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  • Shen Gua (Chinese astronomer, mathematician and official)

    Shen Kuo, Chinese astronomer, mathematician, and high official whose famous work Mengxi bitan (“Brush Talks from Dream Brook” [Dream Brook was the name of his estate in Jingkou]) contains the first reference to the magnetic compass, the first description of movable type, and a fairly accurate

  • Shen K’uo (Chinese astronomer, mathematician and official)

    Shen Kuo, Chinese astronomer, mathematician, and high official whose famous work Mengxi bitan (“Brush Talks from Dream Brook” [Dream Brook was the name of his estate in Jingkou]) contains the first reference to the magnetic compass, the first description of movable type, and a fairly accurate

  • Shen Kuo (Chinese astronomer, mathematician and official)

    Shen Kuo, Chinese astronomer, mathematician, and high official whose famous work Mengxi bitan (“Brush Talks from Dream Brook” [Dream Brook was the name of his estate in Jingkou]) contains the first reference to the magnetic compass, the first description of movable type, and a fairly accurate

  • Shen Nung (Chinese mythological emperor)

    Shennong, (Chinese: “Divine Husbandman”) in Chinese mythology, second of the mythical emperors, said to have been born in the 28th century bce with the head of a bull and the body of a man. By inventing the cart and plow, by taming the ox and yoking the horse, and by teaching his people to clear

  • Shen Ts’ung-wen (Chinese author)

    Shen Congwen, author of fiction and prose who is commonly considered the greatest lyric novelist in modern China. Shen was a member of the Miao ethnic minority. At age 16 he joined a regiment in Yuanling, where he spent the next few years adding to his scanty education and observing the border

  • Shen Tsung (emperor of Song dynasty)

    Shenzong, temple name (miaohao) of the sixth emperor (reigned 1067–85) of the Song dynasty (960–1279) of China. During his reign some of the greatest intellectual and cultural figures of the era flourished, among them Ouyang Xiu and Su Dongpo. Under the Shenzong emperor, the radical reformer Wang

  • Shen Tuan-hsien (Chinese author)

    Xia Yan, Chinese writer, journalist, and playwright known for his leftist plays and films. Xia was sent to study in Japan in 1920, and, after his forced return to China in 1927, he joined the Chinese Communist Party. In 1929 he founded the Shanghai Art Theatre, was the first to call for a “drama of

  • Shen Xue (Chinese skater)

    Olympic Games: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 2010: China’s Shen Xue and Zhao Hongbo took first place in pairs to give the country its first gold in figure skating. Canadians Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir surprisingly triumphed in the ice dancing event, becoming not only the first non-Europeans to win the Olympic ice dancing…

  • Shen Yanbing (Chinese author)

    Mao Dun, Chinese literary critic and author, generally considered republican China’s greatest realist novelist. Forced to interrupt his schooling in 1916 because he ran out of money, Shen Yanbing became a proofreader at the Commercial Press in Shanghai, the most important publishing house of the

  • Shen Yazhi (Chinese writer)

    Chinese literature: Prose: …romances were Han Yu’s pupil Shen Yazhi and Bai Xingjian, younger brother of the poet Bai Juyi. These prose romances, generally short, were written in the classical prose style for the amusement of the literati and did not reach the masses until some of the popular ones were adapted by…

  • Shen Yue (Chinese linguist)

    Nanjing: The early empires: …and the invention (reportedly by Shen Yue, a 6th-century courtier) of the system of determining the four tones of the Chinese language. In philosophy, the so-called qingtan (“pure discourse”) movement, spiritually akin to a form of Daoism, found many adherents who held themselves aloof from politics. Hundreds of Buddhist temples…

  • Shen Yuehuan (Chinese author)

    Shen Congwen, author of fiction and prose who is commonly considered the greatest lyric novelist in modern China. Shen was a member of the Miao ethnic minority. At age 16 he joined a regiment in Yuanling, where he spent the next few years adding to his scanty education and observing the border

  • Shen Zhou (Chinese painter)

