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  • shock weapon

    weapon: A weapon may be a shock weapon, held in the hands, such as the club, mace, or sword. It may also be a missile weapon, operated by muscle power (as with the javelin, sling, and bow and arrow), mechanical power (as with the crossbow and catapult), or chemical power (as…

  • shock, electric

    Electrical shock, the perceptible and physical effect of an electrical current that enters the body. The shock may range from an unpleasant but harmless jolt of static electricity, received after one has walked over a thick carpet on a dry day, to a lethal discharge from a power line. The great

  • shock, electrical

    Electrical shock, the perceptible and physical effect of an electrical current that enters the body. The shock may range from an unpleasant but harmless jolt of static electricity, received after one has walked over a thick carpet on a dry day, to a lethal discharge from a power line. The great

  • Shock-headed Peter (German literary figure)

    children's literature: Heritage and fairy tales: Struwwelpeter (“Shock-headed Peter”), by the premature surrealist Heinrich Hoffmann, aroused cries of glee in children across the continent. Wilhelm Busch created the slapstick buffoonery of Max and Moritz, the ancestors of the Katzenjammer Kids and indeed of many aspects of the comic strip.

  • shock-heating (geophysics)

    Earth: Effects of planetesimal impacts: …is thought to have been shock-heated by the impacts of meteorite-size bodies and larger planetesimals. For a meteorite collision, the heating is concentrated near the surface where the impact occurs, which allows the heat to radiate back into space. A planetesimal, however, can penetrate sufficiently deeply on impact to produce…

  • Shockaholic (memoir by Fisher)

    Carrie Fisher: …other works included the memoir Shockaholic (2011) and The Princess Diarist (2016), which includes a selection of journal entries written during the filming of the first Star Wars movie.

  • Shockley, William B. (American physicist)

    William B. Shockley, American engineer and teacher, cowinner (with John Bardeen and Walter H. Brattain) of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1956 for their development of the transistor, a device that largely replaced the bulkier and less-efficient vacuum tube and ushered in the age of microminiature

  • Shockley, William Bradford (American physicist)

    William B. Shockley, American engineer and teacher, cowinner (with John Bardeen and Walter H. Brattain) of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1956 for their development of the transistor, a device that largely replaced the bulkier and less-efficient vacuum tube and ushered in the age of microminiature

  • Shockley, William Bradford (American physicist)

    William B. Shockley, American engineer and teacher, cowinner (with John Bardeen and Walter H. Brattain) of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1956 for their development of the transistor, a device that largely replaced the bulkier and less-efficient vacuum tube and ushered in the age of microminiature

  • Shockproof (film by Sirk [1949])

    Douglas Sirk: Hollywood films of the 1940s: Shockproof (1949), another film noir (written by Samuel Fuller and Helen Deutsch), explored the dark side of human nature, as evinced by a cunning parolee (Patricia Knight) who deceives but then does right by the parole officer (Cornel Wilde) who has fallen in love with…

  • Shockwave (computer program)

    Adobe Inc.: Application software: …Adobe gained two innovative programs, Shockwave and Flash, for producing and distributing animations and interactive media over the Internet for viewing in Web browsers. In 2008 Adobe Media Player was introduced as a competitor to Apple’s iTunes, Windows Media Player, and RealPlayer from RealNetworks, Inc. In addition to playing audio…

  • Shōda Michiko (wife of Japanese emperor Akihito)

    Akihito: …tradition, he married a commoner, Shōda Michiko, who was the daughter of a wealthy businessman. Michiko was a graduate of a Roman Catholic university for women in Tokyo. Their first child, Crown Prince Naruhito, was born on February 23, 1960; he was followed by Prince Akishino (born November 30, 1965)…

  • Shodeke (Nigerian leader)

    Abeokuta: …was founded about 1830 by Sodeke (Shodeke), a hunter and leader of the Egba refugees who fled from the disintegrating Oyo empire. The town was also settled by missionaries (in the 1840s) and by Sierra Leone Creoles, who later became prominent as missionaries and as businessmen. Abeokuta’s success as the…

  • shoe (footwear)

    Shoe, outer covering for the foot, usually of leather with a stiff or thick sole and heel, and generally (distinguishing it from a boot) reaching no higher than the ankle. Climatic evidence suggests that people were probably protecting their feet from frigid conditions by about 50,000 years ago.

