War Industries Board. In the 1920s he began to write songs and

  • Rose, Derrick (American basketball player)

    Chicago Bulls: …play of star point guard Derrick Rose, the Bulls posted the best record in the NBA during the 2010–11 and 2011–12 regular seasons, but the team lost in the Eastern Conference finals in the former season and was upset by the eighth-seeded Philadelphia 76ers in the latter after Rose was…

  • Rose, Doudou N’diaye (Senegalese drummer and bandleader)

    Doudou N’diaye Rose, (Mamadou N’diaye), Senegalese drummer and bandleader (born July 28, 1930, Dakar, French West Africa [now in Senegal]—died Aug. 19, 2015, Dakar), was a virtuoso percussionist who earned the appellation “mathematician of rhythm” for the complex rhythmic structures, including

  • Rose, Ernestine (American social reformer)

    Ernestine Rose, Polish-born American reformer and suffragist, an active figure in the 19th-century women’s rights, antislavery, and temperance movements. Born in the Polish ghetto to the town rabbi and his wife, Ernestine Potowski received a better education and more freedom than was typical for

  • Rose, Fred (American singer and songwriter)

    Fred Rose, U.S. singer and songwriter, a pioneer of country music. He grew up in St. Louis, and he performed at Chicago nightclubs as a teenager. He wrote and recorded popular music in the 1920s, including “Honest and Truly.” As country music emerged, Rose became one of its foremost songwriters. He

  • Rose, George (British-born actor)

    George Rose, British-born actor who for decades was a multitalented star on Broadway. Rose excelled in comic roles ranging from Shakespeare to Gilbert and Sullivan. He garnered two Tony Awards, in the role of the master of ceremonies in The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1985–87) and as Alfred P.

  • Rose, Gustav (German crystallographer and mineralogist)

    Rose family: His brother, Gustav Rose (b. March 18, 1798, Berlin—d. July 15, 1873, Berlin), was perhaps the most celebrated member of the family. He began his career as a mining engineer but soon turned his attention to theoretical studies. He graduated in 1820 from Berlin University where he…

  • Rose, Heinrich (German chemist)

    niobium: In 1844 a German chemist, Heinrich Rose, discovered what he considered to be a new element occurring along with tantalum and named it niobium after Niobe, the mythological goddess who was the daughter of Tantalus. After considerable controversy it was decided that columbium and niobium were the same element. Eventually…

  • Rose, Hugh Henry, Baron Strathnairn of Strathnairn and of Jhānsi (British field marshal)

    Hugh Henry Rose, Baron Strathnairn of Strathnairn and of Jhansi, British field marshal and one of the ablest commanders during the Indian Mutiny (1857–58). Son of the diplomat Sir George Rose, he was educated and received his military training in Berlin and entered the British army in 1820. From

  • Rose, Iain Murray (Australian swimmer)

    Murray Rose, Australian swimmer who won six Olympic medals and was the first man to swim the 1,500-metre freestyle in less than 18 minutes. At age 17 Rose became the youngest Olympian to win three gold medals during one Olympics. At the 1956 Games in Melbourne, Australia, Rose set an Olympic record

  • Rose, Irwin (American biochemist)

    Irwin Rose , American biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with Aaron J. Ciechanover and Avram Hershko for their joint discovery of the process by which the cells of most living organisms remove unwanted proteins. Rose received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of

  • Rose, Irwin Allan (American biochemist)

    Irwin Rose , American biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with Aaron J. Ciechanover and Avram Hershko for their joint discovery of the process by which the cells of most living organisms remove unwanted proteins. Rose received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of

  • Rose, John (English potter)

    Coalport porcelain: …in Shropshire, England, founded by John Rose in 1795. “Coalbrookdale Porcelain” was used sometimes as a trade description and a mark because the factory was located at Coalbrookdale. Coalport’s glazed bone china was in great demand and improved greatly in quality about 1820 with the refinement of a hard, white…

  • Rose, John, II (English potter)