    Shen Zhou, Chinese artist who was a leading member of a group of scholar-artists later known as the Wu school (after Wu district). Shen was born to an honoured and secure family and enjoyed a long life involved in the learned arts of poetry, painting, and calligraphy. His many paintings reveal an

  • Shen-chen (China)

    Shenzhen, city, south-central Guangdong sheng (province), southeastern China. It lies along the coast of the South China Sea and immediately north of Hong Kong. In 1979 Shenzhen was a small border city of some 30,000 inhabitants that served as a customs stop into mainland China from Hong Kong. That

  • Shen-hsi (province, China)

    Shaanxi, sheng (province) of north-central China. It is bordered by the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to the north, Shanxi province to the east, Henan and Hubei provinces to the southeast, Chongqing municipality and Sichuan province to the south, Gansu province to the west, and the Hui

  • Shen-yang (China)

    Shenyang, capital of Liaoning sheng (province), China, and the largest city in the Northeast (formerly Manchuria). It is one of China’s greatest industrial centres. Shenyang is situated in the southern portion of the vast Northeast (Manchurian) Plain just north of the Hun River, a major tributary

  • Shenandoah (play by Howard)

    Bronson Howard: …a satire on business, and Shenandoah (1889), which established Charles Frohman as a producer and made a fortune for both producer and author, were also great successes. Howard’s other plays include The Banker’s Daughter (1878), first produced in 1873 as Lillian’s Last Love; Wives (1879); Young Mrs. Winthrop (1882); and…

  • Shenandoah (airship)

    William Mitchell: …loss of the navy dirigible Shenandoah in a storm inspired him to publicly accuse the War and Navy departments of “incompetency, criminal negligence, and almost treasonable administration of the national defense.” He was, as he expected, immediately court-martialed, and, after he made the trial a platform for his views, he…

  • Shenandoah National Park (national park, Virginia, United States)

    Shenandoah National Park, preserve of 311 square miles (805 square km) in the Blue Ridge section of the Appalachian Mountains, in northern Virginia, U.S. The park was authorized in 1926 and established in 1935. The park is noted for its scenery, which affords some of the most spectacular panoramic

  • Shenandoah Valley (valley, United States)

    Shenandoah Valley, part of the Great Appalachian Valley, chiefly in Virginia, U.S. It extends southwestward from the vicinity of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, on the Potomac River and lies between the Blue Ridge to the east and the Allegheny Mountains to the west. Drained by the Shenandoah River,

  • Shenandoah Valley campaigns (American Civil War)

    Shenandoah Valley campaigns, (July 1861–March 1865), in the American Civil War, important military campaigns in a four-year struggle for control of the strategic Shenandoah Valley in Virginia, running roughly north and south between the Blue Ridge and the Allegheny Mountains. The South used the

  • Shenandoah Valley, Museum of the (museum, Winchester, Virginia, United States)

    Shenandoah Valley: The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, which opened in 2005, highlights the region’s art, culture, and history. Located in Winchester, Virginia, it is part of a complex that also features gardens and a historic house.

  • Shenandoah, Leon (American chief of Iroquois Confederacy)

    Leon Shenandoah, U.S. Native American leader of the Onondaga Indians and, from 1969, Tadadaho--chief of chiefs, the spiritual and political spokesman--of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy (b. May 18, 1915--d. July 22,

  • Shenfu (China)

    Shaanxi: Resources and power: …the Wei valley, and at Shenfu, near Shenmu and Fugu in the northern part of the province. There are minor coal and oil-shale deposits in the Han basin in the south, where there are also iron-ore deposits. In the north, near the border with Gansu, Ningxia, and Inner Mongolia, large…

  • sheng (musical instrument)

    Sheng, Chinese free reed wind instrument consisting of usually 17 bamboo pipes set in a small wind-chest into which a musician blows through a mouthpiece. Each pipe has a free reed, made of metal (or formerly of bamboo or reed), that vibrates to produce sound when a finger hole on the pipe is

  • sheng (Chinese government unit)