  • shoe (baccarat)

    baccarat: …dealing box called a “shoe.” Players aim for a total count of nine, or as close as they can get, in a hand of two or three cards. Face (court) cards and 10s are counted as zero; all others take their index value. The cards in each hand are…

  • shoe brake (machine part)

    automobile: Brakes: …was carried directly to semicircular brake shoes by a system of flexible cables. Mechanical brakes, however, were difficult to keep adjusted so that equal braking force was applied at each wheel; and, as vehicle weights and speeds increased, more and more effort on the brake pedal was demanded of the…

  • shoe buckle (ornament)

    buckle: The shoe buckle has also been important as an ornament. Jewelled buckles (with real or imitation gems) were worn during the reign of Louis XIV, and at about the same time the shoe buckle became popular in the United States. In 18th-century Europe, buckles became even…

  • shoe flower (plant)

    Redbird cactus, (Pedilanthus tithymaloides), succulent plant, of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native from Florida to Venezuela and sometimes grown in tropical rock gardens or as a pot plant in the north. (It is not a true cactus.) It is called devil’s backbone, for the zigzag form some

  • Shoe, The (American jockey)

    Bill Shoemaker, greatest American jockey of the second half of the 20th century. Weighing only 1 pound 13 ounces (0.8 kg) at birth, Shoemaker grew to an adult weight of 98 pounds (44.5 kg) and a height of 4 feet 11.5 inches (1.51 metres). He moved with his family at age 10 to California, which

  • shoe-billed stork (bird)

    Shoebill, (Balaeniceps rex), large African wading bird, a single species that constitutes the family Balaenicipitidae (order Balaenicipitiformes, Ciconiiformes, or Pelecaniformes). The species is named for its clog-shaped bill, which is an adaptation for catching and holding the large, slippery

  • Shoe: Willie Shoemaker’s Illustrated Book of Racing, The (work by Smith)

    Bill Shoemaker: The Shoe: Willie Shoemaker’s Illustrated Book of Racing, written with Dan Smith, was published in 1976.

  • shoebill (bird)

    Shoebill, (Balaeniceps rex), large African wading bird, a single species that constitutes the family Balaenicipitidae (order Balaenicipitiformes, Ciconiiformes, or Pelecaniformes). The species is named for its clog-shaped bill, which is an adaptation for catching and holding the large, slippery

  • Shoemaker’s Prodigious Wife, The (play by García Lorca)

    Federico García Lorca: Early poetry and plays: …prodigiosa (written 1924, premiered 1930; The Shoemaker’s Prodigious Wife), a classic farce, and El amor de don Perlimplín con Belisa en su jardín (written 1925, premiered 1933; The Love of Don Perlimplín with Belisa in Their Garden in Five Plays: Comedies and Tragi-Comedies, 1970), a “grotesque tragedy” partially drawn from…

  • Shoemaker, Bill (American jockey)

    Bill Shoemaker, greatest American jockey of the second half of the 20th century. Weighing only 1 pound 13 ounces (0.8 kg) at birth, Shoemaker grew to an adult weight of 98 pounds (44.5 kg) and a height of 4 feet 11.5 inches (1.51 metres). He moved with his family at age 10 to California, which

  • Shoemaker, Carolyn (American astronomer)

    Carolyn Shoemaker, American astronomer who became an expert at identifying comets. With her husband, Gene Shoemaker, and David H. Levy, she discovered the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet in 1993. Spellman received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Chico (Calif.) State College, having studied history,

  • Shoemaker, Edwin J. (American engineer and entrepreneur)

