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  • Setthavong (king of Lan Xang)

    Setthathirat I, sovereign of the Lao kingdom of Lan Xang who prevented it from falling under Burmese domination and whose reign was marked by notable achievements in domestic and foreign affairs. As the son of King Photisarath, Setthathirat was placed on the throne of the principality of Chiang

  • setting (theatre)

    environmental theatre: The sets were usually based on multilevel platforms, balconies, ramps, and scaffolds surrounding a stage that encroached on the audience’s territory, providing a wider range of space for the actors and a greater flexibility of interaction between the audience and performers. The audience of the environmental…

  • setting (literary device)

    Setting, in literature, the location and time frame in which the action of a narrative takes place. The makeup and behaviour of fictional characters often depend on their environment quite as much as on their personal characteristics. Setting is of great importance in émile Zola’s novels, for

  • Setting Free the Bears (novel by Irving)

    John Irving: Setting Free the Bears, begun as his master’s thesis, was published in 1968. The novel, a latter-day picaresque, charts the exploits of two college dropouts as they journey through Austria by motorcycle and plot the liberation of the titular bruins and other denizens of the…

  • Setting Sun, The (novel by Dazai Osamu)

    The Setting Sun, novel by Dazai Osamu, published in 1947 as Shayō. It is a tragic, vividly painted story of life in postwar Japan. The narrator is Kazuko, a young woman born to gentility but now impoverished. Though she wears Western clothes, her outlook is Japanese; her life is static, and she

  • settle (furniture)

    Settle, long wooden bench with backrest and arms, designed to seat several people. Originating in Europe in the 10th century, it was apparently derived from the chest, a resemblance often retained, with additional elements based on the monastic choir stall. It could be used for a variety of

  • Settle, Martha (American historian and teacher)

    Martha S. Putney, (Martha Settle), American historian and teacher (born Nov. 9, 1916, Norristown, Pa.—died Dec. 11, 2008, Washington, D.C.), chronicled the contributions of blacks in the U.S. military in such landmark works as When the Nation Was in Need: Blacks in the Women’s Army Corps During

  • Settle, Mary Lee (American author)

    Mary Lee Settle, American author (born July 29, 1918, Charleston, W.Va.—died Sept. 27, 2005, Ivy, Va.), penned the critically acclaimed Beulah Quintet—a historical fiction that traced events from Cromwellian England to 20th-century West Virginia. The saga debuted in 1956 with O Beulah Land and c

  • settled society (sociology)

    history of Central Asia: …the relationship between the “civilized” and the “barbarian”—the two opposed but complementary. The equation so often propounded—of the civilized with the sedentary and the barbarian with the nomad—is misleading, however. The most significant distinction between the two groups in Eurasia lies probably in the successful attempt of the civilized…

  • settlement (geology)

    mass movement: …in a gradual manner, called settlement. Subsidence involves a roof collapse or breakdown of a subsurface cavity such as a cave. Extensive subsidence is evident in areas where coal, salt, and metalliferous ores are mined. Marine erosion sometimes causes the roof collapse of sea caves. Regions of karst topography will…

  • settlement (law)

    Settlement, in law, a compromise or agreement between litigants to settle the matters in dispute between them in order to dispose of and conclude their litigation. Generally, as a result of the settlement, prosecution of the action is withdrawn or dismissed without any judgment being entered (see

  • settlement
  • Settlement Cook Book: The Way to a Man’s Heart, The (work by Kander)

    Lizzie Black Kander: …book form in 1901 as The Settlement Cook Book: The Way to a Man’s Heart.

  • settlement house (social agency)

    Social settlement, a neighbourhood social welfare agency. The main purpose of a social settlement is the development and improvement of a neighbourhood or cluster of neighbourhoods. It differs from other social agencies in being concerned with neighbourhood life as a whole rather than with

  • Settlement Island (island, Tasmania, Australia)

    Macquarie Harbour: This settlement, centring on Sarah (Settlement) Island, lasted until 1833, when the difficulty of supply forced its abandonment. Deserted for more than 40 years, the harbour later saw activity with gold mining in the King valley and timber cutting in the Gordon. Sarah Island and the outlying Isle of…

  • settlement movement (American social-welfare movement)

    folk dance: The settlement movement: Both Burchenal and Hinman participated in the settlement movement (see social settlement), an idealistic social-welfare movement begun in the late 19th century. In the larger U.S. cities of the early 20th century, neighbourhood institutions called settlement houses fostered the health of urban neighbourhoods…

