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  • Rockford Peaches (American baseball team)

    Dorothy Kamenshek: …1953 she played for the Rockford (Illinois) Peaches, starting as an outfielder but soon taking over at first base. Kamenshek’s skills at first base impressed former New York Yankee Wally Pipp as being the most accomplished he had ever seen among men or women. He once predicted that Kamenshek would…

  • Rockford University (university, Rockford, Illinois, United States)

    Anna Peck Sill: …name was not changed to Rockford College until 1892. Sill retired in 1884 and continued to live on the campus until her death.

  • Rockfort (fort, Kingston, Jamaica)

    Kingston: …limits of the town stands Rockfort, a moated fortress dating from the late 17th century and last manned in 1865. On Duke Street stands Headquarters House (formerly the seat of government), built by Thomas Hibbert, an 18th-century merchant; it is one of the few remaining architectural showpieces of a city…

  • rockfowl (bird)

    Rockfowl, either of the two species of western African birds, genus Picathartes, constituting the subfamily Picathartinae, of uncertain family relationships in the order Passeriformes. Both species, with virtually no feathering on the head, have drab, grayish plumage and are thin-necked, h

  • Rockhampton (Queensland, Australia)

    Rockhampton, city and commercial centre for a large part of central Queensland, Australia, at the head of ocean navigation on the Fitzroy River, 38 miles (60 km) upstream from its mouth on Keppel Bay. The town was laid out in 1858 on Gracemere Station and its name chosen in reference to rock

  • rockhare (mammal)

    rabbit: …are actually hares, whereas the rockhares and the hispid hare are rabbits. Rabbits differ from hares in size, life history, and preferred habitat. In general, rabbits are smaller and have shorter ears than hares. They are born without fur and with closed eyes after a gestation period of 30–31 days.…

  • rockhopper penguin (bird)

    Rockhopper penguin, either of two species of crested penguins (genus Eudyptes, order Sphenisciformes) characterized by its red eyes, a relatively thin stripe of upright yellow feathers extending from the bill to the back of the head above each eye (the superciliary stripe), and a crest of black

  • Rockies, The (mountains, North America)

    Rocky Mountains, mountain range forming the cordilleran backbone of the great upland system that dominates the western North American continent. Generally, the ranges included in the Rockies stretch from northern Alberta and British Columbia southward to New Mexico, a distance of some 3,000 miles

  • Rocking Chair and Other Poems, The (work by Klein)

    A.M. Klein: The Rocking Chair and Other Poems (1948) departs from the Jewish frame of reference in describing the change wrought by industrialization on Quebec.

  • Rockingham (county, New Hampshire, United States)

    Rockingham, county, extreme southeastern New Hampshire, U.S. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and Maine and Little and Great bays to the northeast; the Piscataqua River constitutes the boundary with Maine. The county is the state’s only coastal lowland,

  • Rockingham State Historic Site (building, New Jersey, United States)

    Princeton: At nearby Rocky Hill is Rockingham State Historic Site, the house used by Washington as his headquarters when the Continental Congress convened in Princeton and where he wrote his Farewell Address to the Armies. Area township, 17 square miles (44 square km). Pop. (2000) borough, 14,203; township, 16,027; (2010) borough,…

  • Rockingham ware (pottery)

    Rockingham ware, English earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain made at Swinton, Yorkshire, in a factory on the estate of the Marquess of Rockingham. The pottery was started in 1745, but it was not until 1826 that it assumed the name Rockingham. It continued to operate until 1842. Rockingham

  • Rockingham, Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of (prime minister of Great Britain)

    Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd marquess of Rockingham, prime minister of Great Britain from July 1765 to July 1766 and from March to July 1782. He led the parliamentary group known as Rockingham Whigs, which opposed Britain’s war (1775–83) against its colonists in North America. He succeeded to his

  • Rockland (county, New York, United States)

    Rockland, county, southeastern New York state, U.S., consisting of a hilly region bordered by the Hudson River to the east and New Jersey to the southwest. Sandstone bluffs known as the Palisades border the Hudson where it narrows below the Tappan Zee area of the river. Among the other waterways

  • Rockland (Maine, United States)