    Edwin J. Shoemaker, American engineer and businessman whose invention of the recliner made the La-Z-Boy furniture company one of the most successful in the U.S. (b. 1907?, Monroe county, Mich.--d. March 15, 1998, Sun City,

  • Shoemaker, Eugene Merle (American astrogeologist)

    Gene Shoemaker, American astrogeologist who—along with his wife, Carolyn Shoemaker, and David H. Levy—discovered the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet in 1993. Shoemaker received a bachelor’s degree in geology from the California Institute of Technology and a doctorate from Princeton University. He worked for

  • Shoemaker, Gene (American astrogeologist)

    Gene Shoemaker, American astrogeologist who—along with his wife, Carolyn Shoemaker, and David H. Levy—discovered the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet in 1993. Shoemaker received a bachelor’s degree in geology from the California Institute of Technology and a doctorate from Princeton University. He worked for

  • Shoemaker, Sidney (American philosopher)

    personal identity: Traditional criticisms: …by the contemporary American philosopher Sydney Shoemaker, is to replace the notion of memory with that of “quasi-memory.” A person quasi-remembers a past experience or action if he has a memory experience that is caused in some appropriate way by that past action or experience. It may be theoretically possible…

  • Shoemaker, The (work by Gropper)

    William Gropper: …Depression agricultural program) and “The Shoemaker” (on the poverty of the working class). He later painted a mural at the Department of the Interior building in Washington, D.C.

  • Shoemaker, William Lee (American jockey)

    Bill Shoemaker, greatest American jockey of the second half of the 20th century. Weighing only 1 pound 13 ounces (0.8 kg) at birth, Shoemaker grew to an adult weight of 98 pounds (44.5 kg) and a height of 4 feet 11.5 inches (1.51 metres). He moved with his family at age 10 to California, which

  • Shoemaker, Willie (American jockey)

    Bill Shoemaker, greatest American jockey of the second half of the 20th century. Weighing only 1 pound 13 ounces (0.8 kg) at birth, Shoemaker grew to an adult weight of 98 pounds (44.5 kg) and a height of 4 feet 11.5 inches (1.51 metres). He moved with his family at age 10 to California, which

  • Shoemaker-Levy 9, Comet (astronomy)

    Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, comet whose disrupted nucleus crashed into Jupiter over the period of July 16–22, 1994. The cataclysmic event, the first collision between two solar system bodies ever predicted and observed, was monitored from Earth-based telescopes worldwide, the Hubble Space Telescope and

  • shōen (Japanese history)

    Shōen, in Japan, from about the 8th to the late 15th century, any of the private, tax-free, often autonomous estates or manors whose rise undermined the political and economic power of the emperor and contributed to the growth of powerful local clans. The estates developed from land tracts

  • Shoenberg, Sir Isaac (British inventor)

    Sir Isaac Shoenberg, principal inventor of the first high-definition television system, which was used by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for the world’s first public high-definition telecast (from London, 1936). Before emigrating to England in 1914, Shoenberg had installed the first

  • Shoes of the Fisherman, The (novel by West)

    Morris West: …The Devil’s Advocate (1959) and The Shoes of the Fisherman (1963).

  • Shoes Walking on My Brain (painting by Dine)

    Jim Dine: His Shoes Walking on My Brain (1960), for example, is a childlike painting of a face with a pair of leather shoes fixed to the forehead. His reputation was secured during the 1960s by his wittily incongruous painted images of tools, clothes, and other utilitarian and…

  • Shoeshine (film by De Sica [1946])

    Vittorio De Sica: …of the genre: Sciuscià (1946; Shoeshine), an account of the tragic lives of two children during the American occupation of Italy; Ladri di biciclette (1948; The Bicycle Thief), an Oscar winner for best foreign film; Miracolo a Milano (1951; Miracle in Milan), a comic parable about the clash of rich…

