You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • sheepshank (knot)

    knot: The sheepshank is a simple knot useful for temporarily shortening a rope. It is made by making a double loop in the rope and tying a half hitch at each end. It can be used to strengthen a rope at its weak point by placing the…

  • sheepshead (fish, Archosargus species)

    Sheepshead, (Archosargus probatocephalus), popular edible sport fish in the family Sparidae (order Perciformes), common in Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico waters of the southern North American coast. Although once prevalent in the New England to Chesapeake Bay area, the species has inexplicably become

  • sheepshead (fish)

    drum: …of the eastern Pacific; the freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens), a silvery, lake-and-river fish of the Americas; the kingfish, or whiting (Menticirrhus saxatilis), of the Atlantic, notable among drums in that it lacks an air bladder; and the sea drum, or black drum (Pogonias cromis), a gray or coppery red, western…

  • sheepskin (animal product)

    shoe: Materials: Sheepskin is used in linings and slippers. Reptile leathers (alligator, lizard, and snake) are used in women’s and some men’s shoes. Cordovan (a small muscle layer obtained from horsehide) is a heavy leather used in men’s shoes. Patent leather, usually made from cattle hide, is…

  • Sheer Heart Attack (album by Queen)

    Queen: …charts with its third album, Sheer Heart Attack (1974). A Night at the Opera (1975), one of pop music’s most expensive productions, sold even better. Defiantly eschewing the use of synthesizers, the band constructed a sound that was part English music hall, part Led Zeppelin, epitomized by the mock-operatic “Bohemian…

  • sheer hulk (engineering)

    shipyard: …a floating stage called a sheer hulk, where it received its masts and rigging. Modern ships also are launched incomplete.

  • Sheer Thursday (religious holiday)

    Maundy Thursday, the Thursday before Easter, observed in commemoration of Jesus Christ’s institution of the Eucharist during the Last Supper. The name is thought to be a Middle English derivation taken from a Latin anthem sung in Roman Catholic churches on that day: “Mandatum novum do vobis” (“a

  • Sheesh Mahal (Agra, India)

    Agra Fort: …its northeast is the splendid Palace of Mirrors (Sheesh Mahal), its walls and ceilings inlaid with thousands of small mirrors. The structure’s two dazzling chambers were probably used as baths and possibly as a boudoir by the queens.

  • sheet (mineralogy)

    amphibole: Crystal structure: …I beams and the mica sheets. Both structures contain a band of octahedrons sandwiched between two oppositely pointing chains of tetrahedrons. Combinations of these two basic structural units, or “modules,” can produce all other minerals in the layer silicate and chain silicate groups. The term biopyribole has been used to…

  • sheet (rigging)

    rigging: …lowered, and the tacks and sheets, which hold down the lower corners of the sails. The history of the development of rigging over the centuries is obscure, but the combination of square and fore-and-aft sails in the full-rigged ship created a highly complex, interdependent set of components.

  • sheet (metallurgy)

    materials science: Polymer-matrix composites: Sheet forming, used since the 19th century by metallurgists, is now applied to the processing of thermoplastic composites. In a typical thermoforming process, the sheet stock, or preform, is heated in an oven. At the forming temperature, the sheet is transferred into a forming system,…

  • sheet (geology)

    Sill, flat intrusion of igneous rock that forms between preexisting layers of rock. Sills occur in parallel to the bedding of the other rocks that enclose them, and, though they may have vertical to horizontal orientations, nearly horizontal sills are the most common. Sills may measure a fraction

  • sheet bend (knot)

    knot: The sheet bend, or weaver’s knot, is widely used by sailors for uniting two ropes of different sizes. The end of one rope is passed through a loop of the other, is passed around the loop, and under its own standing part. An ordinary fishnet is…

  • sheet erosion (geology)

    Sheet erosion, detachment of soil particles by raindrop impact and their removal downslope by water flowing overland as a sheet instead of in definite channels or rills. A more or less uniform layer of fine particles is removed from the entire surface of an area, sometimes resulting in an

  • sheet film (photography)

    technology of photography: Sheet film: View and studio cameras generally take sheet film—single sheets (typical sizes range between 212 × 312 and 8 × 10 inches) loaded in the darkroom into light-tight film holders for subsequent insertion in the camera.

