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  • Silvestri, Filippo (Italian entomologist)

    Filippo Silvestri, Italian entomologist, best remembered for his pioneering work in polyembryony, the development of more than one individual from a single fertilized egg cell. During the late 1930s Silvestri discovered that this type of reproduction occurs in the species Litomatix truncatellus of

  • Silvetti, Jorge (architect)

    J. Paul Getty Museum: …Boston-based architects Rodolfo Machado and Jorge Silvetti. It became home to a research centre and Getty’s collection of ancient Greek, Roman, and Etruscan art. In 2018 the collection was reinstalled chronologically after decades of being displayed thematically.

  • Silvia (queen consort of Sweden)

    Silvia, queen consort of Sweden (1976– ), wife of King Carl XVI Gustaf. Silvia was born in Heidelberg, Ger., to a Brazilian mother and German father. When she was three years old, her family moved to S?o Paulo, where she spent much of her childhood. After they returned to West Germany in 1957,

  • Silvia (fictional character)

    The Two Gentlemen of Verona: …and abruptly becomes enamoured with Silvia, the Duke’s fair daughter, with whom Valentine plans secretly to elope. Proteus treacherously betrays Valentine’s plan to the Duke, who promptly banishes Valentine. The Duke is assisted in all this by Thurio, a wealthy and most unwelcome suitor to Silvia. Concurrently, Julia disguises herself…

  • silviculture (forestry)

    forestry: Silviculture: Silviculture is the branch of forestry concerned with the theory and practice of controlling forest establishment, composition, and growth. Like forestry itself, silviculture is an applied science that rests ultimately upon the more fundamental natural and social sciences. The immediate foundation of silviculture in the…

  • silvopasture (agroforestry)

    forestry: Range and forage: …agroforestry, a practice known as silvopasture, or dehesa, specifically seeks to combine trees with forage (pasture) and livestock production. The components are structurally and functionally combined and actively managed to optimize the positive biophysical interactions between them. This form of agroforestry is a practical and low-cost means of implementing integrated…

  • Silvretta Group (mountains, Europe)

    Silvretta Group, mountain range of the Rhaetian Alps along the Austrian-Swiss border, extending eastward from near Klosters to north of Schuls, both in Switzerland. The glacier-covered range rises to Linard Peak (11,191 feet [3,411 metres]) in Switzerland and to Buin Peak (10,866 feet [3,312

  • Silvretta Gruppe (mountains, Europe)

    Silvretta Group, mountain range of the Rhaetian Alps along the Austrian-Swiss border, extending eastward from near Klosters to north of Schuls, both in Switzerland. The glacier-covered range rises to Linard Peak (11,191 feet [3,411 metres]) in Switzerland and to Buin Peak (10,866 feet [3,312

  • Silzibul (Turkish leader)

    ancient Iran: Conflicts with the Turks and Byzantium: …with a Turkish leader called Sinjibu (Silzibul), Khosrow was able to inflict a decisive defeat on the Hephthalites, after which event a common frontier between the Turkish and Sāsānian empires was established. Inevitably, this alliance became a source of possible friction, and the Turks sometimes acted as an ally of…

  • Sim, Alastair (British actor)

    A Christmas Carol: …of Ebenezer Scrooge (played by Alastair Sim), a rich, self-obsessed miser. On Christmas Eve he is given one last chance for redemption when the ghost of his equally miserly business partner, Jacob Marley (Michael Hordern), comes back to warn him of the potentially devastating consequences of his cruel behaviour. After…

  • Sim, Gordon (American set designer and set decorator)
  • Sima Changqing (Chinese author)

    Sima Xiangru, Chinese poet renowned for his fu, a form of descriptive poetry. Self-trained in literature and fencing, Sima Xiangru was appointed bodyguard to the Han emperor Jingdi, but soon he took a new position at the court of Prince Xiao of Liang. There he began to compose his famous fu

  • Sima Chengzhen (Daoist leader)

