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  • RhD (RH antigen)

    therapeutics: Blood and blood cells: …means that they have the D antigen of the complex Rh blood group system. Approximately 15 percent of the population lacks this antigen; such individuals are described as Rh-negative. Although anti-D antibodies are not naturally present, the antigen is so highly immunogenic (able to provoke an immune response) that anti-D…

  • Rhea (astronomy)

    Rhea, major regular moon of Saturn and the planet’s second largest, after Titan. It was discovered in 1672 by the Italian-born French astronomer Gian Domenico Cassini and named for a Titan of Greek mythology. Rhea has a diameter of 1,528 km (949 miles) and revolves around Saturn in a prograde,

  • Rhea (Greek goddess)

    Rhea, in Greek religion, ancient goddess, probably pre-Hellenic in origin, who was worshipped sporadically throughout the Greek world. She was associated with fruitfulness and had affinities with Gaea (Earth) and the Great Mother of the Gods (also called Cybele). A daughter of Uranus (Heaven) and

  • rhea (bird group)

    Rhea, either of two species of large, flightless birds in the family Rheidae, order Rheiformes. They are native to South America and are related to the ostrich and emu. The common rhea (Rhea americana) is found in open country from northeastern Brazil southward to Argentina, while Darwin’s rhea

  • rhea (plant)

    ramie: …to Malaysia and frequently called rhea, is also a fibre source.

  • Rhea americana (bird)

    rhea: The common rhea (Rhea americana) is found in open country from northeastern Brazil southward to Argentina, while Darwin’s rhea (Pterocnemia pennata) lives from Peru southward to Patagonia, at the tip of the continent. Both species are considerably smaller than the ostrich; the common rhea stands about…

  • Rhea Silvia (mythological figure)

    Romulus and Remus: …they were the sons of Rhea Silvia, daughter of Numitor, king of Alba Longa.

  • Rheden (Netherlands)

    Rheden, gemeente (municipality), east-central Netherlands. It lies between the IJssel River and the Veluwe hills, along the road from Arnhem to Zutphen. Rheden encompasses the villages of Velp, Rheden, De Steeg, Ellecom, Dieren, Spankeren, and Laag Soeren. In the locality are several medieval

  • Rhee, Samuel (American diver)

    Sammy Lee, American diver, the first Asian American man to win an Olympic gold medal and the first diver to win consecutive Olympic gold medals in the platform event. While growing up, Lee, the son of Korean immigrants, faced racial prejudice and was permitted to use his community’s public pool

  • Rhee, Syngman (president of South Korea)

    Syngman Rhee, first president of the Republic of Korea (South Korea). Rhee completed a traditional classical Confucian education and then entered a Methodist school, where he learned English. He became an ardent nationalist and, ultimately, a Christian. In 1896 he joined with other young Korean

  • Rheedia intermedia (plant)

    Clusiaceae: Waika plum, or lemon drop mangosteen (G. intermedia), native to Central America, has a small, oval, yellow fruit. There are about 250 species in the tropics, especially common in Indo-Malesia.

  • Rhegium (Italy)

    Reggio di Calabria, city, former capital (until 1971) of Calabria region, southern Italy. It is a port on the Strait of Messina, opposite the city of Messina, Sicily. The original settlement of Rhegion (Latin Rhegium) was founded c. 720 bc by Greek colonists from Chalcis as a daughter city to

  • rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (pathology)

    detached retina: …the retina, a situation called rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. The fluid is derived from the aging vitreous gel that fills the central eyeball space. The retinal break can result from a number of different mechanisms, including trauma or degenerative changes in the peripheral retina.