  • settlement option (insurance)

    insurance: Settlement options: The death proceeds or cash values of insurance may be settled in various ways. The insured may take the cash value and lapse the policy. A beneficiary may take a lump sum settlement of the face amount upon the death of the insured.…

  • Settlement, Act of (Great Britain [1701])

    Act of Settlement, (June 12, 1701), act of Parliament that, since 1701, has regulated the succession to the throne of Great Britain. Toward the end of 1700 William III was ill and childless; his sister-in-law, the prospective queen, Anne, had just lost her only surviving child; and abroad the

  • Settlement, Act of (England [17th-century])

    Ireland: Charles I (1625–49) and the Commonwealth (1649–60): By an Act of Settlement, Ireland, regarded as conquered territory, was parceled out among soldiers and creditors of the Commonwealth, and only those Irish landowners able to prove their constant support of the parliamentary cause escaped having their estates confiscated. Of these, those who were Roman Catholics…

  • Settlements, Book of (work by Ari Thorgilsson)

    Landnámabók, (Icelandic: “Book of Settlements”) unique Icelandic genealogical record, probably originally compiled in the early 12th century by, at least in part, Ari Thorgilsson the Learned, though it exists in several versions of a later date. It lists the names of nearly 400 prominent original

  • Settlers and Convicts; or, Recollections of Sixteen Years’ Labour in the Australian Backwoods (work by Harris)

    Alexander Harris: ), English author whose Settlers and Convicts; or, Recollections of Sixteen Years’ Labour in the Australian Backwoods (1847) is an outstanding fictional account of life in Australia.

  • Settlers of the Marsh (work by Grove)

    Canadian literature: Modern period, 1900–60: father, and Frederick Philip Grove’s Settlers of the Marsh (1925) and Fruits of the Earth (1933), depicting man’s struggle for mastery of himself and his land, are moving testaments to the courage of farmers. Painter Emily Carr wrote stories about her childhood and her visits to First Nations sites in…

  • settling (soil mechanics)

    Settling, in soil mechanics, refers to sedimentation; i.e., the settling out of solid particles from suspension in water. The velocity of settling depends on the size, shape, and density of the particles, and on the viscosity of the water. Particles may be classified in size by relative settling

  • settling tank (water treatment)

    Sedimentation tank, component of a modern system of water supply or wastewater treatment. A sedimentation tank allows suspended particles to settle out of water or wastewater as it flows slowly through the tank, thereby providing some degree of purification. A layer of accumulated solids, called

  • settling velocity equation (geology)

    sedimentation: The settling velocity equation formulated in 1851 by G.G. Stokes is the classic starting point for any discussion of the sedimentation process. Stokes showed that the terminal settling velocity of spheres in a fluid was inversely proportional to the fluid’s viscosity and directly proportional to the…

  • settlor (law)

    trust: The maker (“settlor”) of the trust will convey property to the trustee (who may be an individual or a corporation, such as a bank or trust company) and instruct the trustee to hold and manage the property for the benefit of one or more beneficiaries of the…

  • Settrington, Baron of (British politician [1735-1806])

    Charles Lennox, 3rd duke of Richmond, one of the most progressive British politicians of the 18th century, being chiefly known for his advanced views on parliamentary reform. Richmond succeeded to the peerage in 1750 (his father, the 2nd duke, having added the Aubigny title to the Richmond and

  • Settrington, Baron of (English noble [1672-1723])

    Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond, son of Charles II of England by his mistress Louise de Kéroualle, duchess of Portsmouth. He was aide-de-camp to William III from 1693 to 1702 and lord of the bedchamber to George I from 1714 to 1723. Charles II awarded a number of peerages (duchies, earldoms,

  • Setúbal (Portugal)

    Setúbal, city and concelho (municipality), southwestern Portugal. It is located southeast of Lisbon, on the northern shore of the deep estuary formed by the Sado, Marateca, and S?o Martinho rivers. The city served as a royal residence during the reign of King John II (1481–95). With the exception

  • Seubert, Marie Antonia Siegelinde Martha (actress)

    Lil Dagover, actress who was a prominent figure of German silent cinema. Although that was the era in which she made her reputation, she continued to act until shortly before her death at age 92. (Her actual year of birth, 1887 rather than 1897 as she had claimed, became known only after her

  • Seuffert, Martin (Austrian piano maker)

    upright piano: …“giraffe-style” design (Giraffenflügel; 1804) of Martin Seuffert of Vienna, with one side straight and one bent, as on a grand piano.

