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  • Rostov (oblast, Russia)

    Rostov, oblast (region), southwestern Russia, athwart the lower Don and Manych rivers. The Donets Ridge in the west and the Don Ridge in the north form areas of mildly accented relief, but most of the oblast is a low, rolling plain cut by the wide floodplains of the rivers. The entire oblast lies

  • Rostov family (fictional characters)

    Rostov family, fictional characters, members of one of the central families in the epic novel War and Peace (1865–69) by Leo Tolstoy. The Rostov family is headed by the Count, a well-meaning but ineffectual nobleman who manages his business affairs poorly. The Countess, who arranges advantageous

  • Rostov Ripper (Soviet serial killer)

    Andrei Chikatilo, Soviet serial killer who murdered at least 50 people between 1978 and 1990. His case is noteworthy not only because of the large number of his victims but because efforts by Soviet police to issue warnings to the public during their investigation were hampered by the country’s

  • Rostov State University (university, Rostov-on-Don, Russia)

    Rostov-on-Don: Rostov State University was founded in 1917, and there are numerous other institutions of higher education and scientific-research. Pop. (2002) 1,068,267; (2006 est.) 1,054,865.

  • Rostov Veliky (Russia)

    Rostov, city, Yaroslavl oblast (region), northwestern Russia. It lies along Lake Nero and the Moscow-Yaroslavl railway. First mentioned in the chronicles in 862, Rostov was an outstanding centre of early medieval Russia. In 1207 Rostov became the capital of a princedom, which remained under Tatar

  • Rostov-na-Donu (Russia)

    Rostov-on-Don, city and administrative centre of Rostov oblast (province), southwestern Russia. It lies along the lower Don River, 30 miles (50 km) above the latter’s mouth on the Sea of Azov. The city was founded in 1749 as the customs post of Temernika, when the river mouth was still in Turkish

  • Rostov-on-Don (Russia)

    Rostov-on-Don, city and administrative centre of Rostov oblast (province), southwestern Russia. It lies along the lower Don River, 30 miles (50 km) above the latter’s mouth on the Sea of Azov. The city was founded in 1749 as the customs post of Temernika, when the river mouth was still in Turkish

  • Rostovtsev, Iakov Ivanovich (Russian count)

    Iakov Ivanovich Rostovtsev, leader in the formulation of the statutes emancipating the Russian serfs. Rostovtsev was a career military man. He was a young officer at the time of the Decembrist uprising in 1825. After being invited by several Decembrist officers to participate in the plot, he

  • Rostovtsev, Mikhail Ivanovich (American archaeologist)

    Michael Ivanovich Rostovtzeff, Russian-born archaeologist who became one of the 20th century’s most influential authorities on ancient Greek and Roman history, particularly their economic and social aspects. A professor of Latin at the University of St. Petersburg (1898–1918), he was unsympathetic

  • Rostovtzeff, Michael Ivanovich (American archaeologist)

    Michael Ivanovich Rostovtzeff, Russian-born archaeologist who became one of the 20th century’s most influential authorities on ancient Greek and Roman history, particularly their economic and social aspects. A professor of Latin at the University of St. Petersburg (1898–1918), he was unsympathetic

  • Rostow, W. W. (American economist)

    Walt Whitman Rostow, American economic historian and government official (born Oct. 7, 1916, New York, N.Y.—died Feb. 13, 2003, Austin, Texas), as an adviser to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, advocated an ever-increasing American commitment to the Vietnam War (1955–75). He was a R

  • Rostow, Walt Whitman (American economist)

    Walt Whitman Rostow, American economic historian and government official (born Oct. 7, 1916, New York, N.Y.—died Feb. 13, 2003, Austin, Texas), as an adviser to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, advocated an ever-increasing American commitment to the Vietnam War (1955–75). He was a R

  • rostral column (architecture)

    column: A rostral column is a pillar decorated with the prow of a ship, or rostrum, to serve as a naval monument.

  • Rostratula benghalensis (bird)

    painted snipe: The Old World painted snipe (Rostratula benghalensis) ranges from Africa to Australia and Japan and has yellowish “spectacles” around the eyes. The South American painted snipe (Nycticryphes semicollaris) is a darker bird with a yellow-striped back.