  • shoestring sand (geological deposit)

    sedimentary rock: Formation of sandstones today: River sands today form shoestring-shaped bodies, tens of metres thick, a few hundred metres wide, up to 60 kilometres or more long, and usually oriented perpendicularly to the shoreline. In meandering back and forth, a river may construct a wide swath of sand deposits, mostly accumulating on meander-point bars.…

  • shofar (horn)

    Shofar, a ritual musical instrument, made from the horn of a ram or other animal, used on important Jewish public and religious occasions. In biblical times the shofar sounded the Sabbath, announced the New Moon, and proclaimed the anointing of a new king. This latter custom has been preserved in

  • shofet (Hebrew leader)

    biblical literature: The role of the judges: The Hebrew term shofet, which is translated into English as “judge,” is closer in meaning to “ruler,” a kind of military leader or deliverer from potential or actual defeat. In a passage from the so-called Ras Shamra tablets (discovered in 1929), the concept of the judge as a…

  • shofrot (horn)

    Shofar, a ritual musical instrument, made from the horn of a ram or other animal, used on important Jewish public and religious occasions. In biblical times the shofar sounded the Sabbath, announced the New Moon, and proclaimed the anointing of a new king. This latter custom has been preserved in

  • shofroth (horn)

    Shofar, a ritual musical instrument, made from the horn of a ram or other animal, used on important Jewish public and religious occasions. In biblical times the shofar sounded the Sabbath, announced the New Moon, and proclaimed the anointing of a new king. This latter custom has been preserved in

  • shōfū (haiku)

    Japan: Commerce, cities, and culture: …developing a new style called shōfū or “Bashō style.” Bashō proclaimed what he called makoto no (“true”) haiku, seeking the spirit of this poetic form in sincerity and truthfulness. He also introduced a new beauty to haiku by using simple words. Bashō essentially grafted the aristocratic conceptions of medieval poetry…

  • shoga (music)

    Japanese music: Music notation: …a column of syllables called shoga, which were used to help players memorize the instrumental part by singing it. With that system it was even possible to substitute a vocal rendition of one part in an ensemble if that instrument was missing. Finally, there is another parallel column that contains…

  • Shōga (Japanese painter)

    Takuma Shōga, original name Takuma Tamemoto , member of a Japanese family of professional artists who specialized in Buddhist paintings (butsuga), creating a new style of religious painting that incorporated features of Chinese Southern Sung art. A high-ranking priest of the Shingon sect of

  • Shōgatsu (Japanese holiday)

    Shōgatsu, public holiday observed in Japan on January 1–3 (though celebrations sometimes last for the entire week), marking the beginning of a new calendar year. On the eve of the new year, temple bells ring 108 times: 8 times to ring out the old year and 100 times to usher in the new year. Prior

  • Shoghi Effendi Rabbānī (Bahā?ī leader)

    Shoghi Effendi Rabbānī, leader of the international Bahā?ī faith, who held the title of Guardian of the Cause of God from 1921 until his death. Shoghi Effendi spent his early childhood in Acre. In 1918 he earned a B.A. from the American University in Beirut, Lebanon. His education was directed to

  • shōgi (game)

    Shogi, Japanese form of chess, the history of which is obscure. Traditionally it is thought to have originated in India and to have been transmitted to Japan via China and Korea. Shogi, like Western chess and Chinese chess, is played by two persons on a board with pieces of varying powers, and the

  • shogi (game)

    Shogi, Japanese form of chess, the history of which is obscure. Traditionally it is thought to have originated in India and to have been transmitted to Japan via China and Korea. Shogi, like Western chess and Chinese chess, is played by two persons on a board with pieces of varying powers, and the

  • Shogun (American television miniseries)

    Television in the United States: The era of the miniseries: …developed as limited series, including Shogun (NBC, 1980), The Thorn Birds (ABC, 1983), The Winds of War (ABC, 1983), and the 25-hour-long Centennial (NBC, 1978). Escalating production budgets and increasingly lower ratings threatened the miniseries by the end of the 1980s, however. War and Remembrance (ABC, 1988–89), at 30 hours…

