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  • Rock, The (American railway)

    Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad Company, U.S. railroad company founded in 1847 as the Rock Island and La Salle Railroad Company to build a line from Rock Island to La Salle, Ill. By 1866 its lines extended from Chicago to Council Bluffs, Iowa. Management in the late 19th century was

  • Rock, the (Monaco)

    Monaco: …town of Monaco, or “the Rock,” a headland jutting into the sea on which the old town is located; La Condamine, the business district on the west of the bay, with its natural harbour; Monte-Carlo, including the gambling casino; and the newer zone of Fontvieille, in which various light…

  • Rock, The (American professional wrestler and actor)

    Dwayne Johnson, American professional wrestler and actor whose charisma and athleticism made him a success in both fields. Johnson was born into a wrestling family. His maternal grandfather, “High Chief” Peter Maivia, emerged on the professional scene in the 1960s and ’70s. Johnson’s father,

  • Rock, The (island, California, United States)

    Alcatraz Island, rocky island in San Francisco Bay, California, U.S. The island occupies an area of 22 acres (9 hectares) and is located 1.5 miles (2 km) offshore. The island had little vegetation and was a seabird habitat when it was explored in 1775 by Lieutenant Juan Manuel de Ayala, who named

  • Rock-a-Bye Baby (film by Tashlin [1958])

    Frank Tashlin: Films of the late 1950s: Rock-a-Bye Baby (1958), Tashlin’s first project with the now-solo Lewis, starred Marilyn Maxwell as an actress who has recently given birth to triplets and been widowed. Lewis played her befuddled babysitter. Lewis and Tashlin teamed again on The Geisha Boy (1958), in which Lewis played…

  • rock-cut temple (religion)

    India: Architecture: …many cave temples hewn from rock (of which those at Ajanta and Ellora are most noteworthy); the Sun Temple at Konarak (Konarka); the vast temple complexes at Bhubaneshwar, Khajuraho, and Kanchipuram (Conjeeveram); such Mughal masterpieces as Humayun’s tomb and the Taj Mahal; and, from the 20th century,

  • rock-cut terrace (geology)

    river: River terraces: Rock-cut terraces and depositional terraces can be distinguished by certain properties that reflect their mode of origin. Rock-cut surfaces are usually capped by a uniformly thin layer of alluvium, the total thickness of which is determined by the depth of scour of the river that…

  • rock-cut tomb (archaeology)

    Aegean civilizations: The Shaft Grave Period on the mainland (c. 1600–1450): …family tomb, however, was a rock-cut chamber with a dromos leading down to the entrance. The entrance was blocked with stones and the passage filled with earth after each burial. The rock-cut tomb may have been developed in Messenia during the 16th century under Cretan influence, like the tholos tomb.…

  • rock-fill dam (engineering)

    Earthfill dam, dam built up by compacting successive layers of earth, using the most impervious materials to form a core and placing more permeable substances on the upstream and downstream sides. A facing of crushed stone prevents erosion by wind or rain, and an ample spillway, usually of

  • rock-forming mineral (geology)

    Rock-forming mineral, any mineral that forms igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks and that typically, or solely, forms as an intimate part of rock-making processes. In contrast are those minerals that have a limited mode of occurrence or are formed by more unusual processes, such as the ores

  • rock-knob landscape (geology)

    Canada: The Canadian Shield: …surface into a type of rock-knob, or grained, landscape, with the hollows between the knobs or the troughs between the ridges occupied by enormous numbers of lakes. In other areas the glaciers deposited till or moraine on the surface and in still others left gigantic fields of erratics (boulders and…

  • rock: Athens 1980s overview

    It is said that in every musical generation something new crawls out of the American South. But few would have expected anything earthshaking from Athens, a small city in Georgia that calls itself the “Classic City.” American college towns tend to be consumers rather than creators of musical

  • rock: Bristol 1990s overview

    Until 1990 if a musician came from Bristol—the quiet West Country city whose wealth was built on the slave trade—there was little to be gained from admitting it. But the success of the trio Massive Attack, especially in Britain, so changed perceptions that by the end of the decade, in the eyes of

