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  • Rice, Susan Elizabeth (American public official and foreign policy analyst)

    Barack Obama: Spring scandals and summer challenges: …be used by UN Ambassador Susan Rice when she appeared on television news programs several days after the attack. Republican critics alleged that these changes showed that the administration had “scrubbed” Rice’s remarks in order not to tarnish Obama’s record on security during the run-up to the presidential election. The…

  • Rice, Thomas Dartmouth (American entertainer)

    Thomas Dartmouth Rice, American actor regarded as the father of the minstrel show. Rice was an itinerant actor until his song and dance Jump Jim Crow, first presented in Louisville in 1828, caught the public fancy and made him one of the most popular specialty performers of his day. Although he was

  • Rice, Tim (English lyricist)

    Tim Rice, English lyricist who coauthored some of the most successful stage and film musicals of the 20th century. He often collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber, and their notable works included Jesus Christ Superstar and Evita. After singing briefly with the pop group the Aardvarks during his

  • Rice, Tony (American musician)

    Ricky Skaggs: …his influential collaboration with guitarist Tony Rice on older country tunes (inaugurated in 1980 with the album Skaggs & Rice). In the realm of bluegrass, Skaggs shifted his focus to the traditional sound of the genre’s founding generation. He established Skaggs Family Records and formed the band Kentucky Thunder. Renowned…

  • Rice, Victor M. (American educator)

    Spencerian penmanship: Spencer had an advocate in Victor M. Rice, a teacher who became superintendant of schools for Buffalo and later for New York state, and Spencer’s sons and nephews formed connections with the widespread network of Bryant & Stratton business colleges. Thus was Spencerian established as the major form of penmanship…

  • rice, wild (plant)

    Wild rice, (genus Zizania), genus of four species of coarse grasses of the family Poaceae, the grain of which is sometimes grown as a delicacy. Despite their name, the plants are not related to true rice (Oryza sativa). Wild rice grows naturally in shallow freshwater marshes and along the shores of

  • Rice-Davies, Mandy (British model, showgirl, and entrepreneur)

    Mandy Rice-Davies, (Marilyn Rice-Davies; Marilyn Foreman), British model, showgirl, and entrepreneur (born Oct. 21, 1944, Llanelli, Wales—died Dec. 18, 2014, London, Eng.), gained notoriety in 1963 as the friend and roommate of model Christine Keeler, a central figure in the Profumo Affair, the

  • Rice-Davies, Marilyn (British model, showgirl, and entrepreneur)

    Mandy Rice-Davies, (Marilyn Rice-Davies; Marilyn Foreman), British model, showgirl, and entrepreneur (born Oct. 21, 1944, Llanelli, Wales—died Dec. 18, 2014, London, Eng.), gained notoriety in 1963 as the friend and roommate of model Christine Keeler, a central figure in the Profumo Affair, the

  • rice-field rat (rodent)

    rat: Natural history: …tropical species, such as the rice-field rat (R. argentiventer) and Malayan field rat (R. tiomanicus), primarily consume the insects, snails, slugs, and other invertebrates found in habitats of forest patches, secondary growth, scrubby and fallow fields, palm plantations, and rice fields.

  • rice-paper plant (plant)

    Rice-paper plant, (species Tetrapanax papyriferum), shrub or small tree of the ginseng family (Araliaceae), native to southern China and Taiwan. It is the source of rice paper. It has large, lobed leaves that form an almost palmlike crown. The central tissues of the stem are split and pressed into

  • ricebird (bird)

    Java sparrow, (Padda oryzivora), bird of the mannikin group in the family Estrildidae (order Passeriformes). One of the best-known cage birds, it is an attractive pet that chirps and trills. Native to Java and Bali, it has become established in the wild elsewhere in Asia as well as in Fiji, Mexico,

  • ricebird (bird)

    mannikin: …in southern Asia are the nutmeg mannikin (L. punctulata), also called spice finch or spotted munia, and the striated mannikin (L. striata), also called white-backed munia. The former is established in Hawaii, where it is called ricebird. A domestic strain of the latter is called Bengal finch.

