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  • Shanghai (motion picture [2010])

    Chow Yun-Fat: …and in the espionage noir Shanghai (2010), set in the Shanghai underworld of the 1940s. In Jian dang wei ye (2011; Beginning of the Great Revival), which dramatized the events leading to the founding of the Chinese Communist Party, Chow took on the role of political leader Yuan Shikai. His…

  • Shanghai (China)

    Shanghai, city and province-level shi (municipality), east-central China. It is one of the world’s largest seaports and a major industrial and commercial centre of China. The city is located on the coast of the East China Sea between the mouth of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) to the north and the

  • Shanghai (language)

    Chinese languages: Shanghai dialect: The Shanghai dialect belongs to Wu. The use of only two tones or registers (high and low) is prevalent; these are related in an automatic way to the initial consonant type (voiceless and voiced).

  • Shanghai Art School (school, Shanghai, China)

    Chinese painting: Painting and printmaking: …academy, later to become the Shanghai Art School, was founded in the year of the revolution, 1911, by the 16-year-old Liu Haisu. In the next decade he would pioneer the first public exhibitions (1913) and the use of live models, first clothed and then nude, in the classroom.

  • Shanghai Bowuguan (museum, Shanghai, China)

    Shanghai Museum, museum in Shanghai founded in 1952 that contains some 120,000 objects, considered one of the finest collections of art in China. In 1996 the museum was relocated to the People’s Square in the city centre and was reopened. The new building was designed to symbolize the ancient

  • Shanghai Commune (Chinese history)

    Mao Zedong: The Cultural Revolution: …immediately after setting up the Shanghai Commune, Mao asserted that the demand for the abolition of “heads” (leaders), which had been heard in their city, was “extreme anarchism” and “most reactionary”; in fact, he stated, there would “always be heads.” Communes, he added, were “too weak when it came to…

  • Shanghai dialect (language)

    Chinese languages: Shanghai dialect: The Shanghai dialect belongs to Wu. The use of only two tones or registers (high and low) is prevalent; these are related in an automatic way to the initial consonant type (voiceless and voiced).

  • Shanghai Expo, The

    On May 1, 2010, the Expo 2010 Shanghai China opened to the public after eight years of preparation and some $50 billion in expenditures. By the time the event closed on October 31, China’s first international exposition, or world’s fair, was believed to have attracted a record 73 million visitors,

  • Shanghai Express (film by Sternberg [1932])

    Marlene Dietrich: (1930), Dishonored (1931), Shanghai Express (1932), Blonde Venus (1932), The Scarlet Empress (1934), and The Devil Is a Woman (1935). She showed a lighter side in Desire (1936), directed by Frank Borzage, and Destry Rides Again (1939).

  • Shanghai General Labour Union

    China: Expulsion of communists from the KMT: …the communists and suppress the Shanghai General Labour Union. On April 12–13, gangsters and troops bloodily suppressed the guards of the General Labour Union, arrested many communists, and executed large numbers. Similar suppressions were carried out in Guangzhou, Nanjing, Nanchang, Fuzhou, and other cities under military forces that accepted Chiang’s…

  • Shanghai Media Group (Chinese conglomerate)

    Li Ruigang: …president of the state-owned conglomerate Shanghai Media Group (SMG).

  • Shanghai Museum (museum, Shanghai, China)

    Shanghai Museum, museum in Shanghai founded in 1952 that contains some 120,000 objects, considered one of the finest collections of art in China. In 1996 the museum was relocated to the People’s Square in the city centre and was reopened. The new building was designed to symbolize the ancient

  • Shanghai Sharks (Chinese basketball team)

    Yao Ming: In 1997 he joined the Shanghai Sharks of the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA). By the time he led the Chinese team to a respectable 10th-place finish at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Yao had become a national icon.

  • Shanghai Surprise (film by Goddard [1986])

    Sean Penn: …the couple had costarred in Shanghai Surprise (1986), a film reviled by most critics.

