You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Sīdī ?Abīd Mosque (mosque, Tozeur, Tunisia)

    Tozeur: This is seen in Sīdī ?Abīd Mosque, the zāwiyah (seat of a religious fraternity) Sīdī Mūldi, the Great Mosque built in 1030, and the marabout (holy man) tomb of Sīdī ?Alī Abū Lifah, which was built in 1282.

  • Sidibé, Malick (Malian photographer)

    Malick Sidibé, Malian photographer who created mainly black-and-white images that revealed the gradual Westernization of Mali as it made the transition from colony to independent country. Sidibé’s first home was a Peul (Fulani) village. After finishing school in 1952, he trained as a jewelry maker

  • siding (building construction)

    Siding, material used to surface the exterior of a building to protect against exposure to the elements, prevent heat loss, and visually unify the facade. The word siding implies wood units, or products imitative of wood, used on houses. There are many different types of siding, including

  • Siding Spring Observatory (observatory, Australia)

    Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories: The Siding Spring Observatory was originally a field station for the Mount Stromlo site, but it has become in itself one of the most important optical observatories in the world. Its main telescope is the Anglo-Australian Telescope, which was jointly built by Australia and Great Britain…

  • Sidki, Aziz (prime minister of Egypt)

    ?Azīz ?idqī, Egyptian politician who was prime minister of Egypt from 1972 to 1973. An engineering graduate of Cairo University with a doctorate in economic planning from Harvard University, ?idqī became a university teacher. Shortly after the revolution that deposed the Egyptian monarchy, he was

  • Sidki, Ismael (prime minister of Egypt)

    Ismā?īl ?idqī, Egyptian politician who was twice premier of his country (1930–33, 1946). ?idqī earned his diploma at the Collège des Frères and won honours at the Khedivial Law school. He joined the public prosecutor’s office but in 1899 became administrative secretary of the Alexandria municipal

  • Sidlosky, Carolyn (American poet)

    Carolyn Forché, American poet whose concern for human rights is reflected in her writing, especially in the collection The Country Between Us (1981), which examines events she witnessed in El Salvador. Forché was educated at Michigan State (B.A., 1972) and Bowling Green State (M.F.A., 1975)

  • Sidmouth (England, United Kingdom)

    Sidmouth, town and coastal resort, East Devon district, administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England, 15 miles (24 km) east-southeast of Exeter by road. Lying in a hollow formed by the River Sid, the town is shut in by hills that terminate in the forelands of Salcombe Hill and

  • Sidmouth of Sidmouth, Henry Addington, 1st Viscount (prime minister of Great Britain)

    Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, British prime minister from March 1801 to May 1804. Honest but unimaginative and inflexibly conservative, he proved unable to cope with the problems of the Napoleonic Wars, and later, in his decade as home secretary, he made himself unpopular by his harsh

  • Sidmouth, Henry Addington, 1st Viscount (prime minister of Great Britain)

    Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, British prime minister from March 1801 to May 1804. Honest but unimaginative and inflexibly conservative, he proved unable to cope with the problems of the Napoleonic Wars, and later, in his decade as home secretary, he made himself unpopular by his harsh

  • Sidney (Nebraska, United States)

    Sidney, city, seat (1870) of Cheyenne county, western Nebraska, U.S. It lies in the valley formed by Lodgepole Creek, a few miles north of the Colorado state line, in the Nebraska panhandle. It was founded in 1867 by the Union Pacific Railroad as a construction camp and named for Sidney Dillon,

  • Sidney of Sheppey, Baron Milton, Viscount (English statesman)

    Henry Sidney, earl of Romney, English statesman who played a leading role in the Revolution of 1688–89. The son of Robert Sidney, 2nd earl of Leicester, he entered Parliament in 1679 and supported legislation to exclude King Charles II’s Roman Catholic brother James, duke of York (later King James

  • Sidney, Algernon (English politician)

    Algernon Sidney, English Whig politician executed for allegedly plotting to overthrow the government of King Charles II (ruled 1660–85). His guilt was never conclusively proved, and Whig tradition regarded him as a great republican martyr. A descendant of the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney,