  • sheet flow (geology)

    oceanic crust: Sheet flows have the appearance of wrinkled bed sheets. They commonly are thin (only about 10 cm [4 inches] thick) and cover a broader area than pillow lavas. There is evidence that sheet flows are erupted at higher temperatures than those of the pillow variety.…

  • sheet metal (metallurgy)

    materials science: Polymer-matrix composites: Sheet forming, used since the 19th century by metallurgists, is now applied to the processing of thermoplastic composites. In a typical thermoforming process, the sheet stock, or preform, is heated in an oven. At the forming temperature, the sheet is transferred into a forming system,…

  • Sheet Metal Donkey (airplane)

    Hugo Junkers: His J-1 Blechesel (“Sheet Metal Donkey”) monoplane was the first successful all-metal airplane (1915), and his F-13 was the first all-metal transport plane (1919). Many Junkers aircraft had a corrugated sheet-metal skin, which was copied by several American builders, including the Ford Motor Company. The Junkers…

  • sheet moss (plant)

    Sheet moss, (Hypnum curvifolium), a species of carpet moss (family Hypnaceae). The names sheet moss and carpet moss refer to the growth pattern of the plants, which often form large carpetlike mats on rocks or soil. This species is sometimes used by florists in constructing flower

  • sheet silicate (mineral)

    Phyllosilicate, compound with a structure in which silicate tetrahedrons (each consisting of a central silicon atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms at the corners of a tetrahedron) are arranged in sheets. Examples are talc and mica. Three of the oxygen atoms of each tetrahedron are shared with

  • sheet steel

    food preservation: Canning: 5 percent sheet steel with a thin coating of tin, soon became common. These cans had a double seamed top and bottom to provided an airtight seal and could be manufactured at high speeds.

  • sheet structure (mineralogy)

    clay mineral: Kaolin-serpentine group: …consists of tetrahedral and octahedral sheets in which the anions at the exposed surface of the octahedral sheet are hydroxyls (see Figure 4). The general structural formula may be expressed by Y2 - 3Z2O5(OH)4, where Y are cations in the octahedral sheet such as Al3+ and Fe3+ for dioctahedral species…

  • sheet-piled quay (construction)

    harbours and sea works: The sheet-piled quay: An extension of the piled jetty concept is a quay design based on steel sheetpiling, the design becoming increasingly popular with improvements in the detail and manufacture of the material. Steel sheetpiling consists in essence of a series of rolled trough sections…

  • sheet-web weaver (spider)

    Sheet-web weaver, (family Linyphiidae), a rather common group of small spiders (order Araneida) numbering about 2,000 species worldwide. Most are less than 6 mm (14 inch) in length and are seldom seen. Their webs are flat and sheetlike and dome- or cup-shaped. The spider is usually found on the

  • sheeted dike (geology)

    oceanic crust: …is a layer composed of feeder, or sheeted, dikes that measures more than 1 km (0.6 mile) thick. Dikes are fractures that serve as the plumbing system for transporting magmas (molten rock material) to the seafloor to produce lavas. They are about 1 metre (3 feet) wide, subvertical, and elongate…

  • sheetflood (geology)

    sheet erosion: …are moved downslope, commonly by sheetflooding. Broad sheets of rapidly flowing water filled with sediment present a potentially high erosive force. Generally produced by cloudbursts, sheetfloods are of brief duration, and they commonly move only short distances. On relatively rough surfaces, sheetflooding may give way to rill wash, in which…

  • sheetpiling

    harbours and sea works: Design: …quay design based on steel sheetpiling, the design becoming increasingly popular with improvements in the detail and manufacture of the material. Steel sheetpiling consists in essence of a series of rolled trough sections with interlocking grooves or guides, known as clutches, along each edge of the section. Each pile is…