    China: …country is the province, or sheng (“secretariat”). The provinces are traceable in their current form to the Tang dynasty (ad 618–907). Over the centuries, provinces gained in importance as centres of political and economic authority and increasingly became the focus of regional identification and loyalty. Provincial power reached its peak…

  • Sheng Hsüan-huai (Chinese official)

    Sheng Xuanhuai, Chinese government official and entrepreneur in the last years of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), responsible for much of China’s early industrialization. His efforts to nationalize the railroad lines in 1911 touched off the crisis that eventually overthrew the dynasty. In 1870

  • Sheng Xuanhuai (Chinese official)

    Sheng Xuanhuai, Chinese government official and entrepreneur in the last years of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), responsible for much of China’s early industrialization. His efforts to nationalize the railroad lines in 1911 touched off the crisis that eventually overthrew the dynasty. In 1870

  • Sheng-ching (province, China)

    Liaoning, sheng (province) in the Northeast region of China (formerly called Manchuria). It is bounded to the northeast by the province of Jilin, to the east by North Korea, to the south by the Yellow Sea, to the southwest by the province of Hebei, and to the northwest by the Inner Mongolia

  • Sheng-li Feng (mountain, Asia)

    Victory Peak, mountain in the eastern Kakshaal (Kokshaal-Tau) Range of the Tien Shan, on the frontier of Kyrgyzstan and China. It was first identified in 1943 as the tallest peak (24,406 feet [7,439 metres]) in the Tien Shan range and the second highest peak in what was then the Soviet Union; it is

  • Sheng-li oil field (oil field, China)

    Shengli oil field, (English: “Victory” oil field) oil field in Shandong province, China, one of the country’s major sources of petroleum. Consisting of about 40 small fields, it is located southeast of Beijing, near the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli) and south of the mouth of the Huang He (Yellow River).

  • Sheng-li, Mount (mountain, Asia)

    Victory Peak, mountain in the eastern Kakshaal (Kokshaal-Tau) Range of the Tien Shan, on the frontier of Kyrgyzstan and China. It was first identified in 1943 as the tallest peak (24,406 feet [7,439 metres]) in the Tien Shan range and the second highest peak in what was then the Soviet Union; it is

  • Shengjing (China)

    Shenyang, capital of Liaoning sheng (province), China, and the largest city in the Northeast (formerly Manchuria). It is one of China’s greatest industrial centres. Shenyang is situated in the southern portion of the vast Northeast (Manchurian) Plain just north of the Hun River, a major tributary

  • Shengli oil field (oil field, China)

    Shengli oil field, (English: “Victory” oil field) oil field in Shandong province, China, one of the country’s major sources of petroleum. Consisting of about 40 small fields, it is located southeast of Beijing, near the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli) and south of the mouth of the Huang He (Yellow River).

  • Shengsichang (novel by Xiao Hong)

    Xiao Hong: …finished her novel Shengsichang (The Field of Life and Death). The same year, they went to Shanghai, where Shengsichang was published in 1935 with the renowned writer Lu Xun’s help. Lu Xun praised the novel for its carefully observed depiction of the lives and struggles of ordinary northeasterners. The…

  • Shenguttuvan (Cēra ruler)

    India: Southern Indian kingdoms: His son Shenguttuvan, much eulogized in the poems, also is mentioned in the context of Gajabahu’s rule in Sri Lanka, which can be dated to either the first or last quarter of the 2nd century ce, depending on whether he was the earlier or the later Gajabahu.…

  • Shengzu (emperor of Qing dynasty)

    Kangxi, reign name (nianhao) of the second emperor (reigned 1661–1722) of the Qing (Manchu) dynasty (1644–1911/12). To the Chinese empire he added areas north of the Amur River (Heilong Jiang) and portions of Outer Mongolia, and he extended control over Tibet. He opened four ports to foreign trade