  • Sidney, George (American director)

    George Sidney, American film director who directed a number of the most popular movie musicals of the 1940s and ’50s, including Anchors Aweigh (1945), Annie Get Your Gun (1950), Show Boat (1951), and Kiss Me Kate (1953). Sidney was born into a show-business family. His father was a theatre

  • Sidney, Henry (English statesman)

    Henry Sidney, earl of Romney, English statesman who played a leading role in the Revolution of 1688–89. The son of Robert Sidney, 2nd earl of Leicester, he entered Parliament in 1679 and supported legislation to exclude King Charles II’s Roman Catholic brother James, duke of York (later King James

  • Sidney, Mary (English translator)

    Mary Herbert, countess of Pembroke, patron of the arts and scholarship, poet, and translator. She was the sister of Sir Philip Sidney, who dedicated to her his Arcadia. After his death she published it and completed his verse translation of the Psalms. In 1575 Queen Elizabeth I invited Mary to

  • Sidney, Sir Henry (British statesman [1529-1586])

    Sir Henry Sidney, English lord deputy of Ireland from 1565 to 1571 and from 1575 to 1578 who cautiously implemented Queen Elizabeth I’s policy of imposing English laws and customs on the Irish. His father, Sir William Sidney, was a courtier to King Henry VIII. Sidney became a favourite of young

  • Sidney, Sir Philip (English author and statesman)

    Sir Philip Sidney, Elizabethan courtier, statesman, soldier, poet, and patron of scholars and poets, considered the ideal gentleman of his day. After Shakespeare’s sonnets, Sidney’s Astrophel and Stella is considered the finest Elizabethan sonnet cycle. His The Defence of Poesie introduced the

  • Sidney, Sylvia (American actress)

    Sylvia Sidney, (Sophia Kosow), American actress who became a prominent film star in the 1930s; usually cast as a vulnerable, victimized young woman, she appeared in numerous melodramas, including City Streets (1931), Jennie Gerhardt (1933), and Fury (1936); after a long hiatus from acting, she

  • Sidon (Lebanon)

    Sidon, ancient city on the Mediterranean coast of Lebanon and the administrative centre of al-Janūb (South Lebanon) mu?āfa?ah (governorate). A fishing, trade, and market centre for an agricultural hinterland, it has also served as the Mediterranean terminus of the Trans-Arabian Pipeline, 1,069 mi

  • Sidonius Apollinaris (Gallo-Roman bishop and poet)

    Western architecture: France: According to Apollinaris Sidonius, the naves of the cathedral of Lyon (founded about 470) were separated from each other by a forest of columns and were covered by gilded, paneled ceilings. Saint Gregory of Tours relates that the church of Bishop Namatius of Clermont (built c. 450)…

  • Sidorka (Russian pretender)

    False Dmitry: In March 1611 a third False Dmitry, who has been identified as a deacon called Sidorka, appeared at Ivangorod. He gained the allegiance of the Cossacks (March 1612), who were ravaging the environs of Moscow, and of the inhabitants of Pskov, thus acquiring the nickname Thief of Pskov. In…

  • ?idqī Pasha, Ismā?īl (prime minister of Egypt)

    Ismā?īl ?idqī, Egyptian politician who was twice premier of his country (1930–33, 1946). ?idqī earned his diploma at the Collège des Frères and won honours at the Khedivial Law school. He joined the public prosecutor’s office but in 1899 became administrative secretary of the Alexandria municipal

  • ?idqī, Bakr (Iraqi general)

    Bakr ?idqī, Iraqi general. ?idqī joined the Turkish army at age 18 but was already an ardent Arab nationalist who championed the cause of the Arabs against the Turks. He was named general by King Fay?al I and put down tribal rebellions in 1933 (resulting in a massacre of Assyrian tribesmen), 1935,

  • ?idqī, Ismā?īl (prime minister of Egypt)