  • Rostratulidae (bird)

    Painted snipe, either of two species of marsh birds comprising the family Rostratulidae (order Charadriiformes). They are boldly marked birds with a snipelike body and bill. Painted snipes are about 25 cm (10 inches) in length and are brown and white in colour. The Old World painted snipe

  • Rostrhamus sociabilis (bird)

    kite: Best known is the Everglade kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis), now rare in Florida and Cuba but occurring in numbers in eastern Mexico, Central America, and most of eastern South America. It is a blackish or slate-coloured bird, about 50 cm long, with red eyes and white tail-base.

  • Rostroconchia (fossil mollusk class)

    mollusk: Evolution and paleontology: …ancestor in the fossil class Rostroconchia. These groups have a mantle with the shell enlarged in width to envelop the soft body as well as an anterior elongated foot to live on the bottoms of mobile particles (sand, mud). In contrast, a free head with cerebral eyes is set off…

  • Rostron, Arthur Henry (British captain)

    Carpathia: Arthur Henry Rostron ordered the Carpathia to the Titanic’s position, which was about 58 miles (107 km) away, and began preparing the ship for any survivors. Despite the presence of icebergs, the ship traveled at top speed (some 17 knots), arriving at approximately 3:30 am.…

  • Rostropovich, Mstislav (Russian musician)

    Mstislav Rostropovich, Russian conductor and pianist and one of the best-known cellists of the 20th century. Trained by his parents (a cellist and a pianist) and at the Moscow Conservatory (1943–48), Rostropovich became professor of cello at the conservatory in 1956. He began touring abroad in the

  • Rostropovich, Mstislav Leopoldovich (Russian musician)

    Mstislav Rostropovich, Russian conductor and pianist and one of the best-known cellists of the 20th century. Trained by his parents (a cellist and a pianist) and at the Moscow Conservatory (1943–48), Rostropovich became professor of cello at the conservatory in 1956. He began touring abroad in the

  • rostrum (anatomy)

    sawfish: …dangerous, but their saws (or rostrums), constituting as much as one-third their total length, can be formidable. The saws are used in feeding, in digging out bottom animals, and, when lashed about, in killing or maiming schooling fishes. These structures also contain electroreceptors called ampullae of Lorenzini, which can detect…

  • rostrum (architecture)

    Gaius Duilius: The English term rostrum derives from this Roman custom. In 258 Duilius was censor (magistrate responsible for the census and for public morality), and in 231 he was empowered (as a magistrate with emergency powers, or a dictator) by the Senate to hold elections.

  • rostrum camera (animation technology)

    motion-picture technology: Figural basis of animation: …the use of a so-called rostrum camera, which photographs downward onto the background with its series of superimposed cel layers pegged into place to secure accurate registration.

  • Rosvita (German poet)

    Hrosvitha, regarded as the first German woman poet. Of noble birth, Hrosvitha spent most of her life as a nun in the Benedictine convent at Gandersheim. In an effort to counteract the pagan morality expressed in classical works, Hrosvitha wrote (c. 960) six comedies in Latin, based on Terence, but

  • Roswell (American television program)

    X: …in the supernatural television series Roswell (1999–2002). Alvin earned a Grammy Award for his traditional folk album Public Domain: Songs from the Wild Land (2000). The original X lineup reunited for a pair of concerts in 2004 (later collected in the album Live in Los Angeles [2005]), and the Knitters…

  • Roswell (New Mexico, United States)

    Roswell, city, seat (1889) of Chaves county, southeastern New Mexico, U.S. It lies along the Hondo River near the Pecos River. Founded as a trading post in 1871 by Van C. Smith, it was named for his father, Roswell, and developed as a ranching and agricultural centre supported by irrigation. The

  • Roswell incident (United States history)

    Roswell incident, events surrounding the crash and recovery of a U.S. Army Air Forces high-altitude balloon in 1947 near Roswell, New Mexico, which became the centre of a conspiracy theory involving UFOs and extraterrestrials. The U.S. military fostered the intrigue by initially claiming that the

  • Roswell UFO incident (United States history)