    Rockland, city, seat (1860) of Knox county, southern Maine, U.S., on the western shore of Penobscot Bay 81 miles (130 km) northeast of Portland. The site, settled about 1719, was originally part of Thomaston; it was separately incorporated in 1848 as the town of East Thomaston and was renamed

  • Rockledge (Florida, United States)

    Cocoa-Rockledge: cities, Brevard county, east-central Florida, U.S., on the Indian River (lagoon; part of the Intracoastal Waterway), about 45 miles (70 km) southeast of Orlando. They are linked to Merritt Island, Cape Canaveral, and the city of Cocoa Beach by causeways across the Indian and Banana…

  • Rockne, Knute (Norwegian-born American football coach)

    Knute Rockne, Norwegian-born American gridiron football coach who built the University of Notre Dame in Indiana into a major power in college football and became the intercollegiate sport’s first true celebrity coach. In 1893 Rockne moved to Chicago with his family, and in 1910 he entered Notre

  • Rockne, Knute Kenneth (Norwegian-born American football coach)

    Knute Rockne, Norwegian-born American gridiron football coach who built the University of Notre Dame in Indiana into a major power in college football and became the intercollegiate sport’s first true celebrity coach. In 1893 Rockne moved to Chicago with his family, and in 1910 he entered Notre

  • Rockport (Ohio, United States)

    Lakewood, city, Cuyahoga county, northeastern Ohio, U.S., on Lake Erie, just west of Cleveland. Surveyed in 1806 as part of Rockport township, the area was not permanently settled until James Nicholson arrived from Connecticut in 1818; several dozen settlers were there by the following year and

  • Rocks in Space: The Search for Asteroids

    On Feb. 15, 2013, the planetary science community awaited the close fly-by of Earth of asteroid 2012 DA14. The asteroid had been discovered one year earlier, and determination of its orbit showed that it would pass by at a distance of less than 27,700 km (1 km = 0.621 mi) from Earth’s surface,

  • rockskipper (fish)

    blenny: The rockskipper (Istiblennius zebra) is a small Hawaiian blenny representative of several that live along shores and can hop about on land. The Hawaiian Runula goslinei and the Pacific R. tapeinosoma, both of which are small, are noted for nipping at swimmers.

  • rockslide (geology)

    landslide: Types of landslides: Rockslides and other types of slides involve the displacement of material along one or more discrete shearing surfaces. The sliding can extend downward and outward along a broadly planar surface (a translational slide), or it can be rotational along a concave-upward set of shear surfaces…

  • Rockstar Games (American company)

    Grand Theft Auto: …created by the American company Rockstar Games and published in 1997 and 1998 by the American Softworks Corporation (ASC Games) for play on video game consoles and personal computers. After an immensely popular debut, Grand Theft Auto went on to generate multiple sequels and expansions, including Grand Theft Auto: Vice…

  • Rockville (Maryland, United States)

    Rockville, city, seat (1776) of Montgomery county, west-central Maryland, U.S. It is a northwestern suburb of Washington, D.C. The settlement originated during the Revolutionary period around Hungerford’s tavern and was known first as Montgomery Court House and later as Williamsburg. Designated a

  • rockweed (name of various species of brown algae)

    Rockweed, common name for various species of brown algae growing attached to intertidal rocks. See Fucus;

  • Rockwell Automation (American corporation)

    Rockwell International Corporation, diversified American corporation that was formerly one of the country’s leading aerospace contractors, making launch vehicles and spacecraft for the U.S. space program. The main company was incorporated in 1928 as North American Aviation, Inc., a holding company

  • Rockwell hardness tester

    hardness tester: The Rockwell hardness tester utilizes either a steel ball or a conical diamond known as a brale and indicates hardness by determining the depth of penetration of the indenter under a known load. This depth is relative to the position under a minor initial load; the…

  • Rockwell International Corporation (American corporation)

    Rockwell International Corporation, diversified American corporation that was formerly one of the country’s leading aerospace contractors, making launch vehicles and spacecraft for the U.S. space program. The main company was incorporated in 1928 as North American Aviation, Inc., a holding company

  • Rockwell, Norman (American illustrator)

    Norman Rockwell, American illustrator best known for his covers for the journal The Saturday Evening Post. Rockwell, a scholarship winner of the Art Students League, received his first freelance assignment from Condé Nast at age 17 and thereafter provided illustrations for various magazines. In