    Ismā?īl ?idqī, Egyptian politician who was twice premier of his country (1930–33, 1946). ?idqī earned his diploma at the Collège des Frères and won honours at the Khedivial Law school. He joined the public prosecutor’s office but in 1899 became administrative secretary of the Alexandria municipal

  • ?idqī, ?Azīz (prime minister of Egypt)

    ?Azīz ?idqī, Egyptian politician who was prime minister of Egypt from 1972 to 1973. An engineering graduate of Cairo University with a doctorate in economic planning from Harvard University, ?idqī became a university teacher. Shortly after the revolution that deposed the Egyptian monarchy, he was

  • sidra (Judaism)

    Sidra, in Judaism, weekly readings from the Scriptures as part of the sabbath service. Each week a portion, or sidra, of the Pentateuch is read aloud in the synagogue; and it takes a full year to complete the reading. The Pentateuch—consisting of the biblical books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus,

  • Sidra, Gulf of (gulf, Libya)

    Gulf of Sidra, arm of the Mediterranean Sea, indenting the Libyan coast of northern Africa. It extends eastward for 275 mi (443 km) from Mi?rātah to Banghāzī. A highway links scattered oases along its shore, which is chiefly desert, with salt marshes. In August the gulf’s water temperature reaches

  • sidrah (Judaism)

    Sidra, in Judaism, weekly readings from the Scriptures as part of the sabbath service. Each week a portion, or sidra, of the Pentateuch is read aloud in the synagogue; and it takes a full year to complete the reading. The Pentateuch—consisting of the biblical books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus,

  • Sidran, Abdulah (Bosnian author)

    Emir Kusturica: Films of the 1980s: …written by the Bosnian author Abdulah Sidran, won the Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival. Kusturica reteamed with Sidran for his next movie, Otac na slubenom putu (1985; When Father Was Away on Business). A story of the brutal intrusion of politics into the 1950s childhood of a…

  • sidro (Judaism)

    Sidra, in Judaism, weekly readings from the Scriptures as part of the sabbath service. Each week a portion, or sidra, of the Pentateuch is read aloud in the synagogue; and it takes a full year to complete the reading. The Pentateuch—consisting of the biblical books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus,

  • sidrot (Judaism)

    Sidra, in Judaism, weekly readings from the Scriptures as part of the sabbath service. Each week a portion, or sidra, of the Pentateuch is read aloud in the synagogue; and it takes a full year to complete the reading. The Pentateuch—consisting of the biblical books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus,

  • sidroth (Judaism)

    Sidra, in Judaism, weekly readings from the Scriptures as part of the sabbath service. Each week a portion, or sidra, of the Pentateuch is read aloud in the synagogue; and it takes a full year to complete the reading. The Pentateuch—consisting of the biblical books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus,

  • SIDS (pathology)

    Sudden infant death syndrome , unexpected death of an apparently healthy infant from unexplained causes. SIDS is of worldwide incidence, and within industrialized countries it is the most common cause of death of infants between two weeks and one year old. In 95 percent of SIDS cases, infants are

  • siduan (Chinese philosophy)

    Mencius: Doctrine of human nature.: That the four beginnings (siduan)—the feeling of commiseration, the feeling of shame, the feeling of courtesy, and the feeling of right and wrong—are all inborn in man was a self-evident truth to Mencius; and the “four beginnings,” when properly cultivated, will develop into the four cardinal virtues of ren,…

  • Siduri (mythological figure)

    epic: Eastern influences: …to a divine woman named Siduri, who keeps an inn in a marvellous garden of the sun god near the shores of ocean. Like the two Greek goddesses, Siduri tries to dissuade Gilgamesh from the pursuit of his journey by representing the pleasures of life, but the firm resolution of…

  • Siebeck, Wolfram (German restaurant critic)

    molecular gastronomy: Critics of molecular gastronomy: …Similarly, Germany’s most-famous restaurant critic, Wolfram Siebeck, called Blumenthal’s mustard ice “a fart of nothingness” and compared his cooking techniques to something out of Frankenstein’s lab.