    Roswell incident, events surrounding the crash and recovery of a U.S. Army Air Forces high-altitude balloon in 1947 near Roswell, New Mexico, which became the centre of a conspiracy theory involving UFOs and extraterrestrials. The U.S. military fostered the intrigue by initially claiming that the

  • Rosweyde, Heribert (Belgian priest)

    Bollandist: The idea was conceived by Heribert Rosweyde, a Jesuit who intended to publish, from early manuscripts, 18 volumes of lives of the saints with notes attached. After Rosweyde’s death in 1629, Jean Bolland organized a group that continued to gather material and, especially on the advice of Henschenius (Godefroid Henskens),…

  • Roswitha (German poet)

    Hrosvitha, regarded as the first German woman poet. Of noble birth, Hrosvitha spent most of her life as a nun in the Benedictine convent at Gandersheim. In an effort to counteract the pagan morality expressed in classical works, Hrosvitha wrote (c. 960) six comedies in Latin, based on Terence, but

  • rosy apple aphid (insect)

    aphid: Types of aphids: The rosy apple aphid (Dysaphis plantaginea) deforms fruit, producing “aphis apples.” Its feeding activity causes leaves to curl about it, providing some protection from insecticide sprays. The life cycle involves plantain plants as alternate hosts from which the aphid returns to the apple tree to deposit…

  • rosy barb (fish)

    barb: Rosy barb (B. conchonius), to 5–6 cm (2–2.5 inches) in aquariums, larger in nature; colour silvery rose with dark spot near tail; breeding male deep rose with black-edged dorsal fin.

  • rosy boa (snake)

    snake: Early development and growth: A brood of California rosy boas (Charina trivirgata) doubled their length in a nine-month period, growing to only a few inches shorter than their mother, an adult close to maximum length for the species. It has been suggested that all snakes grow rapidly until they reach sexual maturity, after…

  • rosy-faced lovebird (bird)

    lovebird: The largest species is the rosy-faced lovebird, A. roseicollis, of Angola to South Africa.

  • rosyside dace (fish)

    dace: …daces include: the redside and rosyside daces (Clinostomus), which are black-banded fishes about 12 cm (4 34 inches) long found in the eastern and central United States; and several species of the genus Rhinichthys, among them the black-nosed dace (R. atratulus), a fine-scaled, black-banded, 7.5-centimetre-long fish found from New England…

  • Rosyth (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Rosyth, town and naval base in Fife council area and historic county, Scotland, on the north shore of the Firth of Forth. The naval base played a vital role in both World Wars as a ship-repair and dry-dock complex. During World War II the dockyard was greatly expanded, and more than 3,000 warships

  • Roszak, Theodore (American historian and social critic)

    Theodore Roszak, American historian and social critic (born Nov. 15, 1933, Chicago, Ill.—died July 5, 2011, Berkeley, Calif.), provided incisive commentary on American cultural movements and coined the term counterculture in his seminal book The Making of a Counter Culture: Reflections on the

  • rot (plant disease)

    Rot, any of several plant diseases, caused by any of hundreds of species of soil-borne bacteria, fungi, and funguslike organisms (Oomycota). Rot diseases are characterized by plant decomposition and putrefaction. The decay may be hard, dry, spongy, watery, mushy, or slimy and may affect any plant

  • rota (papal stamp)

    diplomatics: The papal chancery: …in a round symbol, the rota. By the early 13th century, papal documents had evolved into two distinctive groups: solemn privileges and letters. Solemn privileges can be distinguished by their enlarged letters (elongata) of the first line, by the phrase in perpetuum (“in perpetuity”) at the end of the address,…

  • Rota (island, Northern Mariana Islands)

    Rota, island, one of the Mariana Islands and part of the Northern Mariana Islands commonwealth of the United States, in the western Pacific Ocean. Rota is situated about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Guam. Of volcanic formation, the island rises to 1,627 feet (496 metres). Under Japanese

  • Rota’s theorem (mathematics)

    combinatorics: The M?bius inversion theorem: One consequence of Rota’s theorem is the following:

  • Rota, Gian-Carlo (American mathematician and philosopher)