  • sheetwash (geology)

    Sheet erosion, detachment of soil particles by raindrop impact and their removal downslope by water flowing overland as a sheet instead of in definite channels or rills. A more or less uniform layer of fine particles is removed from the entire surface of an area, sometimes resulting in an

  • Shefela, ha- (hills, Middle East)

    Palestine: Land: …km) wide, known as Ha-Shefela. The Judaean plateau falls abruptly to the Jordan Valley, which is approached with difficulty along the wadis Qelt and Muqalliq.

  • Sheffer stroke function (logic)

    history of logic: Gottfried Ploucquet: …the 20th century as the “Sheffer stroke” function (also known to Peirce) meaning “neither . . . nor.” The universal negative proposition, “No A’s are B’s,” would become “A > B” (or, convertibly, “B > A”). The equality sign was used to denote conceptual identity, as in Leibniz. Capital letters…

  • Sheffey, Asa Bundy (American poet)

    Robert Hayden, African American poet whose subject matter is most often the black experience. Hayden grew up in Detroit and attended Detroit City College (now Wayne State University; B.A., 1936). He joined the Federal Writers’ Project, researching black folklore and the history of the Underground

  • Sheffield (Alabama, United States)

    Sheffield, city, Colbert county, northwestern Alabama, U.S., about 65 miles (105 km) west of Huntsville. It lies on the south bank of the Tennessee River in the Muscle Shoals region and forms, with Florence, Tuscumbia, and the city of Muscle Shoals, a four-city metropolitan area. Sheffield began as

  • Sheffield (British ship)

    naval warfare: The age of the guided missile: …first against the destroyer HMS Sheffield (May 4) and then, after penetrating fleet defenses, the supply ship Atlantic Conveyor (May 25). Also, a land-to-sea missile struck and damaged the destroyer HMS Glamorgan (June 12), presaging more strikes from land in future maritime wars. Third, the British relearned lessons of damage…

  • Sheffield (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Sheffield: borough, metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, north-central England. Sheffield lies about 160 miles (260 km) northwest of London. The city and metropolitan borough lie within the historic county of Yorkshire, except for the area around Beighton and Mosborough, which belongs to the historic county of…

  • Sheffield (England, United Kingdom)

    Sheffield, town, city, and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, north-central England. Sheffield lies about 160 miles (260 km) northwest of London. The city and metropolitan borough lie within the historic county of Yorkshire, except for the area around Beighton and

  • Sheffield Football Association (British sports organization)

    football: The early years: …also gave birth to the Sheffield Football Association, the forerunner of later county associations. Sheffield and London clubs played two matches against each other in 1866, and a year later a match pitting a club from Middlesex against one from Kent and Surrey was played under the revised rules. In…

  • Sheffield plate (metalwork)

    Sheffield plate, in metalwork, articles made of copper coated with silver by fusion. The technique was discovered about 1742 by Thomas Boulsover, a Sheffield (Yorkshire, Eng.) cutler, who noted that the combination of fused silver and copper retained all the ductility possessed by both metals and

  • Sheffield Theatres (British theatrical organization)

    Michael Grandage: …named artistic director of the Sheffield Theatres. He quickly began to attract major names to this regional theatre complex; in 2001 Joseph Fiennes played the title role in Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II, and in 2002 Kenneth Branagh starred in William Shakespeare’s Richard III. Grandage continued working at Sheffield until 2005.…

  • Sheffield, John (British statesman and author)

    John Sheffield, 1st duke of Buckingham and Normanby, English statesman, patron of the poet John Dryden, and author of poetic essays in heroic couplets. The son of Edmund, 2nd earl of Mulgrave, he succeeded to the title on his father’s death in 1658. He served under Charles II and was a favourite