  • Rheic Ocean (ancient ocean)

    Silurian Period: Gondwana: …Europe (Baltica) is called the Rheic Ocean and was essentially a southwestern extension of the Paleotethys Sea. The flooded margin of eastern Australia had a more-varied seafloor topography than the other shallow seas because of the extensive volcanism occurring there during Silurian time, but it shared many of the same…

  • rheidity (mechanics)

    rock: Stress-strain relationships: The concept of rheidity refers to the capacity of a material to flow, arbitrarily defined as the time required with a shear stress applied for the viscous strain to be 1,000 times greater than the elastic strain. It is thus a measure of the threshold of fluidlike behaviour.…

  • rheiform (bird order)

    tinamou: Paleontology and classification: …biological resemblances between tinamous and rheas. The structure of the bony palate, an important feature in the taxonomy of ratite birds, quite clearly links the two groups, as does DNA and protein analysis. Thus, most authorities prefer to maintain them in separate orders. Many ornithologists place rheas with ostriches, kiwis,…

  • Rheiformes (bird order)

    tinamou: Paleontology and classification: …biological resemblances between tinamous and rheas. The structure of the bony palate, an important feature in the taxonomy of ratite birds, quite clearly links the two groups, as does DNA and protein analysis. Thus, most authorities prefer to maintain them in separate orders. Many ornithologists place rheas with ostriches, kiwis,…

  • Rheims (France)

    Reims, city, Marne département, Grand Est région, northeastern France. It lies east-northeast of Paris. On the Vesle River, a tributary of the Aisne, and the Marne–Aisne canal, the city is situated in vine-growing country in which champagne wine is produced. It is overlooked from the southwest by

  • Rheims-Douay Bible (Roman Catholic Bible)

    Douai-Reims Bible, English translation of the Latin Vulgate Bible produced by Roman Catholic scholars in exile from England at the English College in Douai (then in the Spanish Netherlands but now part of France). The New Testament translation was published in 1582 at Rheims, where the English C

  • Rhein II (photograph by Gursky)

    Andreas Gursky: In Rhein II (1999)—which is 5 × 10 feet (about 1.5 × 3 metres)—Gursky created a nonexistent section of the Rhine River. By joining photographs of different segments of the river, Gursky invented an entirely new landscape, free of industry and human presence. Like a colour-field…

  • Rhein River (river, Europe)

    Rhine River, river and waterway of western Europe, culturally and historically one of the great rivers of the continent and among the most important arteries of industrial transport in the world. It flows from two small headways in the Alps of east-central Switzerland north and west to the North

  • Rhein-Hesse Plateau (plateau, Germany)

    Rhineland-Palatinate: Geography: …the southeast contains the treeless Rhein-Hesse Plateau and the Rhine River valley. The plateau is covered by loess, while the valley contains fertile alluvial soils.

  • Rheinberger, Joseph (German composer)

    Joseph Rheinberger, German composer and teacher whose organ sonatas are among the finest 19th-century works for that instrument. Rheinberger studied organ at Vaduz and became organist at the parish church when he was only seven years old. He later studied at Feldkirch and Munich and in 1867 became

  • Rheinberger, Joseph Gabriel (German composer)

    Joseph Rheinberger, German composer and teacher whose organ sonatas are among the finest 19th-century works for that instrument. Rheinberger studied organ at Vaduz and became organist at the parish church when he was only seven years old. He later studied at Feldkirch and Munich and in 1867 became

  • Rheinbund (France-Germany [1806–1813])

    Confederation of the Rhine, union (1806–13) of all the states of Germany, except Austria and Prussia, under the aegis of Napoleon I, which enabled the French to unify and dominate the country until Napoleon’s downfall. The formation of the confederation was preceded by French encroachment in

  • Rheinbund (Europe [1658])

    Johann Christian, baron von Boyneburg: …a principal negotiator of the League of the Rhine (1658), whereby a number of German states, both Roman Catholic and Protestant, secured a French guarantee against any attempt by the new Holy Roman emperor, Leopold I, to restore Habsburg domination. In 1664, however, while he was concerned with asserting the…

  • Rheine (Germany)