  • Rocky (film by Avildsen [1976])

    Rocky, American boxing film, released in 1976, that was the highest-grossing movie of that year, earning more than $117 million at the box office. It was nominated for 10 Academy Awards and won three, including best picture, and made its writer and lead actor, Sylvester Stallone, a star. Rocky

  • rocky coast (landform)

    coastal landforms: Tides: …a beach or on a rocky coast, it causes the shoreline to move accordingly. This movement of the shoreline changes the zone where waves and longshore currents can do their work. Tidal range in combination with the topography of the coast is quite important in this situation. The greater the…

  • Rocky Flats (nuclear weapons plant, Colorado, United States)

    Rocky Flats, U.S. nuclear weapons plant near Denver, Colorado, that manufactured the plutonium detonators, or triggers, used in nuclear bombs from 1952 until 1989, when production was halted amid an investigation of the plant’s operator, Rockwell International Corporation, for violations of

  • Rocky Mount (North Carolina, United States)

    Rocky Mount, city, Nash and Edgecombe counties, east-central North Carolina, U.S., about 50 miles (80 km) east-northeast of Raleigh. The area was settled in the mid-1700s by Virginians after the war (1711–13) with the Tuscarora Indians. The name Rocky Mount, first used in 1816 to designate the

  • Rocky Mountain bee plant

    spiderflower: Rocky Mountain bee plant, or stinking clover (C. serrulata), is a summer-flowering annual of North American damp prairies and mountains. About 50 to 150 cm (20 to 60 inches) tall, it has three-parted leaves and clusters of spidery pink flowers with long stamens.

  • Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (tree)

    bristlecone pine: Of the Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines (P. aristata), the oldest known individual is estimated to be over 2,480 years old.

  • Rocky Mountain Fur Company (American trading company)

    Arikara: Ashley’s Rocky Mountain Fur Company resulted in the first U.S. Army campaign against a Plains tribe. In response, the Arikara left their villages and adopted a nomadic equestrian lifestyle for a period of years.

  • Rocky Mountain Geosyncline (geological feature, North America)

    Rocky Mountains: Physiography: …structural depression, known as the Rocky Mountain Geosyncline, eventually extended from Alaska to the Gulf of Mexico and became a continuous seaway during the Cretaceous Period (about 145 to 66 million years ago). The ranges of the Canadian and Northern Rockies were created when thick sheets of Paleozoic limestones were…

  • Rocky Mountain goat (mammal)

    Mountain goat, (Oreamnos americanus), a stocky North American ruminant of the family Bovidae (order Artiodactyla). Surefooted relatives of the chamois, mountain goats cling to steep cliffs in habitats ranging from ocean shores to glaciated mountain tops. They are agile, methodical climbers, adapted

  • Rocky Mountain grasshopper (extinct insect)

    locust: The Rocky Mountain locust and the migratory grasshopper (Melanoplus spretus and M. sanguinipes, respectively) destroyed many prairie farms in Canada and the United States in the 1870s. Many other species occasionally increase sufficiently in numbers to be called plagues.

  • Rocky Mountain locust (extinct insect)

    locust: The Rocky Mountain locust and the migratory grasshopper (Melanoplus spretus and M. sanguinipes, respectively) destroyed many prairie farms in Canada and the United States in the 1870s. Many other species occasionally increase sufficiently in numbers to be called plagues.

  • Rocky Mountain National Park (national park, Colorado, United States)

    Rocky Mountain National Park, spectacular mountainous region of north-central Colorado, U.S. It lies just west of the town of Estes Park and adjoins Arapaho National Recreation Area, which surrounds two lakes formed by the impounding of the Colorado River, to the southwest; the eastern entrance of

  • Rocky Mountain News (American newspaper)

    Colorado: Media and publishing: … is The Denver Post; the Rocky Mountain News (Denver), which was founded in 1859, ceased publication in February 2009. Daily newspapers are also published in more than a dozen other cities, including Boulder, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, and Greeley.