  • Shegarka River (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …below the confluence of the Shegarka River from the left. Successive tributaries along the northwesterly course, after the Chulym, include the Chaya and the Parabel (both left), the Ket (right), the Vasyugan (left), and the Tym and Vakh rivers (both right). Down to the Vasyugan confluence the river passes through

  • Shegui (Turkic leader)

    China: Foreign affairs under Yangdi: …however, Yangdi supported a rival, Shegui, who drove out Chuluo. The latter took service, with an army of 10,000 followers, at Yangdi’s court. When Sui power began to wane after 612, the western Turks under Shegui gradually replaced the Sui garrisons in Central Asia and established control over the states…

  • Shehada, Salah Mustafa (Palestinian militant)

    Salah Mustafa Shehada, Palestinian guerrilla leader (born 1953, Beit Hanoun, Gaza Strip—died July 22, 2002, Gaza City, Gaza Strip), was the commander of Izz al-Din al-Qassam, the military wing of the anti-Israeli Hamas (Islamic Resistance Movement). Shehada openly endorsed armed attacks and s

  • Sheherazade (literary character)

    The Thousand and One Nights: …vizier, however, has two daughters, Shahrazad (Scheherazade) and Dunyazad; and the elder, Shahrazad, having devised a scheme to save herself and others, insists that her father give her in marriage to the king. Each evening she tells a story, leaving it incomplete and promising to finish it the following night.…

  • Sheherazade (work by Rimsky-Korsakov)

    Scheherazade, orchestral suite by Russian composer Nicolay Rimsky-Korsakov that was inspired by the collection of largely Middle Eastern and Indian tales known as The Thousand and One Nights (or The Arabian Nights). Exemplary of the late 19th-century taste for program music—or, music with a story

  • shehita (Judaism)

    kosher: …slaughtered by ritual method of shehitah (see below); (3) that the meat has been salted to remove the blood (Deuteronomy 12:16, 23–25, and elsewhere) after the carcass has been critically examined for physical blemishes and that the ischiatic nerve has been removed from hindquarters (Genesis 32:32); and (4) that meat…

  • shehitah (Judaism)

    kosher: …slaughtered by ritual method of shehitah (see below); (3) that the meat has been salted to remove the blood (Deuteronomy 12:16, 23–25, and elsewhere) after the carcass has been critically examined for physical blemishes and that the ischiatic nerve has been removed from hindquarters (Genesis 32:32); and (4) that meat…

  • shehnai (musical instrument)

    Shehnai, double-reed conical oboe of North India. The shehnai is made of wood, except for a flaring metal bell attached to the bottom of the instrument, and measures about 12–20 inches (30–50 cm) in length, with six to eight keyless finger holes along its body. Possessing a two-octave range, the

  • Shehu Ahmadu Lobbo (Fulani Muslim leader)

    Shehu Ahmadu Lobbo, Fulani Muslim leader in western Africa who established a theocratic state in the Macina region of what is now Mali. Influenced by the teachings of the Islamic reformer Usman dan Fodio, he began a holy war (jihad) in 1818 or possibly as early as 1810. He defeated the forces of

  • Shehu Ahmadu Lobo (Fulani Muslim leader)

    Shehu Ahmadu Lobbo, Fulani Muslim leader in western Africa who established a theocratic state in the Macina region of what is now Mali. Influenced by the teachings of the Islamic reformer Usman dan Fodio, he began a holy war (jihad) in 1818 or possibly as early as 1810. He defeated the forces of

  • Shehu, Mehmet (Albanian politician)

    Mehmet Shehu, Albanian politician who served as interior minister (1948–54) and chairman of the Council of Ministers (premier) of Albania (1954–81). He was also Albania’s minister of defense from 1974 to 1980. In 1935, after graduating from Tirana Technical College, Shehu enrolled at a military

  • Shehuangdi (emperor of Xin dynasty)

    Wang Mang, founder of the short-lived Xin dynasty (ad 9–25). He is known in Chinese history as Shehuangdi (the “Usurper Emperor”), because his reign (ad 9–23) and that of his successor interrupted the Liu family’s succession of China’s Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220); as a result, the Han is typically

