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  • Russian Telegraph Agency (Russian news agency)

    ITAR-TASS, (Russian: “Information Telegraph Agency of Russia–Telegraph Agency of the Soviet Union”), Russian news agency formed in 1992 after the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. ITAR reports on domestic news, while TASS reports on world events, including news from the other countries of the

  • Russian whist (game)

    Vint, trick-taking card game, popular around the Baltic Sea, and a significant contributor to the development of bridge. It developed from a game called Siberia, played in St. Petersburg in the 1870s. This was a form of whist exhibiting the then novel feature that the dealer announced the trump

  • Russian wolfhound (breed of dog)

    Borzoi, breed of hound dog developed in Russia to pursue wolves. It is descended from the Arabian greyhound and a collielike Russian sheepdog. The borzoi—formerly known as the Russian wolfhound—is a graceful, strong, and swift dog. Males stand at least 28 inches (71 cm) and females 26 inches (66

  • Russian Workingmen, Assembly of (Russian labour union)

    Bloody Sunday: …the legal organizations of workers—the Assembly of Russian Workingmen—broke out in St. Petersburg. The leader of the assembly, the priest Georgy Gapon, hoping to present the workers’ request for reforms directly to Emperor Nicholas II, arranged a mass demonstration. Having told the authorities of his plan, he led the workers—who…

  • Russian-American Company (Russian company)

    Russian-American Company, Russian trading monopoly that established colonies in North America (primarily in California and Alaska) during the 19th century. The Northeastern Company, headed by the merchants Grigory I. Shelikov and Ivan I. Golikov, was organized in 1781 to establish colonies on the N

  • Russianization (social policy)

    Russia: Russification policies: After the Crimean War the Russian government made some attempt to introduce in Poland a new system acceptable to the Polish population. The leading figure on the Polish side was the nobleman Aleksander Wielopolski. His pro-Russian program proved unacceptable to the Poles. Tension…

  • Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming, The (film by Jewison [1966])

    The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming, American screwball comedy film, released in 1966, that parodies the fears of the Cold War. The film begins with a Soviet submarine accidentally running aground on a sandbank near a tiny New England town in the United States. A group of crewmen led

  • Russification (social policy)

    Russia: Russification policies: After the Crimean War the Russian government made some attempt to introduce in Poland a new system acceptable to the Polish population. The leading figure on the Polish side was the nobleman Aleksander Wielopolski. His pro-Russian program proved unacceptable to the Poles. Tension…

  • russische Revolution, Die (work by Luxemburg)

    Rosa Luxemburg: …her Die russische Revolution (1922; The Russian Revolution) chastised Lenin’s party on its agrarian and national self-determination stands and its dictatorial and terrorist methods. Luxemburg always remained a believer in democracy as opposed to Lenin’s democratic centralism. She was never able, however, to exercise a decisive influence on the new…

  • Russkaya Pravda (Russian politics)

    Pavel Ivanovich Pestel: …political transformation of Russia, titled Russkaya Pravda (1824; “Russian Truth”), called for the execution of the imperial family, the emancipation of the serfs, the replacement of the tsarist autocracy by a republican form of government, and the allotment of land to the freed serfs.

  • Russkaya Ravnina (region, Eastern Europe)

    Russian Plain, plain and series of broad river basins in eastern Europe (including western Russia). It extends over nearly 1,500,000 square miles (4,000,000 square km) and averages about 560 feet (170 m) in height. The plain is subdivided into a number of distinct regions, including the Valday

  • Russki yazyk

    Russian language, Cyrillic alphabet: RussianThe Russian Cyrillic alphabet.principal state and cultural language of Russia. Together with Ukrainian and Belarusian, the Russian language makes up the eastern branch of the Slavic family of languages. Russian is the primary language of the overwhelming