  • Shanghai World Financial Center (building, Shanghai, China)

    Shanghai World Financial Center, mixed-use skyscraper in Shanghai, China, that is one of the tallest buildings in the world. The tower is located in the Pudong district of the city, adjacent to the 88-story Jin Mao Tower. Designed by the American architectural firm of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

  • Shanghai wuyanxia (play by Xia Yan)

    Xia Yan: …courtesan, and Shanghai wuyanxia (1937; Under Shanghai Eaves), a naturalistic depiction of tenement life that became a standard leftist work. After the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War, Xia worked as a journalist while continuing his creative writing. He published Faxisi-xijun (“The Fascist Bacillus”) in 1942 and Tianya-fangcao (“Fragrant Flowers on…

  • Shanghvi, Dilip (Indian business executive)

    Dilip Shanghvi, Indian business executive who was the founder (1983) of Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. The son of a wholesale drug distributor, Shanghvi launched Sun Pharma soon after graduating (1982) from the University of Calcutta with a bachelor’s degree in commerce. He assumed the post of

  • Shanghvi, Dilip Shantilal (Indian business executive)

    Dilip Shanghvi, Indian business executive who was the founder (1983) of Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. The son of a wholesale drug distributor, Shanghvi launched Sun Pharma soon after graduating (1982) from the University of Calcutta with a bachelor’s degree in commerce. He assumed the post of

  • Shangjun shu (Chinese book)

    Shang Yang: The work Shangjun shu (“Book of the Lord of Shang”) probably contains writings and ideas of Shang Yang, although the exact authorship of the book is in doubt. It is one of the major works of the highly pragmatic and authoritarian Legalist school of Chinese philosophy.

  • Shangluo (China)

    Shangluo, city, southeastern Shaansi sheng (province), China. It is situated some 70 miles (110 km) southeast of Xi’an (Sian) at the southern end of one of the few passes across the Qin (Tsinling) Mountains, on the headwaters of the Dan River, which is a tributary of the Han River. Since ancient

  • Shango (Yoruba deity)

    Shango, major deity of the religion of the Yoruba of southwestern Nigeria. He also figures in the religion of the Edo people of southeastern Nigeria, who refer to him as Esango, and in the religion of the Fon people of Benin, who call him Sogbo or Ebioso. Like all of the Yoruba gods (orishas),

  • Shangqing (Daoism)

    Shangqing, (Chinese: “Highest Purity” or “Supreme Clarity”) important early sectarian movement associated with the emergence of Daoism during the southern Six Dynasties period (220–589 ce). The origins of the sect go back to the revelations made to Yang Xi in the 4th century, which were gathered

  • Shangqiu (China)

    Shangqiu, city, eastern Henan sheng (province), east-central China. Situated in the middle of the North China Plain, it lies at the junction of the north-south route from Jinan in Shandong province to the central section of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) and the routes from Zhengzhou and

  • Shangrao (China)

    Shangrao, city, northeastern Jiangxi sheng (province), southeastern China. It lies along the Xin River, about 110 miles (180 km) east of Nanchang, the provincial capital, and is on the main rail and highway route from Nanchang to the coastal ports of Hangzhou and Shanghai. Shangrao has been an

  • Shangri-La (presidential retreat, Maryland, United States)

    Camp David, rural retreat of U.S. presidents in Catoctin Mountain Park, a unit of the National Park Service on a spur of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Frederick county, northern Maryland, U.S. Camp David lies just west of Thurmont and 64 miles (103 km) northwest of Washington, D.C. The retreat, which

  • Shangri-Las, the (American musical group)

    The Shangri-Las, American girl group whose string of hits in the mid-1960s included the bad-boy anthem “Leader of the Pack” (1964). The group was formed in 1963 by two pairs of sisters: Mary Weiss(b. 1946, Queens, New York, U.S.) and Betty Weiss (byname of Elizabeth Weiss;b. 1948, Queens) and twi

  • Shangshu (Chinese historical text)

    Shujing, (Chinese: “Classic of History”) one of the Five Classics (Wujing) of Chinese antiquity. The Shujing is a compilation of documentary records related to events in China’s ancient history. Though it has been demonstrated that certain chapters are forgeries, the authentic parts constitute the

  • Shangu Daoren (Chinese poet and calligrapher)

    Huang Tingjian, Chinese poet and calligrapher esteemed as the founder of the Jiangxi school of poetry. Born into a family of poets, Huang Tingjian was educated in the Confucian classics, history, and literature, and he received the jinshi (“advanced scholar”) degree in 1067. He passed the

  • Shangzhou (China)

    Shangluo, city, southeastern Shaansi sheng (province), China. It is situated some 70 miles (110 km) southeast of Xi’an (Sian) at the southern end of one of the few passes across the Qin (Tsinling) Mountains, on the headwaters of the Dan River, which is a tributary of the Han River. Since ancient