    Coalport porcelain: John Rose II, succeeding in 1828, lavishly imitated the French Sèvres style as well as the styles of Chelsea and Derby, with versions of their respective turquoise, claret, and mazarine blue. Gilded and molded ornamental ware with mass incrustations of flowers, after Meissen, was frequent.…

  • Rose, Leonard (American cellist)

    Isaac Stern: …pianist Eugene Istomin and cellist Leonard Rose. Among their acclaimed recordings were the complete trios of Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Schubert, and Johannes Brahms. The group toured extensively, and to honour Beethoven’s bicentennial they performed a series of concerts around the world. Following Rose’s death in 1984, Stern teamed up…

  • Rose, Lionel (Australian boxer)

    Lionel Rose, Australian professional boxer, world bantamweight champion, 1968–69. He was the first Aboriginal person to win a world boxing title. Rose was age 16 when he made his professional boxing debut, and at age 18 he won the Australian bantamweight title. At age 19 he won the world

  • Rose, Murray (Australian swimmer)

    Murray Rose, Australian swimmer who won six Olympic medals and was the first man to swim the 1,500-metre freestyle in less than 18 minutes. At age 17 Rose became the youngest Olympian to win three gold medals during one Olympics. At the 1956 Games in Melbourne, Australia, Rose set an Olympic record

  • rose, otto of (essential oil)

    Attar of roses, fragrant, colourless or pale-yellow liquid essential oil distilled from fresh petals of Rosa damascena and R. gallica and other species of the rose family Rosaceae. Rose oils are a valuable ingredient of fine perfumes and liqueurs. They are also used for flavouring lozenges and

  • Rose, Pete (American baseball player)

    Pete Rose, professional baseball player who in 1985 exceeded Ty Cobb’s record for career hits (4,189). During his career Rose was noted for his all-around ability and enthusiasm. He was named Player of the Decade (1970–79) by The Sporting News. At the end of his career, he became better known for

  • Rose, Peter Edward (American baseball player)

    Pete Rose, professional baseball player who in 1985 exceeded Ty Cobb’s record for career hits (4,189). During his career Rose was noted for his all-around ability and enthusiasm. He was named Player of the Decade (1970–79) by The Sporting News. At the end of his career, he became better known for

  • Rose, Ralph Waldo (American athlete)

    Ralph Rose and Martin Sheridan: The Battle of Shepherd's Bush: Sultry heat and pelting rain turned the road through the exhibition grounds into “a sea of liquid mud,” marring the 1908 Olympics, according to the The Times of London. A much greater problem, however, was bitter partisanship that had emerged between the United States and…

  • Rose, Reginald (American writer)

    Reginald Rose, American television playwright (born Dec. 10, 1920, New York, N.Y.—died April 19, 2002, Norwalk, Conn.), was known for exploring complex social and political issues in teleplays for many of early television’s best dramatic series, including Studio One, for which he wrote Twelve A

  • Rose, Ruth (American screenwriter)

    Ernest B. Schoedsack: Early life and work: He met and later married Ruth Rose, a former stage actress who was the expedition’s official historian and who would later collaborate on several Cooper-Schoedsack productions. Meanwhile, Grass had been distributed by Paramount Pictures, and that studio’s production head, Jesse Lasky, funded a second natural drama. Chang: A Drama of…

  • Rose, Sir Michael (British military officer)

    Sir Michael Rose, British military officer who commanded United Nations (UN) peacekeeping forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina (1994–95) during the disintegration of Yugoslavia. After studying at the University of Oxford and at the Sorbonne, Rose was commissioned in 1964 into the Coldstream Guards. He

  • Rose, The (sculpture by DeFeo)

    Jay DeFeo: …began working on her masterpiece, The Rose. She worked for eight years on what resulted in a nearly 11-foot- (3.3-metre-) high and 1,850-pound (839-kilogram) work of art which she created by applying and scraping off paint until she had built up a floral sculptural relief. The Rose was exhibited at…