  • rock: Chicago 1950s overview

    Then the second most populous city in the United States, Chicago had the potential talent and market to sustain a substantial music industry—but it rarely did so. The city did support a vibrant jazz scene during Prohibition and was the leading recording centre for artists supplying the “race”

  • rock: Greenwich Village 1960’s overview

    Beginning in the early 20th century and especially since the Beat movement of the early 1950s, Greenwich Village had been a mecca for creative radicals—artists, poets, jazz musicians, and guitar-playing folk and blues singers—from all over the United States. In coffeehouses such as the Cafe Wha? on

  • rock: London 1960s overview

    London’s music scene was transformed during the early 1960s by an explosion of self-described rhythm-and-blues bands that started out in suburban pubs and basements where students, former students, and could-have-been students constituted both the audience and the performers. In short order many of

  • rock: London 1970s overview

    As Britain’s finances spiraled downward and the nation found itself suppliant to the International Monetary Fund, the seeming stolidity of 1970s London concealed various, often deeply opposed, radical trends. The entrepreneurial spirit of independent record labels anticipated the radical economic

  • rock: London clubs

    If it is possible to be both a midwife and a father figure, Alexis Korner played both roles for British rhythm and blues in 1962. He opened the Ealing Blues Club in a basement on Ealing Broadway and encouraged, inspired, and employed a number of musicians in his band, Blues Incorporated, some of

  • rock: Los Angeles 1950s overview

    Capitol Records was launched in Los Angeles in 1942 in association with the British company EMI and soon became a serious rival to the major New York City-based companies, but no other major label appeared on the West Coast until Warner Brothers launched a record division in 1958. Among the

  • rock: Los Angeles 1960s overview

    During the 1950s there had been no distinctive “Sound of California,” but in the decade that followed there were several. Capitol Records, after long disdaining the youth market, released a series of records by the Beach Boys celebrating cars, surfing, and girls. The group’s glee-club harmonies and

  • rock: Los Angeles 1970s overview

    Los Angeles had been an important music-business city since the 1930s. The city’s movie industry, the favourable climate, the influx of European émigrés and Southern blacks during World War II, and the founding of Capitol Records in 1942 all contributed to the city’s growth as a music centre. But

  • rock: Los Angeles 1980s overview

    In the immediate post-World War II period, Los Angeles had a strong, distinctive black music industry. Yet, as the city grew in importance as a music centre, the business became increasingly dominated by whites. Even the city’s notable jazz scene was overwhelmingly white. In the 1980s, however, Los

  • rock: Los Angeles 1990s overview

    After the buoyancy and optimism of the 1980s, black music in Los Angeles in the early ’90s turned desolate. As economic recession and crack cocaine swept through Watts and East Los Angeles, a generation of artists chose to portray the world of the ghetto with unfettered realism. These were tough

  • rock: Memphis 1960s overview

    Having made an enormous impact in the 1950s, Sam Phillips and Sun Records largely faded away by 1960, but other labels and studios kept Memphis, Tenn., on the musical map. Joe Cuoghi’s Hi Records label had several instrumental hits from 1959 through 1962 with the combo led by Elvis Presley’s bass

  • rock: Minneapolis 1980s overview

    Buried by snow in winter, Minneapolis, Minnesota, the northernmost major city on the Mississippi River, is a long way from the fountainhead of modern popular music, the Mississippi delta—some 800 miles as the crow flies, a little farther if one takes Highway 61 or Ol’ Man River itself. Yet some of

  • rock: Nashville 1950s overview

    Rarely has a section of the pop market been as completely dominated by the major companies as country music was during the 1950s. Only five companies—RCA, Decca, Columbia, Capitol, and MGM—reached the top spot on the best-seller charts until independent Cadence claimed it for seven weeks at the end

  • rock: Nashville 1960’s overview

    From 1958 through 1962 some of the biggest international hits were made by country singers recording in Nashville, Tennessee, including the Everly Brothers, Jim Reeves, Marty Robbins, Johnny Cash, Leroy Van Dyke, Jimmy Dean, Patsy Cline, and Johnny Horton. Nevertheless, the market for “pure”

  • rock: New York 1950s overview

    At the start of the 1950s, midtown Manhattan was the centre of the American music industry, containing the headquarters of three major labels (RCA, Columbia, and Decca), most of the music publishers, and many recording studios. Publishers were the start of the recording process, employing “song