  • ricercar (music)

    Ricercare, (Italian: “to seek out”) musical composition for instruments in which one or more themes are developed through melodic imitation; it was prominent in the 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest ricercari, which were for the lute, appeared in late 15th-century manuscripts and in a

  • ricercare (music)

    Ricercare, (Italian: “to seek out”) musical composition for instruments in which one or more themes are developed through melodic imitation; it was prominent in the 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest ricercari, which were for the lute, appeared in late 15th-century manuscripts and in a

  • Rich and Famous (film by Cukor [1981])

    George Cukor: Last films: His last film—Rich and Famous (1981), a remake of the 1943 melodrama Old Acquaintance, with Jacqueline Bisset and Candice Bergen—was not without its merits, but it was met with generally unkind reviews, which convinced Cukor that the strain was no longer worth the reward, and he retired.

  • Rich like Us (novel by Sahgal)

    Nayantara Sahgal: …in such Sahgal novels as Rich like Us (1985), which confronts civil disorder, corruption, and oppression while detailing the internal conflicts in a businessman’s family. Three of Sahgal’s later novels—Plans for Departure (1985), Mistaken Identity (1988), and Lesser Breeds (2003)—are set in colonial India. When the Moon Shines by Day

  • Rich Man, Poor Man (American television miniseries)

    Television in the United States: The era of the miniseries: …adaptation of Irwin Shaw’s novel Rich Man, Poor Man the previous season to a large and enthusiastic audience. Nonetheless, it was the phenomenal commercial success of Roots that guaranteed the immediate future of the historical miniseries as a viable new programming genre. During the next decade, many historical novels would…

  • Rich Man, Poor Man (novel by Shaw)

    Irwin Shaw: …was derided by critics, was Rich Man, Poor Man (1970), which was the source of the first television miniseries. Shaw’s novels and stories were the basis of several movies, including Take One False Step (1949), Tip on a Dead Jockey (1958), and Three (1969).

  • Rich Mountain (mountain, Oklahoma, United States)

    Ouachita Mountains: …metres]) in the range is Rich Mountain in Le Flore county, Oklahoma, near the Arkansas border. Hot Springs National Park lies in the Ouachita Mountains. Native Americans had visited the area’s hot springs for centuries before the region was designated as a national “reservation” (nature preserve) at the beginning of…

  • Rich of Leighs, Richard Rich, 1st Baron (English lord chancellor)

    Richard Rich, 1st Baron Rich, powerful minister to England’s King Henry VIII and lord chancellor during most of the reign of King Edward VI. Although he participated in the major events of his time, Rich was more a civil servant than a politician; by shifting his allegiances he continually came out

  • rich oil

    natural gas: Recovery of hydrocarbon liquids: …bottoms liquid stream, now called rich oil, for further processing in a distillation tower to remove ethane for plant fuel or petrochemical feedstock and to recover the lean oil. Some gas-processing plants may contain additional distilling columns for further separation of the NGL into propane, butane, and heavier liquids.

  • Rich Relations (play by Hwang)

    David Henry Hwang: He also penned Rich Relations (1986), his first play without an Asian or Asian American element. Although that play was a critical failure, the playwright found its reception freeing in that it drove him to embrace experimentation over positive critical response. His next drama, M. Butterfly (1988; film…

  • rich site summary (computer science)

    RSS, format used to provide subscribers with new content from frequently updated Web sites. An RSS feed is a set of instructions residing on the computer server of a Web site, which is given upon request to a subscriber’s RSS reader, or aggregator. The feed tells the reader when new material—such

  • Rich, Adrienne (American poet, scholar, and critic)

    Adrienne Rich, American poet, scholar, teacher, and critic whose many volumes of poetry trace a stylistic transformation from formal, well-crafted but imitative poetry to a more personal and powerful style. Rich attended Radcliffe College (B.A., 1951), and before her graduation her poetry was