  • Rose, The (film by Rydell [1979])

    Mark Rydell: …his first major hit with The Rose. The drama featured Bette Midler in a breakthrough role as a Janis Joplin-like rock singer who is self-destructive. Frederic Forrest played her boyfriend, and both performers were nominated for Oscars. Rydell then scored his biggest success—both critically and commercially—with On Golden Pond (1981),…

  • Rose, Valentine, the elder (German chemist)

    Rose family: Valentine Rose, the elder (b. Aug. 16, 1736, Neuruppin, Brandenburg, Prussia—d. April 28, 1771, Berlin), was an apothecary in Berlin and, for a short time, assessor of the Ober Collegium Medicum. He was the discoverer of “Rose’s fusible metal.” His son, Valentine Rose, the younger…

  • Rose, Valentine, the younger (German chemist)

    Rose family: ” His son, Valentine Rose, the younger (b. Oct. 31, 1762, Berlin—d. Aug. 10, 1807, Berlin), was also an apothecary in Berlin and assessor of the Ober Collegium Medicum from 1797. It was he who in 1800 proved that sulfuric ether contains no sulfur. He had four sons,…

  • Rose, William (American screenwriter)
  • rose-breasted grosbeak (bird)

    grosbeak: …nest in North America: the rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) and the black-headed grosbeak (P. melanocephalus), which range east and west of the Rockies, respectively. Some authorities believe the two forms represent a single species, even though the coloration of the males’ underparts differs: red and white in the rose-breasted and…

  • Rose-Coloured Map (Portuguese history)

    Portugal: Overseas empire: …scheme known as the “Rose-Coloured Map,” which laid claim to a colony stretching across Africa from Angola to Mozambique, was recognized by France and Germany in 1886. However, Britain challenged Portugal’s claim to territory in central Africa (in what are now Malawi and Zimbabwe) and issued an ultimatum, dated…

  • rose-coloured starling (bird)

    locust bird: In India the rose-coloured starling is called locust bird.

  • rose-geranium oil

    geranium: … species are commercially important for geranium oil, an essential oil used in perfumery. Geranium oil, which is also called pelargonium oil, or rose-geranium oil, is colourless to pale yellow-brown or greenish and has an odour like that of roses. It is used chiefly in perfumes, soaps, ointments, and tooth and…

  • Rose-Marie (film by Van Dyke [1936])

    W.S. Van Dyke: Powell and Loy, Eddy and MacDonald: …Life (1935), Van Dyke made Rose-Marie (1936), the second Eddy-MacDonald musical. An even bigger hit than the first, it was perhaps the best of their showcases. San Francisco (1936; uncredited) proved that MacDonald could hold her own opposite the studio’s biggest star, Gable, in a primarily dramatic role. The classic…

  • Roseanne (American television series)

    Roseanne, American situation comedy that aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) network for nine seasons (1988–97) and a later nine-episode revival (2018). From its debut, the show enjoyed superior Nielsen ratings, including stints in the top three positions, and it remained in the top 20

  • roseate cockatoo (bird)

    cockatoo: …species is the 35-cm (14-inch) galah (Eolophus roseicapillus). It is pink with gray wings and sweeps through Australian skies in noisy, gregarious flocks. Galahs, also known as roseate cockatoos, pair for life and defend nest hollows together against intruders. They also cooperate to incubate and feed their two–six young. Newly…

  • roseate spoonbill (bird)

    spoonbill: …a rosy tinge, but the roseate spoonbill (Ajaia ajaja), of North and South America, about 80 cm long, is deep pink with a white neck and upper back. It ranges from the Gulf Coast of Texas and the West Indies to Argentina and Chile. In some places it has been…

  • Roseau (national capital, Dominica)

    Roseau, capital and chief town of Dominica, an independent island republic in the Caribbean Sea. It lies on the island’s southwestern coast, at the mouth of the Roseau River. Roseau, formerly called Charlotte Town, was burned by the French in 1805 and again suffered nearly total destruction by a

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