  • rock: New York City 1960s overview

    At the start of the decade, Paul Simon, Neil Diamond, and Lou Reed were among the hopeful young songwriters walking the warrenlike corridors and knocking on the glass-paneled doors of publishers in the Brill Building and its neighbours along Broadway. Only Diamond achieved significant success in

  • rock: New York City 1970s overview

    In the early 1970s the city of New York lapsed into bankruptcy, and the music business completed its move west, centring on Los Angeles. When New York City’s musical resurgence occurred at the end of the decade, it owed little to the tradition of craftsmanship in songwriting, engineering, and

  • rock: New York City 1980s overview

    By the 1980s the record business in New York City was cocooned in the major labels’ midtown Manhattan skyscraper offices, where receptionists were instructed to refuse tapes from artists who did not already have industry connections via a lawyer, a manager, or an accountant. Small labels such as

  • rock: San Francisco 1960s overview

    During the 1950s San Francisco supported several folk clubs including the hungry i, where the Kingston Trio recorded a best-selling live album in 1958. But the city was a backwater of the national music industry until 1966, when promoters such as Bill Graham began booking local bands such as the

  • rock: San Francisco ballrooms

    The Avalon Ballroom, the Fillmore Auditorium, Fillmore West, and Winterland: these four venues ushered in the modern era of rock show presentation and grew out of the hippie counterculture of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district. The first multiband rock show was held at the Ark in Sausalito in

  • rock: Scotland 1980s overview

    In the 1970s several Scottish performers, including the Average White Band and Rod Stewart (who was born in London to a Scottish family), had to relocate to the United States to experience wide-reaching success. At the turn of the 1980s, however, a small but significant music scene developed in

  • rock: Seattle 1990s overview

    If it was the worldwide reaction to the suicide of Nirvana’s driving force, Kurt Cobain, in 1994 that confirmed Seattle’s status as a major influence on early 1990s popular music, its arrival was announced by the band’s hit “Smells Like Teen Spirit” (1991)—a forceful but melodic record that caught

  • rock: Sheffield 1980s overview

    Home to the National Centre for Popular Music, Sheffield, England, is the heartland of Britain’s rust belt. Built on coal and steel industries, it was devastated by the tsunami of world economic change in the 1980s. The contemporaneous wave of innovative music produced in the city owed far less to

  • rockabilly (music)

    Rockabilly, early form of rock music originated by white performers in the American South, popular from the mid-1950s to 1960, with a revival in the late 1970s. Record reviewers coined the term rockabilly—literally, rock and roll played by hillbillies—to describe the intense, rhythm-driven musical

  • Rockall (islet, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Rockall, isolated granite rock in the North Atlantic Ocean 220 miles (354 km) west of the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Rockall is about 100 yards (91 metres) in circumference and stands some 70 feet (21 metres) above sea level. It was formally annexed by the United Kingdom in 1955 and incorporated as

  • rockaway (carriage)

    Rockaway, a light, low, four-wheeled, horse-drawn carriage popular in the United States after its introduction at Rockaway, N.J., in 1830. It had a driver’s seat built into the body, with the top projecting forward to protect the driver from inclement weather. The main body was of the coupé type

  • rockberry (plant)

    crowberry: Purple crowberry, or rockberry (E. eamesii), is found in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada, and red crowberry (E. rubrum) is native to Chile, Argentina, and the Falkland Islands.

  • Rockdale: The Growth of an American Village in the Early Industrial Revolution (work by Wallace)

    Anthony F.C. Wallace: His most important work, Rockdale: The Growth of an American Village in the Early Industrial Revolution (1978), is a psychoanthropological history of the Industrial Revolution. Wallace studied the cultural aspects of the cognitive process, especially when it involves the transfer of information during periods of technological expansion. In other…

  • Rockefeller (Illinois, United States)

    Mundelein, village, Lake county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. A suburb of Chicago, it lies 35 miles (55 km) north-northwest of downtown. Before settlement the area was inhabited by Potawatomi Indians. The village was founded in 1835 and was successively known as Mechanics Grove, for the English

  • Rockefeller Center (architectural complex, New York City, New York, United States)