  • shogun (Japanese title)

    Shogun, (Japanese: “barbarian-quelling generalissimo”) in Japanese history, a military ruler. The title was first used during the Heian period, when it was occasionally bestowed on a general after a successful campaign. In 1185 Minamoto Yoritomo gained military control of Japan; seven years later

  • shogunate (Japanese history)

    Shogunate, government of the shogun, or hereditary military dictator, of Japan from 1192 to 1867. The term shogun appeared in various titles given to military commanders commissioned for the imperial government’s 8th- and 9th-century campaigns against the Ezo (Emishi) tribes of northern Japan. The

  • shōgunshoku (Japanese history)

    Shogunate, government of the shogun, or hereditary military dictator, of Japan from 1192 to 1867. The term shogun appeared in various titles given to military commanders commissioned for the imperial government’s 8th- and 9th-century campaigns against the Ezo (Emishi) tribes of northern Japan. The

  • Shōhaku (Japanese poet)

    Shōhaku, Japanese scholar and author of waka and renga (“linked-verse”) poetry during the late Muromachi period (1338–1573). Along with two other renga masters, he composed Minase sangin hyakuin (1488; Minase Sangin Hyakuin: A Poem of One Hundred Links Composed by Three Poets at Minase). Little i

  • Shōheikō (college, Japan)

    Japan: Political reform in the bakufu and the han: …Chu Hsi school at the Shōheikō, the bakufu official college headed by the Hayashi family. He even instituted a five-level examination system for promotions among bakufu officials who were trained at this shogunal academy.

  • shoin (Japanese architecture)

    Shoin, in Japanese domestic architecture, desk alcove that projects onto the veranda and has above it a shoji window made of latticework wood covered with a tough, translucent white paper. The shoin is one of the formative elements of, and lends its name to, the shoin style of Japanese domestic

  • shoin style (Japanese architectural style)

    Shoin-zukuri, style of Japanese domestic architecture. The name is taken from a secondary feature called the shoin, a study alcove. The shoin, tokonoma (alcove for the display of art objects), and chigai-dana (shelves built into the wall) are all formative elements of this style, which appeared in

  • shoin-zukuri (Japanese architectural style)

    Shoin-zukuri, style of Japanese domestic architecture. The name is taken from a secondary feature called the shoin, a study alcove. The shoin, tokonoma (alcove for the display of art objects), and chigai-dana (shelves built into the wall) are all formative elements of this style, which appeared in

  • Shojā? Mirza (king of Afghanistan)

    Shāh Shojā?, shāh, or king, of Afghanistan (1803–10; 1839–42) whose alliance with the British led to his death. Shojā? ascended the throne in 1803 after a long fratricidal war. In 1809 he concluded an alliance with the British against an expected Franco-Russian invasion of India but, the following

  • Shojā?-ul-Mulk (king of Afghanistan)

    Shāh Shojā?, shāh, or king, of Afghanistan (1803–10; 1839–42) whose alliance with the British led to his death. Shojā? ascended the throne in 1803 after a long fratricidal war. In 1809 he concluded an alliance with the British against an expected Franco-Russian invasion of India but, the following

  • shoji (Japanese architecture)

    Shoji, in Japanese architecture, sliding outer partition doors and windows made of a latticework wooden frame and covered with a tough, translucent white paper. When closed, they softly diffuse light throughout the house. In summer they are often removed completely, opening the house to the

  • shōji (Japanese architecture)

    Shoji, in Japanese architecture, sliding outer partition doors and windows made of a latticework wooden frame and covered with a tough, translucent white paper. When closed, they softly diffuse light throughout the house. In summer they are often removed completely, opening the house to the

  • Shōjirō (Japanese painter)

    Torii Kiyomasu, painter of Ukiyo-e (scenes from Japanese daily life). He is thought to have been a relative of Torii Kiyonobu, the first Japanese to paint actors. He made hand-coloured prints of the kind called tan-e (in which the dominant colour is supplied by tan, or red lead, a method used from