    Sima Chengzhen, sixth patriarch of the Shangqing school of Daoism, who had many associations with famous poets such as Li Bai and Wang Wei during the Tang dynasty. Called to court during the reign of the emperor Ruizong (reigned 710–712), Sima recommended a government that followed the principles

  • Sima de los Huesos (cave, Atatpuerca, Spain)

    Atapuerca: …Atapuerca is a cave called Sima de los Huesos (“Pit of the Bones”), where more than 1,600 human fossils, including several nearly complete skulls, have been found. The age of this material is at least 300,000 years and may be as old as 600,000 years. Brain sizes are within the…

  • Sima del Elefante (archaeological site, Spain)

    Atapuerca: The site called Sima del Elefante (“Pit of the Elephant”) contains the earliest evidence of humans in western Europe—fragments of a jawbone and teeth date to 1.1–1.2 million years ago. The nearby site of Gran Dolina contains human remains dating to about 800,000 years ago and some of…

  • Sima Guang (Chinese scholar)

    Sima Guang, scholar, statesman, and poet who compiled the monumental Zizhi tongjian (“Comprehensive Mirror for Aid in Government”), a general chronicle of Chinese history from 403 bce to 959 ce, considered one of the finest single historical works in Chinese. Known for his moral uprightness, he was

  • Sima Qian (Chinese historian and scientist)

    Sima Qian, astronomer, calendar expert, and the first great Chinese historian. He is most noted for his authorship of the Shiji (“Historical Records”), which is considered to be the most important history of China down to the end of the 2nd century. Sima Qian was the son of Sima Tan, the grand

  • Sima Tan (Chinese historian)

    Sima Qian: Life: …Qian was the son of Sima Tan, the grand historian (sometimes translated as “astronomer royal”) at the Han court during the period 140–110 bce. The office of grand historian combined responsibility for astronomical observations and for the regulation of the calendar with the duties of keeping a daily record of…

  • Sima Xiangru (Chinese author)

    Sima Xiangru, Chinese poet renowned for his fu, a form of descriptive poetry. Self-trained in literature and fencing, Sima Xiangru was appointed bodyguard to the Han emperor Jingdi, but soon he took a new position at the court of Prince Xiao of Liang. There he began to compose his famous fu

  • Sima Yan (emperor of Jin dynasty)

    Wudi, posthumous name (shi) of the founder and first emperor (265–290) of the Xi (Western) Jin dynasty (265–316/317), which briefly reunited China during the turbulent period following the dissolution of the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220). Sima Yan was the scion of the great Sima clan to which the

  • simakobu (primate)

    Simakobu, (Simias concolor), leaf-eating monkey found only on the Mentawai Islands west of Sumatra. The body averages about half a metre (20 inches) in length, and it is unique among langurs in having a tail that is much shorter than the body (15 cm [6 inches]). Females weigh 7 kg (15.5 pounds) on

  • Simancas (Spain)

    Simancas, town, Valladolid provincia (province), in the Castile-León comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), north-central Spain. It lies on the right bank of the Pisuerga River, just southwest of Valladolid city. The town originated as the Roman Septimanca, and its most important landmark is a

  • Simandl bow (musical instrument accessory)

    stringed instrument: The bow: …a little later, by the Simandl bow, named after Franz Simandl, a double-bass professor at the Vienna Conservatory from 1869 to 1910. This bow is really an adaptation of the older type but with an incurved stick, wide frog, and narrow head.