  • Sieben Legenden (work by Keller)

    Gottfried Keller: …Seldwyla) and Sieben Legenden (1872; Seven Legends). His last novel, Martin Salander (1886), deals with political life in Switzerland in his time.

  • Siebenbürgen (region, Romania)

    Transylvania, historic eastern European region, now in Romania. After forming part of Hungary in the 11th–16th centuries, it was an autonomous principality within the Ottoman Empire (16th–17th century) and then once again became part of Hungary at the end of the 17th century. It was incorporated

  • Siebenbürger rug

    Transylvanian rug, any of the large numbers of floor coverings found in the churches of Transylvania (part of Romania), to which they had been donated by pious families. Some of these rugs are of Turkish manufacture, survivals of a massive importation centuries ago. Turkey is generally assumed to

  • Siebengebirge (hills, Germany)

    Siebengebirge, cluster of hills southeast of Bonn, Germany. Volcanic in origin and actually about 40 in number, they rise on the right bank of the Rhine between K?nigswinter and the Cologne–Frankfurt am Main Autobahn. A popular tourist resort area and nature reserve, the hills form the northwestern

  • siebente Kontinent, Die (film by Haneke [1989])

    Michael Haneke: …with Der siebente Kontinent (1989; The Seventh Continent), his screenplay for which had been rejected for television. Based on an actual event, the film depicts the tedious routines, and eventually the joint suicide, of a middle-class Viennese family. The first installment in what Haneke would call his emotionalen Vergletscherung (“emotional…

  • Sieber Rudolf (German casting director)

    Marlene Dietrich: …she attracted the attention of Rudolf Sieber, a casting director at UFA film studios, who began casting her in small film roles. She and Sieber married the following year, and, after the birth of their daughter, Maria, Dietrich returned to work on the stage and in films. Although they did…

  • Siebert Entrepreneurial Philanthropic Plan (American organization)

    Muriel Siebert: In 1990 Siebert established the Siebert Entrepreneurial Philanthropic Plan (SEPP), which donated to charity half of the net profits from new securities underwriting at Muriel Siebert & Co., Inc. Siebert was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1994. In 1999 she developed the Personal Finance Program, a…

  • Siebert, Mickie (American executive)

    Muriel Siebert, American business executive whose successful ventures in the realm of high finance helped expand opportunities for women in that field. Siebert attended Western Reserve University in her hometown from 1949 to 1952 but did not complete a degree. In 1954 she moved to New York City,

  • Siebert, Muriel (American executive)

    Muriel Siebert, American business executive whose successful ventures in the realm of high finance helped expand opportunities for women in that field. Siebert attended Western Reserve University in her hometown from 1949 to 1952 but did not complete a degree. In 1954 she moved to New York City,

  • Siebold maple (plant)

    maple: The shrubby Siebold maple (A. sieboldianum) has seven- to nine-lobed leaves that turn red in fall.

  • Siebold’s beech (tree)

    beech: The Japanese, or Siebold’s, beech (F. crenata) is grown as an ornamental in the Western Hemisphere. The Mexican beech, or haya (F. mexicana), a timber tree often 40 metres (130 feet) tall, has wedge-shaped leaves. The Oriental beech (F. orientalis), a pyramidal Eurasian tree about 30 metres (about…

  • Siebold’s hemlock (plant)

    hemlock: Siebold’s hemlock (T. sieboldii) and the Japanese hemlock (T. diversifolia), both native to Japan, are grown as ornamentals in North America and Europe.