  • Russkoe Natsionalnoe Edinstvo (Russian paramilitary organization)

    fascism: Russia: The Russian National Unity (Russkoe Natsionalnoe Edinstvo; RNE), a paramilitary organization founded in 1990 by Aleksandr Barkashov, claimed to have an extensive network of local branches, but its electoral support was significantly less than that of the LDPR. Barkashov, a former commando in the Russian army,…

  • Russky Formalism (literary criticism)

    Formalism, innovative 20th-century Russian school of literary criticism. It began in two groups: OPOYAZ, an acronym for Russian words meaning Society for the Study of Poetic Language, founded in 1916 at St. Petersburg (later Leningrad) and led by Viktor Shklovsky; and the Moscow Linguistic Circle,

  • Russky Mir (Russian periodical)

    Mikhail Grigoryevich Chernyayev: …of a conservative, nationalistic periodical, Russky Mir, in which he supported the Balkan Slavs’ rebellions and promoted Pan-Slavism, advocating Russia’s mission to free the Slavs from subservience to Turkey while spreading Russian culture and influence in the Balkans. When Serbia declared war on Turkey (1876), the Serbian government asked the…

  • Russo, Alecu (Romanian author)

    Romanian literature: The national renaissance: Alecu Russo, another leader of 1848, enriched literature with a biblical prose poem, Cantarea Romaniei.

  • Russo, Patricia (American businesswoman)

    Patricia Russo, American businesswoman who served as CEO of Lucent Technologies (later called Alcatel-Lucent) from 2002 to 2008. Russo had six siblings. She was active in sports and captained the cheerleading squad before graduating from Lawrence High School in 1969. In 1973 she earned a bachelor’s

  • Russo, Patricia Fiorello (American businesswoman)

    Patricia Russo, American businesswoman who served as CEO of Lucent Technologies (later called Alcatel-Lucent) from 2002 to 2008. Russo had six siblings. She was active in sports and captained the cheerleading squad before graduating from Lawrence High School in 1969. In 1973 she earned a bachelor’s

  • Russo-Finnish War (Russo-Finnish history [1939–1940])

    Russo-Finnish War, (November 30, 1939–March 12, 1940), war waged by the Soviet Union against Finland at the beginning of World War II, following the conclusion of the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact (August 23, 1939). During the 1920s the Finnish government, wary of the threat posed by the Soviet

  • Russo-Iranian war (Russo-Iranian history)

    ?Abbās Mīrzā: When war broke out between Russia and Iran in 1804, he was made commander of the Iranian expeditionary force of 30,000 men. The war (1804–13) resulted in the loss of most of Iran’s Georgian territory and showed ?Abbās Mīrzā the necessity of reforming the Qājār military forces. He began sending…

  • Russo-Japanese War (Russo-Japanese history)

    Russo-Japanese War, (1904–05), military conflict in which a victorious Japan forced Russia to abandon its expansionist policy in East Asia, thereby becoming the first Asian power in modern times to defeat a European power. By the early 17th century, Russia had established its authority over all of

  • Russo-Polish War (1919–1920)

    Russo-Polish War, (1919–20), military conflict between Soviet Russia and Poland, which sought to seize Ukraine. It resulted in the establishment of the Russo-Polish border that existed until 1939. Although there had been hostilities between the two countries during 1919, the conflict began when the

  • Russo-Polish War (1654–1667)

    Poland: Bohdan Khmelnytsky: At any rate, war began between Muscovy and the Commonwealth, and Alexis’s armies drove deep into Lithuania. In 1655 they occupied its capital, Wilno. For the first time in nearly two centuries, an enemy invasion had taken place, and, when it was followed by a Swedish aggression, a…

  • Russo-Polish War (Polish history)

    Thirteen Years’ War, (1454–66), war between Poland and the Teutonic Knights that began as a revolt by the Prussian populace against their overlords, the Teutonic Knights, and was concluded by the Treaty of Toruń (Thorn; Oct. 19, 1466). In 1454 rebel Prussian groups petitioned Casimir IV of Poland

  • Russo-Polish War (Polish history)