  • Simanggang (Malaysia)

    Sri Aman, market town and port, East Malaysia (northwestern Borneo), on the Lupar River. Situated in one of the few major agricultural areas of Sarawak, it is a trade centre for timber, oil palms, rubber, and pepper. Sri Aman has an airstrip and a road link to Kuching, 80 miles (129 km)

  • Simansky, Sergei Vladimirovich (patriarch of Moscow)

    Alexis I, Russian Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia (1945–70) whose allegiance to the Soviet government helped him strengthen the structure of the church within an officially atheistic country. Born to an aristocratic family, Simansky received a law degree from the University of Moscow

  • SimAnt (electronic game)

    electronic artificial life game: …again with a simpler simulation, SimAnt (1991), in which players take the role of a black ant (yellow in the game) as it helps its colony compete for resources with a computer-controlled colony of red ants. Maxis followed with the critically acclaimed SimLife (1992), an A-life simulation in which players…

  • Simao (China)

    Pu’er, city, southern Yunnan sheng (province), China. It is situated in a small basin among mountains some 5,000 feet (1,500 metres) in elevation, 19 miles (30 km) south of Ning’er (formerly Pu’er), the former centre of the Yunnanese tea trade, and about 355 miles (570 km) southwest of Kunming, the

  • Simaroubaceae (plant family)

    Simaroubaceae, the quassia family of flowering plants, in the order Sapindales, comprising 25 genera of pantropical trees, including Ailanthus, or the tree of heaven (q.v.). Members of the family have leaves that alternate along the stem and are composed of a number of leaflets arranged along an

  • Simash dynasty (rulers of Elam)

    ancient Iran: The Old Elamite period: …ruling house soon appeared, the Simash dynasty (Simash may have been in the mountains of southern Lorestān). The outstanding event of this period was the virtual conquest of Elam by Shulgi of the 3rd dynasty of Ur (c. 2094–c. 2047 bc). Eventually the Elamites rose in rebellion and overthrew the…

  • Simbar-Shihu (king of Babylonia)

    history of Mesopotamia: Babylonia under the 2nd dynasty of Isin: …had the Kassitic name of Simbar-Shihu (or Simbar-Shipak; (c. 1020–c. 1003).

  • Simbar-Shipak (king of Babylonia)

    history of Mesopotamia: Babylonia under the 2nd dynasty of Isin: …had the Kassitic name of Simbar-Shihu (or Simbar-Shipak; (c. 1020–c. 1003).

  • Simbi and the Satyr of the Dark Jungle (work by Tutuola)

    Amos Tutuola: Another quest is found in Simbi and the Satyr of the Dark Jungle (1955), a more compact tale focusing upon a beautiful and rich young girl who leaves her home and experiences poverty and starvation. In this and the books that followed—The Brave African Huntress (1958), The Feather Woman of…

  • Simbirsk (Russia)

    Ulyanovsk, city and administrative centre of Ulyanovsk oblast (region), western Russia. It lies along the Volga River at its confluence with the Sviyaga. Founded in 1648, it was a key fortress on the Sinbirsk defensive line; in 1924 it was renamed after V.I. Ulyanov (Lenin), who was born there and

  • Simbirsk (oblast, Russia)

    Ulyanovsk, oblast (region), western Russia. The oblast lies athwart the middle Volga River, which is there transformed into a broad lake by the downstream Samara dam. The larger western part lies on the Volga Upland, which is dissected by river valleys and erosion gullies; the smaller Trans-Volga

  • Simblum (fungus genus)

    stinkhorn: Mutinus, Dictyophora, Simblum, and Clathrus.

  • Simbólicas (work by Eguren)

    José María Eguren: His first book of poetry, Simbólicas (1911; “Symbolisms”), signaled a break with the Modernismo tradition, while still maintaining contacts with the Romantic and early French Symbolist poets who had influenced the Modernist movement. Eguren’s often fantastic creations reflect his desire to escape to an imagined medieval world of adventure peopled…

  • Simca (French firm)

    automotive industry: Growth in Europe: A new French firm, Simca, rose to prominence in the 1930s. The German automobile industry suffered from the dislocation of World War I and Germany’s subsequent economic difficulties. The major developments of the 1920s were the merger of Daimler and Benz in 1926, after the founders of those firms…

  • Simchas Torah (religious festival)