  • Siebold, Carl Theodor Ernst von (German zoologist)

    Carl Theodor Ernst von Siebold, German zoologist who specialized in invertebrate research and contributed significantly to the development of parasitology. Born in a family of biologists, Siebold studied at Berlin and G?ttingen and practiced medicine briefly. Largely for his scientific writings, he

  • Siècle de Louis XIV, Le (work by Voltaire)

    Voltaire: Life with Mme du Chatelet: He began Le Siècle de Louis XIV, sketched out a universal history of kings, wars, civilization and manners that became the Essai sur les moeurs, and plunged into biblical exegesis. Mme du Chatelet herself wrote an Examen, highly critical of the two Testaments. It was at Cirey…

  • Siedlce (Poland)

    Siedlce, city, Mazowieckie województwo (province), east-central Poland. It is an economic centre for the eastern section of the province, with food processing, textile milling, and toy production. It lies on the Warsaw-Moscow road and rail line. Siedlce was first chronicled in 1448 as a settlement

  • Sieff of Brimpton, Marcus Joseph Sieff, Baron (British entrepreneur)

    Marcus Joseph Sieff, Baron Sieff of Brimpton, British businessman (born July 2, 1913, Manchester, Eng.—died Feb. 23, 2001, London, Eng.), succeeded his father, Baron Sieff, and uncle, Simon Marks, in the family business—retailer Marks and Spencer, which was founded by his maternal grandfather, M

  • Sieg, Emil (German scholar)

    Indo-European languages: Sanskrit studies and their impact: …announced by the German scholars Emil Sieg and Wilhelm Siegling in 1908. The Norwegian Assyriologist J?rgen Alexander Knudtzon recognized Hittite as Indo-European on the basis of two letters found in Egypt (translated in Die zwei Arzawa-briefe [1902; “The Two Arzawa Letters”]), but his views were not generally accepted until 1915,…

  • Siegal, J. (Austrian inventor)

    match: Merkel of Paris and J. Siegal of Austria, among others, by 1832, by which time the manufacture of friction matches was well established in Europe.

  • Siegbahn, Kai Manne B?rje (Swedish physicist)

    Kai Manne B?rje Siegbahn, Swedish physicist, corecipient with Nicolaas Bloembergen and Arthur Leonard Schawlow of the 1981 Nobel Prize for Physics for their revolutionary work in spectroscopy, particularly the spectroscopic analysis of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter.

  • Siegbahn, Karl Manne Georg (Swedish physicist)

    Karl Manne Georg Siegbahn, Swedish physicist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1924 for his discoveries and investigations in X-ray spectroscopy. Siegbahn was educated at the University of Lund and obtained his doctorate there in 1911. At Lund he became a research assistant to Johannes

  • siege (warfare)

    fortification: The American Civil War: Two notable sieges, that of Vicksburg, Miss., in the west, and Petersburg, Va., in the east, were characterized by the construction of extensive and continuous trench lines that foreshadowed those of World War I. In the Cold Harbor, Va., campaign, when General Ulysses S. Grant sent his…

  • siege climbing (mountain climbing)

    Mount Everest: Routes and techniques: …it has been called “siege” climbing. With this technique, a large team of climbers establishes a series of tented camps farther and farther up the mountain’s side. For instance, on the most frequently climbed southern route, the Base Camp on the Khumbu Glacier is at an elevation of about…

  • Siège de Corinthe, Le (opera by Rossini)

    Gioachino Rossini: Parisian period: …Le Siège de Corinthe (The Siege of Corinth, 1826), a revision of the earlier Maometto II (1820), which was saluted by the prominent composer Hector Berlioz. Le Siège was followed by Mo?se (Moses, 1827) and Le Comte Ory (Count Ory, 1828), an adaptation of opera buffa style to French…

  • Siege of Corinth, The (opera by Rossini)

    Gioachino Rossini: Parisian period: …Le Siège de Corinthe (The Siege of Corinth, 1826), a revision of the earlier Maometto II (1820), which was saluted by the prominent composer Hector Berlioz. Le Siège was followed by Mo?se (Moses, 1827) and Le Comte Ory (Count Ory, 1828), an adaptation of opera buffa style to French…

  • Siege of Krishnapur, The (work by Farrell)

    J.G. Farrell: …time in India, Farrell produced The Siege of Krishnapur, a fictional treatment of the 1857–58 Indian Mutiny that blends a lively adventure narrative with an unmistakable critique of British Victorian values. Esteemed by critics, it won the Booker Prize. The Singapore Grip (1978), the final novel in the series, ambitiously…

  • Siege of Rhodes Made a Representation by the Art of Prospective in Scenes, And the Story sung in Recitative Musick, The (opera by Davenant)

    Sir William Davenant: …first public opera in England, The Siege of Rhodes Made a Representation by the Art of Prospective in Scenes, And the Story sung in Recitative Musick (produced 1656). In The Siege he introduced three innovations to the English public stage: an opera, painted stage sets, and a female actress-singer.

