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  • Roby (England, United Kingdom)

    Huyton, former town, metropolitan borough of Knowsley, metropolitan county of Merseyside, historic county of Lancashire, northwestern England. It lies on the eastern periphery of Liverpool. It was mentioned (as Hitune and Rabil) in Domesday Book (1086), the record of William I the Conqueror’s land

  • roc (legendary bird)

    Roc, gigantic legendary bird, said to carry off elephants and other large beasts for food. It is mentioned in the famous collection of Arabic tales, The Thousand and One Nights, and by the Venetian traveler Marco Polo, who referred to it in describing Madagascar and other islands off the coast of e

  • Roc, Patricia (British actress)

    Patricia Roc, (Felicia Miriam Ursula Herold Reise; Felicia Reif), British actress (born June 7, 1915, London, Eng.—died Dec. 30, 2003, Locarno, Switz.), was one of Britain’s top box-office screen stars in the 1940s and early ’50s, particularly in such dramas as Millions Like Us (1943), The Wicked L

  • Roc-aux-Sorciers (Paleolithic site, Vienne, France)

    cave art: …discovered in the shelters of Roc-aux-Sorciers (1950) in Vienne and of Cap Blanc (1909) in Dordogne. Engravings were made with fingers on soft walls or with flint tools on hard surfaces in a number of other caves and shelters.

  • ro?a (Brazilian farm)

    history of Latin America: The early period: …types of agricultural establishments emerged: ro?as, which were food farms or truck gardens near towns, and fazendas, or export enterprises. The last were mainly sugar plantations, which were not yet very prosperous, even though conditions for sugar growing and transport were ideal in many places, because of lack of capital…

  • Roca, Cabo da (cape, Portugal)

    Cape Roca, promontory in Portugal, and the westernmost point of continental Europe. It lies on the Atlantic coast of Lisboa district, about 25 miles (40 km) west-northwest of Lisbon. Known to the Romans as Promontorium Magnum, the cape is a narrow granite cliff, 472 feet (144 m) high, forming the

  • Roca, Cape (cape, Portugal)

    Cape Roca, promontory in Portugal, and the westernmost point of continental Europe. It lies on the Atlantic coast of Lisboa district, about 25 miles (40 km) west-northwest of Lisbon. Known to the Romans as Promontorium Magnum, the cape is a narrow granite cliff, 472 feet (144 m) high, forming the

  • Roca, Julio Argentino (president of Argentina)

    Argentina: National consolidation, 1852–80: General Julio Argentino Roca, who was also from San Miguel de Tucumán and who had influence in Córdoba, became the next president (1880–86). Roca had led a brilliant military career that included directing the Conquest of the Desert, the campaign that brought the Indian wars to…

  • Roca-Runciman Agreement (Argentina-United Kingdom [1933])

    Roca-Runciman Agreement, a three-year trade pact between Argentina and Great Britain, signed in May 1933, that guaranteed Argentina a fixed share in the British meat market and eliminated tariffs on Argentine cereals. In return, Argentina agreed to restrictions with regard to trade and currency

  • Rocafuerte, Vicente (president of Ecuador)

    Ecuador: Rivalry between Flores and Rocafuerte (1830–45): …of independence—Juan José Flores and Vicente Rocafuerte—struggled for power; Flores found much of his support in Quito, Rocafuerte in Guayaquil. Hostility was not constant, and for a few years the rivals agreed to alternate in the presidency. They were not simply personalist dictators; Rocafuerte in particular had a coherent ideology…

  • rocaille (decorative art)

    Rocaille, in Western architecture and decorative arts, 18th-century ornamentation featuring elaborately stylized shell-like, rocklike, and scroll motifs. Rocaille is one of the more prominent aspects of the Rococo style of architecture and decoration that developed in France during the reign of

  • Rocamadour (village, France)

    Rocamadour, village, Lot département, Occitanie région, southwestern France. Its buildings, overlooked by a 14th-century chateau, rise in stages above the gorge of the Alzou River. Rocamadour owes its origin, according to tradition, to St. Amadour (or Amateur), who chose the spot as a hermitage. It

  • Rocard, Michel (premier of France)

    Michel Rocard, French public servant and politician who was premier of France from 1988 to 1991. Upon graduating from the elite National School of Administration, Rocard became an inspector of finances in 1958, and he subsequently rose to high posts in the government accounting service. He was