  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, form of tick-borne typhus first described in the Rocky Mountain section of the United States, caused by a specific microorganism (Rickettsia rickettsii). Discovery of the microbe of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in 1906 by H.T. Ricketts led to the understanding of other

  • Rocky Mountain Trench (region, North America)

    Rocky Mountain Trench, geological depression extending north-northwest for about 900 miles (1,400 km) from western Montana, U.S., south of Flathead Lake, through British Columbia, Can., to the headwaters of the Yukon River. The trench parallels the steep western face of the Rockies, separating

  • Rocky Mountains (mountains, North America)

    Rocky Mountains, mountain range forming the cordilleran backbone of the great upland system that dominates the western North American continent. Generally, the ranges included in the Rockies stretch from northern Alberta and British Columbia southward to New Mexico, a distance of some 3,000 miles

  • Rocky Mountains, The (painting by Bierstadt)

    Albert Bierstadt: , The Rocky Mountains (1863; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City) and Mount Corcoran (c. 1875–77; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.). Executed in his studio in New York, the large works do not have the freshness and spontaneity of the small on-the-spot paintings from…

  • rocky shore (landform)

    coastal landforms: Tides: …a beach or on a rocky coast, it causes the shoreline to move accordingly. This movement of the shoreline changes the zone where waves and longshore currents can do their work. Tidal range in combination with the topography of the coast is quite important in this situation. The greater the…

  • Rococo (design)

    Rococo, style in interior design, the decorative arts, painting, architecture, and sculpture that originated in Paris in the early 18th century but was soon adopted throughout France and later in other countries, principally Germany and Austria. It is characterized by lightness, elegance, and an

  • Rococo style (music)

    sonata: The Classical era and later: The Rococo style of the mid-18th century, generally known as style galant, had attained a halfway stage in which counterpoint had been virtually dropped and tunes had occupied the forefront of interest. But now, in the mature Classical style of Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,…

  • ROCOR

    Eastern Orthodoxy: The Orthodox diaspora and missions: …and became known as the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia (ROCOR). It had no canonical relation with the official Orthodox patriarchates and churches until May 2007. That year, following reforms within both Russia and the Russian Orthodox Church in the wake of the fall of the Soviet Union, the…

  • Rocque, Fran?ois de La (French politician)

    Fran?ois de La Rocque, French fascist and army officer who sought dictatorial power but merely helped bring down the government of édouard Daladier in 1934. The son of a general, Rocque was from a long line of career officers. After graduating from the prestigious military academy of Saint-Cyr

  • Rocque, Jean-Fran?ois de La (French explorer)

    Jean-Fran?ois de La Rocque, sieur de Roberval, French colonizer chosen by Francis I to create a settlement on North American lands found earlier by Jacques Cartier. Roberval was born into a noble family and lived at the court of Francis of Angoulême. Roberval converted to Protestantism and was

  • Rocroi (France)

    Rocroi, ancient fortress town, Ardennes département, Grand Est région, northeastern France. It lies 4 miles (6 km) from the Belgian frontier. The great bastions surrounding the small town in the form of a pentagon have been preserved intact and offer an excellent example of 16th- to 17th-century

  • Rocroi, Battle of (French history [1643])

    Battle of Rocroi, (May 19, 1643), a military engagement of the Thirty Years’ War in which a French army of 22,000 men, under the Duke d’Enghien (later known as the Great Condé), annihilated a Spanish army of 26,000 men under Don Francisco de Melo, marking the end of Spain’s military ascendancy in

  • Rod (Slavic religion)

    Rod, in Slavic religion, god of fate and the creator of the world. Ceremonial meals in his honor, consisting of meatless dishes such as bread and cheese, survived into Christian

  • rod (retinal cell)

    Rod, one of two types of photoreceptive cells in the retina of the eye in vertebrate animals. Rod cells function as specialized neurons that convert visual stimuli in the form of photons (particles of light) into chemical and electrical stimuli that can be processed by the central nervous system.