    Gian-Carlo Rota, Italian-born American mathematician and philosopher best known for his work in combinatorics; author of nearly 200 mathematical papers, he brought the once obscure field of combinatorics into prominence as an important area of study; he also wrote or co-wrote popular books of

  • Rota, Nino (Italian composer)

    Nino Rota, Italian composer of film scores. Rota had composed an oratorio and an opera by age 13. After studies at Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute he began writing film scores. From 1950 to 1978 he served as director of the Liceo Musicale, a conservatory in Bari. In 1950 he also began his long

  • rotary blower pump

    vacuum technology: Mechanical booster: Capacities are available from 100 to 70,000 cu ft per minute, operating usually in the pressure range of 10 to 10-3 torr. The peak speed of the pump is developed in the pressure range of 1 to 10-2 torr, the speed at the…

  • rotary caster (metallurgy)

    steel: Variations: …special continuous process is the rotary casting of rounds, mainly for seamless tubes. A rotary caster is similar to a straight-mold vertical caster, except that the round mold, the strand, and the withdrawal system revolve at about 75 rotations per minute. This creates a centrifugal force within the strand and…

  • rotary casting (metallurgy)

    steel: Variations: …special continuous process is the rotary casting of rounds, mainly for seamless tubes. A rotary caster is similar to a straight-mold vertical caster, except that the round mold, the strand, and the withdrawal system revolve at about 75 rotations per minute. This creates a centrifugal force within the strand and…

  • Rotary Club (service club)

    Rotary International, civilian service club founded as the Rotary Club of Chicago in 1905 by American attorney Paul P. Harris. For having created the organization, Harris is credited with initiating the idea of a civilian service club, an organization of men or women from varied business and

  • rotary dialing (telephones)

    telephone: Rotary dialing: The first automatic switching systems, based on the Strowger switch described in the section Electromechanical switching, were activated by a push button on the calling party’s telephone. More accurate call dialing was permitted by the advent of the rotary dial in 1896. A…

  • rotary drill (technology)

    drilling machinery: The simplest rotary drill is the earth auger, which is hand-operated and resembles the wood auger used in carpentry. The earth auger, used principally for drilling holes in relatively soft earth, is armed with either a spiral drill or a pod-type drill and is attached to a…

  • rotary drilling

    coal mining: Core drilling and rotary drilling: A second factor associated with a drilling program is the choice between core drilling and rotary drilling. In core drilling, a hollow drill bit is attached to a core barrel so that cylindrical samples of the strata can be obtained. (Since the drill…

  • rotary engine

    Rotary engine, internal-combustion engine in which the combustion chambers and cylinders rotate with the driven shaft around a fixed control shaft to which pistons are affixed; the gas pressures of combustion are used to rotate the shaft. Some of these engines have pistons that slide in toroidal

  • rotary excavator (tunneling machine)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Soft-ground moles: …their first success in 1954, moles (mining machines) have been rapidly adopted worldwide. Close copies of the Oahe moles were used for similar large-diameter tunnels in clay shale at Gardiner Dam in Canada and at Mangla Dam in Pakistan during the mid-1960s, and subsequent moles have succeeded at many other…

  • rotary hoe (agriculture)

    cultivator: Rotary hoes, used for early cultivation of corn, cotton, soybeans, potatoes, and small grain, have as many as 12 sections, each mounting several hoe wheels, with the whole machine up to 40 feet (12 metres) wide. When the rotary hoe is drawn backward, it gives…

  • Rotary International (service club)

    Rotary International, civilian service club founded as the Rotary Club of Chicago in 1905 by American attorney Paul P. Harris. For having created the organization, Harris is credited with initiating the idea of a civilian service club, an organization of men or women from varied business and

  • rotary joint (skeleton)

    Pivot joint, in vertebrate anatomy, a freely moveable joint (diarthrosis) that allows only rotary movement around a single axis. The moving bone rotates within a ring that is formed from a second bone and adjoining ligament. The pivot joint is exemplified by the joint between the atlas and the axis

  • rotary kiln

    cement: Burning: …means of burning is the rotary kiln. These kilns—up to 200 metres (660 feet) long and six metres in diameter in wet process plants but shorter for the dry process—consist of a steel, cylindrical shell lined with refractory materials. They rotate slowly on an axis that is inclined a few…