  • Rocard, Michel Louis Leon (premier of France)

    Michel Rocard, French public servant and politician who was premier of France from 1988 to 1991. Upon graduating from the elite National School of Administration, Rocard became an inspector of finances in 1958, and he subsequently rose to high posts in the government accounting service. He was

  • Rocard, Yves-André (French mathematician and physicist)

    Yves-André Rocard, French mathematician and physicist who contributed to the development of the French atomic bomb and to the understanding of such diverse fields of research as semiconductors, seismology, and radio astronomy. Rocard received doctorates in mathematics (1927) and physical science

  • Rocca (castle, Bergamo, Italy)

    Bergamo: The Rocca, a 14th-century castle, houses the Roman and Risorgimento museums, and the old citadel has a museum of geology and natural history. The birthplace of the composer Gaetano Donizetti is preserved as a museum. The modern lower town, the community centre since the 19th century,…

  • Rocca, Roberto (Italian-Argentine businessman)

    Roberto Rocca, Italian-born Argentine businessman (born Feb. 1922, Milan, Italy—died June 10, 2003, Milan), transformed Techint, a steel corporation founded in 1945 by his father, into Argentina’s largest conglomerate, with more than 100 companies worldwide operating in such fields as c

  • Roccella (lichen genus)

    Roccella, genus of tropical fruticose lichen, an important source of the dye orchil and

  • Roccella tinctorum (lichen)

    litmus: …Netherlands, particularly Lecanora tartarea and Roccella tinctorum. Litmus turns red in acidic solutions and blue in alkaline solutions and is the oldest and most commonly used indicator of whether a substance is an acid or a base.

  • Rocco, San (Roman Catholic saint)

    Tintoretto: Career: San Rocco (St. Roch) is the protector against plagues; the numerous epidemics of that period had given new impetus to the cult of the saint and caused great riches to flow to the Scuola, which built a splendid centre to assist the poor and the…

  • Roccus americanus (fish)

    sea bass: The white perch (M. americana, or R. americanus), which also enters fresh water to breed, is in some areas permanently landlocked in certain streams and ponds.

  • Roccus saxatilis (fish)

    sea bass: …these fishes, such as the striped bass (Morone, or Roccus, saxatilis), enter rivers to spawn. The white perch (M. americana, or R. americanus), which also enters fresh water to breed, is in some areas permanently landlocked in certain streams and ponds.

  • Roch, Saint (Roman Catholic saint)

    Tintoretto: Career: San Rocco (St. Roch) is the protector against plagues; the numerous epidemics of that period had given new impetus to the cult of the saint and caused great riches to flow to the Scuola, which built a splendid centre to assist the poor and the…

  • Rocha (Uruguay)

    Rocha, city, southeastern Uruguay, situated in palm-dotted coastal lowlands. It is the surrounding region’s main commercial and manufacturing centre, with wool and hides the main trade commodities. The railroad and highway from Montevideo to Rocha continue southeastward to the harbour at La Paloma,

  • Rocha, Adolfo Correia da (Portuguese poet and diarist)

    Miguel Torga, poet and diarist whose forceful and highly individual literary style and treatment of universal themes make him one of the most important writers in 20th-century Portuguese literature. Torga embarked on his literary career while a medical student at the University of Coimbra. After

  • Rocha, Glauber (Brazilian director)

    Glauber Rocha, motion-picture director who was a leading figure in Brazil’s Cinema Novo (“New Cinema”). Rocha’s avant-garde films depict Brazil’s history and upheavals in its social and political scene in a stylized, often violent manner. He began his career as a journalist and film critic, and his

  • Rochalimaea (bacteria genus)

    rickettsia: …of three genera (Rickettsia, Coxiella, Rochalimaea) of bacteria in the family Rickettsiaceae. The rickettsiae are rod-shaped or variably spherical, nonfilterable bacteria, and most species are gram-negative. They are natural parasites of certain arthropods (notably lice, fleas, mites, and ticks) and can cause serious diseases—usually characterized by acute, self-limiting fevers—in humans…

  • Rochalimaea quintana (bacteria)

    trench fever: …causative organism, the rickettsial bacterium Rochalimaea (formerly Rickettsia) quintana. There may be one period of fever, or the fever may recur several times at intervals of four to five days. Most persons recover within about two months; there may be relapses, however, and the disease becomes chronic in about 5…