  • Rich, Adrienne Cecile (American poet, scholar, and critic)

    Adrienne Rich, American poet, scholar, teacher, and critic whose many volumes of poetry trace a stylistic transformation from formal, well-crafted but imitative poetry to a more personal and powerful style. Rich attended Radcliffe College (B.A., 1951), and before her graduation her poetry was

  • Rich, Alexander (American molecular biologist and biophysicist)

    Alexander Rich, American molecular biologist and biophysicist (born Nov. 15, 1924, Hartford, Conn.—died April 27, 2015, Boston, Mass.), made groundbreaking discoveries concerning the structure and function of DNA and RNA. His most-noted contributions included the first image (1973) of an RNA double

  • Rich, Barbara (American poet and critic)

    Laura Riding, American poet, critic, and prose writer who was influential among the literary avant-garde during the 1920s and ’30s. From 1918 to 1921 Riding attended Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., and soon her poetry began to gain attention. Early on she came to be associated with the Fugitives,

  • Rich, Barnabe (English author and soldier)

    Barnabe Rich, English author and soldier whose Farewell to Militarie Profession (1581) was the source for Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. He entered military service in 1562 and fought in the Low Countries and in Ireland; he eventually became a captain. Later he was an informer for the crown in

  • Rich, Ben R. (American engineer)

    Ben R. Rich, U.S. engineer who conducted top secret research on advanced military aircraft while working at Lockheed Aircraft Corporation (now Lockheed Martin Corporation) under an alias, which he was required to adopt for security reasons. Rich, known as Ben Dover, helped develop more than 25

  • Rich, Bernard (American musician)

    Buddy Rich, American jazz drum virtuoso who accompanied major big bands before forming his own popular big band in the 1960s. Born into a musical family (biographies differ on his date of birth), Rich began dancing in his parents’ vaudeville act at the age of 18 months, soon acquired the stage name

  • Rich, Buddy (American musician)

    Buddy Rich, American jazz drum virtuoso who accompanied major big bands before forming his own popular big band in the 1960s. Born into a musical family (biographies differ on his date of birth), Rich began dancing in his parents’ vaudeville act at the age of 18 months, soon acquired the stage name

  • Rich, Charlie (American musician)

    Charlie Rich, U.S. country singer (born Dec. 14, 1932, Colt, Ark.—died July 25, 1995, Hammond, La.), vaulted to the top of the country music charts in 1973 with the release of two million-selling records, “Behind Closed Doors” and “The Most Beautiful Girl.” The Silver Fox (so nicknamed because h

  • Rich, Claudius James (British businessman)

    Claudius James Rich, British business agent in Baghdad whose examination of the site of Babylon (1811) is considered the starting point of Mesopotamian archaeology. Rich was a man of remarkable linguistic accomplishment; he knew Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Persian, Syriac, and several modern European

  • Rich, Edmund (archbishop of Canterbury)

    St. Edmund of Abingdon, distinguished scholar and outspoken archbishop of Canterbury, one of the most virtuous and attractive figures of the English church, whose literary works strongly influenced subsequent spiritual writers in England. After studies at Oxford—where he took a vow of perpetual

  • Rich, Irene (American actress)

    Irene Rich, American actress who abandoned her career as a successful real estate agent to become a popular star of the silent screen, appearing in scores of melodramas in the 1920s. Rich first appeared in motion pictures as an extra in 1918 and later played opposite such stars as Lon Chaney,

  • Rich, John (British theatrical manager and actor)

    John Rich, English theatre manager and actor, the popularizer of English pantomime and founder of Covent Garden Theatre. Rich was a manager by inheritance; he received a three-quarter share in Lincoln’s Inn Fields Theatre from his father, Christopher Rich, in 1714, and, after running that house

  • Rich, Lady Penelope (English noble)

    Lady Penelope Rich, English noblewoman who was the “Stella” of Sir Philip Sidney’s love poems Astrophel and Stella (1591). She was the daughter of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex. From an early age she was expected to be a likely wife for Sidney, but after her father’s death her guardian, Henry

  • Rich, Malcolm N. (American chemist)

    vanadium: …chemists John Wesley Marden and Malcolm N. Rich obtained it 99.7 percent pure in 1925 by reduction of vanadium pentoxide, V2O5, with calcium metal.