    November Insurrection, (1830–31), Polish rebellion that unsuccessfully tried to overthrow Russian rule in the Congress Kingdom of Poland as well as in the Polish provinces of western Russia and parts of Lithuania, Belorussia, (now Belarus), and Ukraine. When a revolution broke out in Paris (July

  • Russo-Swedish Wars (Russo-Swedish history)

    Sweden: The reign of Gustav II Adolf: The war with Russia was fought more successfully, however, with Swedish armies even reaching Moscow. Russia was thereby forced to agree to the Treaty of Stolbovo in 1617, by the terms of which Sweden acquired the provinces of Ingria and Kexholm. The war with Poland continued…

  • Russo-Turkish Convention (British and Russian history [1800])

    Párga: In 1819 Britain invoked the Russo-Turkish Convention of 1800, by terms of which Párga was surrendered to Turkey, provided that no mosque be built or Muslim settle there. The Parganites regarded this British move as an act of betrayal. Rather than submit to Turkish rule, about 4,000 Parganites elected in…

  • Russo-Turkish War (Ninth [1806–1812])

    Treaty of Bucharest: …18, 1812, that ended the Russo-Turkish War, begun in 1806. The terms of the treaty allowed Russia to annex Bessarabia but required it to return Walachia and the remainder of Moldavia, which it had occupied. The Russians also secured amnesty and a promise of autonomy for the Serbs, who had…

  • Russo-Turkish War (Tenth [1828–1829])

    Hans Karl von Diebitsch: …the Russian victory in the Russo-Turkish War of 1828–29.

  • Russo-Turkish wars (Russo-Turkish history)

    Russo-Turkish wars, series of wars between Russia and the Ottoman Empire in the 17th–19th century. The wars reflected the decline of the Ottoman Empire and resulted in the gradual southward extension of Russia’s frontier and influence into Ottoman territory. The wars took place in 1676–81, 1687,

  • Russolo, Luigi (Italian musician)

    electronic music: Beginnings: The Italian Futurist painter Luigi Russolo was another early exponent of synthesized music. As early as 1913 Russolo proposed that all music be destroyed and that new instruments reflecting current technology be built to perform a music expressive of industrialized society. Russolo subsequently did build a number of mechanically…

  • Russulales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Russulales (incertae sedis; not placed in any subclass) Parasitic or saprotrophic, often found at the base of trees; fruiting body may be slimy; many have gills; some are very large, reaching a diameter of 1 metre (3.3 feet); includes some edible fungi, such as some…

  • Russwurm, John Brown (American editor, publisher, and statesman)

    Freedom's Journal: …Cornish, a Presbyterian minister, and John Russwurm, one of the first African Americans to graduate from a U.S. college, were chosen senior editor and junior editor, respectively. The newspaper’s first issue, which was four pages long, appeared on March 16, 1827.

  • rust (chemical process)

    Corrosion, wearing away due to chemical reactions, mainly oxidation (see oxidation-reduction, oxide). It occurs whenever a gas or liquid chemically attacks an exposed surface, often a metal, and is accelerated by warm temperatures and by acids and salts. Normally, corrosion products (e.g., rust,

  • rust (plant disease)

    Rust, plant disease caused by more than 7,000 species of fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota. Rust affects many economically important plant species and usually appears as yellow, orange, red, rust, brown, or black powdery pustules on leaves, young shoots, and fruits. Plant growth and productivity

  • Rust and Bone (film by Audiard [2012])

    Jacques Audiard: …De rouille et d’os (2012; Rust and Bone), which starred Marion Cotillard as an orca trainer struggling to recover from the loss of her legs in a gruesome occupational accident. Dheepan (2015), which won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes film festival, tells the story of a former Tamil Tiger…

  • rust fly (insect)

    Rust fly, (family Psilidae), any of a group of insects (order Diptera) that are small, slender, brownish flies with long antennae. The larvae feed on plants and may be garden pests. The carrot rust fly (Psila rosae; also known as Chamaepsila rosae) often damages carrots, celery, and related

  • Rust Never Sleeps (album by Young)

    Pocahontas: …paean “Pocahontas,” from his album Rust Never Sleeps (1979), casts her as the object of male romantic desire situated in pristine, unspoiled America.