  • Shanhai (mountain pass, China)

    Beijing: City site: …of Beijing), Gubei (northeast), and Shanhai (east in Hebei, on the Bo Hai)—and are so situated that all roads leading from Mongolia and the Northeast to the North China Plain are bound to converge on Beijing. For centuries, therefore, Beijing was an important terminus of the caravan routes leading to…

  • Shanhaiguan (former town, Qinhuangdao, China)

    Shanhaiguan, former town, eastern Hebei sheng (province), northeastern China. It lies on the coast of the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli) just northeast of Qinhuangdao, into which it was incorporated in 1954. Until the 17th century the area was a strategic site that played a major role in the defense of

  • Shanhaijing (Chinese classic)

    fenghuang: …the first chapter of the Shanhaijing (3rd century bce–1st century ce; “The Classic of Mountains and Rivers”), the fenghuang appears to be a symbol of Confucian values, wearing the characters meaning virtue, duty, ritual, compassion, and trust on various parts of its body. If seen, it is a sign of…

  • Shania Twain (album by Twain)

    Shania Twain: Her first album, Shania Twain, sold only 100,000 copies, but her talent caught the eye of another producer, Robert John (“Mutt”) Lange, who had a highly successful career producing albums for Def Leppard, Bryan Adams, and Michael Bolton. Twain and Lange, who immediately began writing songs together, also…

  • Shanidar (anthropological and archaeological site, Iraq)

    Shanidar, site of paleoanthropological excavations in the Zagros Mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan. Two clusters of human fossils discovered at the Shanidar cave between 1953 and 1960 provide information on the geographic range of Neanderthals and on their relationship to earlier archaic humans. The

  • Shanidar remains (human fossils)

    Shanidar: Two clusters of human fossils discovered at the Shanidar cave between 1953 and 1960 provide information on the geographic range of Neanderthals and on their relationship to earlier archaic humans.

  • Shaniwar teli (people)

    Bene Israel, (Hebrew: “Sons of Israel”) the largest and oldest of several groups of Jews of India. Believed by tradition to have shipwrecked on the Konkan coast of western India more than 2,100 years ago, they were absorbed into Indian society, maintaining many Jewish observances while operating

  • Shank’s Mare (story by Jippensha)

    Japan: The maturity of Edo culture: …his Tōkai dōchu hizakurige (1802–22; Shank’s Mare), a humorous and bawdy tale of adventures on the Tōkaidō. In contrast, Bakin’s lengthy Nansō Satomi hakkenden (1814–42; “Satomi and the Eight Dogs”) is a didactic tale about the attempt to restore the fortunes of a warrior house.

  • Shank, Bud (American musician)

    Bud Shank, (Clifford Everett Shank, Jr.), American musician (born May 27, 1926, Dayton, Ohio—died April 2, 2009, Tucson, Ariz.), was a leading figure in 1950s West Coast jazz as an alto saxophonist with a bright, singing sound and as a pioneering modern-jazz flutist. Shank played (1950–52) in Stan

  • Shank, Clifford Everett, Jr. (American musician)

    Bud Shank, (Clifford Everett Shank, Jr.), American musician (born May 27, 1926, Dayton, Ohio—died April 2, 2009, Tucson, Ariz.), was a leading figure in 1950s West Coast jazz as an alto saxophonist with a bright, singing sound and as a pioneering modern-jazz flutist. Shank played (1950–52) in Stan

  • Shankar Chowdhury, Ravindra (Indian musician and composer)

    Ravi Shankar, Indian musician, player of the sitar, composer, and founder of the National Orchestra of India, who was influential in stimulating Western appreciation of Indian music. Born into a Bengali Brahman (highest social class in Hindu tradition) family, Shankar spent most of his youth

  • Shankar’s Weekly (Indian magazine)

    O.V. Vijayan: Initially he joined Shankar’s Weekly (1948–75), a magazine founded by the legendary political cartoonist P. Shankar Pillai. Subsequently, Vijayan became a staff cartoonist at the The Patriot. He also worked as a journalist with the The Hindu and the The Statesman.