    Rheine, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), northwestern Germany. It lies on the Ems River, north of Münster. First mentioned in 838 and chartered in 1327, it suffered in the Thirty Years’ War (1618–48) and was severely damaged in World War II, but it has been rebuilt. Rheine lies in a

  • Rheinfall (waterfall, Switzerland)

    Rhine Falls, the most spectacular waterfall in central Europe, on the upper Rhine River just below Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland. The total fall of the cataract, including the rapids, is about 100 feet (30 m), the width 492 feet (150 m). There are two main falls divided by a pillarlike rock

  • Rheinfelden, Treaty of (Austria [1283])

    Austria: Accession of the Habsburgs: …at the same time, the Treaty of Rheinfelden (June 1, 1283) provided that Duke Albert should be the sole ruler. In 1282 Carniola had already been pawned to Meinhard II of Tirol (of the counts of Gorizia), one of the most reliable allies of Rudolf who, in 1286, was also…

  • Rheingold, Das (work by Wagner)

    Der Ring des Nibelungen: The operas are Das Rheingold (“The Rhine Gold”), Die Walküre (“The Valkyrie”), Siegfried, and G?tterd?mmerung (“The Twilight of the Gods”), first performed in sequence at the Festspielhaus in Bayreuth, Bavaria, Germany, on August 13, 14, 16, and 17, 1876. Collectively they are often

  • Rheingold, Howard (American writer)

    Howard Rheingold, American writer who was especially influential in the development of virtual communities; he wrote The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier (1993), which was one of the first books to treat the Internet as a social and cultural environment worthy of popular

  • Rheinische Merkur (German newspaper)

    Joseph von G?rres: …him to found the newspaper Rheinische Merkur (1814). Considered to be the most influential journal of the time, it turned first against Napoleon and, after his fall, against the reactionary politics of the German states, which led to its suppression in 1816. With the publication of his pamphlet “Teutschland und…

  • Rheinische Zeitung (socialist newspaper)

    Moses Hess: …ideas in the radical newspaper Rheinische Zeitung (“Rhinelander Gazette”), for which he served as Paris correspondent from 1842 to 1843. After Karl Marx joined the newspaper, Hess influenced Marx’s thinking appreciably, and they collaborated on several works. Later, however, Marx rejected Hess’s type of utopian socialism, specifically mocking Hess in…

  • Rheinisches Schiefergebirge (mountains, Europe)

    Middle Rhine Highlands, mountainous highlands lying mainly in northwestern Germany but also extending westward as the Ardennes through southeastern Belgium and northern Luxembourg, with an overlap into eastern France beyond the Meuse River. The highlands form a greatly varied plateau with areas of

  • Rheinland (region, Europe)

    Rhineland, historically controversial area of western Europe lying in western Germany along both banks of the middle Rhine River. It lies east of Germany’s border with France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Apart from the strip from Karlsruhe southward to the Swiss frontier (west of

  • Rheinland-Pfalz (state, Germany)

    Rhineland-Palatinate, Land (state) situated in southwestern Germany. It is bordered by the states of North Rhine–Westphalia to the north, Hessen to the east, Baden-Württemberg to the southeast, and Saarland to the southwest and by France, Luxembourg, and Belgium to the south and west. Its

  • Rheinschanze (Germany)

    Ludwigshafen, city, Rhineland-Palatinate Land (state), southwestern Germany. Ludwigshafen is a port on the west (left) bank of the Rhine River. Founded in 1606 as a bridgehead (Rheinschanze) opposite Mannheim, it was renamed for King Louis (Ludwig) I of Bavaria in 1843 and was chartered in 1859.