  • Rust, Frances (British writer)

    Western dance: Social dance: …interesting interpretations was that of Frances Rust:

  • Rust, Samuel (American inventor)

    printing: The metal press (1795): …followed by the “Washington” of Samuel Rust, the apogee of the screw press inherited from Gutenberg; its printing capacity was about 250 copies an hour.

  • Rustam (literary character)

    Islamic arts: Epic and romance: …on tales of the hero Rostam. These stories are essentially part of a different culture, thus revealing something about the Indo-European sources of Iranian mythology. The struggle between Iran and Tūrān (the central Asian steppes from which new waves of nomadic conquerors distributed Iran’s urban culture) forms the central theme…

  • Rustam Khan (Mughal general)

    Moradabad: …was founded in 1625 by Rustam Khan, a Mughal general who built the fort north of the city as well as the Jāmi? Masjid (Great Mosque). The city, located at a major road and rail junction, is a trade centre for agricultural products. Industries include cotton milling and weaving, metalworking,…

  • Rustam-o-Sohrab (play by Agha Hashr)

    South Asian arts: Parsi theatre: His last play, Rustam-o-Sohrab, the tragic story of two legendary Persian heroes, Rustam and his son Sohrab, is a drama of passion and fatal irony.

  • Rustamid kingdom (historical state, Algeria)

    Rustamid kingdom, Islamic state (761–909 ce) on the high plateau of northern Algeria, founded by followers of the Iba?īyah branch of Khārijism. It was one of several kingdoms that arose in opposition to the new ?Abbāsid dynasty and its Eastern orientation. The Khārijites preached a puritanical,

  • Rustaveli, Mount (mountain, Asia)

    Georgia: Relief, drainage, and soils: …point in Georgia, and Mounts Rustaveli, Tetnuld, and Ushba, all of which are above 15,000 feet. The cone of the extinct Mkinvari (Kazbek) volcano dominates the northernmost Bokovoy range from a height of 16,512 feet. A number of important spurs extend in a southward direction from the central range, including…

  • Rustaveli, Mount (mountain, Georgia)

    Georgia: Relief, drainage, and soils: …point in Georgia, and Mounts Rustaveli, Tetnuld, and Ushba, all of which are above 15,000 feet. The cone of the extinct Mkinvari (Kazbek) volcano dominates the northernmost Bokovoy range from a height of 16,512 feet. A number of important spurs extend in a southward direction from the central range, including…

  • Rustaveli, Shota (Georgian poet)

    Shota Rustaveli, Georgian poet, author of Vepkhvistqaosani (The Knight in the Panther’s Skin, or The Lord of the Panther-Skin), the Georgian national epic. Very little is known of Rustaveli, and what is known is uncertain. A portrait in Jerusalem inscribed with the word Shota may not necessarily be

  • Rustavi (Georgia)

    Rustavi, city, southeastern Georgia, on the Kura River. The city was developed after World War II with the establishment of a large iron and steel works that supplied rolled steel and steel tubes to the entire Transcaucasus region. The population is more than twice the size the town was designed to

  • Rustebeuf (French poet)

    Rutebeuf, French poet and jongleur whose pungent commentaries on the orders of society are considered the first expression of popular opinion in French literature. The lack of any contemporary reference to someone of this name has led scholars to suppose that he wrote under a pseudonym.