  • Shenin, Oleg (Soviet politician)

    collapse of the Soviet Union: The coup against Gorbachev: defense council; Oleg Shenin, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU); and Gen. Valentin Varennikov, chief of the Soviet Army’s ground forces. They were accompanied by KGB Gen. Yury Plekhanov, chief of security for party and state personnel. Their unexpected…

  • shenjiao (Chinese folk religion)

    Daoism: Communal folk Daoism (shenjiao): Popular, or folk, religion is not a separate religious tradition but the wholly unorganized undercurrent of Chinese religious culture from the earliest times, shared by all strata of society. The Chinese have no single name for it; it may be called the religion of…

  • Shenlong (Chinese mythology)

    long: …and the Spiritual Dragon (Shenlong), who controls the rain and winds. In popular belief only the latter two were significant; they were transformed into the Dragon Kings (Longwang), gods who lived in the four oceans, delivered rain, and protected seafarers.

  • Shennong (Chinese mythological emperor)

    Shennong, (Chinese: “Divine Husbandman”) in Chinese mythology, second of the mythical emperors, said to have been born in the 28th century bce with the head of a bull and the body of a man. By inventing the cart and plow, by taming the ox and yoking the horse, and by teaching his people to clear

  • Shennong bencaojing (Chinese text)

    traditional Chinese medicine: Shennong and the Shennong bencaojing: …in the Shennong bencaojing (Divine Husbandsman’s Classic of Medicine), where he categorized the medicines as superior (nonpoisonous and rejuvenating), medium (having some toxicity based on the dosage and exerting tonic effects), or inferior (poisonous but able quickly to reduce fever and cure indigestion). Although most authorities now agree that…

  • Shenoud (Egyptian religious reformer)

    Shenute, monastic reformer, abbot of the White Monastery, near Atripe in Upper Egypt, who is regarded as a saint in the Coptic (Egyptian Christian) Church. Shenute entered monastic life as a youth and succeeded his uncle as abbot of the White Monastery in 383. He revived the rule of Pachomius, the

  • Shenouda III (Egyptian religious leader)

    Shenouda III, 117th pope of Alexandria and patriarch of the see of St. Mark. As the leader of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, an autocephalous (ecclesiastically independent) church of the Oriental Orthodox communion, Shenouda expanded the church’s membership both in Egypt and abroad while

  • Shenoudi (Egyptian religious reformer)

    Shenute, monastic reformer, abbot of the White Monastery, near Atripe in Upper Egypt, who is regarded as a saint in the Coptic (Egyptian Christian) Church. Shenute entered monastic life as a youth and succeeded his uncle as abbot of the White Monastery in 383. He revived the rule of Pachomius, the

  • Shenoute (Egyptian religious reformer)

    Shenute, monastic reformer, abbot of the White Monastery, near Atripe in Upper Egypt, who is regarded as a saint in the Coptic (Egyptian Christian) Church. Shenute entered monastic life as a youth and succeeded his uncle as abbot of the White Monastery in 383. He revived the rule of Pachomius, the

  • Shenshin, Afanasy Afanasyevich (Russian author)

    Afanasy Afanasyevich Fet, Russian poet and translator, whose sincere and passionate lyric poetry strongly influenced later Russian poets, particularly the Symbolist Aleksandr Blok. The illegitimate son of a German woman named Fet (or Foeth) and of a Russian landowner named Shenshin, whose name he

  • Shensi (province, China)

    Shaanxi, sheng (province) of north-central China. It is bordered by the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to the north, Shanxi province to the east, Henan and Hubei provinces to the southeast, Chongqing municipality and Sichuan province to the south, Gansu province to the west, and the Hui

  • Shenstone, William (English connoisseur)

    William Shenstone, a representative 18th-century English “man of taste.” As a poet, amateur landscape gardener, and collector, he influenced the trend away from Neoclassical formality in the direction of greater naturalness and simplicity. From 1745, in response to the current vogue for the ferme

  • Shenute (Egyptian religious reformer)

    Shenute, monastic reformer, abbot of the White Monastery, near Atripe in Upper Egypt, who is regarded as a saint in the Coptic (Egyptian Christian) Church. Shenute entered monastic life as a youth and succeeded his uncle as abbot of the White Monastery in 383. He revived the rule of Pachomius, the