  • Shehuen (river, Argentina)

    Patagonia: Drainage and soils: …have intermittent streams—such as the Shehuen, Coig, and Gallegos rivers, which have their sources east of the Andes—or contain streams like the Deseado River, which completely dry up along all or part of their courses and are so altered by the combined effect of wind and sand as to afford…

  • sheh?nai (musical instrument)

    Shehnai, double-reed conical oboe of North India. The shehnai is made of wood, except for a flaring metal bell attached to the bottom of the instrument, and measures about 12–20 inches (30–50 cm) in length, with six to eight keyless finger holes along its body. Possessing a two-octave range, the

  • sheik (Arabic title)

    Sheikh, Arabic title of respect dating from pre-Islāmic antiquity; it strictly means a venerable man of more than 50 years of age. The title sheikh is especially borne by heads of religious orders, heads of colleges, such as Al-Azhar University in Cairo, chiefs of tribes, and headmen of villages

  • sheikh (Arabic title)

    Sheikh, Arabic title of respect dating from pre-Islāmic antiquity; it strictly means a venerable man of more than 50 years of age. The title sheikh is especially borne by heads of religious orders, heads of colleges, such as Al-Azhar University in Cairo, chiefs of tribes, and headmen of villages

  • Sheikh Abreiq (Israel)

    Bet She?arim, agricultural cooperative settlement (moshav) and archaeological site in northern Israel, near the western end of the Plain of Esdraelon. Ancient Bet She?arim (Hebrew: House [of the] Gates), about 3 mi (5 km) east-northeast of the modern settlement (founded in 1936), is frequently

  • Sheikh al-Akbar, Al- (Muslim mystic)

    Ibn al-?Arabī, celebrated Muslim mystic-philosopher who gave the esoteric, mystical dimension of Islamic thought its first full-fledged philosophic expression. His major works are the monumental Al-Futū?āt al-Makkiyyah (“The Meccan Revelations”) and Fu?ū? al-?ikam (1229; “The Bezels of Wisdom”).

  • Sheikh Mujib (president of Bangladesh)

    Mujibur Rahman, Bengali leader who became the first prime minister (1972–75) and later the president (1975) of Bangladesh. Mujib, the son of a middle-class landowner, studied law and political science at the Universities of Calcutta and Dacca (now Dhaka). Although jailed briefly as a teenager for

  • Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor (Malaysian orthopedic surgeon)

    Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor, Malaysian orthopedic surgeon who became the first Malaysian to go into space. Sheikh earned a degree in medicine and surgery at Kasturba Medical College in Manipal, India. He also earned an advanced degree in orthopedic surgery at University Kebangsaan, Kuala Lumpur,

  • Sheikh Zayed Road (street, Dubai, United Arab Emirates)

    Dubai: City site and layout: …a string of skyscrapers lining Sheikh Zayed Road. Notable among these are the Emirates Towers, which were built in the late 1990s and early 2000s and which house a hotel and government offices. Close to Sheikh Zayed Road is the Dubai International Financial Centre, housed in a futuristic arch-shaped building,…

  • Sheikh ?Ibade (historic site, Egypt)

    Antino?polis, Roman city in ancient Egypt, on the east bank of the Nile, 24 miles (38 km) south of modern al-Minyā in al-Minyā mu?āfa?ah (governorate) and 177 miles (285 km) south of Cairo. The earliest levels excavated date to the New Kingdom (1567–1085 bc). On the site of a Ramesside temple, the

  • Sheikh, Suraiya Jamal (Indian actress and singer)

    Suraiya, (Suraiya Jamal Sheikh), Indian actress and singer (born 1929, Lahore, India [now in Pakistan]—died Jan. 31, 2004, Mumbai [Bombay], India), captivated Bollywood movie audiences in the 1940s and early 1950s with her beauty and her melodious singing voice; she was one of the few Indian film a