  • Rüstem Pa?a Mosque (mosque, Istanbul, Turkey)

    Islamic arts: Other arts: …such as the mosque of Rüstem Pa?a in Istanbul into a visual spectacle of brilliant colours. The history and development of this type of ceramic decoration is intimately tied to the complex and much-controverted problem of the growth of several distinctive Ottoman schools of pottery: ?znik, Rhodian, and Damascus ware.…

  • Rustenburg (South Africa)

    Rustenburg, town, North West province, South Africa, west of Pretoria. Founded in 1850, its name was allegedly derived from the rust (“rest”) that white settlers were able to enjoy between black African attacks. The town was important in the political affairs of the Transvaal in the middle and late

  • rustic capital (calligraphy)

    majuscule: …books and official documents was rustic capitals. This letter form was freer and more curved and flowing than that of square capitals and could be more easily written because of the oblique angle at which the pen was held to form the letters. The letters were more compact, and rounded…

  • rustic script (calligraphy)

    majuscule: …books and official documents was rustic capitals. This letter form was freer and more curved and flowing than that of square capitals and could be more easily written because of the oblique angle at which the pen was held to form the letters. The letters were more compact, and rounded…

  • rustic style (art)

    Rustic style, in decorative arts, any ruralizing influence; more precisely, a type of furniture made of wood or metal, the main components of which are carved and fretted to resemble the branches of trees. Stemming from the idealization of nature and the “simple life” that occurred in the mid-18th

  • rustic ware (pottery)

    Rustic ware, in pottery, creations of the French potter Bernard Palissy, who from about 1548 produced large earthenware dishes decorated with naturalistic pictures of reptiles, insects, and the like in high relief. The wares were coloured with lead glazes that enhanced the lifelike quality of the

  • Rusticatio Mexicana of Rafael Landívar, The (poem by Landívar)

    Latin American literature: Poetry: …Landívar, wrote Rusticatio mexicana (1782; The Rusticatio Mexicana of Rafael Landívar), a Latin poem that owes much to the bucolic poetry published in France and England a century earlier. Rusticatio mexicana exalts the animals, plants, and minerals native to New Spain, detailing the agricultural, textile, and mining practices of the…

  • rustication (architecture)

    Rustication, in architecture, type of decorative masonry achieved by cutting back the edges of stones to a plane surface while leaving the central portion of the face either rough or projecting markedly. Rustication provides a rich and bold surface for exterior masonry walls. Rusticated masonry is

  • Rustichello (Italian writer)

    Marco Polo: Compilation of Il milione: …with a prisoner from Pisa, Rustichello (or Rusticiano), a fairly well-known writer of romances and a specialist in chivalry and its lore, then a fashionable subject. Polo may have intended to write about his 25 years in Asia but possibly did not feel sufficiently comfortable in either Venetian or Franco-Italian;…

  • Rustici, Giovanni Francesco (Italian artist)

    Leonardo da Vinci: Sculpture: …his immediate influence (perhaps by Giovanni Francesco Rustici). Rustici, according to Vasari, was Leonardo’s zealous student and enjoyed his master’s help in sculpting his large group in bronze, St. John the Baptist Teaching, over the north door of the Baptistery in Florence. There are, indeed, discernible traces of Leonardo’s influence…

  • Rusticiano (Italian writer)

    Marco Polo: Compilation of Il milione: …with a prisoner from Pisa, Rustichello (or Rusticiano), a fairly well-known writer of romances and a specialist in chivalry and its lore, then a fashionable subject. Polo may have intended to write about his 25 years in Asia but possibly did not feel sufficiently comfortable in either Venetian or Franco-Italian;…

  • Rustico di Filippo (Italian author)

    Italian literature: Comic verse: The earliest of them was Rustico di Filippo, who produced both courtly love poetry and coarse, sometimes obscene verse of the “realistic” kind. The best-known and most versatile was Cecco Angiolieri, whose down-to-earth mistress Becchina was a parody of the ethereal women of the stil novo and whose favourite subject…

  • Rusticus (work by Poliziano)

    Poliziano: …“The Cloak”), on Virgil’s poetry; Rusticus (1483; “The Countryside”), on the bucolic poems of Hesiod and Virgil; Ambra (1485; “Amber”), on Homer; and Nutricia (1486; “The Foster Mother”), on the different genres of Greek and Latin literature.