    Simhath Torah, (“Rejoicing of the Torah”), Jewish religious observance held on the last day of Sukkoth (“Festival of Booths”), when the yearly cycle of Torah reading is completed and the next cycle is begun. Torah scrolls are removed from the ark and carried through the synagogue seven times in a

  • Simchat Torah (religious festival)

    Simhath Torah, (“Rejoicing of the Torah”), Jewish religious observance held on the last day of Sukkoth (“Festival of Booths”), when the yearly cycle of Torah reading is completed and the next cycle is begun. Torah scrolls are removed from the ark and carried through the synagogue seven times in a

  • Simchath Torah (religious festival)

    Simhath Torah, (“Rejoicing of the Torah”), Jewish religious observance held on the last day of Sukkoth (“Festival of Booths”), when the yearly cycle of Torah reading is completed and the next cycle is begun. Torah scrolls are removed from the ark and carried through the synagogue seven times in a

  • SimCity (electronic game)

    SimCity, city creation and management simulation game designed and produced in 1989 by American game designer Will Wright and electronic game developer Maxis (now a division of Electronic Arts [EA]). SimCity is viewed as a quite original game, and it inspired an array of sequels, including the very

  • Simcoe (Ontario, Canada)

    Simcoe, former town, now incorporated into (and administrative centre of) the regional municipality of Norfolk county, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It lies along the Lynn River, 5 miles (8 km) north of Lake Erie. Settled before 1780 and named after John Graves Simcoe, the first lieutenant governor

  • Simcoe, John Graves (British statesman)

    John Graves Simcoe, British soldier and statesman who became the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (present-day Ontario). Simcoe—educated at Exeter Grammar School, Eton College, and Oxford University—entered the British army as an ensign in 1770. He served during the American Revolution

  • Simcoe, Lake (lake, Ontario, Canada)

    Lake Simcoe, lake, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It lies between Lake Huron’s Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario, 40 miles (65 km) north of Toronto. Fed by numerous small streams and joined by the Trent Canal, the lake, 287 square miles (743 square km) in area, drains northward through Couchiching Lake

  • SimEarth (electronic game)

    electronic artificial life game: …first commercial A-life release was SimEarth (1990), a world-builder simulation for personal computers (PCs) in which players select from various landforms and climates for their planet, seed the planet with very primitive life forms, and wait to see if advanced life will develop. Compared with his hit electronic management game…

  • Simen jackal (mammal)

    wolf: Other wolves: The critically endangered Ethiopian wolf (C. simensis) looks similar to the coyote. It lives in a few isolated areas of grassland and heath scrub at high elevations in Ethiopia. Although it lives in packs, the wolves hunt alone for rodents and other small mammals.

  • Simēn Mountains (mountains, Ethiopia)

    Simien Mountains, mountains in northern Ethiopia, northeast of Gonder. In the range is Ras Dejen (or Dashen), the highest peak in Ethiopia at 14,872 feet (4,533 metres). The region is the site of Simien Mountains National Park, which is home to a number of very rare species that include the walia

  • Simenon, Georges (Belgian-French author)

    Georges Simenon, Belgian-French novelist whose prolific output surpassed that of any of his contemporaries and who was perhaps the most widely published author of the 20th century. Simenon began working on a local newspaper at age 16, and at 19 he went to Paris determined to be a successful writer.

  • Simenon, Georges-Joseph-Christian (Belgian-French author)

    Georges Simenon, Belgian-French novelist whose prolific output surpassed that of any of his contemporaries and who was perhaps the most widely published author of the 20th century. Simenon began working on a local newspaper at age 16, and at 19 he went to Paris determined to be a successful writer.