    Rockefeller Center, a 12-acre (5-hectare) complex of 14 limestone buildings in midtown Manhattan in New York City, designed by a team of architects headed by Henry Hofmeister, H.W. Corbett, and Raymond Hood. The group of skyscrapers was built between 1929 and 1940. Wood veneering, mural painting,

  • Rockefeller Foundation (American organization)

    Rockefeller Foundation, U.S. philanthropic organization. It was endowed by John D. Rockefeller and chartered in 1913 to alleviate human suffering worldwide. Rockefeller was assisted in its management by his son John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Among its many activities, the foundation supports medical

  • Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (university, New York City, New York, United States)

    Rockefeller University, private coeducational institution in New York, New York, U.S., devoted to research and graduate education in the biomedical sciences. It was founded by industrialist John D. Rockefeller in 1901 as a medical-research centre, and in 1954 the school became part of the State

  • Rockefeller Mountains (mountains, Antarctica)

    Richard E. Byrd: Antarctic expeditions: …of high mountains, named the Rockefeller Mountains, was discovered, and a large tract of hitherto unknown territory beyond them was named Marie Byrd Land, after Byrd’s wife. On November 29, 1929, Byrd, as navigator, and three companions made the first flight over the South Pole, flying from Little America to…

  • Rockefeller University (university, New York City, New York, United States)

    Rockefeller University, private coeducational institution in New York, New York, U.S., devoted to research and graduate education in the biomedical sciences. It was founded by industrialist John D. Rockefeller in 1901 as a medical-research centre, and in 1954 the school became part of the State

  • Rockefeller, Abby Aldrich (American philanthropist)

    John D. Rockefeller, Jr.: In 1901 Rockefeller married Abby Greene Aldrich (1874–1948), daughter of U.S. Senator Nelson W. Aldrich. As an art collector, she was instrumental in the founding of the Museum of Modern Art. They had six children—a daughter, Abby (1903–76), and five sons: John D. III, Nelson A., Laurance S., Winthrop,…

  • Rockefeller, Cettie (American educator and philanthropist)

    Laura Spelman Rockefeller, American educator and philanthropist who was the wife of John D. Rockefeller. Both of Spelman’s parents were active in social causes; her father, a wealthy businessman, was an abolitionist involved in the Underground Railroad, and her mother supported the temperance

  • Rockefeller, David (American banker)

    David Rockefeller, American banker and philanthropist who was the youngest of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He received a B.S. degree from Harvard University (1936), did graduate study in economics at Harvard and at the London School of Economics, and then earned a Ph.D. degree from the

  • Rockefeller, Happy (American socialite)

    Happy Rockefeller, (Margaretta Large Fitler), American socialite (born June 9, 1926, Bryn Mawr, Pa.—died May 19, 2015, Tarrytown, N.Y.), created a scandal when in 1963 she married Gov. Nelson Rockefeller of New York shortly after both she and he had divorced their spouses. Their nuptial was widely

  • Rockefeller, John D. (American industrialist)

    John D. Rockefeller, American industrialist and philanthropist, founder of the Standard Oil Company, which dominated the oil industry and was the first great U.S. business trust. Rockefeller was the eldest son and second of six children born to traveling physician and snake-oil salesman William

  • Rockefeller, John D., III (American philanthropist)

    John D. Rockefeller III, American philanthropist, eldest of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. After graduating from Princeton University (1929), he joined the family’s enterprises, becoming, by 1931, trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation, the General Education Board, the Institute for

  • Rockefeller, John D., Jr. (American philanthropist)

    John D. Rockefeller, Jr., American philanthropist, the only son of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., and heir to the Rockefeller fortune, who built Rockefeller Center in New York City and was instrumental in the decision to locate the United Nations in that city. After graduation from Brown University in

  • Rockefeller, John Davison (American industrialist)

    John D. Rockefeller, American industrialist and philanthropist, founder of the Standard Oil Company, which dominated the oil industry and was the first great U.S. business trust. Rockefeller was the eldest son and second of six children born to traveling physician and snake-oil salesman William

  • Rockefeller, John Davison, III (American philanthropist)

    John D. Rockefeller III, American philanthropist, eldest of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. After graduating from Princeton University (1929), he joined the family’s enterprises, becoming, by 1931, trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation, the General Education Board, the Institute for