  • Rusticus ad Academicos; or, The Country Correcting the University and Clergy (work by Fisher)

    Benedict de Spinoza: Association with Collegiants and Quakers: …of more than 700 pages, Rusticus ad Academicos; or, The Country Correcting the University and Clergy, in which he raised almost every point of biblical criticism that Spinoza was later to make in the Tractatus.

  • Rustin, Bayard (American civil-rights activist)

    Bayard Rustin, American civil rights activist who was an adviser to Martin Luther King, Jr., and who was the main organizer of the March on Washington in 1963. After finishing high school, Rustin held odd jobs, traveled widely, and obtained five years of university schooling at the City College of

  • Rüstkammer (art collection)

    art market: Northern Europe and the Austrian Empire: …Alps these were known as Kunstkammern or Wunderkammern, from Kunst (“man-made objects”), Wunder (“natural curiosities”), and Kammern (“chambers, rooms”).

  • Rustlers (American baseball team [1966–present])

    Atlanta Braves, American professional baseball team based in Atlanta. The team is the only existing major league franchise to have played every season since professional baseball came into existence. They have won three World Series titles (1914, 1957, and 1995) and 17 National League (NL)

  • Ruston (Louisiana, United States)

    Ruston, city, seat of Lincoln parish, northern Louisiana, U.S., 33 miles (53 km) west of Monroe. It was founded in 1883 by Robert E. Russ, for whom the town was named, on the Vicksburg, Shreveport, and Pacific Railroad (now part of the Illinois Central Railroad Company). Its economy is largely

  • Ruston, Audrey Kathleen (Belgian-born British actress)

    Audrey Hepburn, Belgian-born British actress known for her radiant beauty and style, her ability to project an air of sophistication tempered by a charming innocence, and her tireless efforts to aid children in need. Her parents were the Dutch baroness Ella Van Heemstra and Joseph Victor Anthony

  • rusty blackhaw (plant)

    viburnum: …North American species are the southern black haw (V. rufidulum), similar but taller; the sheepberry, or nannyberry (V. lentago), with finely toothed, oval leaves; and the arrowwood (V. dentatum), with roundish to oval, coarsely toothed leaves. Laurustinus (V. tinus), a 3-metre-tall evergreen with oblong leaves, is native to the Mediterranean…

  • rusty dab (fish)

    dab: Other species include the yellowtail flounder, or rusty dab (L. ferruginea), a reddish brown western Atlantic fish with rust-coloured spots and a yellow tail; the yellowfin sole, or Alaska dab (L. aspera), a brownish northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish…

  • Rust?avi (Georgia)

    Rustavi, city, southeastern Georgia, on the Kura River. The city was developed after World War II with the establishment of a large iron and steel works that supplied rolled steel and steel tubes to the entire Transcaucasus region. The population is more than twice the size the town was designed to

  • Rusyn (people)

    Rusyn, any of several East Slavic peoples (modern-day Belarusians, Ukrainians, and Carpatho-Rusyns) and their languages. The name Rusyn is derived from Rus (Ruthenia), the name of the territory that they inhabited. The name Ruthenian derives from the Latin Ruthenus (singular), a term found in

  • Rusyn (language dialect)

    Slavic languages: East Slavic: Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian: Carpathian, also called Carpatho-Rusyn, has sometimes been considered a language apart. In 1995 a codified form of it (Rusyn) was presented in Slovakia, thus enabling the teaching of Rusyn in schools.