  • Rheinwaldhorn (mountain, Switzerland)

    Ticino: …feet (3,402 m) at the Rheinwaldhorn and 10,738 feet (3,273 m) at the Basodino. The canton is dominated physically by three river systems occupying steep-sided valleys extending from the mountain frontier southward to Lake Maggiore. The chief system is that of the Ticino River, which rises in the northwest, flows…

  • rheme (linguistics)

    linguistics: Later contributions: …the distinction between theme and rheme and the notion of “functional sentence perspective” or “communicative dynamism.” By the theme of a sentence is meant that part that refers to what is already known or given in the context (sometimes called, by other scholars, the topic or psychological subject); by the…

  • Rhénanie (region, Europe)

    Rhineland, historically controversial area of western Europe lying in western Germany along both banks of the middle Rhine River. It lies east of Germany’s border with France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Apart from the strip from Karlsruhe southward to the Swiss frontier (west of

  • Rhenish Franconian (language)

    Germany: Languages: The Rhenish Franconian dialect extends northwest from approximately Metz, in French Lorraine, through the states of Rhineland-Palatinate and Hessen. Moselle Franconian extends from Luxembourg through the Moselle valley districts and across the Rhine into the Westerwald. Ripuarian Franconian begins roughly near Aachen, at the Dutch-Belgian border,…

  • Rhenish Friedrich-Wilhelm University of Bonn (university, Bonn, Germany)

    Bonn: …former Electoral Palace (now the Rhenish Friedrich-Wilhelm University of Bonn [founded 1786]) and the Poppelsdorf Palace, with its botanical gardens, along with the city’s beautiful avenues and parks are reminders of the electoral and archiepiscopal capital. Recreational areas include the forests of Venusberg, Kreuzberg, Kottenforst, and Ennert on the southern…

  • Rhenish League (German history)

    Germany: Wenceslas: The stipendiaries of the Rhenish League were put to flight by the count palatine Rupert II near Worms on November 6.

  • Rhenish Missionary Society

    Batak Protestant Christian Church: …work of missionaries of the Rhenish Mission Society, established in Barmen, Ger., in 1828. Under the leadership of the German Lutheran missionary Ludwig Ingwer Nommensen, the missionaries began working among the Batak people in Sumatra in 1862. Resistance to Christianity lessened slowly, and by 1880 entire tribes and villages began…

  • Rhenish Slate Mountains (mountains, Europe)

    Middle Rhine Highlands, mountainous highlands lying mainly in northwestern Germany but also extending westward as the Ardennes through southeastern Belgium and northern Luxembourg, with an overlap into eastern France beyond the Meuse River. The highlands form a greatly varied plateau with areas of

  • Rhenish Symphony (work by Schumann)

    symphony: Schumann: 3 in E-flat Major (1850; Rhenish) and Symphony No. 4 in D Minor (1841, rev. 1851). The five-movement Rhenish is less “classical” than the Symphony No. 2. Inspired by a ceremony at Cologne Cathedral as well as by the appearance of the cathedral itself, the polyphonic grandeur and harmonic richness,…

  • Rhenish Uplands (mountains, Europe)

    Middle Rhine Highlands, mountainous highlands lying mainly in northwestern Germany but also extending westward as the Ardennes through southeastern Belgium and northern Luxembourg, with an overlap into eastern France beyond the Meuse River. The highlands form a greatly varied plateau with areas of

  • rhenium (chemical element)

    Rhenium (Re), chemical element, a very rare metal of Group 7 (VIIb) of the periodic table and one of the densest elements. Predicted by the Russian chemist Dmitry Ivanovich Mendeleyev (1869) as chemically related to manganese, rhenium was discovered (1925) by the German chemists Ida and Walter

  • rhenium-187 (isotope)

    spectroscopy: Thermal atomization: The isotope rhenium-187 (187Re) decays to osmium-187 (187Os) having a half-life of 43 billion years; hence, the Re-Os system can be used to determine when geologic materials were solidified in Earth.