  • rotary molder (machine)

    baking: Rotary molding: Cookies produced on rotary molders include sandwich-base cakes and pieces made with embossed designs. A steel cylinder, the surface covered with shallow engraved cavities, rotates past the opening in a hopper filled with cookie dough. The pockets are filled with the dough, which is sheared off from the…

  • rotary motion (mechanics)

    history of technology: Mechanical contrivances: …transformation: the widespread introduction of rotary motion. This was exemplified in the use of the treadmill for powering cranes and other heavy lifting operations, the introduction of rotary water-raising devices for irrigation works (a scoop wheel powered by a treadmill), and the development of the waterwheel as a prime mover.…

  • rotary photogravure (printing)

    Rotogravure printing, system of printing based on the transfer of fluid ink from depressions in a printing plate to the paper. It is an intaglio process, so-called because the design to be printed is etched or engraved below the surface of the printing plate. At the start of the gravure printing

  • rotary plow (agriculture)

    agricultural technology: Primary tillage equipment: The rotary plow’s essential feature is a set of knives or tines rotated on a shaft by a power source. The knives chop the soil up and throw it against a hood that covers the knife set. These machines can create good seedbeds, but their high…

  • rotary polarization (physics)

    Optical activity, the ability of a substance to rotate the plane of polarization of a beam of light that is passed through it. (In plane-polarized light, the vibrations of the electric field are confined to a single plane.) The intensity of optical activity is expressed in terms of a quantity,

  • rotary press (printing)

    Rotary press, printing press that prints on paper passing between a supporting cylinder and a cylinder containing the printing plates. It may be contrasted to the flatbed press, which has a flat printing surface. It is primarily used in high-speed, web-fed operations, in which the press takes paper

  • rotary tiller (agriculture)

    agricultural technology: Primary tillage equipment: The rotary plow’s essential feature is a set of knives or tines rotated on a shaft by a power source. The knives chop the soil up and throw it against a hood that covers the knife set. These machines can create good seedbeds, but their high…

  • rotary-drum vacuum filter (technology)

    filtration: Filter types: The rotary-drum vacuum filter is used extensively in industry for the continuous filtration of large quantities of slurries containing a high content of suspended solids. The filter consists of a cylindrical drum with internal divisions, ports and valves for application of the vacuum and removal of…

  • rotary-wing aircraft

    helicopter: …more power-driven horizontal propellers or rotors that enable it to take off and land vertically, to move in any direction, or to remain stationary in the air. Other vertical-flight craft include autogiros, convertiplanes, and V/STOL aircraft of a number of configurations.

  • rotating band (military technology)

    artillery: Mortars: …Hotchkiss-Brandt type, a prerifled copper driving band, wrapped around the bomb, expanded under gas pressure and engaged the grooves in the barrel.

  • rotating biological contacter (sanitation engineering)

    wastewater treatment: Rotating biological contacter: In this treatment system a series of large plastic disks mounted on a horizontal shaft are partially submerged in primary effluent. As the shaft rotates, the disks are exposed alternately to air and wastewater, allowing a layer of bacteria to grow on…

  • rotating black hole (astronomy)

    Roy Kerr: …black holes are also called Kerr black holes. In later work (written jointly with A. Schild), he introduced a new class of solutions, known as Kerr–Schild solutions, which have had a profound influence on finding exact solutions to Einstein’s equations.

  • rotating compressor (mechanics)

    pneumatic device: Major types of pneumatic devices: A rotating type of compressor, operating in reverse, serves as one type of motor. Compressed air enters the housing, pushes on the vanes, and rotates a central shaft or spindle. A drill, grinding wheel, or other device is fastened to the spindle. A reciprocating-piston compressor, operating…

  • rotating disk (electric motor)

    electric generator: Rotor: An elementary synchronous generator is shown in cross section in Figure 2. The central shaft of the rotor is coupled to the mechanical prime mover. The magnetic field is produced by conductors, or coils, wound into slots cut in the surface of the cylindrical…

  • rotating magnetic field (electronics)

    electric motor: Induction motors: …position, is to produce a rotating magnetic field with a constant magnitude and a mechanical angular velocity that depends on the frequency of the electric supply.