  • Ruta (plant genus)

    Rue, (genus Ruta), genus of about 40 species of perennial shrubs and herbs in the family Rutaceae, native to Eurasia and the Canary Islands. Common rue (R. graveolens) is cultivated as a small garden shrub for its evergreen leaves and dull-yellow flower clusters. The gland-studded, translucent

  • ruta de Don Quijote, La (work by Azorín)

    Azorín: …Soul”) and his essay collections La ruta de Don Quijote (1905; “The Route of Don Quixote”) and Una hora de Espa?a 1560–1590 (1924; An Hour of Spain, 1560–1590) carefully and subtly reconstruct the spirit of Spanish life, directing the reader’s sensibility by the suggestive power of their prose. Azorín’s literary…

  • Ruta graveolens (plant)

    rue: Common rue (R. graveolens) is cultivated as a small garden shrub for its evergreen leaves and dull-yellow flower clusters. The gland-studded, translucent leaves have been used for centuries as a spice and in traditional medicines.

  • rutabaga (plant)

    Rutabaga, (Brassica napus, variety napobrassica), root vegetable in the mustard family (Brassicaceae), cultivated for its fleshy roots and edible leaves. Rutabagas likely originated as a cross between turnips (Brassica rapa, variety rapa) and wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and are thought to have

  • Rutaceae (plant family)

    Rutaceae, the rue family of flowering plants (order Sapindales), composed of 160 genera and about 2,070 species. Rutaceae includes woody shrubs and trees (and a few herbaceous perennials) and is distributed throughout the world, especially in warm temperate and tropical regions. The largest numbers

  • Rutan, Burt (American aircraft and spacecraft designer)

    Burt Rutan, American aircraft and spacecraft designer who was perhaps best known for SpaceShipOne, which in 2004 became the first private crewed spacecraft. Rutan was raised in Dinuba, California, where he and his elder brother, Dick, developed a strong interest in flight at an early age. Rutan

  • Rutan, Dick (American aviator)

    Voyager: Piloted by Dick Rutan and Jeana Yeager, the craft took off on December 14 from Edwards Air Force Base, 60 miles (100 km) northeast of Los Angeles, and landed at that same base 9 days later after completing a course of 25,012 miles (40,251 km) around the…

  • Rutan, Elbert Leander (American aircraft and spacecraft designer)

    Burt Rutan, American aircraft and spacecraft designer who was perhaps best known for SpaceShipOne, which in 2004 became the first private crewed spacecraft. Rutan was raised in Dinuba, California, where he and his elder brother, Dick, developed a strong interest in flight at an early age. Rutan

  • Rutebeuf (French poet)

    Rutebeuf, French poet and jongleur whose pungent commentaries on the orders of society are considered the first expression of popular opinion in French literature. The lack of any contemporary reference to someone of this name has led scholars to suppose that he wrote under a pseudonym.

  • Rutebuef (French poet)

    Rutebeuf, French poet and jongleur whose pungent commentaries on the orders of society are considered the first expression of popular opinion in French literature. The lack of any contemporary reference to someone of this name has led scholars to suppose that he wrote under a pseudonym.

  • Rutelinae (insect)

    Shining leaf chafer, any member of the insect subfamily Rutelinae of the scarab family Scarabaeidae (order Coleoptera), including some of the most beautifully coloured and most destructive beetles. The iridescent and metallic colours of most species are produced by pigments in the integument

  • Rutelli, Francesco (Italian government official)

    Rome: Capital of a united Italy: …corruption scandals, a centre-left politician, Francesco Rutelli, was elected mayor of Rome in a runoff against right-wing candidate Gianfranco Fini. Rutelli proceeded to transform the city: he cracked down on illegal construction, worked toward ameliorating Rome’s traffic problems, and recommenced a series of blocked improvement projects. Meanwhile, the city’s service…

  • Rutenberg, Adolph (German journalist)

    Karl Marx: Early years: …intimate friend” of this period, Adolph Rutenberg, an older journalist who had served a prison sentence for his political radicalism, pressed for a deeper social involvement. By 1841 the Young Hegelians had become left republicans. Marx’s studies, meanwhile, were lagging. Urged by his friends, he submitted a doctoral dissertation to…

  • Rutgers College (university system, New Jersey, United States)