  • rhenium–osmium dating

    Rhenium–osmium dating, method of determining the age of the important ore mineral molybdenite; the method is based upon the radioactive decay of rhenium-187 to osmium-187. The rhenium–osmium ratio in most minerals is too low to be of general use as a dating technique, but molybdenite (molybdenum

  • Rhens, Declaration of (German history)

    Germany: Constitutional conflicts in the 14th century: Six electors responded in the Declaration of Rhens (1338), proclaiming as an ancient custom of the empire that election by a majority was valid and that the king-elect assumed his administrative power immediately, without the intervention of papal approbation. Under Louis’s direction the declaration was repeated at the subsequent Diet…

  • Rhenus River (river, Europe)

    Rhine River, river and waterway of western Europe, culturally and historically one of the great rivers of the continent and among the most important arteries of industrial transport in the world. It flows from two small headways in the Alps of east-central Switzerland north and west to the North

  • Rheobatrachus silus (extinct amphibian)

    Myobatrachidae: Rheobatrachus silus, an extinct species, swallowed its eggs and brooded them in its stomach.

  • Rheol Buchedd Sanctaidd (work by Wynne)

    Celtic literature: Welsh literature in the 17th century: His two great works were Rheol Buchedd Sanctaidd (1701), a translation of Jeremy Taylor’s Rule and Exercises of Holy Living, and Gweledigaetheu y Bardd Cwsc (1703; The Visions of the Sleeping Bard), an adaptation of a translation of the Sue?os of the Spanish satirist Quevedo.

  • rheology (physics)

    surface coating: Rheological-control additives: The rheological properties of coatings (that is, their ability to flow) are of prime importance in their preparation, storage, and application, and in fluids such as coatings the key factor in rheology is the viscosity of the fluid. In some cases the viscous properties of the…

  • rheostat (electronic device)

    Rheostat, adjustable resistor used in applications that require the adjustment of current or the varying of resistance in an electric circuit. The rheostat can adjust generator characteristics, dim lights, and start or control the speed of motors. Its resistance element can be a metal wire or

  • rheotaxis (zoology)

    mechanoreception: The sense of touch: …head-on against the current (rheotaxis). Study of rheotaxic behaviour reveals that the sensory basis almost exclusively depends on visual or tactile stimuli (or both) arising from the animal’s movements relative to the solid bottom or surroundings. The long antennae of many arthropods (e.g., crayfish) and the lengthened tactile hairs…

  • Rhesus factor (blood)

    therapeutics: Blood and blood cells: Most individuals are Rh-positive, which means that they have the D antigen of the complex Rh blood group system. Approximately 15 percent of the population lacks this antigen; such individuals are described as Rh-negative. Although anti-D antibodies are not naturally present, the antigen is so highly immunogenic (able…

  • rhesus monkey (primate)

    Rhesus monkey, (Macaca mulatta), sand-coloured primate native to forests but also found coexisting with humans in northern India, Nepal, eastern and southern China, and northern Southeast Asia. The rhesus monkey is the best-known species of macaque and measures about 47–64 cm (19–25 inches) long,

  • Rheticus, Georg Joachim (Austrian astronomer)

    Georg Joachim Rheticus, Austrian-born astronomer and mathematician who was among the first to adopt and spread the heliocentric theory of Nicolaus Copernicus. In 1536 Rheticus was appointed to a chair of mathematics and astronomy at the University of Wittenberg. Intrigued by the news of the

  • Rhetikus, Georg Joachim (Austrian astronomer)

    Georg Joachim Rheticus, Austrian-born astronomer and mathematician who was among the first to adopt and spread the heliocentric theory of Nicolaus Copernicus. In 1536 Rheticus was appointed to a chair of mathematics and astronomy at the University of Wittenberg. Intrigued by the news of the

  • Rhétiques, Alpes (mountains, Europe)

    Rhaetian Alps, segment of the Central Alps extending along the Italian-Swiss and Austrian-Swiss borders but lying mainly in Graubünden canton, eastern Switzerland. The mountains are bounded by the Lepontine Alps and Splügen Pass (west-southwest), the Hinterrhein River (west), the Lechtaler Alps (