  • rotating radio transients (astronomy)

    neutron star: …also seen as objects called rotating radio transients (RRATs) and as magnetars. The RRATs are sources that emit single radio bursts but at irregular intervals ranging from four minutes to three hours. The cause of the RRAT phenomenon is unknown. Magnetars are highly magnetized neutron stars that have a magnetic…

  • rotating transmitter ceilometer (measurement instrument)

    ceilometer: The rotating-transmitter ceilometer has its separate receiver fixed to direct reflections only from directly overhead while the transmitter sweeps the sky. When the modulated beam intersects a cloud base directly over the receiver, light is reflected downward and detected.

  • rotating-mirror system (motion-picture technology)

    motion-picture technology: Introduction of sound: …recording was modulated by a rotating mirror and the slit was parallel to the edge of the film; reproduction employed the perpendicular slit of the variable density sound track. Minor problems of incompatibility between recording and reproduction were solved in late 1928 when the track was narrowed down to stay…

  • rotation (game)

    billiards: Pocket billiards, or pool: …pool is rotation, or “Chicago,” in which the object is to pocket the balls in numerical order, starting with the lowest number. The numbers of the balls are added up to determine the winner of the game. In so-called straight pool (also called 14.1 continuous pool, or rack pool),…

  • rotation (movement of joints)

    joint: Joint movements: …denoted by the anatomical term rotation. An important example of spin is provided by the radius (outer bone of the forearm); this bone can spin upon the lower end of the humerus (upper arm) in all positions of the elbow. When an individual presses the back of the hand against…

  • rotation (physics)

    asteroid: Rotation and shape: The rotation periods and shapes of asteroids are determined primarily by monitoring their changing brightness on timescales of minutes to days. Short-period fluctuations in brightness caused by the rotation of an irregularly shaped asteroid or a spherical spotted asteroid (i.e., one with…

  • rotation (mathematics)

    linear algebra: Linear transformations and matrices: Another example is a rotation, which leaves all lengths the same but alters the directions of the vectors. Linear refers to the fact that the transformation preserves vector addition and scalar multiplication. This means that if T is a linear transformation sending a vector v to T(v), then for…

  • rotation axis (crystallography)

    mineral: Symmetry elements: A rotation axis is an imaginary line through a crystal around which it may be rotated and repeat itself in appearance one, two, three, four, or six times during a complete rotation. (For example, a sixfold rotation occurs when the crystal repeats itself each 60°—that is,…

  • rotation, axis of (physics and mathematics)

    mechanics: Rotation about a fixed axis: Take the axis of rotation to be the z-axis. A vector in the x-y plane from the axis to a bit of mass fixed in the body makes an angle θ with respect to the x-axis. If the body is rotating, θ changes with time, and the…

  • rotation, optical (physics)

    Optical activity, the ability of a substance to rotate the plane of polarization of a beam of light that is passed through it. (In plane-polarized light, the vibrations of the electric field are confined to a single plane.) The intensity of optical activity is expressed in terms of a quantity,

  • rotational axis (physics and mathematics)

    mechanics: Rotation about a fixed axis: Take the axis of rotation to be the z-axis. A vector in the x-y plane from the axis to a bit of mass fixed in the body makes an angle θ with respect to the x-axis. If the body is rotating, θ changes with time, and the…

  • rotational energy (molecular)

    spectroscopy: Rotational energy states: …diatomic molecule shows that the rotational energy is quantized and is given by EJ = J(J + 1)(h2/8π2I), where h is Planck’s constant and J = 0, 1, 2,… is the rotational quantum number. Molecular rotational spectra originate when a molecule undergoes a transition from one rotational level to another,

  • rotational energy (mechanics)

    kinetic energy: Accordingly, rotational kinetic energy is equal to one-half the product of the moment of inertia and the square of the angular velocity, or 12Iω2.