  • Shenyang (China)

    Shenyang, capital of Liaoning sheng (province), China, and the largest city in the Northeast (formerly Manchuria). It is one of China’s greatest industrial centres. Shenyang is situated in the southern portion of the vast Northeast (Manchurian) Plain just north of the Hun River, a major tributary

  • Shenzhen (China)

    Shenzhen, city, south-central Guangdong sheng (province), southeastern China. It lies along the coast of the South China Sea and immediately north of Hong Kong. In 1979 Shenzhen was a small border city of some 30,000 inhabitants that served as a customs stop into mainland China from Hong Kong. That

  • Shenzhen River (river, China)

    Hong Kong: Drainage: …in the north where the Sham Chun (Shenzhen) River, which forms the boundary between Guangdong and Hong Kong, flows into Deep Bay after collecting a number of small tributaries. Most of the streams are small, and they generally run perpendicular to the northeast-southwest trend of the terrain. The construction of…

  • Shenzhou (Chinese spacecraft)

    Shenzhou, (Chinese: “Divine Craft”) any of a series of Chinese spacecraft, the fifth flight of which carried the first Chinese astronaut into space. Shenzhou is similar in design to the Russian Soyuz spacecraft. Like Soyuz, Shenzhou consists of three modules: a cylindrical rear module that contains

  • Shenzhou (China)

    Shenyang, capital of Liaoning sheng (province), China, and the largest city in the Northeast (formerly Manchuria). It is one of China’s greatest industrial centres. Shenyang is situated in the southern portion of the vast Northeast (Manchurian) Plain just north of the Hun River, a major tributary

  • Shenzong (emperor of Song dynasty)

    Shenzong, temple name (miaohao) of the sixth emperor (reigned 1067–85) of the Song dynasty (960–1279) of China. During his reign some of the greatest intellectual and cultural figures of the era flourished, among them Ouyang Xiu and Su Dongpo. Under the Shenzong emperor, the radical reformer Wang

  • Shenzong (emperor of Ming dynasty)

    Wanli, reign name (nianhao) of the emperor of China from 1572 to 1620, during the latter portion of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The Wanli emperor was a recluse whose apparent inattention to government affairs contributed to the abuses of power by provincial officials and other political figures

  • sheol (Judaism)

    death: Judaism: …somewhere or other, probably in Sheol, “the land of gloom and deep darkness” (Job 10:21). In Sheol, the good and the wicked shared a common fate, much as they had in the Babylonian underworld. The place did not conjure up images of an afterlife, for nothing happened there. It was…

  • Sheopur (India)

    Sheopur, town, northern Madhya Pradesh state, central India. It is situated in a plateau region on a small tributary of the Chambal River. The town and fort were founded in 1537 by Gaur Rajputs (a warrior caste) and served as capital of Sheopur princely state. It is now a road junction and rail

  • Sheopur Kalan (India)

    Sheopur, town, northern Madhya Pradesh state, central India. It is situated in a plateau region on a small tributary of the Chambal River. The town and fort were founded in 1537 by Gaur Rajputs (a warrior caste) and served as capital of Sheopur princely state. It is now a road junction and rail

  • Shepard, Alan B., Jr. (American astronaut)

    Alan B. Shepard, Jr., first U.S. astronaut to travel in space. Shepard graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, in 1944 and served in the Pacific during World War II onboard the destroyer Cogswell. He earned his naval aviator wings in 1947, qualified as a test pilot in 1951, and

  • Shepard, Alan Bartlett, Jr. (American astronaut)

    Alan B. Shepard, Jr., first U.S. astronaut to travel in space. Shepard graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, in 1944 and served in the Pacific during World War II onboard the destroyer Cogswell. He earned his naval aviator wings in 1947, qualified as a test pilot in 1951, and

  • Shepard, Clara Mae (American civil rights activist)