  • Seunade?a (historical kingdom, India)

    India: The Deccan and the south: …Devagiri (Daulatabad), whose kingdom (Seunadesha) included the broad swaths of what is now Maharashtra state. The kingdom expanded during the reign of Simhana (reigned c. 1210–47), who campaigned against the Hoysala in northern Karnataka, against the lesser chiefs of the western coast, and against the Kakatiya kingdom in the…

  • Seuphor, Michel (French artist)

    Abstraction-Création: …and Square”) group, founded by Michel Seuphor and Joaquin Torres-Garcia in 1930. Artists Georges Vantongerloo, Jean Hélion, and Auguste Herbin worked together to form a similar association, and by 1931 they managed to attract over 40 members to a group they called Abstraction-Création. That same year an annual periodical published…

  • Seurat, Georges (French painter)

    Georges Seurat, painter, founder of the 19th-century French school of Neo-Impressionism whose technique for portraying the play of light using tiny brushstrokes of contrasting colours became known as Pointillism. Using this technique, he created huge compositions with tiny, detached strokes of pure

  • Seuse, Heinrich (German mystic)

    Heinrich Suso, one of the chief German mystics and leaders of the Friends of God (Gottesfreunde), a circle of devout ascetic Rhinelanders who opposed contemporary evils and aimed for a close association with God. Of noble birth, Suso joined the Dominicans in Constance, where five years later he

  • Seuss, Doctor (American author and illustrator)

    Dr. Seuss, American writer and illustrator of immensely popular children’s books, which were noted for their nonsense words, playful rhymes, and unusual creatures. After graduating from Dartmouth College (B.A., 1925), Geisel did postgraduate studies at Lincoln College, Oxford, and at the Sorbonne.

  • Seuss, Dr. (American author and illustrator)

    Dr. Seuss, American writer and illustrator of immensely popular children’s books, which were noted for their nonsense words, playful rhymes, and unusual creatures. After graduating from Dartmouth College (B.A., 1925), Geisel did postgraduate studies at Lincoln College, Oxford, and at the Sorbonne.

  • Seuter, Bartholom?us (German painter)

    pottery: Porcelain: …it painted by the Hausmaler Bartholom?us Seuter, is in gold silhouette followed by polychrome painting after designs by the Obermaler. The figures are painted in three-quarter length. Indianische Blumen motifs were used, and Arita decorations, particularly those of Kakiemon (see below Japan: Edo period), were closely copied.

  • Seuthopolis (Bulgaria)

    Kazanl?k, town, central Bulgaria. It lies in the Kazanl?k basin, 2 miles (3 km) north of the Tundzha River. The area is famous for its roses, which are made into attar of roses for the perfume industry. This industry, which developed in the 17th century, now uses approximately 20,000 acres (8,000

  • Sevagram (India)

    Sevagram, (Hindi: “Village of Service”) town, eastern Maharashtra state, western India. It is situated on a level plain just east of Wardha. The town was originally called Segaon. It was given its present name by Mohandas K. Gandhi, the Indian nationalist leader. In 1936 he left his ashram

  • Sevan Basin (region, Armenia)

    Armenia: Relief: …eastern part of Armenia, the Sevan Basin, containing Lake Sevan (525 square miles) and hemmed in by ranges soaring as high as 11,800 feet, lies at an altitude of about 6,200 feet. In the southwest, a large depression—the Ararat Plain—lies at the foot of Mount Aragats and the Geghama Range;…

  • Sevan, Lake (lake, Armenia)

    Lake Sevan, lake in Armenia, with an area of 525 sq mi (1,360 sq km). Lying at 6,250 ft (1,905 m) above sea level in a mountain-enclosed basin, it drains by the Hrazdan River into the Aras River and to the Caspian Sea, but most of its water is lost by evaporation rather than by runoff. The lake is

  • Sevareid, Arnold Eric (American journalist)

    Eric Sevareid, American broadcast journalist, an eloquent commentator and scholarly writer with Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) News (1939–77) who pioneered a new journalism by introducing opinion and analysis in news reports. After graduating from the University of Minnesota (1935), Sevareid

  • Sevareid, Eric (American journalist)

    Eric Sevareid, American broadcast journalist, an eloquent commentator and scholarly writer with Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) News (1939–77) who pioneered a new journalism by introducing opinion and analysis in news reports. After graduating from the University of Minnesota (1935), Sevareid

  • Sevasadana (novel by Premchand)

    Premchand: His first major Hindi novel, Sevasadana (1918; “House of Service”), dealt with the problems of prostitution and moral corruption among the Indian middle class. Premchand’s works depict the social evils of arranged marriages, the abuses of the British bureaucracy, and exploitation of the rural peasantry by moneylenders and officials.