  • Shankar, Ananda (Indian musician)

    Ananda Shankar, Indian musician and composer who was best known for his successful fusion of classical Indian music with Western rock and for the Ananda Shankar Centre for Performing Arts based in Calcutta; he was the son of famed dancer and choreographer Uday Shankar and the nephew of renowned

  • Shankar, Anoushka (Indian musician)

    South Asian arts: Interaction with Western music: …he and his daughter, sitarist Anoushka Shankar, performed these compositions to wide international acclaim in the early 21st century. Anoushka, moreover, worked to strengthen the bridge between the classical and popular traditions of India and the West through touring and performing with such bands as the art rock group Jethro…

  • Shankar, Ravi (Indian musician and composer)

    Ravi Shankar, Indian musician, player of the sitar, composer, and founder of the National Orchestra of India, who was influential in stimulating Western appreciation of Indian music. Born into a Bengali Brahman (highest social class in Hindu tradition) family, Shankar spent most of his youth

  • Shankar, Uday (Indian dancer)

    Uday Shankar, major dancer and choreographer of India whose adaptation of Western theatrical techniques to traditional Hindu dance popularized the ancient art form in India, Europe, and the United States. Shankar began formal art training in Bombay in 1917 and two years later studied at the Royal

  • Shankara (Indian philosopher)

    Shankara, philosopher and theologian, most renowned exponent of the Advaita Vedanta school of philosophy, from whose doctrines the main currents of modern Indian thought are derived. He wrote commentaries on the Brahma-sutra, the principal Upanishads, and the Bhagavadgita, affirming his belief in

  • Shankara Mishra (Indian philosopher)

    Indian philosophy: The new school: …of the Aloka gloss), and Shankara Mishra (author of Upaskara); and the Navadvipa school, whose chief representatives were Vasudeva Sarvabhauma (1450–1525), Raghunatha Shiromani (c. 1475–c. 1550), Mathuranatha Tarkavagisha (flourished c. 1570), Jagadisha Tarkalankara (flourished c.

  • Shankaracharya (Indian philosopher)

    Shankara, philosopher and theologian, most renowned exponent of the Advaita Vedanta school of philosophy, from whose doctrines the main currents of modern Indian thought are derived. He wrote commentaries on the Brahma-sutra, the principal Upanishads, and the Bhagavadgita, affirming his belief in

  • Shanker, Albert (American labour leader)

    Albert Shanker, American union official best remembered as the leader of New York City’s United Federation of Teachers in 1968 during a bitter series of strikes over decentralization that became racially and religiously divisive; later, as president of the American Federation of Teachers, he was

  • Shankly, Bill (Scottish football player and manager)

    Liverpool FC: Two managers, Bill Shankly (1959–74) and Bob Paisley (1974–83), were responsible for much of Liverpool’s success. Shankly took Liverpool from the English second division to win three English top-division league titles (1963–64, 1965–66, and 1972–73), as well as a Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Cup victory…

  • Shankman, Elizabeth Stern (Canadian pathologist)

    Elizabeth Stern, Canadian-born American pathologist, noted for her work on the stages of a cell’s progression from a normal to a cancerous state. Stern received a medical degree from the University of Toronto in 1939 and the following year went to the United States, where she became a naturalized

  • Shanks (film by Castle [1974])

    William Castle: King of the Gimmick: …directing for his final film, Shanks. The gruesome production featured Marcel Marceau as a puppeteer who uses dead bodies instead of marionettes.

  • Shanksville (borough, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Shanksville, borough, Somerset county, southwestern Pennsylvania. It lies on the Stonycreek River in the Laurel Highlands of the Allegheny Mountains about 17 miles (27 km) south of Johnstown. It is best known for its proximity to the site of the crash of United Airlines flight 93, one of the planes

  • Shanley, John Patrick (American author)
  • Shannon (Ireland)

    Ireland: Air facilities: …airports are located at Dublin, Shannon, and Cork, and there are several regional airports. Dublin Airport Authority, a public limited-liability company, has responsibility for the operation, management, and development of the three major international airports. Shannon was the world’s first duty-free airport; a state-sponsored company offers substantial tax breaks and…

  • Shannon’s entropy (information theory)

    information theory: Entropy: …determines a limit, known as Shannon’s entropy, on the best average (that is, the shortest) attainable encoding scheme. The theoretical best encoding scheme can be attained only in special circumstances. Finally, an encoding scheme can be found as close to the theoretical best as desired, although its use may be…

  • Shannon, Charles (American painter and teacher)