  • rhetoric

    Rhetoric, the principles of training communicators—those seeking to persuade or inform. In the 20th century it underwent a shift of emphasis from the speaker or writer to the auditor or reader. This article deals with rhetoric in both its traditional and its modern forms. For information on

  • Rhetoric (work by Aristotle)

    hubris: …is by Aristotle in his Rhetoric:

  • Rhetoric of Fiction, The (work by Booth)

    Wayne C. Booth: In his influential first book, The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961; rev. ed., 1983), Booth presented a detailed examination of narrative technique and introduced such terms as “implied author” and “reliable narrator.” In 1974 he produced Modern Dogma and the Rhetoric of Assent, a plea for reasoned assent in the educational…

  • rhetorical question (rhetoric)

    figure of speech: …I could chew nails”; the rhetorical question (asked for effect, with no answer expected), as in “How can I express my thanks to you?”; litotes (an emphasis by negation), as in “It’s no fun to be sick”; and onomatopoeia (imitation of natural sounds by words), in such words as “crunch,”…

  • Rhétorique des dieux, La (work by Gaultier)

    Denis Gaultier: …modes (the Lydian is missing), La Rhétorique des dieux (compiled between 1648 and 1652; “The Rhetoric of the Gods”). He was hugely popular in his own time, and much of his music was transcribed from lute tablature into staff notation so that it might reach the growing public of keyboard…

  • rhétoriqueurs (French poets)

    Rhétoriqueur, any of the principal poets of the school that flourished in 15th- and early 16th-century France (particularly in Burgundy), whose poetry, based on historical and moral themes, employed allegory, dreams, symbols, and mythology for didactic effect. Guillaume de Machaut, who popularized

  • Rhetra (ancient Greek law)

    ancient Greek civilization: The Rhetra: The Rhetra is an alleged response by the Delphic oracle to the lawgiver Lycurgus around the 9th or 8th century bce. The Rhetra purports to define the powers of the various Spartan groups and individuals just mentioned. It begins, however, by saying that the tribes must…

  • Rheum rhabarbarum (plant)

    Rhubarb, (Rheum rhabarbarum), a hardy perennial of the smartweed family (Polygonaceae), native to Asia and grown for its large edible leafstalks. Rhubarb is commonly grown in cool areas of the temperate zones. The plant’s fleshy, tart, and highly acidic leafstalks are used in pies, often with

  • rheumatic chorea (pathology)

    Sydenham chorea, a neurological disorder characterized by irregular and involuntary movements of muscle groups in various parts of the body that follow streptococcal infection. The name St. Vitus Dance derives from the late Middle Ages, when persons with the disease attended the chapels of St.

  • rheumatic fever (pathology)

    Rheumatic fever, inflammatory disease of the heart, joints, central nervous system, and subcutaneous tissues that develops after a throat infection with group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus bacteria, including untreated scarlet fever or strep throat. Prevention is possible with penicillin, but

  • rheumatic heart disease (pathology)

    cardiovascular disease: Rheumatic heart disease: Rheumatic heart disease results from inflammation of the endocardium (heart lining), myocardium (heart muscle), and pericardium (the sac that surrounds the heart) that occurs during acute rheumatic fever, an infection with Streptococcus pyogenes organisms. The disease includes those later

  • rheumatism (pathology)

    Rheumatism, any of several disorders that have in common inflammation of the connective tissues, especially the muscles, joints, and associated structures. The most common symptoms are pain and stiffness. Specific diseases that are alternatively called rheumatism include rheumatoid arthritis;

  • rheumatism root (plant)

    pipsissewa: …called striped pipsissewa, rheumatism root, dragon’s tongue, and spotted wintergreen, occurs in North America from Canada to the southern United States. The name pipsissewa derives from a Cree Indian word referring to the diuretic properties of the leaves when eaten.