  • Rochambeau, Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur, comte de (French general)

    Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, general who supported the American Revolution by commanding French forces that helped defeat the British at Yorktown, Va. (1781). Rochambeau was originally trained for the church but then entered a cavalry regiment. He fought in the War of the

  • Rochas, Alphonse-Eugène Beau de (French engineer)

    Alphonse Beau de Rochas, French engineer who originated the principle of the four-stroke internal-combustion engine. His achievement lay partly in his emphasizing the previously unappreciated importance of compressing the fuel–air mixture before ignition. Beau de Rochas patented his idea in 1862

  • Rochat, Ami Napoléon (French designer)

    automaton: Types of automatons: …speciality of the Rochat brothers, Ami-Napoléon and Louis, both of whom were among the finest 19th-century designers and craftsmen of automatons.

  • Rochat, Louis (French designer)

    automaton: Types of automatons: …the Rochat brothers, Ami-Napoléon and Louis, both of whom were among the finest 19th-century designers and craftsmen of automatons.

  • Rochberg, George (American composer)

    George Rochberg, American composer (born July 5, 1918, Paterson, N.J.—died May 29, 2005, Bryn Mawr, Pa.), at first wrote in a Modernist vein but from the 1960s embraced an eclectic style that he felt offered greater expressive possibilities. His works included symphonies, string quartets, and s

  • Rochdale (England, United Kingdom)

    Rochdale, town and metropolitan borough in the northeastern part of the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, northeastern England. The borough is cradled on two sides by the Pennines uplands and also includes the towns of Heywood, Middleton, and Littleborough,

  • Rochdale (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Rochdale: Rochdale, town and metropolitan borough in the northeastern part of the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, northeastern England. The borough is cradled on two sides by the Pennines uplands and also includes the towns of Heywood, Middleton, and Littleborough, several villages,…

  • Rochdale Equitable Pioneers Society (British organization)

    cooperative: …Britain in 1844, with the Rochdale Equitable Pioneers Society The society created a set of organizational and working rules that have been widely adopted. They included open membership, democratic control, no religious or political discrimination, sales at prevailing market prices, and the setting aside of some earnings for education.

  • Roche limit (astronomy)

    Roche limit, in astronomy, the minimum distance to which a large satellite can approach its primary body without tidal forces overcoming the internal gravity holding the satellite together. If the satellite and the primary body are of similar composition, the theoretical limit is about 2 12 times

  • roche moutonnée (geology)

    Roche moutonnée, (French: “fleecy rock”) glaciated bedrock surface, usually in the form of rounded knobs. The upstream side of a roche moutonnée has been subjected to glacial scouring that has produced a gentle, polished, and striated slope; the downstream side has been subjected to glacial

  • Roche, Eamonn Kevin (American architect)

    Kevin Roche, Irish American architect of governmental, educational, and corporate structures, especially noted for the work he did in partnership with Eero Saarinen. Roche graduated in 1945 with a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the National University of Ireland, Dublin. After short-term

  • Roche, édouard (French astronomer and mathematician)

    Roche limit: …calculated by the French astronomer édouard Roche (1820–83). Artificial satellites are too small to develop substantial tidal stresses.

  • Roche, Frances Ruth Burke (mother of Diana, princess of Wales)

    Diana, princess of Wales: Early life and education: …Spencer, and his first wife, Frances Ruth Burke Roche (daughter of the 4th Baron Fermoy). Her parents’ troubled marriage ended in divorce when Diana was a child, and she, along with her brother and two sisters, remained with her father. She became Lady Diana Spencer when her father succeeded to…

  • Roché, H. P. (publisher)

    Marcel Duchamp: Farewell to art: …movement, Duchamp helped Arensberg and H.P. Roché to publish The Blind Man, which had only two issues, and Rongwrong, which had only one. Later, with the artist Man Ray, he published a single issue of New York Dada in 1921.