    Bill Traylor: Charles Shannon, a young white artist, discovered Traylor drawing on Monroe Street in 1939. Immediately taken with his work, Shannon bought some drawings and began supplying Traylor with materials. In 1940 he arranged to exhibit about 100 of Traylor’s works at the New South Gallery…

  • Shannon, Claude (American engineer)

    Claude Shannon, American mathematician and electrical engineer who laid the theoretical foundations for digital circuits and information theory, a mathematical communication model. After graduating from the University of Michigan in 1936 with bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and electrical

  • Shannon, Claude Elwood (American engineer)

    Claude Shannon, American mathematician and electrical engineer who laid the theoretical foundations for digital circuits and information theory, a mathematical communication model. After graduating from the University of Michigan in 1936 with bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and electrical

  • Shannon, Del (American musician)

    Del Shannon, American singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was one of the first white rock and rollers to write his own songs. He is best known for the pop music classic “Runaway” (1961). After playing in bands as a teenager in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Shannon released his first single, “Runaway,”

  • Shannon, River (river, Ireland)

    River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, rising in northwestern County Cavan and flowing for about 161 miles (259 km) in a southerly direction to enter the Atlantic Ocean via a 70-mile (113-kilometre) estuary below Limerick city. It drains an area of 6,060 square miles (15,695 square km). As

  • Shannon, Scott (American disc jockey)

    Scott Shannon: An avid fan and student of Top 40 radio since childhood, Michael Moore fashioned his on-air name, Scott Shannon, as a tribute to two of his favourite announcers, Scott Muni and Tom Shannon. Beginning at a station in Mobile, Alabama, in 1969, he became the…

  • Shannon-Weaver information theory (mathematics)

    information science: …post-World War II developments: the Shannon-Weaver information theory model, Norbert Wiener’s conception of the science of cybernetics, and rapid advances in the design and production of electronic computers. These innovations pointed to a new field of study in which many disciplines could be merged under the unifying idea of “information.”…

  • Shansabani (people)

    India: The Delhi sultanate: …of Ghazna by the rival Shansabānīs of Ghūr in 1150–51. The Ghūrids, who inhabited the region between Ghazna and Herāt, rose rapidly in power during the last half of the 12th century, partly because of the changing balance of power that resulted from the westward movement of the non-Muslim Qara…

  • shanshu (Chinese literature)

    Shanshu, (Chinese: “morality books”; literally “good books”) in Chinese religion, popular texts devoted to a moral accounting of actions leading to positive and negative merit. These works often combine traditional Confucian notions of filial piety (xiao) and reciprocity, Daoist ideas of taking no

  • shanshui (Chinese poetry)

    Tao Qian: …(as opposed to the then-fashionable shanshui [“mountains and rivers”] poetry). Essentially a Daoist in his philosophical outlook on life and death, he also freely adopted the elements of Confucianism and Buddhism that most appealed to him.

  • shanshui city (architecture)

    Ma Yansong: …whose designs reflected his “Shanshui City” concept, which called for balancing the natural environment, the urban landscape, and society in new ways through architecture.

  • Shansi (province, China)

    Shanxi, sheng (province) of northern China. Roughly rectangular in shape, Shanxi is bounded by the provinces of Hebei to the east, Henan to the south and southeast, and Shaanxi to the west and by the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to the north. The name Shanxi (“West of the Mountains”—i.e., west

  • Shansi Graben (graben, China)

    mountain: The Himalayan chain: …Zone in Siberia and the Shansi Graben in northern China seem to have resulted from the east-southeastward extrusion of material out of India’s path. Moreover, crustal thickening in the Tibetan Plateau has ceased, and now east–west extension of the plateau contributes to the eastward extrusion. The plateau is laced with…

  • Shanti Parvan (Indian epic)

    Indian philosophy: Early theories of kingship and state: In the Shanti Parvan (“Book of Consolation,” 12th book) of the Mahabharata, there is also a notable account of the origin of kingship and of rajadharma, or the dharma (law) of the king as king. Bhishma, who is discoursing, refers with approval to two different theories of…

  • Shantiniketan (former town, India)

    Shantiniketan, former town, north-central West Bengal state, northeastern India. It is now part of the town of Bolpur. Shantiniketan (Sanskrit: “The Abode of Peace”) began as Shantiniketan Ashram, a meditation centre founded and endowed in 1863 by Maharishi Debendranath, the father of the