  • Shōjō Kyōsai (Japanese painter)

    Kawanabe Kyōsai, Japanese painter and caricaturist. After working briefly with Utagawa Kuniyoshi, the last great master of the Japanese colour print, Kyōsai received most of his artistic training in the studio of Kanō Tōhaku. He soon abandoned the formal traditions of this master for the greater

  • Shojoko Temple (temple, Fujisawa, Japan)

    Fujisawa: …is the site of the Shojoko Temple (Yugyo Temple; 1325), the main temple of the Ji (“Times”) sect of Pure Land Buddhism. Pop. (2010) 409,657; (2015) 423,894.

  • shōka (floral arrangement)

    Shōka, (Japanese: “living flowers”), in classical Japanese floral art, a three-branched asymmetrical style that is a simplification of the ancient stylized temple floral art of rikka. The serenely balanced shōka arrangements are triangular, based on three main lines: shin, the central “truth”

  • Shōkadō Shōjō (Japanese artist)

    Shōkadō Shōjō, Japanese calligrapher and painter, one of the “three brushes” of the Kan-ei era. He was a priest and respected theologian of the Shingon sect of Buddhism, who declined high office and retired to the Takinomoto-bō, a small temple on the slope of Otoko-yama (Mt. Otoko) south of Kyōto,

  • Shōkoku Temple (Zen Buddhist temple)

    Sesshū: Early life and career: The young monk lived at Shōkoku Temple, a famous Zen temple adjacent to the Imperial Palace of the Ashikaga shoguns, who were great art patrons. Shūbun, the most famous Japanese painter of the day, was the overseer of the buildings and grounds at Shōkoku Temple. In addition to studying painting…

  • Shōkosai (Japanese artist)

    Ogata Kenzan, Japanese potter and painter, brother to the artist Ogata Kōrin. He signed himself Kenzan, Shisui, Tōin, Shōkosai, Shuseidō, or Shinshō. Kenzan received a classical Chinese and Japanese education and pursued Zen Buddhism. At the age of 27 he began studying with the potter Ninsei and in

  • Sholapur (India)

    Solapur, city, southern Maharashtra state, western India. It is situated in an upland region on the Sina River. In early centuries the city belonged to the Hindu Chalukyas and Devagiri Yadavas but later became part of the Muslim Bahmani and Bijapur kingdoms. Located on major road and rail routes

  • Sholay (film by Sippy [1975])

    Amitabh Bachchan: …followed, including Deewar (1975; “Wall”), Sholay (1975; “Embers”), and Don (1978). Nicknamed “Big B,” Bachchan personified a new type of action star in Indian films, that of the “angry young man,” rather than the romantic hero. He was often compared to Clint Eastwood—although, unlike Eastwood and other American action stars,…

  • Sholes and Glidden typewriter

    typewriter: …was a crude machine, but Sholes added many improvements in the next few years, and in 1873 he signed a contract with E. Remington and Sons, gunsmiths, of Ilion, New York, for manufacture. The first typewriters were placed on the market in 1874, and the machine was soon renamed the…

  • Sholes, Christopher Latham (American inventor)

    Christopher Latham Sholes, American inventor who developed the typewriter. After completing his schooling, Sholes was apprenticed as a printer. Four years later, in 1837, he moved to the new territory of Wisconsin, where he initially worked for his elder brothers, who published a newspaper in Green

  • Sholokhov, Mikhail Aleksandrovich (Soviet author)

    Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov, Russian novelist, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize for Literature for his novels and stories about the Cossacks of southern Russia. After joining the Red Army in 1920 and spending two years in Moscow, he returned in 1924 to his native Cossack village in the Don

  • Shoman, Abdul Majeed (Palestinian banker)