  • Roche, James Michael (American businessman)

    James Michael Roche, American businessman (born Dec. 16, 1906, Elgin, Ill.—died June 6, 2004, Belleair, Fla.), served (1967–71) as chairman and chief executive officer of General Motors. He joined GM as a statistician in 1927 and slowly worked his way up through the ranks, becoming president of t

  • Roche, Kevin (American architect)

    Kevin Roche, Irish American architect of governmental, educational, and corporate structures, especially noted for the work he did in partnership with Eero Saarinen. Roche graduated in 1945 with a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the National University of Ireland, Dublin. After short-term

  • Roche, Martin (American architect)

    William Holabird: …architect who, with his partner, Martin Roche, was a leading exponent of the influential Chicago School of commercial architecture; their Tacoma Building (Chicago, 1886–89) established the use of a total steel skeleton as a framework for building skyscrapers—a significant advance over the pioneering use of metal supports in the

  • Roche, Mazo de la (Canadian author)

    Mazo de la Roche, Canadian author whose series of novels about the Whiteoak family of Jalna (the name of their estate) made her one of the most popular “family saga” novelists between 1925 and 1950. De la Roche’s first success, Jalna (1927), ended with the 100th birthday of Grandmother Adeline

  • Roche, Tony (Australian tennis player)

    Ken Rosewall: …in 1970 he defeated favourite Tony Roche to win the U.S. Open, 14 years after beating Hoad at the same event. He won the Australian singles championship in 1971 and 1972 and helped Australia win the 1973 Davis Cup. In 1974 Jimmy Connors defeated him in the singles final at…

  • Roche-sur-Yon, La (France)

    La Roche-sur-Yon, town, capital of Vendée département, Pays de la Loire région, western France, south of Nantes. The Vendée region had been pacified at the time of the French Revolution but still remained disaffected after the counterrevolutionary insurrection of 1793. Napoleon in 1804 established

  • Roche-sur-Yon, Prince de la (French noble)

    Fran?ois-Louis de Bourbon, prince de Conti, younger brother of Louis-Armand I de Bourbon. Naturally possessed of great ability, he received an excellent education and was distinguished for both the independence of his mind and the popularity of his manners. On this account he was not received with

  • Rochefort (France)

    Rochefort, town and commercial harbour, Charente-Maritime département, Nouvelle-Aquitaine région, western France. It is situated on the right bank of the Charente River, 10 miles (16 km) from the Bay of Biscay. It has straight, regular streets and promenades running along the sites of its old

  • Rochefort, Christiane (French author)

    French literature: Feminist writers: …works in this mode include Christiane Rochefort’s Les Petits Enfants du siècle (1961; “Children of the Times”; Eng. trans. Josyane and the Welfare) and Claire Etcherelli’s élise; ou, la vraie vie (1967; Elise; or, The Real Life). But an equally significant impact was made by writers looking for ways of…

  • Rochefort, Victor-Henri, marquis de Rochefort-Lucay (French journalist)

    Victor-Henri Rochefort, marquis de Rochefort-Lucay, gifted polemical journalist under the Second Empire and the Third Republic who distinguished himself, at first, as a supporter of the extreme left and later as a champion of the extreme right. Rochefort’s career began in 1868 with the founding of

  • Rochefoucauld, Fran?ois VI, duke de La (French writer)

    Fran?ois VI, duc de La Rochefoucauld, French classical author who had been one of the most active rebels of the Fronde before he became the leading exponent of the maxime, a French literary form of epigram that expresses a harsh or paradoxical truth with brevity. La Rochefoucauld was the son of

  • Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Fran?ois-Alexandre-Frédéric, Duke de La (French educator)

    Fran?ois-Alexandre-Frédéric, duke de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, educator and social reformer who founded the école Nationale Supérieure des Arts et Métiers at Chalons and whose model farm at Liancourt contributed to the development of French agriculture. La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, the son of

  • Rochejaquelein, Henri du Vergier, Count de La (French noble)

    Wars of the Vendée: …Charette de La Contrie, and Henri du Vergier, Count de La Rochejaquelein. In May the rebels (about 30,000 strong) took the towns of Thouars, Parthenay, and Fontenay, and their army, which had changed its name from “the Catholic Army” to “the Catholic and Royal Army,” turned north and on June…

  • Rochelle salt (chemical compound)

    Rochelle salt, a crystalline solid having a large piezoelectric effect (electric charge induced on its surfaces by mechanical deformation due to pressure, twisting, or bending), making it useful in sensitive acoustical and vibrational devices. Like other piezoelectric materials, Rochelle salt c

  • Rochelle, La (France)

    La Rochelle, city, Atlantic seaport and capital of Charente-Maritime département, Nouvelle-Aquitainerégion, western France, situated on an inlet opposite Ré Island. The city, which has straight, regular streets, a large park, and shady promenades on the sites of its old fortifications, grew