  • Rich, Richard Rich, 1st Baron (English lord chancellor)

    Richard Rich, 1st Baron Rich, powerful minister to England’s King Henry VIII and lord chancellor during most of the reign of King Edward VI. Although he participated in the major events of his time, Rich was more a civil servant than a politician; by shifting his allegiances he continually came out

  • Rich, Robert (American author)

    Dalton Trumbo, American screenwriter and novelist who was probably the most talented member of the Hollywood Ten, a group who refused to testify before the 1947 U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities about alleged communist involvement. He was blacklisted and in 1950 spent 11 months in

  • Rich, Robert Rich, 3rd Baron (English noble)

    Lady Penelope Rich: …her marriage in 1581 to Robert Rich, 3rd Baron Rich (afterward Earl of Warwick). The marriage was unhappy from the start, and Sidney continued to have an emotional attachment to her until his death in 1586. Sidney celebrated her charms and his affection for her in the series of sonnets…

  • Rich, Woodrow Wilson (American violinist)

    Ruggiero Ricci, American violinist known especially for his performances and recordings of Niccolò Paganini’s works. Ricci was born into a musical family and studied as a child with Louis Persinger. He gave his first concert in San Francisco at the age of 10. After further study with Mischel

  • Richard (English claimant to the Holy Roman Empire)

    Richard, king of the Romans from 1256 to 1271, aspirant to the crown of the Holy Roman Empire. He was the second son of King John of England and was created Earl of Cornwall (May 30, 1227). Between 1227 and 1238 he frequently opposed his brother, King Henry III by joining the barons in several

  • Richard B. Russell Lake (lake, Georgia-South Carolina, United States)

    Abbeville: …the southwest by the state’s Richard B. Russell Lake border with Georgia; the Saluda River forms the county’s northeastern border. Calhoun Falls State Park is on the lake, which is formed by the Richard B. Russell Dam on the Savannah River. A large part of this hilly rural area lies…

  • Richard Carvel (work by Churchill)

    Winston Churchill: His next, Richard Carvel (1899), a novel of Revolutionary Maryland in which the hero serves as a naval officer under John Paul Jones, sold nearly 1,000,000 copies. Then followed another great success, The Crisis (1901), a novel of the American Civil War, in which the heroine is…

  • Richard Chaffers and Company (British pottery manufacturer)

    Liverpool porcelain: The earliest factory was Richard Chaffers and Company, which first made phosphatic porcelain and then, in 1756, started producing steatitic, or soaprock, porcelain. The products resembled Worcester porcelain. Most of the plates made by the factory are octagonal, and some tea and coffee sets are six-sided. Liverpool porcelain was…

  • Richard Coeur de Lion (opera by Grétry)

    André-Ernest-Modeste Grétry: His masterpiece, Richard Coeur de Lion (1784; “Richard the Lionheart”), is an early example of French Romantic opera.

  • Richard Coeur de Lion (king of England)

    Richard I, duke of Aquitaine (from 1168) and of Poitiers (from 1172) and king of England, duke of Normandy, and count of Anjou (1189–99). His knightly manner and his prowess in the Third Crusade (1189–92) made him a popular king in his own time as well as the hero of countless romantic legends. He

  • Richard Cory (poem by Robinson)

    Richard Cory, poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson, published in the collection The Children of the Night (1897). “Richard Cory,” perhaps his best-known poem, is one of several works Robinson set in Tilbury Town, a fictional New England village. The Tilbury Town community, represented by the collective

  • Richard de Bury (English bishop, diplomat, and scholar)