  • Sevastopil (Ukraine)

    Sevastopol, city and seaport, Crimea, southern Ukraine, in the southwestern Crimean Peninsula on the southern shore of the long, narrow Akhtiarska Bay, which forms a magnificent natural harbour. West of the modern town stood the ancient Greek colony of Chersonesus, founded in 421 bce. Originally a

  • Sevastopol (Ukraine)

    Sevastopol, city and seaport, Crimea, southern Ukraine, in the southwestern Crimean Peninsula on the southern shore of the long, narrow Akhtiarska Bay, which forms a magnificent natural harbour. West of the modern town stood the ancient Greek colony of Chersonesus, founded in 421 bce. Originally a

  • Sevastopol in August (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: …v avguste 1855 goda” (“Sevastopol in August”; all published 1855–56). The first sketch, which deals with the courage of simple soldiers, was praised by the tsar. Written in the second person as if it were a tour guide, this story also demonstrates Tolstoy’s keen interest in formal experimentation and…

  • Sevastopol in December (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: …“Sevastopol v dekabre mesyatse” (“Sevastopol in December”), “Sevastopol v maye” (“Sevastopol in May”), and “Sevastopol v avguste 1855 goda” (“Sevastopol in August”; all published 1855–56). The first sketch, which deals with the courage of simple soldiers, was praised by the tsar. Written in the second person as if it…

  • Sevastopol in May (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: …December”), “Sevastopol v maye” (“Sevastopol in May”), and “Sevastopol v avguste 1855 goda” (“Sevastopol in August”; all published 1855–56). The first sketch, which deals with the courage of simple soldiers, was praised by the tsar. Written in the second person as if it were a tour guide, this story…

  • Sevastopol v avguste 1855 goda (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: …v avguste 1855 goda” (“Sevastopol in August”; all published 1855–56). The first sketch, which deals with the courage of simple soldiers, was praised by the tsar. Written in the second person as if it were a tour guide, this story also demonstrates Tolstoy’s keen interest in formal experimentation and…

  • Sevastopol v dekabre mesyatse (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: …“Sevastopol v dekabre mesyatse” (“Sevastopol in December”), “Sevastopol v maye” (“Sevastopol in May”), and “Sevastopol v avguste 1855 goda” (“Sevastopol in August”; all published 1855–56). The first sketch, which deals with the courage of simple soldiers, was praised by the tsar. Written in the second person as if it…

  • Sevastopol v maye (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: …December”), “Sevastopol v maye” (“Sevastopol in May”), and “Sevastopol v avguste 1855 goda” (“Sevastopol in August”; all published 1855–56). The first sketch, which deals with the courage of simple soldiers, was praised by the tsar. Written in the second person as if it were a tour guide, this story…

  • Sevastopol, Siege of (Russian history)

    Siege of Sevastopol, (Oct. 17, 1854–Sept. 11, 1855), the major operation of the Crimean War (1853–56), in which 50,000 British and French troops (joined by 10,000 Piedmontese troops during 1855), commanded by Lord Raglan and Gen. Fran?ois Canrobert, besieged and finally captured the main naval base

  • Sève, O. J. A. (French military officer)

    Ibrahim Pasha: Sève (Suleiman Pasha al-Faransawi), won military fame. In 1831–32, after a disagreement between Mu?ammad ?Alī and the Ottoman sultan, Ibrahim led an Egyptian army through Palestine and defeated an Ottoman army at Homs. He then forced the Bailan Pass and crossed the Taurus, gaining a final…

  • seven (number)

    September: …from septem, Latin for “seven,” an indication of its position in the early Roman calendar.