  • rotational energy level (molecular)

    chemical analysis: Microwave absorptiometry: …radiation can cause changes in rotational energy levels within molecules, making it useful for other purposes. The rotational energy levels within a molecule correspond to the different possible ways in which a portion of a molecule can revolve around the chemical bond that binds it to the remainder of the…

  • rotational grazing (livestock farming)

    desertification: Solutions to desertification: Rotational grazing, which is the process of limiting the grazing pressure of livestock in a given area. Livestock are frequently moved to new grazing areas before they cause permanent damage to the plants and soil of any one area. Terracing, which involves the creation of…

  • rotational inertia (physics)

    angular momentum: rotary inertia of an object or system of objects in motion about an axis that may or may not pass through the object or system. The Earth has orbital angular momentum by reason of its annual revolution about the Sun and spin angular momentum because…

  • rotational kinetic energy (mechanics)

    kinetic energy: Accordingly, rotational kinetic energy is equal to one-half the product of the moment of inertia and the square of the angular velocity, or 12Iω2.

  • rotational molding (technology)

    plastic: Rotational molding: In order to make a hollow article, a split mold can be partially filled with a plastisol or a finely divided polymer powder. Rotation of the mold while heating converts the liquid or fuses the powder into a continuous film on the interior…

  • rotational motor (mechanics)

    hydraulic power: A rotational motor, sometimes called a rotary hydraulic motor, produces a rotary motion. In such a motor the pressurized fluid supplied by a hydraulic pump acts on the surfaces of the motor’s gear teeth, vanes, or pistons and creates a force that produces a torque on…

  • rotational quantum number (physics)

    spectroscopy: Rotational energy states: …0, 1, 2,… is the rotational quantum number. Molecular rotational spectra originate when a molecule undergoes a transition from one rotational level to another, subject to quantum mechanical selection rules. Selection rules are stated in terms of the allowed changes in the quantum numbers that characterize the energy states. For…

  • rotational slide (geology)

    landslide: Types of landslides: …slide), or it can be rotational along a concave-upward set of shear surfaces (a slump). A translational slide typically takes place along structural features, such as a bedding plane or the interface between resistant bedrock and weaker overlying material. If the overlying material moves as a single, little-deformed mass, it…

  • rotational spectrum (physics)

    spectroscopy: Types of microwave spectrometer: For observation of its rotational spectrum, a molecule must possess a permanent electric dipole moment and have a vapour pressure such that it can be introduced into a sample cell at extremely low pressures (5–50 millitorr; one millitorr equals 1 × 10?3 millimetre of mercury or 1.93 × 10?5…

  • rotational stress (physiology)

    Rotational stress, physiological changes that occur in the body when it is subjected to intense gyrational or centrifugal forces, as in tumbling and spinning. Tumbling and spinning are a hazard to pilots who have been ejected from a moving aircraft. Tolerance levels to rotational stress depend

  • rotational symmetry (crystallography)

    symmetry: …such element of symmetry is rotation; other elements are translation, reflection, and inversion. The elements of symmetry present in a particular crystalline solid determine its shape and affect its physical properties.

  • rotational time (astronomy)

    time: Rotational time: The Earth’s rotation causes the stars and the Sun to appear to rise each day in the east and set in the west. The apparent solar day is measured by the interval of time between two successive passages of the Sun across the…

  • rotational velocity (physics)

    Milky Way Galaxy: The stellar luminosity function: …distribution of proper motions and tangential velocities (the speeds at which stellar objects move at right angles to the line of sight) of stars near the Sun.

  • rotative engine (technology)

    energy conversion: Watt’s engine: …more difficult to build, Watt’s rotative engine opened up an entirely new field of application: it enabled the steam engine to be used to operate rotary machines in factories and cotton mills. The rotative engine was widely adopted; it is estimated that by 1800 Watt and Boulton had built 500…

  • Rotavirus (virus)

    gastroenteritis: …common type of diarrhea worldwide; rotaviruses, caliciviruses, Norwalk viruses, and adenoviruses are the most common causes. Other forms of gastroenteritis include food poisoning, cholera, and traveler’s diarrhea, which develops within a few days after traveling to a country or

  • Rotblat, Sir Joseph (British physicist and philanthropist)

    Sir Joseph Rotblat, Polish-born British physicist who became a leading critic of nuclear weaponry. He was a founding member (1957), secretary-general (1957–73), and president (1988–97) of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, a London-based worldwide organization of scholars that

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