  • rod (glass)

    industrial glass: Tubes and rods: Tubes and rods are made in three processes: the Danner process, the downdraw process, and the Vello process. In the Danner process, a continuous stream of glass flows over a hollow, rotating mandrel that is mounted on an incline inside a surrounding muffle. With…

  • rod (metallurgy)

    sound: In solid rods: A thin metal rod can sustain longitudinal vibrations in much the same way as an air column. The ends of a rod, when free, act as antinodes, while any point at which the rod is held becomes a node, so that the representation of…

  • rod (measurement)

    Rod, old English measure of distance equal to 16.5 feet (5.029 metres), with variations from 9 to 28 feet (2.743 to 8.534 metres) also being used. It was also called a perch or pole. The word rod derives from Old English rodd and is akin to Old Norse rudda (“club”). Etymologically rod is also akin

  • rod

    fishing: Early history: …of the line to a rod, at first probably a stick or tree branch, made it possible to fish from the bank or shore and even to reach over vegetation bordering the water.

  • rod brake (device)

    bicycle: Brakes: In developing countries rod brakes are often used. Rods connect the handlebar levers to stirrups that pull pads of friction material against the inside of the rim. Front and rear brakes on other bikes are actuated by cables connected to a brake lever on each handlebar. Caliper brakes…

  • rod numeral system (mathematics)

    East Asian mathematics: The Nine Chapters: Numbers represented by counting rods could be moved and modified within a computation. However, no written computations were recorded until much later. As will be seen, setting up the computations with counting rods greatly influenced later mathematical developments.

  • rod puppet (puppetry)

    puppetry: Rod puppets: These figures are also manipulated from below, but they are full-length, supported by a rod running inside the body to the head. Separate thin rods may move the hands and, if necessary, the legs. Figures of this type are traditional on the Indonesian…

  • rod weeder (agriculture)

    cultivator: Rod weeders are used for weed control in open unplanted fields; their working element is a square-section rod that revolves a few inches below the soil surface. Field cultivators, essentially light plows, are equipped with spring teeth, shovels, or sweeps.

  • Rod, édouard (French author)

    édouard Rod, French-Swiss writer of psychological novels and a pioneer of comparative criticism. After his first novels, written in the style of émile Zola, the best of which was Palmyre Veulard (1881), Rod soon evolved his own highly sensitive, introverted psychological art in such novels as La

  • roda (sport)

    capoeira: …face each other within the roda—a circle of capoeiristas (practitioners of capoeira)—emulating in a stylized manner the strikes and parries of combat, in time with the rhythms of a small musical ensemble. Music is indeed integral to the practice of capoeira. The ensemble typically consists of one to three berimbaus…

  • Rodbell, Martin (American biochemist)

    Martin Rodbell, American biochemist who was awarded the 1994 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his discovery in the 1960s of natural signal transducers called G-proteins that help cells in the body communicate with each other. He shared the prize with American pharmacologist Alfred G.

  • Rodbertus, Johann Karl (German economist)

    Johann Karl Rodbertus, economist who, because of his conservative interpretation of social reform, was instrumental in shaping the Prussian government’s regulation of its economy. Rodbertus was educated in law at Prussian universities. In 1836 he acquired the landed estate of Jagetzow in Pomerania.

  • Rodchenko, Aleksandr Mikhailovich (Russian artist)

    Aleksandr Mikhailovich Rodchenko, Russian painter, sculptor, designer, and photographer who was a dedicated leader of the Constructivist movement. Rodchenko studied art at the Kazan School of Art in Odessa from 1910 to 1914 and then went to Moscow to continue on at the Imperial Central Stroganov

  • Rodd, Evelyn Violet Elizabeth (British politician)

    Evelyn Violet Elizabeth Emmet, British politician who served as a Conservative member of Parliament for East Grinstead (1955–64) and as chairman of the National Union of the Conservative Party (1955–56). After obtaining a degree from Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, Evelyn traveled extensively in Europe

  • Rodd, Honourable Mrs. Peter (British writer)

    Nancy Mitford, English writer noted for her witty novels of upper-class life. Nancy Mitford was one of six daughters (and one son) of the 2nd Baron Redesdale; the family name was actually Freeman-Mitford. The children were educated at home and were all highly original. Nancy’s sister Unity (d.