  • Sheikhupura (Pakistan)

    Shekhupūra, city, Punjab province, eastern Pakistan. In the town centre stands a fort of the Mughal emperor Jahāngīr (completed 1619) that also served as the 19th-century residence of one of Ranjit Singh’s queens; outside the city, the massive Hiran Minar tower overlooks the countryside. Shekhupūra

  • Shein, Ali Mohamed (Tanzanian politician)

    Tanzania: Challenges into the 21st century: Ali Mohamed Shein of the CCM, won more than 90 percent of the votes. Several diplomats reiterated their earlier position that the October election should not have been annulled and rerun.

  • Sheindlin, Judy (American jurist and television personality)

    Judy Sheindlin, American jurist and television personality who was best known for the show Judge Judy (1996– ). Blum earned (1963) a Bachelor of Arts degree from American University, Washington, D.C. She was the only woman in her graduating class at New York Law School, New York City, when she

  • Sheinerman, Ariel (prime minister of Israel)

    Ariel Sharon, Israeli general and politician, whose public life was marked by brilliant but controversial military achievements and political policies. He was one of the chief participants in the Arab-Israeli wars and was elected prime minister of Israel in 2001, a position he held until he was

  • Sheinwoodian Stage (geology and stratigraphy)

    Sheinwoodian Stage, first of two stages of the Wenlock Series, encompassing all rocks deposited during the Sheinwoodian Age (433.4 million to 430.5 million years ago) of the Silurian Period. The International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) established the Global Stratotype Section and Point

  • sheitan (Islamic mythology)

    Shaitan, in Islāmic myth, an unbelieving class of jinn (“spirits”); it is also the name of Iblīs, the devil, when he is performing demonic acts. In the system of evil jinn outlined by the Arab writer al-Jā?i?, the shaitans are identified simply as unbelieving jinn. Folklore, however, describes t

  • Sheji (Chinese deity)

    Sheji, (Chinese: “Soil and Grain”) in ancient Chinese religion, a compound patron deity of the soil and harvests. China’s earliest legendary emperors are said to have worshipped She (Soil), for they alone had responsibility for the entire earth and country. This worship was meant to include the

  • Shejitan (historical altar, Beijing, China)

    Beijing: Recreation: …Beijing and encloses the former Altar of Earth and Harvests (Shejitan), where the emperors made offerings to the gods of earth and agriculture. The altar consists of a square terrace in the centre of the park. To the north of the altar is the Hall of Worship (Baidian), now the…

  • Shekau, Abubakar (Nigerian militant)

    Nigeria: Rise of Boko Haram: …the leadership of Yusuf’s deputy, Abubakar Shekau, and unleashed a campaign of violence in 2010 that continued in the following years.

  • shekel (unit of weight)

    measurement system: The Babylonians: The shekel, familiar from the Bible as a standard Hebrew coin and weight, was originally Babylonian. Most of the Babylonian weights and measures, carried in commerce throughout the Middle East, were gradually adopted by other countries. The basic Babylonian unit of length was the kus (about…

  • shekel (Israeli currency)

    Sheqel, monetary unit of Israel. The sheqel (plural: sheqalim) is divided into 100 agorot. Israel’s current monetary system, based on the New Israeli Sheqel (NIS), was established in 1985, when the old sheqel was replaced at a rate of 1,000 old sheqalim to 1 new sheqel (NIS 1). Israel has had

  • Shekhar, Chandra (prime minister of India)

    Chandra Shekhar, politician and legislator, who served as prime minister of India from November 1990 to June 1991. Shekhar was a leading member of the Socialist Party before he joined the ruling Congress Party in 1964. He was a member of India’s upper legislative chamber, the Rajya Sabha, from 1962

  • shekhari (Indian architecture)

    shikhara: … has two further variations: the shekhari and the bhumija. The shekhari consists of the central latina spires with one or more rows of half spires added on either side and miniature shikharas clustered along the base and corners. The shekhari was popular from the 10th century onward and can be…