    Abdul Majeed Shoman, Palestinian banker (born 1912, Beit Hanina, near Jerusalem, Ottoman Empire [now in Israel]—died July 5, 2005, Amman, Jordan), was a tireless supporter of Palestinian national aspirations and for 30 years the chairman of the Arab Bank, the largest privately owned bank in the M

  • Shomer, ha- (Israeli organization)

    Mapam: …in 1948 by the ha-Shomer ha-Tza?ir (Young Guard) and the A?dut ?Avoda-Po?ale Tziyyon (Labour Unity-Workers of Zion), which were both Marxist Zionist movements. Mapam maintains a Marxist ideology and is influential in the left-wing section of the kibbutz (collective settlement) movement, from which it draws much of its strength.…

  • shomin-geki (film genre)

    Ozu Yasujirō: …motion-picture director who originated the shomin-geki (“common-people’s drama”), a genre dealing with lower-middle-class Japanese family life. Owing to the centrality of domestic relationships in his films, their detailed character portrayals, and their pictorial beauty, Ozu was considered the most typically Japanese of all directors and received more honours in his…

  • Shomolu (Nigeria)

    Shomolu, town, Lagos state, southwestern Nigeria, just north of Lagos city. A residential suburb of Lagos, the town is plagued by problems of overcrowding, poor housing, and inadequate sanitation. Most of its inhabitants are Yoruba. The town’s local activities include work in leather handicrafts

  • Shomron (historical region, Palestine)

    Samaria, the central region of ancient Palestine. Samaria extends for about 40 miles (65 km) from north to south and 35 miles (56 km) from east to west. It is bounded by Galilee on the north and by Judaea on the south; on the west was the Mediterranean Sea and on the east the Jordan River. The

  • Shomron, Dan (Israeli military leader)

    Dan Shomron, Israeli military leader (born 1937, Kibbutz Ashdot Ya?acov, British Palestine [now in Israel]—died Feb. 26, 2008, Ra?anana, Israel), planned and led the daring rescue of more than 100 Israeli and other Jewish airline passengers who had been hijacked by Palestinian and German militants

  • Shomronim (Judaism)

    Samaritan, member of a community of Jews, now nearly extinct, that claims to be related by blood to those Jews of ancient Samaria who were not deported by the Assyrian conquerors of the kingdom of Israel in 722 bce. The Samaritans call themselves Bene-Yisrael (“Children of Israel”), or Shamerim

  • shomu (season)

    Egypt: Agriculture and fishing: …emerged from the flood; and shomu, the time when water was short. When the Nile behaved as expected, which most commonly was the case, life went on as normal; when the flood failed or was excessive, disaster followed.

  • Shōmu (emperor of Japan)

    Shōmu, 45th emperor of Japan, who devoted huge sums of money to the creation of magnificent Buddhist temples and artifacts throughout the realm; during his reign Buddhism virtually became the official state religion. He ascended the throne in 724, taking the reign name Shōmu. In 729 his consort, a

  • Shōmu Tennō (emperor of Japan)

    Shōmu, 45th emperor of Japan, who devoted huge sums of money to the creation of magnificent Buddhist temples and artifacts throughout the realm; during his reign Buddhism virtually became the official state religion. He ascended the throne in 724, taking the reign name Shōmu. In 729 his consort, a

  • shomyo (Buddhist chant)

    Shomyo, classical chant of Buddhism in Japan. Both the Tendai and Shingon sects maintain the tradition and use its theoretical books and notation systems as the basis for other forms of Buddhist singing. Although derived from earlier Chinese sources, the major influences of shomyo nomenclature and

  • shōmyō (Buddhist chant)

    Shomyo, classical chant of Buddhism in Japan. Both the Tendai and Shingon sects maintain the tradition and use its theoretical books and notation systems as the basis for other forms of Buddhist singing. Although derived from earlier Chinese sources, the major influences of shomyo nomenclature and

  • Shona (people)