  • rheumatoid arthritis (pathology)

    Rheumatoid arthritis, chronic, frequently progressive disease in which inflammatory changes occur throughout the connective tissues of the body. Inflammation and thickening of the synovial membranes (the sacs holding the fluid that lubricates the joints) cause irreversible damage to the joint

  • rheumatoid factor (medicine)

    immunologic blood test: …and IgM complexes known as rheumatoid factors can help confirm the diagnosis of certain conditions, including Sj?gren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic hepatitis.

  • Rhiannon (Celtic deity)

    Rhiannon, in Celtic religion, the Welsh manifestation of the Gaulish horse goddess Epona and the Irish goddess Macha. She is best-known from The Mabinogion, a collection of medieval Welsh tales, in which she makes her first appearance on a pale, mysterious steed and meets King Pwyll, whom she

  • Rhianus (Greek poet and scholar)

    Rhianus, Greek poet and scholar from Crete and a slave. His only surviving works are 10 or 11 epigrams of some merit preserved in the Greek Anthology and a small number of hexameter fragments. He was best known as an epic poet, producing five epics, though the contents of only one, the Messeniaca,

  • RHIC (device)

    antimatter: In 2010 physicists using the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, used a billion collisions between gold ions to create 18 instances of the heaviest antiatom, the nucleus of antihelium-4, which consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons. Since antihelium-4 is produced so rarely…

  • Rhijn, Pieter J. van (Dutch astronomer)

    Milky Way Galaxy: The stellar luminosity function: …named after the Dutch astronomer Pieter J. van Rhijn. The van Rhijn function is a basic datum for the local portion of the Galaxy, but it is not necessarily representative for an area larger than the immediate solar neighbourhood. Investigators have found that elsewhere in the Galaxy, and in the…

  • rhim gazelle (mammal)

    gazelle: African gazelles: The rhim, or slender-horned, gazelle (G. leptoceros) is the most desert-adapted African gazelle and lives in the Sahara’s great sand deserts (ergs) from Algeria to Egypt. The third indigenous species, Speke’s gazelle (G. spekei), inhabits the coastal plain of Somalia.

  • Rhimes, Shonda (American television writer and producer)

    Shonda Rhimes, American writer and producer who was best known for creating such popular TV series as Grey’s Anatomy (2005– ) and Scandal (2012–18). Rhimes grew up in a Chicago suburb. After graduating from Dartmouth in 1991, she initially had dreams of becoming a novelist but ultimately attended

  • Rhin River (river, Europe)

    Rhine River, river and waterway of western Europe, culturally and historically one of the great rivers of the continent and among the most important arteries of industrial transport in the world. It flows from two small headways in the Alps of east-central Switzerland north and west to the North

  • Rhin, Confederation du (France-Germany [1806–1813])

    Confederation of the Rhine, union (1806–13) of all the states of Germany, except Austria and Prussia, under the aegis of Napoleon I, which enabled the French to unify and dominate the country until Napoleon’s downfall. The formation of the confederation was preceded by French encroachment in

  • rhinarium (anatomy)

    primate: Snouts, muzzles, and noses: …moist tip of the nose—the rhinarium—are associated with the reduction in length of the primate snout. Still, although the trend in primate evolution is toward a dethronement of the primacy of the sense of smell, there are still some good snouts to be seen in those lower primates that retain…

  • Rhinatrematidae (amphibian family)

    Gymnophiona: Annotated classification: Family Rhinatrematidae Cretaceous (145.5–65.5 million years ago) to present; tail present; mouth terminal; premaxillae not fused with nasals; prefrontals absent; squamosal not articulating with frontal; aquatic larvae; 2 genera, 11 species; adult size 25–32 cm (10–13 inches); South America. Family Scolecomorphidae Jurassic (200–145.5 million years ago)…

  • Rhincodon typus (fish)