  • Rochelle, Pierre Drieu La (French writer)

    Pierre Drieu La Rochelle, French writer of novels, short stories, and political essays whose life and works illustrate the malaise common among European youth after World War I. Drieu, the brilliant son of a middle-class family, attended the école des Sciences Politiques with the intention of

  • Rochensalm (Finland)

    Kotka, city, southeastern Finland, on two islands, Hovinsaari and Kotkansaari, at the mouth of the Kymi River on the Gulf of Finland, east-northeast of Helsinki. Kotkansaari was fortified by the Russians between 1790 and 1800, and its main fort was destroyed by a British fleet in 1855 during

  • Rocher de Cancale (restaurant, Paris, France)

    restaurant: French restaurants of the 19th century: …favourite eating places were the Rocher de Cancale, on the rue Montorgueil, famous for its oysters and fish, and the Restaurant Durand, at the corner of the Place de la Madeleine and the rue Royale, a favourite gathering place of politicians, artists, and writers, including the authors Anatole France and…

  • Rocher de Sel (physical feature, Egypt)

    Djelfa: …imposing physical feature known as Salt Rock (Rocher de Sel) that resulted from the erosion of rock salts and marls by rain, and to the west of the town Megalithic funerary structures are found. Pop. (1998) 154,265; (2008) 265,833.

  • Rocher, Yves (French cosmetics executive)

    Yves Rocher, French cosmetics executive (born April 7, 1930, La Gacilly, Brittany, France—died Dec. 26, 2009, Paris, France), founded (1959) a cosmetics line that grew into a beauty empire, with some 2,000 stores worldwide. He was an early advocate of using botanicals in cosmetics, and the Yves

  • Rocher-Percé (island, Quebec, Canada)

    Percé: …at low tide, is famed Rocher-Percé (“Pierced Rock”)—a rocky island 290 feet (88 metres) high that is pierced by a 60-foot- (18-metre-) high arch; it and another nearby tourist attraction, Bonaventure Island, are bird sanctuaries. Pop. (2006) 3,419; (2011) 3,312.

  • Roches, Léon (French diplomat)

    Abdelkader: Creation of a new state: …Europeans was the future diplomat Léon Roches, who later recounted his adventures in a fanciful book, Trente-deux ans à travers l’Islam (“Thirty-two Years Through Islam”). Abdelkader organized a regular army of approximately 2,000 men, to be supported by either volunteers or contingents furnished by the tribes. As towns near French…

  • Rochester (England, United Kingdom)

    Rochester, town and urban area (from 2011 built-up area), Medway unitary authority, historic county of Kent, southeastern England. It is situated on the River Medway, east of London and just above the Medway’s confluence with the Thames estuary, and is one of three large adjoining urban centres

  • Rochester (Rhode Island, United States)

    North Kingstown, town (township), Washington county, south-central Rhode Island, U.S., on Narragansett Bay. The area, settled in 1641 as Kings Towne, was incorporated in 1674; in 1686–89 it was called Rochester. In 1722–23 it was divided into North Kingstown and South Kingstown. North Kingstown

  • Rochester (New York, United States)

    Rochester, industrial city, seat (1821) of Monroe county, northwestern New York, U.S. It is a St. Lawrence Seaway port on the Genesee River at its outlet into Lake Ontario, 71 miles (114 km) east-northeast of Buffalo. It is the centre of a metropolitan area that includes Greece, Irondequoit,

  • Rochester (New Hampshire, United States)

    Rochester, city, Strafford county, southeastern New Hampshire, U.S., on the Cocheco and Salmon Falls rivers, just northwest of Dover. Named for Lawrence Hyde, 1st earl of Rochester, it was incorporated as a town (township) in 1722, but no settlement was made until 1728. Chartered as a city in 1891,

  • Rochester (fictional character)

    Jack Benny: …his cast—including Eddie Anderson as Rochester, his chauffeur and valet; and Benny’s wife, Sadie Marks, as Mary Livingstone, his nemesis—carefully developed his stage image as a vain, stingy man and would-be violinist. He was notable for his verbal inflection and his acute sense of timing.