  • Rockefeller, John Davison, Jr. (American philanthropist)

    John D. Rockefeller, Jr., American philanthropist, the only son of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., and heir to the Rockefeller fortune, who built Rockefeller Center in New York City and was instrumental in the decision to locate the United Nations in that city. After graduation from Brown University in

  • Rockefeller, Laura Spelman (American educator and philanthropist)

    Laura Spelman Rockefeller, American educator and philanthropist who was the wife of John D. Rockefeller. Both of Spelman’s parents were active in social causes; her father, a wealthy businessman, was an abolitionist involved in the Underground Railroad, and her mother supported the temperance

  • Rockefeller, Laurance S. (American philanthropist)

    Laurance S. Rockefeller, American venture capitalist and philanthropist, third of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He graduated from Princeton University with a degree in philosophy (1932) but became the most entrepreneurial of all the Rockefeller brothers. He participated in the founding

  • Rockefeller, Laurance Spelman (American philanthropist)

    Laurance S. Rockefeller, American venture capitalist and philanthropist, third of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He graduated from Princeton University with a degree in philosophy (1932) but became the most entrepreneurial of all the Rockefeller brothers. He participated in the founding

  • Rockefeller, Nelson (vice president of United States)

    Nelson Rockefeller, 41st vice president of the United States (1974–77) in the Republican administration of Pres. Gerald Ford, four-term governor of New York (1959–73), and leader of the liberal wing of the Republican Party. He unsuccessfully sought the presidential nomination of his party three

  • Rockefeller, Nelson Aldrich (vice president of United States)

    Nelson Rockefeller, 41st vice president of the United States (1974–77) in the Republican administration of Pres. Gerald Ford, four-term governor of New York (1959–73), and leader of the liberal wing of the Republican Party. He unsuccessfully sought the presidential nomination of his party three

  • Rockefeller, William (American businessman)

    William Rockefeller, American industrialist and financier, known in conjunction with his older brother, John D. Rockefeller, for his role in the establishment and growth of the Standard Oil Company. Rockefeller began his career as a bookkeeper. At age 21 he started his own business, Hughes and

  • Rockefeller, William Avery, Jr. (American businessman)

    William Rockefeller, American industrialist and financier, known in conjunction with his older brother, John D. Rockefeller, for his role in the establishment and growth of the Standard Oil Company. Rockefeller began his career as a bookkeeper. At age 21 he started his own business, Hughes and

  • Rockefeller, Winthrop (American politician and philanthropist)

    Winthrop Rockefeller, American politician and philanthropist, second youngest of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He left college in 1934 and did various kinds of work for the Rockefeller interests—in the oil fields of Texas and at the Chase National Bank—before joining the U.S. Army in

  • rocker (printmaking tool)

    mezzotint: …later an instrument called a cradle, or rocker, was used. It resembles a small spade with a toothed edge, and its cutting action throws up rough ridges of metal called burrs. The burrs are scraped away in places intended to be white in the finished print. In the 21st century,…

  • rocker (mining tool)

    placer mining: …pan was the rocker, or cradle, named for its resemblance to a child’s cradle. As it was rocked, it sifted large quantities of ore. Gravel was shoveled onto a perforated iron plate, and water was poured over it, causing finer material to drop through the perforations and onto an apron…

  • rocker arm (engineering)

    gasoline engine: Valves, pushrods, and rocker arms: Valves for controlling intake and exhaust may be located overhead, on one side, on one side and overhead, or on opposite sides of the cylinder. These are all the so-called poppet, or mushroom, valves, consisting of a stem with one end enlarged to…

  • rocker press (device)

    coin: Early modern minting: The rocker press represents another variation. The bottom roller (actually a quadrant insert, as in the Taschenwerke) remained stationary; the axis of the upper roller rotated about this lower axis as a small circle around a larger, so that the upper die face rolled over a…

  • Rocket (locomotive)

    Rocket, pioneer railway locomotive built by the English engineers George and Robert Stephenson. Following the success of the Stockton & Darlington Railway in 1825, the cities of Liverpool and Manchester decided to build a 40-mile (64-km) steam-operated line connecting them. George Stephenson was

  • rocket (jet-propulsion device and vehicle)

    Rocket, any of a type of jet-propulsion device carrying either solid or liquid propellants that provide both the fuel and oxidizer required for combustion. The term is commonly applied to any of various vehicles, including firework skyrockets, guided missiles, and launch vehicles used in

  • rocket (firework)

    firework: …popular form of firework, the rocket, is lifted into the sky by recoil from the jet of fire thrown out by its burning composition; its case is so designed as to produce maximum combustion and, thus, maximum thrust in its earliest stage.