    Clara Luper, (Clara Mae Shepard), American civil rights activist (born May 3, 1923, Okfuskee county, Okla.—died June 8, 2011, Oklahoma City, Okla.), organized one of the earliest antisegregation sit-ins in the U.S. when she led a group of 14 black students and their 3 adult chaperones to order

  • Shepard, E. H. (English artist)

    caricature and cartoon: England: Bateman, Nicolas Bentley, E.H. Shepard, and Osbert Lancaster. Leech was in a sense the pictorial equivalent of Thackeray (Thackeray was an excellent comic draftsman but better at getting the feel of past time with a comic flavour than at considering his contemporaries other than in words). Leech and…

  • Shepard, Francis P. (American marine geologist)

    Francis P. Shepard, American marine geologist whose pioneering surveys of submarine canyons off the coast of California near La Jolla marked the beginning of Pacific marine geology. Shepard studied geology at Harvard under R.A. Daly and at the University of Chicago (Ph.D., 1922). Most of Shepard’s

  • Shepard, Francis Parker (American marine geologist)

    Francis P. Shepard, American marine geologist whose pioneering surveys of submarine canyons off the coast of California near La Jolla marked the beginning of Pacific marine geology. Shepard studied geology at Harvard under R.A. Daly and at the University of Chicago (Ph.D., 1922). Most of Shepard’s

  • Shepard, Jean (American singer)

    Jean Shepard, (Ollie Imogene Shepard), American country singer (born Nov. 21, 1933, Pauls Valley, Okla.—died Sept. 25, 2016, Nashville, Tenn.), recorded numerous hit songs that expressed a strong female point of view during the 1950s and ’60s and was a mainstay of the Grand Ole Opry from her 1955

  • Shepard, Matthew (American murder victim)

    Matthew Shepard, American college student who was severely beaten because of his sexual orientation and was left to die in 1998. He was discovered and hospitalized, though he succumbed to his injuries. His death, which was evidence of the physical danger that homosexuals still sometimes faced in

  • Shepard, Matthew Wayne (American murder victim)

    Matthew Shepard, American college student who was severely beaten because of his sexual orientation and was left to die in 1998. He was discovered and hospitalized, though he succumbed to his injuries. His death, which was evidence of the physical danger that homosexuals still sometimes faced in

  • Shepard, Oliver (British explorer)

    Sir Ranulph Fiennes: …fellow Britons Charles Burton and Oliver Shepard, had a support crew of some three dozen people, including Ginny. They departed from Greenwich, England, in September 1979, attempting to stay as close as possible to the Greenwich meridian as they journeyed southward over land and water, until they reached the coast…

  • Shepard, Ollie Imogene (American singer)

    Jean Shepard, (Ollie Imogene Shepard), American country singer (born Nov. 21, 1933, Pauls Valley, Okla.—died Sept. 25, 2016, Nashville, Tenn.), recorded numerous hit songs that expressed a strong female point of view during the 1950s and ’60s and was a mainstay of the Grand Ole Opry from her 1955

  • Shepard, Roger N. (American psychologist and cognitive scientist)

    Roger N. Shepard, American psychologist and cognitive scientist known for his work in multidimensional scaling, the use of spatial models to show similarities and dissimilarities between data. He received a Ph.D. from Yale University and later worked at Bell Laboratories (1958–66) and taught at

  • Shepard, Roger Newland (American psychologist and cognitive scientist)

    Roger N. Shepard, American psychologist and cognitive scientist known for his work in multidimensional scaling, the use of spatial models to show similarities and dissimilarities between data. He received a Ph.D. from Yale University and later worked at Bell Laboratories (1958–66) and taught at

  • Shepard, Sam (American playwright and actor)

    Sam Shepard, American playwright and actor whose plays adroitly blend images of the American West, Pop motifs, science fiction, and other elements of popular and youth culture. As the son of a career army father, Shepard spent his childhood on military bases across the United States and in Guam

  • Shephard, Esther (American author)