  • Rochester (Minnesota, United States)

    Rochester, city, seat of Olmsted county, southeastern Minnesota, U.S. It lies on the Zumbro River and on several creeks in a mixed-farming region about 75 miles (120 km) southeast of Minneapolis. The site, which originally served as a camping ground for wagon trains and later as a stagecoach and

  • Rochester Athenaeum (college, Rochester, New York, United States)

    Rochester Institute of Technology, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Rochester, New York, U.S. It includes colleges of business, applied science and technology, liberal arts, science, and engineering. The institute also includes the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences and

  • Rochester cathedral (cathedral, Rochester, England, United Kingdom)

    Rochester: The cathedral church has a Norman west front (1125–30) and later Gothic work. The remains of a Norman castle, chiefly a massive keep, overlook the river crossing, and there are remains of a 13th-century city wall. Other notable buildings include the Guildhall (1687), the almshouses (1579),…

  • Rochester Institute of Technology (college, Rochester, New York, United States)

    Rochester Institute of Technology, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Rochester, New York, U.S. It includes colleges of business, applied science and technology, liberal arts, science, and engineering. The institute also includes the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences and

  • Rochester School of Political Science (political science)

    William Riker: …to be known as the Rochester School of Political Science. He also provided leadership for Rochester University itself as its dean of graduate studies (1978–83). A dedicated teacher and mentor, he continued to teach classes and advise students even after he became emeritus professor in 1991.

  • Rochester Zen Center (American Buddhist organization)

    Philip Kapleau: …and the founder of the Rochester Zen Center, a major venue of Zen meditation and education.

  • Rochester, Edward (fictional character)

    Mr. Rochester, fictional character in Charlotte Bront?’s novel Jane Eyre (1847), the brooding and tormented master of Thornfield Hall, who falls in love with and is loved by Jane

  • Rochester, George (British physicist)

    subatomic particle: Strangeness: …the year Clifford Butler and George Rochester, two British physicists studying cosmic rays, discovered the first examples of yet another type of new particle. The new particles were heavier than the pion or muon but lighter than the proton, with a mass of about 800 times the electron’s mass. Within…

  • Rochester, Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of (English noble)

    Henry Wilmot, 1st earl of Rochester, distinguished Cavalier general during the English Civil Wars, who helped Charles II to escape after the Battle of Worcester. Wilmot’s family was descended from Edward Wilmot of Witney, Oxfordshire, whose son Charles (c. 1570–1643/44), having served with

  • Rochester, Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of, Viscount Wilmot of Athlone, Baron Wilmot of Adderbury (English noble)

    Henry Wilmot, 1st earl of Rochester, distinguished Cavalier general during the English Civil Wars, who helped Charles II to escape after the Battle of Worcester. Wilmot’s family was descended from Edward Wilmot of Witney, Oxfordshire, whose son Charles (c. 1570–1643/44), having served with

  • Rochester, John Wilmot, 2nd earl of (English poet)

    John Wilmot, 2nd earl of Rochester, court wit and poet who helped establish English satiric poetry. Wilmot succeeded his father to the earldom in 1658, and he received his M.A. at Oxford in 1661. Charles II, probably out of gratitude to the 1st earl, who had helped him to escape after the Battle of

  • Rochester, Lawrence Hyde, 1st earl of (English statesman)

    Lawrence Hyde, 1st earl of Rochester, influential English statesman who served under Charles II, James II, William III, and Queen Anne. The second son of the renowned statesman and historian Edward Hyde, 1st earl of Clarendon, he entered Parliament in 1660 and was master of the robes from 1662 to

  • Rochester, Mr. (fictional character)

    Mr. Rochester, fictional character in Charlotte Bront?’s novel Jane Eyre (1847), the brooding and tormented master of Thornfield Hall, who falls in love with and is loved by Jane

  • Rochester, University of (university, Rochester, New York, United States)

    University of Rochester, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Rochester, New York, U.S. The university includes the College of Arts and Science, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Eastman School of Music, William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration,

  • Rochester, Viscount (English noble)

    Robert Carr, earl of Somerset, favourite of King James I of England from 1607 to 1615. His influence on governmental policy was slight, but he brought discredit on James’s court by his involvement in a scandal. Son of a Scottish nobleman, the handsome Carr first attracted James’s interest in 1607.