  • Siege of Rhodes, The (opera by Locke)

    Matthew Locke: …music for Sir William Davenant’s The Siege of Rhodes (1656), which is usually considered the first English opera. Other stage works were music for Thomas Shadwell’s Psyche (1675), for Davenant’s version of Macbeth (revised 1673), and for Shadwell’s version of The Tempest (1674). In The Tempest Locke used for the…

  • Siege of Thebes, The (work by Lydgate)

    John Lydgate: It was followed by The Siege of Thebes, in which the main story is drawn from a lost French romance, embellished by features from Boccaccio.

  • Siege Perilous (Arthurian legend)

    Round Table: This empty place, called the Siege Perilous, could not be occupied without peril except by the destined Grail hero. During the 13th century, when the Grail theme was fully integrated with Arthurian legend in the group of prose romances known as the Vulgate cycle and post-Vulgate romances, it was established…

  • siege piece (coin)

    coin: Ireland: …Wars produced a number of siege pieces, notably the money of the Irish peers Inchiquin and Ormonde. For his Irish campaign James II issued his “gun-money” series of brass (made partly from melted-down old cannon), to be redeemed in silver when he should regain the throne.

  • siege stage (psychology)

    collective behaviour: Active crowds: …preceded by a stage of siege. In riots of limited scale in which no massive police or military forces are used, the peak day is followed by a few more days of successively smaller numbers of widely scattered encounters. Often the last incidents are in areas not previously hit by…

  • siege tower (military technology)

    tower: …peoples also used offensive, or siege, towers, as raised platforms for attacking troops to overrun high city walls. Military towers often gave their name to an entire fortress; the Tower of London, for example, includes the entire complex of buildings contiguous with the White Tower of William I the Conqueror.

  • siege warfare (warfare)

    fortification: The American Civil War: Two notable sieges, that of Vicksburg, Miss., in the west, and Petersburg, Va., in the east, were characterized by the construction of extensive and continuous trench lines that foreshadowed those of World War I. In the Cold Harbor, Va., campaign, when General Ulysses S. Grant sent his…

  • Siege, The (novel by Kadare)

    Ismail Kadare: …Albanian history are K?shtjella (1970; The Castle or The Siege), a recounting of the armed resistance of the Albanian people against the Ottoman Turks in the 15th century, and Dimri i madh (1977; “The Great Winter”), which depicts the events that produced the break between Albania and the Soviet Union…

  • Siegel, Arthur (American photographer)

    Arthur Siegel, photographer noted for his experimental photography, particularly in colour, and for his contributions to photographic education. Siegel already had 10 years of experience in photography when he received a bachelor of science degree in sociology from Wayne State University in Detroit

  • Siegel, Benjamin (American gangster)

    Bugsy Siegel, American gangster who played an instrumental role in the initial development of Las Vegas gambling. Siegel began his career extorting money from Jewish pushcart peddlers on New York’s Lower East Side. He then teamed up with Meyer Lansky about 1918 and took to car theft and, later,

  • Siegel, Bugsy (American gangster)

    Bugsy Siegel, American gangster who played an instrumental role in the initial development of Las Vegas gambling. Siegel began his career extorting money from Jewish pushcart peddlers on New York’s Lower East Side. He then teamed up with Meyer Lansky about 1918 and took to car theft and, later,

  • Siegel, Don (American director)

    Don Siegel, American motion-picture director who specialized in action-packed films with tightly constructed narratives. He frequently worked with actor Clint Eastwood, and their collaborations include the classics Coogan’s Bluff (1968) and Dirty Harry (1971). Siegel studied at Jesus College,