  • Simeon (Hebrew tribe)

    Simeon, one of the 12 tribes of Israel that in biblical times comprised the people of Israel who later became the Jewish people. The tribe was named after the second son born to Jacob and his first wife, Leah. Following the Exodus out of Egypt and the death of Moses, Joshua led the Israelites into

  • Simeon (Christian Apostle)

    St. Peter the Apostle, disciple of Jesus Christ, recognized in the early Christian church as the leader of the 12 disciples and by the Roman Catholic Church as the first of its unbroken succession of popes. Peter, a Jewish fisherman, was called to be a disciple of Jesus at the beginning of Jesus’

  • Simeon (Hebrew patriarch)

    Dinah: Dinah’s brothers Simeon and Levi pretended to agree to the marriage and the covenant if Shechem and all the other males of the city of Shechem were circumcised. After the operations, while the men were still weakened, Simeon and Levi attacked the city, killed all the males,…

  • Simeon ben Gamaliel (Jewish leader)

    yeshiva: …who dominated religious scholarship were Simeon ben Gamaliel (died 175) and his son, Judah ha-Nasi (c. 135–c. 220), under whose tutelage the compilation of the Mishna was completed.

  • Simeon ben Yo?ai (Jewish scholar)

    Simeon ben Yo?ai, Galilean tanna (i.e., one of a select group of Palestinian rabbinic teachers), one of the most eminent disciples of the martyred Rabbi Akiba ben Joseph and, traditionally, author of the Zohar (see Sefer ha-zohar), the most important work of Jewish mysticism. Little is known of

  • Simeon I (tsar of Bulgarian empire)

    Simeon I, tsar of the first Bulgarian empire (925–927), a warlike sovereign who nevertheless made his court a cultural centre. Educated in Constantinople (now Istanbul), Simeon succeeded his father, Boris I, in 893 after the short intervening reign (889–893) of his dissolute elder brother, V

  • Simeon II (prime minister and former king of Bulgaria)

    Simeon Saxecoburggotski, the last king of Bulgaria, reigning as a child from 1943 to 1946 as Simeon II. He later served as the country’s prime minister (2001–05). On Aug. 28, 1943, his father, Boris III, died under mysterious circumstances—the cause of death being reported variously as heart attack

  • Simeon Metaphrastes (Byzantine hagiographer)

    Simeon Metaphrastes, Byzantine hagiographer whose Mēnologion, a 10-volume collection of the lives of early Eastern saints, achieved wide popularity. Of Simeon’s life it is known only that he held an administrative post in the Byzantine civil service and that toward the end of his life he became a

  • Simeon of Durham (English historian)

    Simeon Of Durham, chronicler of medieval England. Simeon entered the Benedictine abbey at Jarrow, in the county of Durham, in about 1071. This abbey was moved (1083) to the town of Durham, and there he made his religious vows in 1085/86 and later became choirmaster. Between 1104 and 1108 Simeon w

  • Simeon of Polotsk (Belarusian writer and theologian)

    Fyodor III: …in Polish and Latin by Simeon Polotsky, a noted theologian who had studied in Kiev and Poland. When Alexis died, Fyodor ascended the throne (Jan. 19 [Jan. 29], 1676), but his youth and poor health prevented him from actively participating in the conduct of government affairs. His uncle Ivan B.…

  • Simeon Stylites, St. (Christian monk)

    St. Simeon Stylites, ; Western feast day January 5; Eastern feast day September 1), Syrian Christian hermit who was the first known stylite, or pillar hermit (from Greek stylos, “pillar”). He was called Simeon the Elder to distinguish him from several other stylites also named Simeon. The son of a

  • Simeon the Elder (Christian monk)

    St. Simeon Stylites, ; Western feast day January 5; Eastern feast day September 1), Syrian Christian hermit who was the first known stylite, or pillar hermit (from Greek stylos, “pillar”). He was called Simeon the Elder to distinguish him from several other stylites also named Simeon. The son of a

  • Simeon the Great (tsar of Bulgarian empire)

    Simeon I, tsar of the first Bulgarian empire (925–927), a warlike sovereign who nevertheless made his court a cultural centre. Educated in Constantinople (now Istanbul), Simeon succeeded his father, Boris I, in 893 after the short intervening reign (889–893) of his dissolute elder brother, V