  • rocket (plant, Sisymbrium genus)

    Rocket, (genus Sisymbrium), genus of 90 species of plants of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Rockets are often weedy and are common in waste areas and fields of the Northern Hemisphere and mountains in the Southern Hemisphere. The plants bear white or yellow four-petaled flowers and produce

  • rocket (plant)

    cress: …closely related winter cress, or yellow rocket (B. vulgaris), is a common weed, conspicuous in fields for its bright yellow spring flowers. Bitter cress, cuckoo flower, or meadow cress (Cardamine pratensis), of the Northern Hemisphere, grows in damp meadows and in bog gardens. It is low-growing, with pinnately divided leaves…

  • Rocket 88 (song)

    Ike Turner: Their first recording, “Rocket 88”—made at Sam Phillips’s Memphis (Tennessee) Recording Service but released on the Chess label—was a number one rhythm-and-blues hit in 1951, though it was credited to saxophonist Jackie Brenston (who provided the lead vocal) and the Delta Cats. After Brenston’s departure, Ike served as…

  • rocket and missile system (weapons system)

    Rocket and missile system, any of a variety of weapons systems that deliver explosive warheads to their targets by means of rocket propulsion. Rocket is a general term used broadly to describe a variety of jet-propelled missiles in which forward motion results from reaction to the rearward ejection

  • rocket assistance

    artillery: Nuclear shells, guided projectiles, and rocket assistance: …improve the range of guns, rocket-assisted projectiles were developed, with moderate success, by the Germans during World War II, and they were the subject of further development in succeeding years. Rocket assistance had certain drawbacks—notably, the loss of payload space in the shell to the rocket motor. A system designed…

  • rocket candytuft (plant)

    candytuft: Rocket candytuft (I. amara) has thick, deeply lobed leaves and large white, often pink-tinged, fragrant flowers on 22-cm (9-inch) stalks. It grows on chalky hills and in fields. The evergreen candytuft (I. sempervirens) is a matting perennial with white flowers and is widely planted in…

  • rocket engine

    rocket: General characteristics and principles of operation: …the turbojet and other “air-breathing” engines in that all of the exhaust jet consists of the gaseous combustion products of “propellants” carried on board. Like the turbojet engine, the rocket develops thrust by the rearward ejection of mass at very high velocity.

  • rocket larkspur (plant)

    larkspur: …genus Consolida) include the common rocket larkspur (D. ajacis or C. ambigua) and its varieties, up to 60 centimetres (2 feet) tall, with bright blue, pink, or white flowers on branching stalks. Perennial larkspurs, which tend toward blue flowers but vary to pink, white, red, and yellow, include a puzzling…

  • rocket launcher (weapon)

    rocket and missile system: Barrage rockets: …their 150-millimetre and 210-millimetre bombardment rockets were highly effective. These were fired from a variety of towed and vehicle-mounted multitube launchers, from launching rails on the sides of armoured personnel carriers, and, for massive bombardments, even from their packing crates. Mobile German rocket batteries were able to lay down heavy…

  • rocket motor

    rocket: General characteristics and principles of operation: …the turbojet and other “air-breathing” engines in that all of the exhaust jet consists of the gaseous combustion products of “propellants” carried on board. Like the turbojet engine, the rocket develops thrust by the rearward ejection of mass at very high velocity.

  • rocket plane (jet-propulsion device and vehicle)
  • Rocket Propulsion Research Institute (Soviet institution)

    space exploration: Soviet Union: …which five years later became Scientific-Research Institute 3 (NII-3). In its early years the organization did not work directly on space technology, but ultimately it played a central role in Soviet rocket development.

  • Rocket to the Morgue (novel by Boucher)

    Anthony Boucher: Rocket to the Morgue (1942), a Sister Ursula novel, featured thinly veiled portraits of science fiction writers such as Robert Heinlein and L. Ron Hubbard.