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, coeducational state institution of higher learning in New Jersey, U.S. Rutgers was founded as private Queens College by the Dutch Reformed Church in 1766. The college struggled to survive in the years after the American Revolution and was closed several

  • Rutgers University (university system, New Jersey, United States)

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, coeducational state institution of higher learning in New Jersey, U.S. Rutgers was founded as private Queens College by the Dutch Reformed Church in 1766. The college struggled to survive in the years after the American Revolution and was closed several

  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (university system, New Jersey, United States)

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, coeducational state institution of higher learning in New Jersey, U.S. Rutgers was founded as private Queens College by the Dutch Reformed Church in 1766. The college struggled to survive in the years after the American Revolution and was closed several

  • Ruth (biblical figure)

    Ruth, biblical character, a woman who after being widowed remains with her husband’s mother. The story is told in the Book of Ruth, part of the biblical canon called Ketuvim, or Writings. Ruth’s story is celebrated during the Jewish festival of Shavuot, the Feast of Weeks, 50 days after Passover.

  • Ruth (work by Gaskell)

    Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell: …for her next social novel, Ruth (1853). It offered an alternative to the seduced girl’s traditional progress to prostitution and an early grave.

  • Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize

    Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, annual prize given by the Poetry Foundation—an independent literary organization and publisher—to an American poet for lifetime achievement. The prize, which comes with an award of $100,000, was established in 1986 by philanthropist Ruth Lilly. It is considered one of the

  • Ruth, Babe (American baseball player)

    Babe Ruth, American professional baseball player. Largely because of his home-run hitting between 1919 and 1935, Ruth became, and perhaps remains to this day, America’s most celebrated athlete. Part of the aura surrounding Ruth arose from his modest origins. Though the legend that he was an orphan

  • Ruth, Book of (Old Testament)

    Book of Ruth, Old Testament book belonging to the third section of the biblical canon, known as the Ketuvim, or Writings. In the Hebrew Bible, Ruth stands with the Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther; together they make up the Megillot, five scrolls that are read at prescribed

  • Ruth, George Herman, Jr. (American baseball player)

    Babe Ruth, American professional baseball player. Largely because of his home-run hitting between 1919 and 1935, Ruth became, and perhaps remains to this day, America’s most celebrated athlete. Part of the aura surrounding Ruth arose from his modest origins. Though the legend that he was an orphan

  • Ruthene (people)

    Rusyn, any of several East Slavic peoples (modern-day Belarusians, Ukrainians, and Carpatho-Rusyns) and their languages. The name Rusyn is derived from Rus (Ruthenia), the name of the territory that they inhabited. The name Ruthenian derives from the Latin Ruthenus (singular), a term found in

  • Ruthenian (people)

    Rusyn, any of several East Slavic peoples (modern-day Belarusians, Ukrainians, and Carpatho-Rusyns) and their languages. The name Rusyn is derived from Rus (Ruthenia), the name of the territory that they inhabited. The name Ruthenian derives from the Latin Ruthenus (singular), a term found in

  • Ruthenian Catholic Church

    Ruthenian Catholic Church, an Eastern Catholic Christian church of the Byzantine rite, in communion with the Roman Catholic Church since the Union of Uzhhorod (or Uzhgorod) in 1646. Eastern Catholic churches generally have been associated with a national or ethnic group, preserving patterns of

  • Ruthenian Church

    Ruthenian Catholic Church, an Eastern Catholic Christian church of the Byzantine rite, in communion with the Roman Catholic Church since the Union of Uzhhorod (or Uzhgorod) in 1646. Eastern Catholic churches generally have been associated with a national or ethnic group, preserving patterns of

  • Ruthenian language

    Ukrainian language, East Slavic language spoken in Ukraine and in Ukrainian communities in Kazakhstan, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Lithuania, and Slovakia and by smaller numbers elsewhere. Ukrainian is a lineal descendant of the colloquial language used in Kievan Rus (10th–13th century). It is

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