  • Simeon the New Theologian, Saint (Byzantine monk)

    Saint Symeon the New Theologian, Byzantine monk and mystic, termed the New Theologian to mark his difference from two key figures in Greek Christian esteem, St. John the Evangelist and the 4th-century theologian St. Gregory of Nazianzus. Through his spiritual experiences and writings Symeon

  • Simeon, Charles (British clergyman)

    Charles Simeon, Anglican clergyman and biblical commentator who led the Evangelical (or Low Church) movement, in reaction to the liturgically and episcopally oriented High Church party. Simeon was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, where he became vice provost (1790–92). In 1782 he was

  • Simeon, Song of (biblical canticle)

    Nunc Dimittis, in the New Testament, a brief hymn of praise sung by the aged Simeon, who had been promised by the Holy Spirit that he would not die until he had seen the Messiah. Simeon was at the Temple in Jerusalem when Mary and Joseph came to present the infant Jesus for the rite of purification

  • Simeoni, Sara (Italian athlete)

    Sara Simeoni, Italian high jumper who won an Olympic gold medal and two silver medals in the 1970s and ’80s. At the 1972 Olympics in Munich, Simeoni advanced to the final round, where she finished in sixth place with a jump of 1.85 m (6 feet 34 inch) behind 16-year-old gold medalist Ulrike

  • Simeuloe? Island (island, Indonesia)

    Simeulue Island, island in the Indian Ocean, Aceh daerah istimewa (special district), Indonesia. Simeulue lies off the northwestern coast of Sumatra, about 170 mi (274 km) southwest of Medan city. The island, 65 mi long and 20 mi wide, covers an area of 712 sq mi (1,844 sq km). Its hills rise to

  • Simeulue Island (island, Indonesia)

    Simeulue Island, island in the Indian Ocean, Aceh daerah istimewa (special district), Indonesia. Simeulue lies off the northwestern coast of Sumatra, about 170 mi (274 km) southwest of Medan city. The island, 65 mi long and 20 mi wide, covers an area of 712 sq mi (1,844 sq km). Its hills rise to

  • Simferopol (Ukraine)

    Simferopol, city and administrative centre of Crimea, in southern Ukraine. The city lies along the Salhyr (Salgir) River where it emerges from the Crimean Mountains. On the present outskirts of the city is the site of Neapolis, occupied by the Scythians from the 3rd century bce to the 4th century

  • Simhali language

    Sinhalese language, Indo-Aryan language, one of the two official languages of Sri Lanka. It was taken there by colonists from northern India about the 5th century bc. Because of its isolation from the other Indo-Aryan tongues of mainland India, Sinhalese developed along independent lines. It was

  • Si?hana (Yādava king)

    India: The Deccan and the south: …expanded during the reign of Simhana (reigned c. 1210–47), who campaigned against the Hoysala in northern Karnataka, against the lesser chiefs of the western coast, and against the Kakatiya kingdom in the eastern Deccan. Turning northward, Simhana attacked the Paramaras and the Caulukyas. The Yadavas, however, facing the Turks to…

  • Sim?at Torah (religious festival)

    Simhath Torah, (“Rejoicing of the Torah”), Jewish religious observance held on the last day of Sukkoth (“Festival of Booths”), when the yearly cycle of Torah reading is completed and the next cycle is begun. Torah scrolls are removed from the ark and carried through the synagogue seven times in a

  • Simhath Torah (religious festival)

    Simhath Torah, (“Rejoicing of the Torah”), Jewish religious observance held on the last day of Sukkoth (“Festival of Booths”), when the yearly cycle of Torah reading is completed and the next cycle is begun. Torah scrolls are removed from the ark and carried through the synagogue seven times in a

  • Si?havarman (Indian ruler)

    Pallava dynasty: A later Pallava king, Simhavarman, is mentioned in the Sanskrit Lokavibhaga as reigning from 436 ce.