  • Rodd, Kylie Tennant (Australian author)

    Kylie Tennant, Australian novelist and playwright famed for her realistic yet affirmative depictions of the lives of the underprivileged in Australia. Tennant attended the University of Sydney but left without a degree and then worked as an assistant publicity officer for the Australian

  • Roddenberry, Eugene Wesley (American writer and producer)

    Gene Roddenberry, American writer and television and film producer who created and served as executive producer of the popular science-fiction television series Star Trek (1966–69), which spawned other television series and a string of motion pictures. Roddenberry briefly attended Los Angeles City

  • Roddenberry, Gene (American writer and producer)

    Gene Roddenberry, American writer and television and film producer who created and served as executive producer of the popular science-fiction television series Star Trek (1966–69), which spawned other television series and a string of motion pictures. Roddenberry briefly attended Los Angeles City

  • Roddenberry, Majel Barrett (American actress)

    Majel Barrett Roddenberry, (Majel Lee Hudec), American actress (born Feb. 23, 1932, Columbus, Ohio—died Dec. 18, 2008, Los Angeles, Calif.), was the wife of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry (from 1969 until his death in 1991) and acted not only in the original series but also in several other

  • Roddick, Andy (American tennis player)

    Jimmy Connors: …2008 he coached American player Andy Roddick. Connors wrote several books, including Jimmy Connors: How to Play Tougher Tennis (1986; written with Robert J. LaMarche), Don’t Count Yourself Out!: Staying Fit After 35 with Jimmy Connors (1992; written with Neil Gordon and Catherine McEvily Harris), and the memoir The Outsider…

  • Roddick, Dame Anita (British businesswoman)

    Dame Anita Roddick, (Anita Lucia Perella), British entrepreneur (born Oct. 23, 1942, Littlehampton, West Sussex, Eng.—died Sept. 10, 2007, Chichester, West Sussex), as the founder of the Body Shop cosmetics chain, championed social issues—such as environmental awareness, animal rights,

  • Rodeheaver, Homer (American musician)

    gospel music: White gospel music: …as Charles McCallom Alexander and Homer Rodeheaver, the music acquired a more upbeat character. The organ was replaced by the piano, which in turn was joined by other instruments. (Rodeheaver’s musical presentations often included his own trombone solos.) The vocal component of the music also took on a more demonstrative,…

  • Roden, Ben (American religious leader)

    Branch Davidian: David Koresh and the ATF raid: …Houteff’s leadership was led by Ben Roden, who had previously called the Davidians to “Get off the dead Rod [led by Florence Houteff] and move to the living Branch.” Roden gained control of Mount Carmel and established the General Association of Davidian Seventh-day Adventists. He called his members to a…

  • Ródenas, Antonio Esteve (Spanish dancer and choreographer)

    Antonio Gades, (Antonio Esteve Ródenas), Spanish dancer and choreographer (born Nov. 14, 1936, Elda, Spain—died July 20, 2004, Madrid, Spain), popularized flamenco and other Spanish dances with his elegant performances and powerful choreography. He was trained by the great dancer Pilar López—who c

  • Rodenbach, Albrecht (Flemish writer)

    Albrecht Rodenbach, Flemish poet who helped to inspire the late 1870s revival in Flemish literature that was intended to counteract the growing French influence on Belgian cultural life. When Rodenbach went to the Catholic University of Leuven (Louvain) in 1876, he at once sought to mobilize

  • Rodenbach, Georges (Belgian poet)

    Georges Rodenbach, Belgian Symbolist poet and novelist whose writing was inspired by scenes of his native country. Rodenbach studied law at the University of Ghent, Belgium, and continued his studies in Paris. His first collection of verse, Le Foyer et les champs (“The Hearth and the Fields”), was

  • Rodenbach, Georges-Raymond-Constantin (Belgian poet)

    Georges Rodenbach, Belgian Symbolist poet and novelist whose writing was inspired by scenes of his native country. Rodenbach studied law at the University of Ghent, Belgium, and continued his studies in Paris. His first collection of verse, Le Foyer et les champs (“The Hearth and the Fields”), was

  • rodent (mammal)

    Rodent, (order Rodentia), any of more than 2,050 living species of mammals characterized by upper and lower pairs of ever-growing rootless incisor teeth. Rodents are the largest group of mammals, constituting almost half the class Mammalia’s approximately 4,660 species. They are indigenous to every