  • Seven Acts of Mercy, The (painting by Caravaggio)

    Caravaggio: Naples, Malta, Sicily, Naples, Porto Ercole: 1606–10: The Seven Acts of Mercy is a tall, dark, claustrophobically congested composition, in which the nominal seven good deeds, ranging from burial of the dead to clothing of the naked, are performed in a world so squeezed and teeming that it resembles some dark corner…

  • Seven Against Thebes (play by Aeschylus)

    Aeschylus: Seven Against Thebes: This is the third and only surviving play of a connected trilogy, presented in 467 bc, that dealt with the impious transgressions of Laius and the doom subsequently inflicted upon his descendants. The first play seems to have shown how Laius, king…

  • Seven Against Thebes (Greek mythology)

    Seven Against Thebes, in Greek mythology, the seven champions who were killed fighting against Thebes after the fall of Oedipus, the king of that city. The twins Eteocles and Polyneices, who had been cursed by their father, Oedipus, failed to agree on which of them was to succeed to the Theban

  • Seven Ages of Man (work by Anand)

    Mulk Raj Anand: …projected seven-volume autobiographical novel entitled Seven Ages of Man, completing four volumes: Seven Summers (1951), Morning Face (1968), Confession of a Lover (1976), and The Bubble (1984).

  • Seven Beauties (film by Wertmüller [1975])

    Lina Wertmüller: …island, and Pasqualino settebellezze (1975; Seven Beauties), a film about an Italian dandy who must betray all moral values while trying to survive World War II and his internment in a Nazi death camp. For the latter, Wertmüller made history with her Academy Award nomination for best director. She also…

  • Seven Books of Histories Against the Pagans (work by Orosius)

    Paulus Orosius: Raymond, Seven Books of Histories Against the Pagans). This book chronicles the history of the world from its creation through the founding and history of Rome up until ad 417. In it Orosius describes the catastrophes that befell mankind before Christianity, arguing against the contention that…

  • Seven Books of the Diana, The (work by Montemayor)

    The Two Gentlemen of Verona: …long Spanish prose romance titled Los siete libros de la Diana (1559?; The Seven Books of the Diana) by Jorge de Montemayor. Shakespeare is thought to have adapted the relationship of the two gentlemen of the title and the ending of the play from various possible sources, including Richard Edwards’s…

  • Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (film by Donen [1954])

    Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, American musical film, released in 1954, that is noted for its lively dance numbers. It was one of the first musicals to capitalize on the new wide-screen process of CinemaScope. In the 1850s lumberjack Adam Pontipee (played by Howard Keel) lives with his six

  • Seven Brothers (work by Kivi)

    Aleksis Kivi: Kivi’s Seitsem?n veljest? (1870; Seven Brothers), the first novel written in Finnish, tells the story of some freedom-loving village youths who take to the woods and live a life of adventure but gradually mature and finally accept the responsibilities of sober citizens in a farming community. It contains elements…

  • Seven Churches of Clonmacnoise (monument, Clonmacnoise, Ireland)

    Clonmacnoise: …the churches, known as the Seven Churches of Clonmacnoise, and two 12th-century towers still survive and are protected as part of a national monument. An annual pilgrimage to Clonmacnoise is held on September 9, the feast of St. Ciaran. Attesting to the city’s historic and religious importance, Pope John Paul…

  • Seven Colleges Conference (college organization)

    Seven Sisters, consortium of seven highly prestigious private institutions of higher education in the northeastern United States. At the time of the consortium’s inception, all of its members were women’s colleges. Its members include Barnard (affiliated with Columbia University), Bryn Mawr, Mount

  • seven corporal works of mercy (Christianity)

    Roman Catholicism: Charitable activities: …fulfills the duty of “the seven corporal works of mercy” mentioned in The Gospel According to Matthew (chapter 25) and carries on the healing mission of Jesus. Protestant churches continued the works of institutional benevolence after their separation from the Roman church. Institutional assistance to the needy is a legacy…

  • Seven Days in May (film by Frankenheimer [1964])

    Seven Days in May, American political thriller film, released in 1964, that addresses the paranoia and fear of the Cold War; the movie centres on the attempted overthrow of a U.S. president. Filmed in the wake of the Cuban Missile Crisis and amid worries of Armageddon, Seven Days in May involves an

  • Seven Days to Noon (film by J. Boulting and R. Boulting [1950])
  • Seven Days’ Battles (American Civil War)

    Seven Days’ Battles, (June 25–July 1, 1862), series of American Civil War battles in which a Confederate army under General Robert E. Lee drove back General George B. McClellan’s Union forces and thwarted the Northern attempt to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. McClellan was