  • Simi Valley (California, United States)

    Simi Valley, city, Ventura county, southern California, U.S. It is adjacent to the northwestern boundary of the San Fernando Valley, 40 miles (65 km) northwest of Los Angeles. The area was founded on the site of a Chumash Indian village and designated a Spanish rancho in 1795. The settlement

  • simian immunodeficiency virus (virus)

    SIV, infectious agent of the genus Lentivirus in the family Retroviridae. The virus infects primates of the infraorder Simiiformes, which includes the so-called anthropoids—apes, monkeys, and humans. SIV is transmitted through contact with infected body fluids such as blood. It is widespread among

  • simian vacuolating virus 40 (biology)

    virus: Malignant transformation: …of the family Polyomaviridae is simian virus 40 (SV40), originally isolated from cells of the African green monkey (Cercopithecus sabaeus), where it grows rapidly and kills the cells. Infection of rodent or human cells, however, results in an abortive infection (an incompatibility between the virus and the host cell) but…

  • simian virus 40 (biology)

    virus: Malignant transformation: …of the family Polyomaviridae is simian virus 40 (SV40), originally isolated from cells of the African green monkey (Cercopithecus sabaeus), where it grows rapidly and kills the cells. Infection of rodent or human cells, however, results in an abortive infection (an incompatibility between the virus and the host cell) but…

  • Simias concolor (primate)

    Simakobu, (Simias concolor), leaf-eating monkey found only on the Mentawai Islands west of Sumatra. The body averages about half a metre (20 inches) in length, and it is unique among langurs in having a tail that is much shorter than the body (15 cm [6 inches]). Females weigh 7 kg (15.5 pounds) on

  • Simic, Charles (American poet)

    Charles Simic, Yugoslavian-born American poet who evoked his eastern European heritage and his childhood experiences during World War II to comment on the dearth of spirituality in contemporary life. At age 15 Simic moved with his mother to Paris, where he attended French schools and studied

  • simien jackal (mammal)

    wolf: Other wolves: The critically endangered Ethiopian wolf (C. simensis) looks similar to the coyote. It lives in a few isolated areas of grassland and heath scrub at high elevations in Ethiopia. Although it lives in packs, the wolves hunt alone for rodents and other small mammals.

  • Simien Mountains (mountains, Ethiopia)

    Simien Mountains, mountains in northern Ethiopia, northeast of Gonder. In the range is Ras Dejen (or Dashen), the highest peak in Ethiopia at 14,872 feet (4,533 metres). The region is the site of Simien Mountains National Park, which is home to a number of very rare species that include the walia

  • Simien Mountains National Park (national park, Ethiopia)

    Ethiopia: Plant and animal life: Simien Mountains National Park, home to several endangered species, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1978.

  • Simien National Park (national park, Ethiopia)

    Ethiopia: Plant and animal life: Simien Mountains National Park, home to several endangered species, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1978.

  • Simiiformes (primate infraorder)

    primate: Classification: Infraorder Simiiformes 8 living and 6 fossil families dating to the Early Miocene. Platyrrhini (New World monkeys) 5 living families with more than 93 species. 1 fossil family of 7 Late Oligocene to Early Miocene genera (8 species) are not assignable to any of these families.…

  • similarity (psychology)

    perception: Gestalt principles: In the right-hand panel, similarity, another principle of organization, is operative. Here, by virtue of similarity in brightness, the visual field tends to be perceptually articulated into alternating sets of black and gray rows.

  • similarity (mathematics)

    mathematics: The Elements: …VI describes the properties of similar plane rectilinear figures and so generalizes the congruence theory of Book I. It appears that the technique of similar figures was already known in the 5th century bce, even though a fully valid justification could not have been given before Eudoxus worked out his…

  • similarity (religion)

    Meister Eckhart: Similarity: Man thus detached from the singular (individual things) and attached to the universal (Being) discovers himself to be an image of God. Divine resemblance, an assimilation, then emerges: the Son, image of the Father, engenders himself within the detached soul. As an image, “thou…

  • similarity, fundamental theorem of (mathematics)

    Euclidean geometry: Similarity of triangles: The fundamental theorem of similarity states that a line segment splits two sides of a triangle into proportional segments if and only if the segment is parallel to the triangle’s third side.