    Shona, group of culturally similar Bantu-speaking peoples living chiefly in the eastern half of Zimbabwe, north of the Lundi River. The main groupings are the Zezuru, Karanga, Manyika, Tonga-Korekore, and Ndau. The Shona are farmers of millet, sorghum, and corn (maize), the last being the primary

  • Shona language

    African literature: Shona: Feso (1956), a historical novel, was the first literary work to be published in Shona. An account of the invasion of the Rozwi kingdom and an expression of longing for the traditional past, it was written by Solomon M. Mutswairo. Another early novel, Nzvengamutsvairo…

  • Shona literature (African literature)

    Zimbabwe: Cultural life: …struggle prompted a renaissance of Shona culture. A forerunner of this renaissance (and a victim of the liberation struggle) was Herbert Chitepo, both as abstract painter and epic poet. Stanlake Samkange’s novels reconstruct the Shona and Ndebele world of the 1890s, while those of the much younger Charles Mungoshi explore…

  • Shonaprastha (India)

    Sonipat, city, east-central Haryana state, northern India. It is situated about 25 miles (40 km) north of Delhi. The city was probably founded by early Aryan settlers about 1500 bce and flourished on the banks of the Yamuna River, which now has receded 9 miles (14 km) to the east. Mentioned in the

  • Shōni Sukeyoshi (Japanese military official)

    Japan: The Mongol invasions: The bakufu appointed Shōni Sukeyoshi as military commander, and the Kyushu military vassals were mobilized for defense. A Mongol army landed in Hakata Bay, forcing the Japanese defenders to retreat to Dazaifu; but a typhoon suddenly arose, destroying more than 200 ships of the invaders, and the survivors…

  • Shonibare, Yinka (British artist)

    Yinka Shonibare, British artist of Nigerian heritage, known for his examination of such ideas as authenticity, identity, colonialism, and power relations in often-ironic drawings, paintings, sculptures, photographs, films, and installations. A signature element of his work is his use of so-called

  • shonkinite (mineral)

    Shonkinite, rare, dark-coloured, intrusive igneous rock that contains augite and orthoclase feldspar as its primary constituents. Other minerals include olivine, biotite, and nepheline, with little plagioclase feldspar and no quartz. At Shonkin-Sag, in the Highwood Mountains, Montana, shonkinite

  • Shoom (British dance music club)

    electronic dance music: Shoom: Electronic dance music’s reputation as “drug music” stems from one of its crucial origin stories. In the late summer of 1987, a group of English DJs visited the Spanish island of Ibiza for a week of partying. At an outdoor venue called Amnesia, the…

  • Shoot (performance piece by Burden)

    Chris Burden: In Shoot, for example, the artist was shot with a rifle by a friend, and the event was photographed. For Trans-fixed, perhaps his best-known work, he had his hands nailed to the back of a Volkswagen Beetle, as if he were reenacting the crucifixion of Jesus.…

  • Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory (album by Traffic)

    Traffic: …of High Heeled Boys (1971), Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory (1973), and When the Eagle Flies (1974). Both on tour and in the studio, the group added and subtracted a number of additional musicians during these years before finally disbanding in 1975.

  • shoot system (plant anatomy)

    plant development: The shoot system and its derivatives: The gametophytes of mosses and liverworts and the sporophytes of many higher plants have a shoot, or early stem, with a single cell at its tip, or apex, from which all the tissues of the stem arise.…

  • Shoot the Piano Player (film by Truffaut [1960])

    Fran?ois Truffaut: Early works: …followed—Tirez sur le pianiste (1960; Shoot the Piano Player), adapted from a 1956 American crime novel (Down There by David Goodis), a genre for which Truffaut displayed great admiration, and Jules et Jim (1962). During this time he also made a second short, Une Histoire d’eau (1961; A Story of…

  • shooter game, electronic (electronic game genre)

    Electronic shooter game, electronic game genre in which players control a character or unit that wields weapons to shoot enemies. While shooting games involving “light guns” and photoreceptors were experimented with as early as the 1930s, the birth of this genre of electronic games really began in

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