    Paul Bunyan: These influenced Esther Shephard, who wrote of the mythic hero in Paul Bunyan (1924). James Stevens, also a lumber publicist, mixed tradition and invention in his version of the story, Paul Bunyan (1925). These books restyled Paul’s image for a wide popular audience; their humour centred on…

  • Shepheardes Calender, The (poetry by Spenser)

    The Shepheardes Calender, series of poems by Edmund Spenser, published in 1579 and considered to mark the beginning of the English Renaissance in literature. Following the example of Virgil and others, Spenser began his career with a group of eclogues (short poems usually cast as pastoral

  • shepherd (agriculture)

    sacred kingship: The king as shepherd: An Egyptian pharaoh once said of himself: “He made me the shepherd of this country.” In Mesopotamia the description of the king as a shepherd was quite frequent; in the 3rd millennium bc the term was applied to Sumerian city princes (e.g., Lugalbanda in…

  • Shepherd of Hermas (early Christian work)

    Shepherd of Hermas, a 2nd-century Christian writing that is one of the works representing the Apostolic Fathers, Greek Christian writers of the late 1st and early 2nd centuries. The author, Hermas, is known only through the autobiographical details given in the Shepherd. A Christian slave who was

  • Shepherd of the Hills, The (work by Wright)

    Ozark Mountains: …by Harold Bell Wright’s novel The Shepherd of the Hills (1907), which romanticized the Missouri Ozarks. Other economic assets include timber (mainly hardwoods), agriculture (livestock, fruit, and truck farming), and lead and zinc mining.

  • Shepherd of the Hills, The (film by Hathaway [1941])

    Henry Hathaway: Early work: In 1941 Hathaway made The Shepherd of the Hills, the first of a number of films to star John Wayne. He then directed a series of World War II dramas, including Sundown (1941), China Girl (1942), and Wing and a Prayer (1944). With Nob Hill (1945), Hathaway ventured into…

  • shepherd satellite (astronomy)

    Saturn: Orbital and rotational dynamics: …moon, Prometheus, have been dubbed shepherd moons because of their influence on ring particles. During Voyager 1’s flyby, the two bodies were discovered orbiting on either side of the narrow F ring, which itself had been found only a year earlier by Pioneer 11. The moons’ gravitational interactions with the…

  • Shepherd’s beaked whale (mammal)

    beaked whale: Natural history: Shepherd’s beaked whale (Tasmacetus shepherdi) is unusual in having numerous small functional teeth.

  • Shepherd’s Bush, The Battle of (1908 Olympic Games)
  • Shepherd’s Crown, The (novel by Pratchett)

    Terry Pratchett: …and his final Discworld book, The Shepherd’s Crown, was published later that year. In 2017, as per Pratchett’s wishes, his uncompleted works were destroyed—his computer hard drive, which contained as many as 10 unfinished novels, was smashed by a steamroller and then run through a stone crusher.

  • shepherd’s pie (food)

    Shepherd’s pie, common and inexpensive British dish originating from the sheep country in Scotland and northern England. It is a baked meat pie made with minced or diced lamb and topped with a thick layer of mashed potatoes. Although the dish is sometimes called cottage pie, that name is usually

  • shepherd’s purse (plant)

    Shepherd’s purse, (Capsella bursa-pastoris), plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Native to the Mediterranean region, shepherd’s purse has become naturalized worldwide and is a common lawn and roadside weed. The plant is most conspicuous in the spring and is distinguished for its flat

  • shepherd’s rod (plant)

    teasel: Major species: Shepherd’s rod, or small teasel (D. pilosus), native to Europe, has a globe-shaped flower head and white blooms with violet anthers.