  • Shantipur (India)

    Santipur, city, eastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies just north of the Hugli (Hooghly) River about 55 miles (90 km) north of Kolkata (Calcutta). Santipur was the centre of large factories (trading stations) under the British East India Company, and Santipur handwoven muslins had a

  • Shantou (China)

    Shantou, city in eastern Guangdong sheng (province), southern China. It lies on the coast of the South China Sea a short distance west of the mouth of the Han River, which, with its tributary, the Mei River, drains most of eastern Guangdong. The Han forms a delta, and Shantou is on an inlet that

  • Shantou wares (pottery)

    Shantou wares, various types of porcelain produced mostly in Fujian province, southeastern China, during the 16th and 17th centuries. Most pieces were exported to Japan, Southeast Asia, India, and the Middle East; some went to the European market. At one time it was believed that this porcelain was

  • Shantung (province, China)

    Shandong, northern coastal sheng (province) of China, lying across the Yellow Sea from the Korean peninsula. Shandong is China’s second most populous province, its population exceeded only by that of Henan. The name Shandong, which means “East of Mountains,” was first officially used during the Jin

  • Shantung Hills (region, China)

    China: The Shandong Hills: These hills are basically composed of extremely ancient crystalline shales and granites of early Precambrian age (i.e., older than about 2.5 billion years) and of somewhat younger sedimentary rocks dating to about 540–420 million years ago. Faults have played a major role in…

  • Shantungosaurus (dinosaur)

    ornithopod: …into the hadrosaurines, such as Shantungosaurus, and the lambeosaurines, including Parasaurolophus and Lambeosaurus, which sported strange bony crests on their skulls. Hadrosaurs commonly reached lengths of 9–11 metres and were among the most abundant dinosaurs in North America by the end of the Cretaceous Period. They are known to have…

  • shanty (music)

    Shanty, also spelled Chantey, or Chanty (from French chanter, “to sing”), English-language sailors’ work song dating from the days of sailing ships, when manipulating heavy sails, by means of ropes, from positions on the deck constituted a large part of a sailor’s work. The leader, or shantyman, c

  • shantyman (sailor)

    shanty: The leader, or shantyman, chosen for his seamanship rather than his musical talent, stood at the leading position on the rope, while the sailors crouched along the rope behind him. The shantyman would intone a line of a song and the group respond in chorus, heaving on the…

  • shantytown (settlement)

    Argentina: Housing: …substandard housing in tenements or shantytowns. More than two-fifths of homes in the city of Buenos Aires are rented. Apartments and condominiums account for three-fourths of homes in the capital but only about one-eighth of those in the surrounding suburbs. At least one-fifth of Argentines occupy substandard housing, lacking indoor…

  • Shantz, Homer L. (American botanist)

    biogeography: …of American botanists Forrest Shreve, Homer L. Shantz, Hugh M. Raup, and others.

  • Shanxi (province, China)

    Shanxi, sheng (province) of northern China. Roughly rectangular in shape, Shanxi is bounded by the provinces of Hebei to the east, Henan to the south and southeast, and Shaanxi to the west and by the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to the north. The name Shanxi (“West of the Mountains”—i.e., west

  • Shanxi Plateau (plateau, China)

    Henan: Relief: …steep eastern edge of the Shanxi Plateau, rising in places above 5,000 feet (1,524 metres). They are part of the Taihang fold system of Permian times (i.e., about 250 to 300 million years ago), have a general northeast-to-southwest trend, and mark the northern border of the province.

  • Shanxi University (university, Taiyuan, China)

    Shanxi: Government and society: Shanxi University, founded in Taiyuan by an English missionary in 1902, was one of the first in China to offer Western curricula in liberal arts, law, and medicine. Since 1949 technical schools for agriculture, mining, forestry, and machine technology have been established, as have universities,…

  • Shanyang Canal (canal, China)

    Grand Canal: …centuries has been called the Southern Grand Canal (Nan Yunhe). This ancient waterway was first constructed as early as the 4th century bce, was rebuilt in 607 ce, and has been used ever since.