  • Shekhem (ancient Canaanite city)

    Shechem, Canaanite city of ancient Palestine. Located near Nāblus, the two cities have been closely—though erroneously—linked for almost 2,000 years: both rabbinic and early Christian literature commonly equated Nāblus with ancient Shechem, and Nāblus has been called Shekhem in Hebrew to the

  • Shekhina (Judaism)

    Shekhina, (Hebrew: “Dwelling,” or “Presence”), in Jewish theology, the presence of God in the world. The designation was first used in the Aramaic form, shekinta, in the interpretive Aramaic translations of the Old Testament known as Targums, and it was frequently used in the Talmud, Midrash, and

  • Shekhinah (Judaism)

    Shekhina, (Hebrew: “Dwelling,” or “Presence”), in Jewish theology, the presence of God in the world. The designation was first used in the Aramaic form, shekinta, in the interpretive Aramaic translations of the Old Testament known as Targums, and it was frequently used in the Talmud, Midrash, and

  • Shekhna (Syria)

    Shubat Enlil, ancient city in northeastern Syria. Excavations of the mound at the site were begun by Harvey Weiss of Yale University in 1979. His work uncovered archaeological remains dating from about 5000 bc to 1726 bc, when the once-flourishing city was destroyed by Babylon. Shubat Enlil was the

  • Shekhupūra (Pakistan)

    Shekhupūra, city, Punjab province, eastern Pakistan. In the town centre stands a fort of the Mughal emperor Jahāngīr (completed 1619) that also served as the 19th-century residence of one of Ranjit Singh’s queens; outside the city, the massive Hiran Minar tower overlooks the countryside. Shekhupūra

  • Sheki (Azerbaijan)

    ??ki, city, north-central Azerbaijan. It is situated on the southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus Range. ??ki, one of the oldest cities in Azerbaijan, was a trading centre on the road to Dagestan. In the 18th and 19th centuries it served as the capital of the khanate of Sheki, which was ceded to

  • Shela, Battle of (East African history)

    eastern Africa: The Omani ascendancy: …defeated by Lamu in the battle of Shela, about 1810. Pate’s preeminence in the Lamu islands was destroyed, Mombasa’s authority on the coast was diminished, and the way was open to Muscat’s great intrusion into East African affairs. Lamu appealed to Oman for a garrison to assist it, to which…

  • Shelburne Essays (work by More)

    Paul Elmer More: …best known work is his Shelburne Essays, 11 vol. (1904–21), a collection of articles and reviews, most of which had appeared in The Nation and other periodicals. Also notable among More’s writings are Platonism (1917); The Religion of Plato (1921); Hellenistic Philosophies (1923); New Shelburne Essays (1928–36); and his biography…

  • Shelburne Museum (museum, Shelburne, Vermont, United States)

    Burlington: Shelburne Museum (1947), a 45-acre (18-hectare) reconstruction of early American life that includes numerous historic buildings and a side-wheel steamship, is 7 miles (11 km) south. Burlington was the home (1787–89) of Ethan Allen, the American Revolutionary War hero, and is the site of his…

  • Shelburne, William Petty-Fitzmaurice, 2nd Earl of (prime minister of Great Britain)

    William Petty-Fitzmaurice, 1st marquess of Lansdowne, British statesman and prime minister (July 1782 to April 1783) during the reign of George III. The son of John Fitzmaurice, who took the additional name of Petty on succeeding to the Irish estates of his uncle and who was created earl of

  • Shelby (North Carolina, United States)

    Shelby, city, seat (1842) of Cleveland county, in the Piedmont region of southwestern North Carolina, U.S., about 40 miles (65 km) west of Charlotte. The area was originally inhabited by Catawba and Cherokee peoples and was settled after 1760. The city was chartered in 1843 and named for Colonel

  • Shelby County v. Holder (law case)