  • rocket-propelled grenade (weapon)

    grenade: …type of grenade is the antitank grenade, which contains a special shaped-charge explosive that can pierce even the heavy armour of a tank. Since these are usually delivered by small rockets launched from shoulder-held tubes, they are commonly referred to as rocket-propelled grenades.

  • Rocketdyne (American company)

    Boeing Company: Rockwell International Corporation: The company’s Rocketdyne division (established as part of North American Aviation in 1955) developed the rocket engines used in many U.S. space programs, including those for the three stages of the Saturn V rocket and the main engines of the shuttle orbiter.

  • Rocketeer, The (film by Johnston [1991])

    the Rocketeer: In 1991 Disney released The Rocketeer, a live-action feature film directed by Joe Johnston. Although the film received generally positive reviews, it underperformed at the box office, and Disney chose not to execute its planned option for a pair of sequels. Critics observed that the film might have been…

  • Rocketeer, the (fictional character)

    The Rocketeer, American comic strip character created by writer and artist Dave Stevens in 1982. The character had its genesis in a backup story in Starslayer, a fantasy comic by independent publisher Pacific Comics. Drawing on the Commando Cody movie serials of the 1950s and pulp novels of the

  • Rocketman (Norwegian skier)

    Bj?rn Daehlie, Norwegian cross-country skier who won more total Olympic Games medals and gold medals than any other cross-country skier. His Olympic success, combined with his record in World Cup competition and world championships, marked him as arguably the greatest Nordic skier of all time.

  • Rockettes, the (American dance troupe)

    The Rockettes, world-famous American precision dance team. The origins of the Rockettes, the world’s most famous precision dance team, can be traced to 1925, when impresario Russell Markert of St. Louis, Missouri, billed a group of women dancers as the Missouri Rockets. Following a positive

  • rockfall (geology)

    mass movement: …of solid rock, known as rockfalls; several types of almost imperceptible downslope movement of surficial soil particles and rock debris, collectively called creep; the subsurface creep of rock material, known as bulging: the multiplicity of downslope movements of bedrock and other debris caused by the separation of a slope section…

  • rockfish (fish)

    mudminnow: In North America the eastern mudminnow (U. pygmaea) is sometimes called rockfish, and the central mudminnow (U. limi) mudfish or dogfish. Mudminnows are often used as bait and sometimes kept in home aquariums.

  • rockfish (fish)

    Scorpionfish, any of the numerous bottom-living marine fish of the family Scorpaenidae, especially those of the genus Scorpaena, widely distributed in temperate and tropical waters. Sometimes called rockfish or stonefish because they commonly live among rocks, scorpionfish are perchlike fish with

  • rockflower order (plant order)

    Crossosomatales, rockflower order of dicotyledonous flowering plants, belonging to the basal rosid group of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group II (APG II) botanical classification system (see angiosperm). The order is a heterogeneous assemblage of eight families, which can be broken down into two

  • rockfoil (plant)

    Saxifrage, (genus Saxifraga), any of a genus of flowering plants, of the family Saxifragaceae, native in temperate, subarctic, and alpine areas. About 300 species have been identified. Many of them are valued as rock-garden subjects, and some are grown in garden borders. As a group they are notable

  • Rockford (Illinois, United States)

    Rockford, city, seat (1836) of Winnebago county, northern Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Rock River, about 90 miles (145 km) northwest of Chicago. Rockford was founded by New Englanders in 1834 as separate settlements (commonly known as Kentville and Haightville, for the founders of each) on each

  • Rockford College (university, Rockford, Illinois, United States)

    Anna Peck Sill: …name was not changed to Rockford College until 1892. Sill retired in 1884 and continued to live on the campus until her death.

  • Rockford Female Seminary (university, Rockford, Illinois, United States)

    Anna Peck Sill: …name was not changed to Rockford College until 1892. Sill retired in 1884 and continued to live on the campus until her death.

  • Rockford Files, The (American television series)

    James Garner: …another hit television series with The Rockford Files, in which he played an easygoing private investigator. He received numerous Emmy Award nominations for his performance, winning in 1977. The show ended in 1980, owing in part to the injuries Garner sustained performing his own stunts. However, he reprised the role…

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