  • rodent bot fly (insect)

    bot fly: The subfamily Cuterebrinae contains important rodent bot flies, such as Cuterebra cuniculi, which infects rabbits, and the tree squirrel bot fly (C. emasculator), which attacks the scrotum of squirrels, sometimes emasculating them. The human bot fly (Dermatobia hominis) attacks livestock, deer, and humans. The female attaches her eggs to mosquitoes,…

  • Rodentia (mammal)

    Rodent, (order Rodentia), any of more than 2,050 living species of mammals characterized by upper and lower pairs of ever-growing rootless incisor teeth. Rodents are the largest group of mammals, constituting almost half the class Mammalia’s approximately 4,660 species. They are indigenous to every

  • rodenticide (chemistry)

    Rodenticide, any substance that is used to kill rats, mice, and other rodent pests. Warfarin, 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate), ANTU (legal label for alpha-naphthylthiourea), and red squill are commonly used rodenticides. These substances kill by preventing normal blood clotting and causing internal

  • Rodeo (ballet by Copland)

    Agnes de Mille: Rodeo (1942), one of her most important ballets, was created for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. The first ballet to include tap dancing, it used distinctively American gestures—bronco-riding and steer-roping movements. Most of de Mille’s other ballets were choreographed for New York City’s Ballet…

  • rodeo (sport)

    Rodeo, sport involving a series of riding and roping contests derived from the working skills of the American cowboy as developed during the second half of the 19th century to support the open-range cattle industry in North America. Although its development as a sport occurred mainly in northern

  • Rodeo Association of America (American organization)

    rodeo: Origins and history: In 1929 the Rodeo Association of America, an organization of rodeo managers and producers, was formed to regulate the sport. The contestants themselves took a hand in 1936 after a strike in Boston Garden and organized the Cowboy Turtles Association—“turtles” because they had been slow to act. That…

  • Rodeo Cowboys Association (American organization)

    rodeo: Origins and history: …(RCA) in 1945 and the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) in 1975, and its rules became accepted by most rodeos.

  • Roderic (king of Visigoths)

    Roderick, the last Visigothic king of Spain, who died in the Muslim invasion. Roderick’s predecessor, King Witiza, died in 710, leaving two young sons, for whom Witiza’s widow and family tried to secure the succession. But a faction of the Visigothic nobles elected Roderick and drove the Witizans

  • Roderic O’Connor (king of Ireland)

    Roderic O’Connor, king of Connaught and the last high king of Ireland; he failed to turn back the Anglo-Norman invasion that led to the conquest of Ireland by England. Roderic succeeded his father, Turloch O’Connor, as king of Connaught in 1156. Since Turloch’s title of high king was claimed by

  • Roderic of Connaught (king of Ireland)

    Roderic O’Connor, king of Connaught and the last high king of Ireland; he failed to turn back the Anglo-Norman invasion that led to the conquest of Ireland by England. Roderic succeeded his father, Turloch O’Connor, as king of Connaught in 1156. Since Turloch’s title of high king was claimed by

  • Roderick (king of Visigoths)

    Roderick, the last Visigothic king of Spain, who died in the Muslim invasion. Roderick’s predecessor, King Witiza, died in 710, leaving two young sons, for whom Witiza’s widow and family tried to secure the succession. But a faction of the Visigothic nobles elected Roderick and drove the Witizans

  • Roderick Hudson (novel by James)

    Roderick Hudson, first novel by Henry James, serialized in The Atlantic Monthly in 1875 and published in book form in 1876. It was revised by the author in 1879 for publication in England. Roderick Hudson is the story of the conflict between art and the passions; the title character is an American

  • Roderick Random (novel by Smollett)

    Roderick Random, picaresque novel by Tobias Smollett, published in 1748. Modeled after Alain-René Lesage’s Gil Blas, the novel consists of a series of episodes that give an account of the life and times of the Scottish rogue Roderick Random. At various times rich and then poor, the hero goes to

  • Roderick Taliaferro (work by Cook)

    George Cram Cook: …reflected in his first novel, Roderick Taliaferro (1903), a historical romance set in the Mexico of Emperor Maximilian. One of his hired workers, Floyd Dell, who later became a novelist, converted him to Socialism (Cook appears as Tom Alden in Dell’s Moon-Calf, 1920). Cook’s novel The Chasm (1911) explores the…

  • Roderick, John (American journalist)

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