  • Shao K’ang-chieh (Chinese philosopher)

    Shao Yong, Chinese philosopher who greatly influenced the development of the idealist school of Neo-Confucianism (see Confucianism). Shao Yong’s mathematical ideas also influenced the 18th-century European philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz in the development of a binary arithmetical

  • Shao Lin (monastery, China)

    tai chi chuan: …at the Buddhist monastery of Shao Lin were performing exercises emulating the five creatures: bear, bird, deer, monkey, and tiger. The snake was added later, and, by the early Ming dynasty (1368), the yin and yang principles had been added to harmonize the whole. An assimilation of these developments, the…

  • Shao Yao-fu (Chinese philosopher)

    Shao Yong, Chinese philosopher who greatly influenced the development of the idealist school of Neo-Confucianism (see Confucianism). Shao Yong’s mathematical ideas also influenced the 18th-century European philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz in the development of a binary arithmetical

  • Shao Yifu (Chinese entertainment mogul and philanthropist)

    Run Run Shaw, (Shao Yifu), Chinese entertainment mogul and philanthropist (born 1907, Ningbo, Zhejiang province, China—died Jan. 7, 2014, Hong Kong, China), in the 1960s and ’70s presided over East Asia’s largest movie studio, where he produced hundreds of popular movies and was credited with

  • Shao Yong (Chinese philosopher)

    Shao Yong, Chinese philosopher who greatly influenced the development of the idealist school of Neo-Confucianism (see Confucianism). Shao Yong’s mathematical ideas also influenced the 18th-century European philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz in the development of a binary arithmetical

  • Shao Yung (Chinese philosopher)

    Shao Yong, Chinese philosopher who greatly influenced the development of the idealist school of Neo-Confucianism (see Confucianism). Shao Yong’s mathematical ideas also influenced the 18th-century European philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz in the development of a binary arithmetical

  • Shao-hsing (China)

    Shaoxing, city, northeastern Zhejiang sheng (province), eastern China. It is situated in the centre of the eastern half of the coastal plain south of Hangzhou Bay. Shaoxing lies along the Hang-Yong Canal (the local section is also called the Zhedong Canal)—which joins Ningbo to the east with

  • Shao-kuan (China)

    Shaoguan, city, northern Guangdong sheng (province), southern China. It lies along the Bei River at the point where it is formed by the junction of the Wu River, flowing southeast from the borders of Hunan, and the Zhen River, flowing southwest from the borders of Jiangxi province. Shaoguan thus

  • Shao-wu (China)

    Shaowu, city in northwestern Fujian sheng (province), China. It is situated on the upper course of the Futun River, some 30 miles (50 km) from the border of Jiangxi province. Shaowu is an important communication centre, located on the railway line from Jiangxi to the coastal ports of Xiamen (Amoy)

  • Shao-yang (China)

    Shaoyang, city, central Hunan sheng (province), southeastern China. It lies in the middle basin of the Zi River. A county named Zhaoling was established at the site of Shaoyang in the 2nd century bce. In the mid-3rd century ce it became the seat of a commandery called Zhaoling. In 280 the name was

  • Shaoguan (China)

    Shaoguan, city, northern Guangdong sheng (province), southern China. It lies along the Bei River at the point where it is formed by the junction of the Wu River, flowing southeast from the borders of Hunan, and the Zhen River, flowing southwest from the borders of Jiangxi province. Shaoguan thus

  • Shaolin Si (film [1982])

    Jet Li: …debut in Shaolin Si (The Shaolin Temple) as a young man who learns martial arts from the monks at the famed Shaolin Temple (noted as the legendary birthplace of Chinese martial arts). Shaolin Si was an enormous hit (with two sequels) and was credited with reviving interest in the…

  • Shaolin Temple, The (film [1982])

    Jet Li: …debut in Shaolin Si (The Shaolin Temple) as a young man who learns martial arts from the monks at the famed Shaolin Temple (noted as the legendary birthplace of Chinese martial arts). Shaolin Si was an enormous hit (with two sequels) and was credited with reviving interest in the…

  • Shaomu (Chinese official)

    Lin Zexu, leading Chinese scholar and official of the Qing (Manchu) dynasty, known for his role in the events leading up to the first Opium War (1839–42) between Britain and China. He was a proponent of the revitalization of traditional Chinese thought and institutions, a movement that became known

  • Shaoshan Irrigation System (water project, China)

    Hunan: Drainage: One of these schemes—the Shaoshan Irrigation System—diverts some of the upper waters of the Lian Stream, thus irrigating the dry hill land, and also controls flooding in the river’s lower reaches; the irrigated area has been converted from single-crop to double-crop rice land.

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