  • simile (literature)

    Simile, figure of speech involving a comparison between two unlike entities. In the simile, unlike the metaphor, the resemblance is explicitly indicated by the words “like” or “as.” The common heritage of similes in everyday speech usually reflects simple comparisons based on the natural world or

  • simillimi, I (work by Trissino)

    Gian Giorgio Trissino: …wrote a later verse comedy, I simillimi (published 1548), based on the Roman playwright Plautus’ Menaechmi. He also wrote the first Italian odes modeled on the irregular lyric verse of the Greek poet Pindar and the first Italian versions of the Horatian ode. His La poetica (1529) used Italian poetry…

  • Simionato, Giulietta (Italian singer)

    Giulietta Simionato, Italian mezzo soprano (born May 12, 1910, Forlì, Italy—died May 5, 2010, Rome, Italy), excelled at bel canto and lighter operas by Rossini and Mozart, which perfectly suited her wide vocal range and warm, expressive lyricism, though she later expanded her repertoire to include

  • Simitière, Pierre Eugène du (American artist)

    Great Seal of the United States: Origin of the Great Seal: …committee consulted with Philadelphia artist Pierre Eugène du Simitière. Choosing a design of his, with slight changes, for the obverse, and one by Franklin for the reverse, it reported to Congress on August 20, 1776. That body tabled the report and deferred further action. However, certain elements carried over into…

  • Simitis, Konstantinos (prime minister of Greece)

    Konstantinos Simitis, legal scholar and politician who served as prime minister of Greece from 1996 to 2004. Simitis was the son of George Simitis, an attorney and prominent leftist politician; both his parents were active in the Resistance during World War II. He received a bachelor’s degree and a

  • Simitis, Konstantinos Georgiou (prime minister of Greece)

    Konstantinos Simitis, legal scholar and politician who served as prime minister of Greece from 1996 to 2004. Simitis was the son of George Simitis, an attorney and prominent leftist politician; both his parents were active in the Resistance during World War II. He received a bachelor’s degree and a

  • Simitis, Kostas (prime minister of Greece)

    Konstantinos Simitis, legal scholar and politician who served as prime minister of Greece from 1996 to 2004. Simitis was the son of George Simitis, an attorney and prominent leftist politician; both his parents were active in the Resistance during World War II. He received a bachelor’s degree and a

  • Simjian, Luther (Armenian American inventor)

    Luther Simjian, Armenian American inventor (born January 28, 1905, Ay?ntab, Ottoman Empire (now Gaziantep, Turkey)—died October 23, 1997, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S.), held patents on more than 200 inventions, including the Teleprompter, the flight simulator, and the automated teller

  • Sīmjūrid dynasty (Iranian dynasty)

    Sīmjūrid Dynasty, (c. 940–1000), minor Iranian dynasty that ruled in Khorāsān. The Sīmjūrids, a family of Iranian notables, rose to prominence early in the 10th century under the Sāmānid rulers of Iran. The detailed history of the family is somewhat obscure, but its historical significance lies in

  • Simla (India)

    Shimla, city, capital of Himachal Pradesh state, northwestern India. The city lies northeast of Chandigarh on a ridge of the Himalayan foothills, at an elevation of about 7,100 feet (2,200 metres). Shimla was built by the British on land they had retained after the Gurkha War of 1814–16 and was

  • SimLife (electronic game)

    electronic artificial life game: …followed with the critically acclaimed SimLife (1992), an A-life simulation in which players adjust numerous environmental and genetic parameters to influence the evolution of plants and animals within the game. It has often been used as a tool for teaching children how plants, herbivores, and carnivores interact to maintain a…

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