  • seven deadly sins (theology)

    Seven deadly sins, in Roman Catholic theology, the seven vices that spur other sins and further immoral behaviour. First enumerated by Pope Gregory I (the Great) in the 6th century and elaborated in the 13th century by St. Thomas Aquinas, they are (1) vainglory, or pride, (2) greed, or

  • Seven Divisions of Law, The (Spanish code)

    Alfonso X: Siete partidas was the most important law code. It was based on Roman law and contained discourses on manners and morals and an idea of the king and his people as a corporation—superior to feudal arrangements—with the king as agent of both God and the…

  • Seven Gables, House of the (building, Salem, Massachusetts, United States)

    Salem: …Seven Gables, which immortalized the house built (1668) by Captain John Turner. On the house’s grounds are several other historic buildings that were moved to the site, including Hawthorne’s birthplace (about 1740), the Hathaway House (1682), and the Retire Beckett House (1655). Hawthorne used the home of his wife’s family,…

  • Seven Gothic Tales (short stories by Dinesen)

    Seven Gothic Tales, volume of short stories by Danish writer Isak Dinesen, published in English in 1934 and then translated by her into Danish as Syv fantastiske fort?llinger. The stories, set in the 19th century and concerned with aristocracy, breeding and legitimacy, and self-delusion, combine

  • Seven Guitars (play by Wilson)

    August Wilson: Seven Guitars, first produced in 1995 as the seventh play of the cycle, is set among a group of friends who reunite in 1948 following the death of a local blues guitarist.

  • Seven Hills (hills, Germany)

    Siebengebirge, cluster of hills southeast of Bonn, Germany. Volcanic in origin and actually about 40 in number, they rise on the right bank of the Rhine between K?nigswinter and the Cologne–Frankfurt am Main Autobahn. A popular tourist resort area and nature reserve, the hills form the northwestern

  • Seven Hills of Rome (Italy)

    Seven Hills of Rome, group of hills on or about which the ancient city of Rome was built. The original city of Romulus was built upon Palatine Hill (Latin: Mons Palatinus). The other hills are the Capitoline, Quirinal, Viminal, Esquiline, Caelian, and Aventine (known respectively in Latin as the

  • Seven Holy Founders (Italian monks)

    Seven Holy Founders, ; canonized 1888; feast day February 17), the seven Italian saints who founded the Servite order in 1233. The Seven Holy Founders are Saints Bonfilius, Alexis Falconieri, John Bonagiunta, Benedict dell’Antella, Bartholomew Amidei, Gerard Sostegni, and Ricoverus Uguccione.

  • Seven Interpretive Essays on Peruvian Reality (work by Maríategui)

    José Carlos Mariátegui: …de la realidad peruana (1928; Seven Interpretive Essays on Peruvian Reality). While emphasizing the economic aspects of Marxism, Mariátegui nonetheless does not repudiate the value of religion and myth in his treatment of the Indians. His views on literature, signaling the importance of indigenous themes and language while adhering to…

  • Seven Ionian Islands (islands, Greece)

    Ionian Islands, island group off the west coast of Greece, stretching south from the Albanian coast to the southern tip of the Peloponnese (Modern Greek: Pelopónnisos), and often called Heptanesos (“Seven Islands”). The islands are Corfu (Kérkyra), Cephallenia (Kefaloniá), Zacynthus (Zákynthos),

  • Seven Islands (Quebec, Canada)

    Sept-?les, (English: “Seven Islands”) city, regional county municipality (RCM) of C?te-Nord (North Shore) region, eastern Quebec province, Canada. It lies on the north shore of the estuary of the St. Lawrence River and is situated on an almost circular bay at the entrance of which are six steep,

  • Seven Lamps of Architecture, The (essay by Ruskin)

    The Seven Lamps of Architecture, book-length essay on architecture by John Ruskin, published in 1849. According to Ruskin, the leading principles of architecture are the “lamps” of Sacrifice, Truth, Power, Beauty, Life, Memory, and Obedience. Ruskin saw Gothic as the noblest style of architecture,

  • Seven Lectures to Young Men (work by Beecher)

    Henry Ward Beecher: …Beecher furthered his reputation through Seven Lectures to Young Men (1844), vivid exhortations on the vices and dangers in a frontier community.