  • Shepherd, Cybill (American actress)

    Peter Bogdanovich: Films: …Jeff Bridges, Timothy Bottoms, and Cybill Shepherd as high schoolers coming of age—was inspired by the works of Hawks and Ford. It is arguably Bogdanovich’s finest movie, and he earned an Academy Award nomination for best director. Oscar nods also went to the film, the screenplay by Bogdanovich and Larry…

  • Shepherd, William (American astronaut)

    International Space Station: …Yuri Gidzenko and American astronaut William Shepherd, who flew up in a Soyuz spacecraft. The ISS has been continuously occupied since then. A NASA microgravity laboratory called Destiny and other elements were subsequently joined to the station, with the overall plan calling for the assembly, over a period of several…

  • Shepherd, William Robert (American historian)

    William Robert Shepherd, American historian known as an authority on Latin America and on European overseas expansion. Shepherd was educated at Columbia University, where he earned his Ph.D. (1896). He studied in Berlin, returned to Columbia as a professor of history, and taught there until his

  • Shepherdia argentea (plant)

    Buffalo berry, (Shepherdia argentea), shrub, 2 to 6 metres (about 6 to 20 feet) high, of the oleaster family (Elaeagnaceae) with whitish, somewhat thorny branches and small, oblong, silvery leaves. It is a very hardy shrub, growing wild along stream banks in the Great Plains of North America.

  • Shepherdia canadensis (plant)

    buffalo berry: A smaller relative, the Canadian buffalo berry (S. canadensis), grows to about 2.5 m high, has oval leaves that are silvery only on the underside, and occurs on wooded banks and hillsides from Newfoundland and New York to Alaska and Oregon and southward along the Rocky Mountains to New…

  • shepherding (astronomy)

    Saturn: Orbital and rotational dynamics: …moon, Prometheus, have been dubbed shepherd moons because of their influence on ring particles. During Voyager 1’s flyby, the two bodies were discovered orbiting on either side of the narrow F ring, which itself had been found only a year earlier by Pioneer 11. The moons’ gravitational interactions with the…

  • Shepherds Calender, The (poetry by Spenser)

    The Shepheardes Calender, series of poems by Edmund Spenser, published in 1579 and considered to mark the beginning of the English Renaissance in literature. Following the example of Virgil and others, Spenser began his career with a group of eclogues (short poems usually cast as pastoral

  • Shepherds of Shadows, The (novel by Petrakis)

    Harry Mark Petrakis: …Bell (1976) and its sequel, The Shepherds of Shadows (2008); Nick the Greek (1979); Days of Vengeance (1983); and The Orchards of Ithaca (2004). He also published collections of short stories. His nonfiction works included a biography of the industrialist Henry Crown (1998; written with David Weber). In addition, Petrakis…

  • shepherds, adoration of the (religious motif)

    Adoration of the shepherds, as a theme in Christian art, depiction of shepherds paying homage to the newborn Christ, an event described in The Gospel According to Luke. It is related to the older but less frequently represented annunciation to the shepherds, which shows the same shepherds in the

  • Shepherdstown (West Virginia, United States)

    Shepherdstown, town, Jefferson county, in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, U.S., near the Potomac River, about 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Harpers Ferry. One of the state’s oldest towns, it was first settled in the early 18th century by Germans from Pennsylvania. In the 1730s Thomas

  • Shepp, Archie (American musician and educator)

    Archie Shepp, African American tenor saxophonist, composer, dramatist, teacher, and pioneer of the free jazz movement, known not only for his creative improvisation and colourful sound but also for his Afrocentric approach to music. Shepp grew up in Philadelphia and attended Goddard College (B.A.,

  • Shepp, Archie Vernon (American musician and educator)

    Archie Shepp, African American tenor saxophonist, composer, dramatist, teacher, and pioneer of the free jazz movement, known not only for his creative improvisation and colourful sound but also for his Afrocentric approach to music. Shepp grew up in Philadelphia and attended Goddard College (B.A.,

  • Sheppard of Liverpool, David Stuart Sheppard, the Right Reverend Lord (British cricketer and bishop)

    The Right Reverend David Stuart Sheppard, Lord Sheppard of Liverpool, British cricketer and Anglican bishop (born March 6, 1929, Reigate, Surrey, Eng.—died March 5, 2005, West Kirby, Wirral, Merseyside, Eng.), was the only man who played cricket for England as an ordained priest. Sheppard a

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