  • Siegel, Donald (American director)

    Don Siegel, American motion-picture director who specialized in action-packed films with tightly constructed narratives. He frequently worked with actor Clint Eastwood, and their collaborations include the classics Coogan’s Bluff (1968) and Dirty Harry (1971). Siegel studied at Jesus College,

  • Siegel, Jerry (American comic-strip writer)

    Jerry Siegel, U.S. cocreator of Superman and comic book writer who, with his artist partner, Joe Shuster, sold the rights to the "Man of Steel" in 1938 for $130; in 1978 their byline was restored and they were awarded an annual stipend (b. Oct. 17, 1914--d. Jan. 28,

  • Siegel, Joanne (American model and businesswoman)

    Joanne Siegel, (Jolan Kovacs), American model and businesswoman (born Dec. 1, 1917, Cleveland, Ohio—died Feb. 12, 2011, Santa Monica, Calif.), served as the model for the original 1930s drawings of the character Lois Lane by Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, the creators of the Superman comic book

  • Siegel, Seymour (American theologian)

    Seymour Siegel, American theologian who helped shape contemporary Conservative Jewish theology and who, with his learned writings, was especially instrumental in paving the way for the ordination of female rabbis. As head of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards of the Rabbinical Assembly for

  • Siegen (Germany)

    Siegen, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), northwestern Germany. It lies on the Sieg River, south of Arnsberg. The first mention of Siegen was in the late 11th century, and the town was incorporated in 1224. Its two castles were formerly seats of two branches of the house of Nassau-Siegen.

  • Siegen, Ludwig von (German engraver)

    Ludwig von Siegen, German painter, engraver, and the inventor of the mezzotint printing method. Siegen spent most of his early life in the services of the landgravine Amelia Elizabeth and the landgrave William of Hesse-Kassel. He lived in Amsterdam from 1641 to about 1644, when he was supposedly

  • Siegfried (opera by Wagner)

    Der Ring des Nibelungen: …Gold”), Die Walküre (“The Valkyrie”), Siegfried, and G?tterd?mmerung (“The Twilight of the Gods”), first performed in sequence at the Festspielhaus in Bayreuth, Bavaria, Germany, on August 13, 14, 16, and 17, 1876. Collectively they are often referred to as the Ring cycle.

  • Siegfried (Germanic literary hero)

    Siegfried, figure from the heroic literature of the ancient Germanic people. He appears in both German and Old Norse literature, although the versions of his stories told by these two branches of the Germanic tradition do not always agree. He plays a part in the story of Brunhild, in which he meets

  • Siegfried (count of Ardennes)

    Luxembourg: …castle in 963 ce by Siegfried, count of Ardennes, marked the beginning of Luxembourg as an independent entity. The castle’s old name, Lucilinburhuc (“Little Fortress”), is the origin of the name Luxembourg.

  • Siegfried (novel by Mulisch)

    Harry Mulisch: Siegfried (2001) is an alternate history novel in which it is revealed to the main character that Adolf Hitler had a son with Eva Braun. In addition to his many novels, Mulisch wrote plays, essays, short stories, and several books of poetry. De zaak 40/61…

  • Siegfried and Roy (American magicians)
  • Siegfried et le Limousin (work by Giraudoux)

    Jean Giraudoux: In Siegfried et le Limousin (1922), Giraudoux depicts in silhouette, as it were, the hostility between two enemies, France and Germany, as a background to his story of a man who suffers from amnesia. Bella (1926) is a love story behind which can be glimpsed the…

  • Siegfried Idyll (work by Wagner)

    Siegfried Idyll, symphonic poem for chamber orchestra by Richard Wagner that reflects a gentle, tender side of the composer. It premiered on Christmas Day 1870. After the wife of the pianist and conductor Hans von Bülow had three children—Isolde (1865), Eva (1867), and Siegfried (1869)—with Wagner,

  • Siegfried Line (German history)