  • Rochette, Joannie (Canadian ice skater)

    Olympic Games: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 2010: …Games’ most memorable moments when Joannie Rochette of Canada skated in the short program just two days after the sudden death of her mother. Her emotional performance helped vault Rochette to a bronze medal in the event. China’s Shen Xue and Zhao Hongbo took first place in pairs to give…

  • Rochford (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Rochford, district, administrative and historic county of Essex, England. Occupying the southeast of the county, it is bordered to the north by the Crouch estuary and to the south by the Southend-on-Sea urban area on the Thames estuary. The River Roach (formerly Roch) flows through the centre of

  • Rochow, Eugene George (American chemist)

    major industrial polymers: Polysiloxanes (silicones): In 1943 Eugene George Rochow at the General Electric Company Laboratories in Schenectady, N.Y., U.S., prepared silicones by the hydrolysis of dialkyldimethoxysilane—a ring-opening process that he patented in 1945 and that remains the basis of modern polymerization methods.

  • Rocinante (fictional character)

    Rocinante, fictional character, the spavined half-starved horse that Don Quixote designates his noble steed in the classic novel Don Quixote (1605, 1615) by Miguel de

  • rock (geology)

    Rock, in geology, naturally occurring and coherent aggregate of one or more minerals. Such aggregates constitute the basic unit of which the solid Earth is composed and typically form recognizable and mappable volumes. Rocks are commonly divided into three major classes according to the processes

  • rock (music)

    Rock, form of popular music that emerged in the 1950s. It is certainly arguable that by the end of the 20th century rock was the world’s dominant form of popular music. Originating in the United States in the 1950s, it spread to other English-speaking countries and across Europe in the ’60s, and by

  • rock ’n’ roll (early style of rock music)

    Rock and roll, style of popular music that originated in the United States in the mid-1950s and that evolved by the mid-1960s into the more encompassing international style known as rock music, though the latter also continued to be known as rock and roll. Rock and roll has been described as a

  • Rock ’n’ Roll (play by Stoppard)

    Trevor Nunn: …in White (2004), Tom Stoppard’s Rock ’n’ Roll (2006), and Stephen Sondheim’s A Little Night Music (2008). He joined the Theatre Royal Haymarket as resident artistic director for the 2011–12 season and directed four plays, including Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead and The Tempest, starring Ralph Fiennes. Nunn’s later…

  • Rock ’n’ Roll Animal (album by Reed)

    Lou Reed: …Reed’s landmark 1974 concert album Rock ’n’ Roll Animal. In 2006 Reed celebrated New York City in a book, Lou Reed’s New York, which collected his photography.

  • rock and film

    From the opening strains of Bill Haley and His Comets’ “Rock Around the Clock” in Blackboard Jungle (1955), the power of rock and roll on film was obvious. Hollywood, however, treated the new music as a fad, which director Frank Tashlin spoofed in The Girl Can’t Help It (1956), the story of a

  • rock and roll (dance)

    dance: Social dance: The lindy and rock and roll brought back contact between the dancers, but it was of a very acrobatic and individualistic kind. The influence of African dance could still be seen in disco and other popular forms, particularly in the characteristic swaying of the hips and the jerky,…

  • rock and roll (early style of rock music)

    Rock and roll, style of popular music that originated in the United States in the mid-1950s and that evolved by the mid-1960s into the more encompassing international style known as rock music, though the latter also continued to be known as rock and roll. Rock and roll has been described as a

  • Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum (museum and hall of fame, Cleveland, Ohio, United States)

    Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, museum and hall of fame in Cleveland that celebrates the history and cultural significance of rock music and honours the contributions of those who have played an important role in the music’s creation and dissemination. Established in 1983 by a group of

  • rock and television

    Think of rock and television as one of those couples plainly destined to get together but often at odds until the shotgun wedding arranged by MTV (Music TeleVision) finally got them to the altar in 1981. From the start, which in this case means Elvis Presley, TV in the United States and Britain

  • rock and theatre

    The world of musical theatre responded much more slowly to the rock-and-roll revolution than did Hollywood, which in 1956 alone produced such films as Rock Around the Clock, Don’t Knock the Rock, and Rock, Rock, Rock. The first Broadway musical to deal with rock music, Bye Bye Birdie (1960), was

  • Rock Around the Clock (recording by Haley)

    Blackboard Jungle: …featuring the hit song “Rock Around the Clock” (1954) by Bill Haley and His Comets. It was the first major film to feature rock music on its sound track.

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