  • Seven Legends (work by Keller)

    Gottfried Keller: …Seldwyla) and Sieben Legenden (1872; Seven Legends). His last novel, Martin Salander (1886), deals with political life in Switzerland in his time.

  • Seven Little Australians (novel by Turner)

    Ethel Turner: …for children, whose popular novel Seven Little Australians (1894) was filmed (1939), twice dramatized for television, once in Great Britain (1953) and once in Australia (1973), and made into a musical (1978).

  • Seven Men from Now (film by Boetticher [1956])

    Budd Boetticher: Westerns: The first was Seven Men from Now (1956), with Scott as an ex-sheriff who methodically tracks down the seven criminals who killed his wife; Lee Marvin was impressive as an opportunistic villain. The Tall T (1957), which was based on an Elmore Leonard short story, was better still,…

  • Seven Nation Army (song by White)

    the White Stripes: …of singles such as “Seven Nation Army” and “The Hardest Button to Button.” Jack appeared in the film Cold Mountain (2003), and he contributed five songs to its Grammy-nominated soundtrack. He also produced country legend Loretta Lynn’s Van Lear Rose (2004), a collection of honky-tonk anthems that

  • Seven Oaks Massacre (Canadian history [1816])

    Seven Oaks Massacre, (1816), destruction of the Hudson’s Bay Company’s Red River Settlement in what is now Manitoba, Canada, by agents of the rival North West Company. On June 19, 1816, a party of about 60 Métis under Cuthbert Grant, a North West Company employee, set out to run provisions for

  • Seven Odes, The (Arabic literature)

    Al-Mu?allaqāt, collection of seven pre-Islamic Arabic qa?īdahs (odes), each considered to be its author’s best piece. Since the authors themselves are among the dozen or so most famous poets of the 6th century, the selection enjoys a unique position in Arabic literature, representing the finest of

  • Seven Pagodas (historical town, India)

    Mamallapuram, historic town, northeast Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. It lies along the Coromandel Coast of the Bay of Bengal 37 miles (60 km) south of Chennai (Madras). The town’s religious centre was founded by a 7th-century-ce Hindu Pallava king—Narasimhavarman, also known as Mamalla—for

  • Seven Pieces for Large Orchestra (work by Holst)

    The Planets, Op. 32, orchestral suite consisting of seven short tone poems by English composer Gustav Holst. Its first public performance took place in 1920, and it was an instant success. Of the various movements, “Mars” and “Jupiter” are the most frequently heard. Holst wrote his collection of

  • Seven Pillars of Wisdom, The (work by Lawrence)

    T.E. Lawrence: …account of those activities in The Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1926).

  • Seven Pines, Battle of (United States history)

    Battle of Seven Pines, (May 31–June 1, 1862), in the American Civil War, two-day battle in the Peninsular Campaign, in which Confederate attacks were repulsed, fought 6 miles (10 km) east of the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia. The Union Army of the Potomac was commanded by Major General

  • Seven Poor Men of Sydney (work by Stead)

    Christina Stead: Seven Poor Men of Sydney, published later the same year, deals with a band of young social radicals and provides a fascinating portrayal of Sydney’s waterfront. Her finest and most highly praised novel, yet one which went virtually unrecognized for 25 years, is The Man…

  • Seven Pounds (film by Muccino [2008])

    Will Smith: …his unpopular image, and in Seven Pounds (2008) he played a man seeking redemption after accidentally killing seven people in a car accident.

  • Seven Princes of Lara, The (Spanish ballad)

    ballad: Historical ballads: …Spanish romances such as “The Seven Princes of Lara,” on wars between Moors and Christians.

  • Seven Rivers West (work by Hoagland)

    Edward Hoagland: His fourth novel, Seven Rivers West (1986), tells of the cultural collision between white railroad builders and Indians in western Canada during the 1880s. He also published the short-story collections City Tales (1986) and The Final Fate of the Alligators (1992).

  • Seven Rules of Hillel (teachings of Hillel)

    Hillel: …came to be called the Seven Rules of Hillel.

  • Seven Sacraments (painting by Weyden)

    Rogier van der Weyden: John altarpiece and the Seven Sacraments triptych, executed between 1451 and 1455, shortly after Rogier’s return north, his characteristic austerity is tempered by his recollection of the more robust Italian styles; and, in both, the panels are unified from a single point of view. Despite this enrichment, however, Rogier’s…

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