    Richard de Bury, scholar, diplomat, and bishop of Durham, who was a noted English bibliophile. After studying at the University of Oxford, Richard joined a Benedictine monastery and became a tutor to the future Edward III of England. Having cultivated an interest in books at an early age, Richard

  • Richard de Wicio (English bishop)

    Saint Richard of Chichester, ; canonized Jan. 28, 1262; feast day April 3), bishop of Chichester, who championed the ideals of St. Edmund of Abingdon. After becoming an M.A. of Oxford, Richard studied canon law at Paris and perhaps at Bologna and later became chancellor of Oxford. From 1236 to 1240

  • Richard de Wych (English bishop)

    Saint Richard of Chichester, ; canonized Jan. 28, 1262; feast day April 3), bishop of Chichester, who championed the ideals of St. Edmund of Abingdon. After becoming an M.A. of Oxford, Richard studied canon law at Paris and perhaps at Bologna and later became chancellor of Oxford. From 1236 to 1240

  • Richard Fitznigel (English bishop)

    Richard Fitzneale, bishop of London and treasurer of England under kings Henry II and Richard I and author of the Dialogus de scaccario (“Dialogue of the Exchequer”). Fitzneale was the son of Nigel, bishop of Ely (1133), and the great nephew of Roger, bishop of Salisbury, who had organized the

  • Richard I (duke of Normandy)

    Richard I, duke of Normandy (942–996), son of William I Longsword. Louis IV of France took the boy-duke into his protective custody, apparently intent upon reuniting Normandy to the crown’s domains, but in 945 Louis was captured by the Normans, and Richard was returned to his people. Richard

  • Richard I (king of England)

    Richard I, duke of Aquitaine (from 1168) and of Poitiers (from 1172) and king of England, duke of Normandy, and count of Anjou (1189–99). His knightly manner and his prowess in the Third Crusade (1189–92) made him a popular king in his own time as well as the hero of countless romantic legends. He

  • Richard II (fictional character)

    Richard II: The story of Richard II was taken mainly from Raphael Holinshed’s Chronicles. While much of the play is true to the facts of Richard’s life, Shakespeare’s account of his murder rests on no reliable authority.

  • Richard II (work by Shakespeare)

    Richard II, chronicle play in five acts by William Shakespeare, written in 1595–96 and published in a quarto edition in 1597 and in the First Folio of 1623. The quarto edition omits the deposition scene in Act IV, almost certainly as a result of censorship. The play is the first in a sequence of

  • Richard II (duke of Normandy)

    Richard II, duke of Normandy (996–1026/27), son of Richard I the Fearless. He held his own against a peasant insurrection, helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy, and repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by the Anglo-Saxon king Ethelred II the

  • Richard II (king of England)

    Richard II, king of England from 1377 to 1399. An ambitious ruler with a lofty conception of the royal office, he was deposed by his cousin Henry Bolingbroke (Henry IV) because of his arbitrary and factional rule. Richard was the younger and only surviving son of Edward, the Black Prince, and his

  • Richard III (film by Olivier [1955])

    Ralph Richardson: …Idol (1948), The Heiress (1949), Richard III (1955), Our Man in Havana (1959), Long Day’s Journey into Night (1962), Doctor Zhivago (1965), and Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984). Richardson also directed one film in which he starred, Murder on Monday (1952; also known as Home…

  • Richard III (film by Loncraine [1995])

    Ian McKellen: David Hare’s Plenty (1985) and Richard III (1995), an adaptation of Shakespeare’s play that is set in a fictionalized version of England in the 1930s; McKellen also cowrote the screenplay. In 1998 he portrayed director James Whale in Gods and Monsters, for which he received his first Academy Award nomination,…

  • Richard III (fictional character)

    Richard III, formerly duke of Gloucester, son of Richard Plantagenet, duke of York, in Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part 2 and Henry VI, Part 3; later king of England in Richard III. One of Shakespeare’s finest creations, the physically deformed Richard is among the earliest and most vivid of the

  • Richard III (duke of Normandy)