    Shelby County v. Holder, legal case, decided on June 25, 2013, in which the U.S. Supreme Court declared (5–4) unconstitutional Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) of 1965, which set forth a formula for determining which jurisdictions were required (under Section 5 of the act) to seek federal

  • Shelby, Carroll (American race-car driver and builder)

    Carroll Hall Shelby, American race-car driver and builder (born Jan. 11, 1923, Leesburg, Texas—died May 10, 2012, Dallas, Texas), was the visionary designer of innovative high-performance racing cars, notably the Shelby Cobra and the Ford GT40 (which captured two Le Mans Grand Prix d’Endurance

  • Shelby, Carroll Hall (American race-car driver and builder)

    Carroll Hall Shelby, American race-car driver and builder (born Jan. 11, 1923, Leesburg, Texas—died May 10, 2012, Dallas, Texas), was the visionary designer of innovative high-performance racing cars, notably the Shelby Cobra and the Ford GT40 (which captured two Le Mans Grand Prix d’Endurance

  • Shelby, James (American governor)

    Kentucky: Exploration and settlement: Isaac Shelby was appointed governor, and a committee was appointed to select a permanent site for the capital. Frankfort was chosen, and the General Assembly met for the first time on Nov. 1, 1793.

  • Shelby, Richard (United States senator)

    Richard Shelby, American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1986 and began representing Alabama the following year; in 1994 he joined the Republican Party. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1979–87). Shelby attended the University of Alabama

  • Shelby, Richard Craig (United States senator)

    Richard Shelby, American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1986 and began representing Alabama the following year; in 1994 he joined the Republican Party. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1979–87). Shelby attended the University of Alabama

  • Shelby, Susan (American diarist)

    Susan Shelby Magoffin, American diarist who was the first woman to write an account of traveling the Santa Fe Trail. Magoffin’s journal, written in 1846–47, describes trade on the trail at its high point and records important details of the Mexican-American War. Susan Shelby was born into a wealthy

  • Shelbyville (Tennessee, United States)

    Shelbyville, city, seat (1809) of Bedford county, south-central Tennessee, U.S. It lies along the Duck River, some 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Nashville. Laid out as the county seat in 1809, it was named for Colonel Isaac Shelby, the American Revolutionary War leader of a force of riflemen

  • Shelbyville (Indiana, United States)

    Shelbyville, city, seat (1822) of Shelby county, central Indiana, U.S. It lies along the forks of the Big Blue and Little Blue rivers, 23 miles (37 km) southeast of Indianapolis. Laid out in 1822 as the county seat, it was named for Isaac Shelby, American Revolutionary War hero and the first

  • sheldgeese (bird)

    Sheldgoose, any of the larger members of the duck tribe Tadornini, family Anatidae (order Anseriformes). The smaller members of the tribe are called shelducks. Sheldgeese inhabit tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. They are small-billed and rather long-legged, with upright stance; some have

  • sheldgoose (bird)

    Sheldgoose, any of the larger members of the duck tribe Tadornini, family Anatidae (order Anseriformes). The smaller members of the tribe are called shelducks. Sheldgeese inhabit tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. They are small-billed and rather long-legged, with upright stance; some have

  • Sheldon, Alice Bradley (American author)

    James Tiptree, Jr., American science fiction author known for her disturbing short stories about love, death, gender, and human and alien nature. When Alice Bradley was six years old, she and her parents traveled to the Belgian Congo (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) on an expedition with

  • Sheldon, Charles Monroe (American writer)

    Charles Monroe Sheldon, American preacher and inspirational writer famous as the author of the best-selling novel In His Steps. Sheldon was educated at Brown University and Andover Theological Seminary. In 1889 he founded the Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kan. He read series of his

  • Sheldon, Edward Austin (American educator)

    Oswego Movement: It was led by Edward Austin Sheldon, who was instrumental in bringing the ideas of Swiss educator Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi into U.S. education through the development of the object method, which Sheldon introduced in Oswego, New York. The normal school associated with that method, founded in 1861, evolved into…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载