    Siegfried Line, system of pillboxes and strongpoints built along the German western frontier in the 1930s and greatly expanded in 1944. In 1944, during World War II, German troops retreating from France found it an effective barrier for a respite against the pursuing Americans. This respite helped

  • Siegfried, André (French political scientist)

    political science: Developments outside the United States: In Paris, André Siegfried, teaching at the école Libre des Sciences Politiques and the Collège de France, introduced the use of maps to demonstrate the influence of geography on politics. At first few Britons turned to behavioralism and quantification, instead continuing in their inclination toward political philosophy.…

  • Siegfriedstellung (German defense system)

    Hindenburg Line, defensive barrier improvised by the German army on the Western Front in World War I. Faced with substantial numerical inferiority and a dwindling firepower advantage, the new German commanders, Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg and Gen. Erich Ludendorff, shortened their lines and

  • Siegling, Wilhelm (German scholar)

    Indo-European languages: Sanskrit studies and their impact: …German scholars Emil Sieg and Wilhelm Siegling in 1908. The Norwegian Assyriologist J?rgen Alexander Knudtzon recognized Hittite as Indo-European on the basis of two letters found in Egypt (translated in Die zwei Arzawa-briefe [1902; “The Two Arzawa Letters”]), but his views were not generally accepted until 1915, when Bed?ich Hrozny…

  • Siegwart-Müller, Constantin (Swiss politician)

    Constantin Siegwart-Müller, Swiss politician who headed the Ultramontane Party at Lucerne and became the leader of the dissident Sonderbund. A lawyer from the canton of Uri, Siegwart-Müller settled in 1832 at Lucerne, where he soon rose to the position of state secretary (1834). In 1839 he

  • Sielanki (work by Szymonowic)

    Polish literature: Kochanowski and his followers: He introduced in his Sielanki (1614; “Idylls”) a poetic genre that was to retain its vitality until the end of the 19th century. These pastoral poems exemplify the processes of imitation, adaptation, and assimilation by which Renaissance writers brought foreign models into the native tradition.

  • Sielanki nowe ruskie (work by Zimorowic)

    Polish literature: Poetry: …by Szymon Zimorowic, and the Sielanki nowe ruskie (1663; “New Ruthenian Idylls”), written by his brother Józef Bart?omiej Zimorowic, introduced topical dramatic elements into the traditional pastoral lyric; images of war and death were superimposed upon the pastoral background, with macabre effect and typical Baroque incongruity.

  • Siem Reap (Cambodia)

    Si?mréab, city, northwestern Cambodia. It lies along the Si?mréab River and is linked to Phnom Penh, the national capital, and neighbouring areas by a national highway. The town has a pharmaceutical production centre, a hog-breeding facility, agricultural-machinery workshops, a crocodile farm, and

  • Siembra (album by Colón and Blades)

    Willie Colón: Their album Siembra (1978) became the top-selling title in the catalog of its record label, Fania, and it remained one of the most popular salsa recordings into the early 21st century. Colón and Blades parted ways in the early 1980s but reunited several times during the next…

  • siemens (unit of energy measurement)

    Siemens (S), unit of electrical conductance. In the case of direct current (DC), the conductance in siemens is the reciprocal of the resistance in ohms (S = amperes per volts); in the case of alternating current (AC), it is the reciprocal of the impedance in ohms. A former term for the reciprocal

  • Siemens AG (German company)

    Siemens AG, German energy technology and manufacturing company formed in 1966 through the merger of Siemens & Halske AG (founded 1847), Siemens-Schuckertwerke (founded 1903), and Siemens-Reiniger-Werke AG (founded 1932). Operating in more than 200 countries and regions, it engages in a wide range

  • Siemens Aktiengesellschaft (German company)

    Siemens AG, German energy technology and manufacturing company formed in 1966 through the merger of Siemens & Halske AG (founded 1847), Siemens-Schuckertwerke (founded 1903), and Siemens-Reiniger-Werke AG (founded 1932). Operating in more than 200 countries and regions, it engages in a wide range

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载