    Richard III, duke of Normandy (1026–27, or 1027), son of Richard II the Good. He was succeeding in quelling the revolt of his brother, Robert, when he died opportunely, perhaps of poison, making way for his brother’s succession as Robert

  • Richard III (king of England)

    Richard III, the last Plantagenet and Yorkist king of England. He usurped the throne of his nephew Edward V in 1483 and perished in defeat to Henry Tudor (thereafter Henry VII) at the Battle of Bosworth Field. For almost 500 years after his death, he was generally depicted as the worst and most

  • Richard III (play by Shakespeare)

    Richard III, chronicle play in five acts by William Shakespeare, written about 1592–94 and published in 1597 in a quarto edition seemingly reconstructed from memory by the acting company when a copy of the play was missing. The text in the First Folio of 1623 is substantially better, having been

  • Richard IV of Normandy (king of England)

    Richard I, duke of Aquitaine (from 1168) and of Poitiers (from 1172) and king of England, duke of Normandy, and count of Anjou (1189–99). His knightly manner and his prowess in the Third Crusade (1189–92) made him a popular king in his own time as well as the hero of countless romantic legends. He

  • Richard IV, duke of Normandy (king of England)

    Richard I, duke of Aquitaine (from 1168) and of Poitiers (from 1172) and king of England, duke of Normandy, and count of Anjou (1189–99). His knightly manner and his prowess in the Third Crusade (1189–92) made him a popular king in his own time as well as the hero of countless romantic legends. He

  • Richard Jewell (film by Eastwood [2019])

    Clint Eastwood: 2000 and beyond: …for his next directorial effort, Richard Jewell (2019), a biopic that centres on the Atlanta Olympic Games bombing of 1996 and the security guard who was wrongly suspected of the attack.

  • Richard le Bon (duke of Normandy)

    Richard II, duke of Normandy (996–1026/27), son of Richard I the Fearless. He held his own against a peasant insurrection, helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy, and repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by the Anglo-Saxon king Ethelred II the

  • Richard le Grant (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Richard le Grant, 45th archbishop of Canterbury (1229–31), who asserted the independence of the clergy and of his see from royal control. Richard was the chancellor of Lincoln Cathedral (1221–29), Lincolnshire. He was then appointed archbishop by Pope Gregory IX at the request of King Henry III of

  • Richard of Aversa (prince of Capua)

    Nicholas II: …Apulia, Calabria, and Sicily and Richard of Aversa as prince of Capua, making them vassals of Rome. Both princes swore an oath of fealty to the pope and promised aid. Robert also swore to help Nicholas regain control of papal territories, to preserve Nicholas in office, and to aid the…

  • Richard of Chichester, Saint (English bishop)

    Saint Richard of Chichester, ; canonized Jan. 28, 1262; feast day April 3), bishop of Chichester, who championed the ideals of St. Edmund of Abingdon. After becoming an M.A. of Oxford, Richard studied canon law at Paris and perhaps at Bologna and later became chancellor of Oxford. From 1236 to 1240

  • Richard of Ely (English bishop)

    Richard Fitzneale, bishop of London and treasurer of England under kings Henry II and Richard I and author of the Dialogus de scaccario (“Dialogue of the Exchequer”). Fitzneale was the son of Nigel, bishop of Ely (1133), and the great nephew of Roger, bishop of Salisbury, who had organized the

  • Richard of Saint-Victor (French theologian)

    Richard of Saint-Victor, Roman Catholic theologian whose treatises profoundly influenced medieval and modern mysticism. Richard entered the Abbey of Saint-Victor, Paris, and studied under the scholastic theologian and philosopher Hugh of Saint-Victor, becoming prior in 1162. Although Richard wrote

  • Richard of Wethershed (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Richard le Grant, 45th archbishop of Canterbury (1229–31), who asserted the independence of the clergy and of his see from royal control. Richard was the chancellor of Lincoln Cathedral (1221–29), Lincolnshire. He was then appointed archbishop by Pope Gregory IX at the request of King Henry III of