    Whale shark, (Rhincodon typus), gigantic but harmless shark (family Rhincodontidae) that is the largest living fish. Whale sharks are found in marine environments worldwide but mainly in tropical oceans. They make up the only species of the genus Rhincodon and are classified within the order

  • Rhind papyrus (ancient Egyptian scroll)

    Rhind papyrus, ancient Egyptian scroll bearing mathematical tables and problems. This extensive document from ancient Egypt has been the source of much information about Egyptian mathematics. The papyrus was bought in 1858 in a Nile resort town by a Scottish antiquary, Alexander Henry Rhind, hence

  • Rhine Falls (waterfall, Switzerland)

    Rhine Falls, the most spectacular waterfall in central Europe, on the upper Rhine River just below Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland. The total fall of the cataract, including the rapids, is about 100 feet (30 m), the width 492 feet (150 m). There are two main falls divided by a pillarlike rock

  • Rhine Rift Valley (valley, Germany)

    Germany: Southern Germany: …central strip to form the Rhine Rift Valley, which extends 185 miles (300 km) in length. The Black Forest reaches its greatest elevation at Mount Feld (Feldberg; 4,898 feet [1,493 metres]) in the south and declines northward beneath secondary sediments before rising to the smaller Oden Forest. For the most…

  • Rhine River (river, Europe)

    Rhine River, river and waterway of western Europe, culturally and historically one of the great rivers of the continent and among the most important arteries of industrial transport in the world. It flows from two small headways in the Alps of east-central Switzerland north and west to the North

  • Rhine Valley (valley, Germany)

    Germany: Southern Germany: …central strip to form the Rhine Rift Valley, which extends 185 miles (300 km) in length. The Black Forest reaches its greatest elevation at Mount Feld (Feldberg; 4,898 feet [1,493 metres]) in the south and declines northward beneath secondary sediments before rising to the smaller Oden Forest. For the most…

  • Rhine wine (alcoholic beverage)

    Rhineland: western Hesse, and southwestern North Rhine–Westphalia.

  • Rhine, Confederation of the (France-Germany [1806–1813])

    Confederation of the Rhine, union (1806–13) of all the states of Germany, except Austria and Prussia, under the aegis of Napoleon I, which enabled the French to unify and dominate the country until Napoleon’s downfall. The formation of the confederation was preceded by French encroachment in

  • Rhine, J. B. (American parapsychologist)

    J.B. Rhine, American parapsychologist who was credited with coining the term extrasensory perception (ESP) in the course of researching such phenomena as mental telepathy, precognition, and clairvoyance. Rhine initially studied to be a botanist but became fascinated with "psychic occurrences." In

  • Rhine, Joseph Banks (American parapsychologist)

    J.B. Rhine, American parapsychologist who was credited with coining the term extrasensory perception (ESP) in the course of researching such phenomena as mental telepathy, precognition, and clairvoyance. Rhine initially studied to be a botanist but became fascinated with "psychic occurrences." In

  • Rhine, League of the (Europe [1658])

    Johann Christian, baron von Boyneburg: …a principal negotiator of the League of the Rhine (1658), whereby a number of German states, both Roman Catholic and Protestant, secured a French guarantee against any attempt by the new Holy Roman emperor, Leopold I, to restore Habsburg domination. In 1664, however, while he was concerned with asserting the…

  • Rhine-Herne Canal (canal, Europe)

    Rhine River: Navigational improvements: …place is taken by the Rhine–Herne Canal, completed in 1916 between Duisburg and Herne and linking the Rhine through the Dortmund–Ems Canal with the German North Sea coast and through the Mittelland Canal with the waterways of central and eastern Germany and eastern Europe; and by the less important Wesel–Datteln–Hamm…

  • Rhine-Hesse Plateau (plateau, Germany)

    Rhineland-Palatinate: Geography: …the southeast contains the treeless Rhein-Hesse Plateau and the Rhine River valley. The plateau is covered by loess, while the valley contains fertile alluvial soils.

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