  • Richard Rolle de Hampole (British mystic)

    Richard Rolle, English mystic and author of mystical and ascetic tracts. Rolle attended the University of Oxford but, dissatisfied with the subjects of study and the disputatiousness there, left without a degree. He established himself as a hermit on the estate of John Dalton of Pickering, but he

  • Richard sans Peur (duke of Normandy)

    Richard I, duke of Normandy (942–996), son of William I Longsword. Louis IV of France took the boy-duke into his protective custody, apparently intent upon reuniting Normandy to the crown’s domains, but in 945 Louis was captured by the Normans, and Richard was returned to his people. Richard

  • Richard Savage (work by Gutzkow)

    Karl Gutzkow: …release he produced the tragedy Richard Savage (1839), the first in a series of well-constructed and effective plays. His domestic tragedy Werner oder Herz und Welt (1840; “Werner or Heart and World”) long remained in the repertory of the German theatres. Gutzkow also wrote Das Urbild des Tartüffe (1844; “The…

  • Richard Strongbow (Anglo-Norman lord)

    Richard FitzGilbert, 2nd earl of Pembroke, Anglo-Norman lord whose invasion of Ireland in 1170 initiated the opening phase of the English conquest. The son of Gilbert FitzGilbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, he succeeded to his father’s estates in southern Wales in 1148/49. Pembroke had evidently lost

  • Richard the Fearless (duke of Normandy)

    Richard I, duke of Normandy (942–996), son of William I Longsword. Louis IV of France took the boy-duke into his protective custody, apparently intent upon reuniting Normandy to the crown’s domains, but in 945 Louis was captured by the Normans, and Richard was returned to his people. Richard

  • Richard the Good (duke of Normandy)

    Richard II, duke of Normandy (996–1026/27), son of Richard I the Fearless. He held his own against a peasant insurrection, helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy, and repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by the Anglo-Saxon king Ethelred II the

  • Richard the Justiciar (count of Autun)

    France: Principalities north of the Loire: …first achieved princely identity under Richard the Justiciar (880–921). Defeating Magyars and Vikings as well as exploiting the rivalries of his neighbours, Richard was regarded (like his near contemporary Arnulf I of Flanders) as virtually a king. Ducal power was contested and diminished thereafter, but it survived as the patrimony…

  • Richard the Lionheart (king of England)

    Richard I, duke of Aquitaine (from 1168) and of Poitiers (from 1172) and king of England, duke of Normandy, and count of Anjou (1189–99). His knightly manner and his prowess in the Third Crusade (1189–92) made him a popular king in his own time as well as the hero of countless romantic legends. He

  • Richard the Lionhearted (king of England)

    Richard I, duke of Aquitaine (from 1168) and of Poitiers (from 1172) and king of England, duke of Normandy, and count of Anjou (1189–99). His knightly manner and his prowess in the Third Crusade (1189–92) made him a popular king in his own time as well as the hero of countless romantic legends. He

  • Richard, Cliff (British singer)

    Cliff Richard, British singer whose “Move It” (1958) was the first great British rock-and-roll song. Having played in skiffle bands during his youth in northern London, Richard, backed by a band that eventually became known as the Shadows, moved on to rock and roll. Dubbed the British Elvis

  • Richard, Maurice (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Maurice Richard, (“the Rocket”), Canadian ice hockey player (born Aug. 4, 1921, Montreal, Que.—died May 27, 2000, Montreal), skated with electrifying passion, as a star of the Montreal Canadiens dynasty that won eight National Hockey League championship Stanley Cups in the 1940s and ’50s. The f

  • Richard, Mira (French Hindu teacher)

    Hinduism: Aurobindo Ashram: …Aurobindo Ashram was assumed by Mira Richard, a Frenchwoman who had been one of his disciples.

  • Richard, Wendy (British actress)

    Wendy Richard, (Wendy Emerton), British actress (born July 20, 1943, Middleborough, Eng.—died Feb. 26, 2009, London, Eng.), displayed her versatility on two long-running BBC television shows: as the sassy Grace Brothers department store sales assistant Shirley Brahms on all 69 episodes of the bawdy

  • Richard-Ginori porcelain (art)

    Doccia porcelain, porcelain produced at a factory near Florence founded by Marchese Carlo Ginori in 1735; until 1896 the enterprise operated under the name Doccia, since then under the name Richard-Ginori. After an initial experimental period, during which he imported Chinese porcelain samples,

  • Richard-Toll (Senegal)

    Sénégal River: Agriculture and irrigation: At Richard-Toll a large area is irrigated by means of a dam across the Taoué (Taouey), a tributary stream up which Sénégal floods penetrate to Lake Guier. Rice and sugarcane have been grown there by the use of mechanized equipment and paid labour, although rice yields…

  • Richards Medical Research Building (building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Louis Kahn: His Richards Medical Research Building (1960–65) at the university is outstanding for its expression of the distinction between “servant” and “served” spaces. The servant spaces (stairwells, elevators, exhaust and intake vents, and pipes) are isolated in four towers, distinct from the served spaces (laboratories and offices).…

  • Richards, Amy (American feminist)

    feminism: Foundations: Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, authors of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future (2000), were both born in 1970 and raised by second wavers who had belonged to organized feminist groups, questioned the sexual division of labour in their households, and raised their daughters to be self-aware,…

  • Richards, Ann (American politician)

    Ann Richards, (Dorothy Ann Willis), American politician (born Sept. 1, 1933, Lakeview, Texas—died Sept. 13, 2006, Austin, Texas), served (1991–95) as the feisty governor of Texas and was the first woman to gain the office in her own right. During her tenure Richards, an ardent feminist, appointed a

  • Richards, Audrey I. (British anthropologist)

    Audrey I. Richards, English social anthropologist and educator known chiefly for her researches among several eastern African peoples, especially the Bemba. She did fieldwork in Northern Rhodesia (Zambia), Uganda, and the Transvaal. Among her subjects of study were social psychology, food culture,

  • Richards, Audrey Isabel (British anthropologist)

    Audrey I. Richards, English social anthropologist and educator known chiefly for her researches among several eastern African peoples, especially the Bemba. She did fieldwork in Northern Rhodesia (Zambia), Uganda, and the Transvaal. Among her subjects of study were social psychology, food culture,

  • Richards, Beah (American actress)

    Beah Richards, American actress (born July 12, 1926, Vicksburg, Miss.—died Sept. 14, 2000, Vicksburg), had a more than 50-year career in film and on stage and television; her television honours included a CableACE Award (1987) for As Summers Die on HBO and Emmy Awards for appearances on Frank’s P

  • Richards, Bob (American athlete)

    Bob Richards, American athlete, the first pole-vaulter to win two Olympic gold medals. Sportswriters called him “the Vaulting Vicar” because he was an ordained minister. Richards was interested in athletics from boyhood, participating in diving and tumbling before taking up the pole vault in junior

  • Richards, Cecile (American activist and administrator)

    Cecile Richards, American activist and administrator who was president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (2006–18). Richards grew up in a liberal family; her father, David, was a civil rights attorney, and her mother, Ann, was a homemaker who later became a politician. As a teenager,

  • Richards, David Adams (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: David Adams Richards’s novels depict the bleakness of New Brunswick communities (Lives of Short Duration, 1981; Nights Below Station Street, 1988; Mercy Among the Children, 2000), while Guy Vanderhaeghe’s fiction has its roots in the Prairies (The Englishman’s Boy, 1996). In Clara Callan (2001), Richard…

  • Richards, Dickinson Woodruff (American physiologist)

    Dickinson Woodruff Richards, American physiologist who shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1956 with Werner Forssmann and André F. Cournand. Cournand and Richards adapted Forssmann’s technique of using a flexible tube (catheter), conducted from an elbow vein to the heart, as a

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