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  • Simmel, Georg (German sociologist)

    Georg Simmel, German sociologist and Neo-Kantian philosopher whose fame rests chiefly on works concerning sociological methodology. He taught philosophy at the Universities of Berlin (1885–1914) and Strassburg (1914–18), and his insightful essays on personal and social interaction inspired the

  • Simmel, Johannes Mario (Austrian writer)

    Johannes Mario Simmel, Austrian German-language writer (born April 24, 1924, Vienna, Austria—died Jan. 1, 2009, Zug, Switz.), penned some 35 sociopolitical novels, as well as novellas, short stories, and a score of film screenplays. Simmel’s carefully researched novels—many of them rousing tales of

  • Simmental (breed of cattle)

    livestock farming: Beef cattle breeds: The Simmental accounts for nearly half of the cattle of Switzerland, Austria, and the western areas of Germany. Smaller than the Charolais and Limousin, the Simmental was developed for milk, meat, and draft. It is yellowish brown or red with characteristic white markings.

  • simmering (cooking)

    boiling: At the simmering point, variously specified but generally approaching the boiling temperature, the surface of the water breaks into small bubbles; simmering, in a covered or open pan, is commonly used to prepare soups, stews, and pot roasts. In blanching, boiling water is poured over vegetables, fruits,…

  • Simmonds disease (disease)

    atrophy: Whole body atrophy: Simmonds disease is a chronic deficiency of function of the pituitary gland, a form of hypopituitarism, that leads to atrophy of many of the viscera, including the heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, thyroid, adrenals, and gonads. The disease results in emaciation and death if left untreated.

  • Simmondsia chinensis (plant)

    Jojoba, (Simmondsia chinensis), leathery-leaved shrub in the box family (Buxaceae), native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, the capsules of which yield jojoba oil. The stiff-branched plant, which grows to a height of up to 2 m (7 feet), is cultivated as hedge material,

  • Simmons, Augusta Emma (American religious leader)

    Augusta Emma Simmons Stetson, American religious leader whose success and popularity as a leader in New York’s Christian Science community was considered a threat by the Mother Church. In 1864 Augusta Simmons married Captain Frederick J. Stetson, with whom she lived in England, India, and British

  • Simmons, E. E. (American artist)

    the Ten: Edmund Tarbell, Robert Reid, and E.E. Simmons. When Twachtman died in 1902, William Merritt Chase replaced him.

  • Simmons, Gene (American musician)

    Van Halen: A demo financed by Gene Simmons of Kiss led to their band’s critically acclaimed debut album, Van Halen (1978), which eventually sold more than 10 million copies in the United States alone. Featuring the hits “Jump” and “Panama,” 1984 (1984) made megastars of the Los Angeles-based band. Soon after,…

  • Simmons, Gertrude (American writer)

    Zitkala-Sa, (Lakota: “Red Bird”) writer and reformer who strove to expand opportunities for Native Americans and to safeguard their cultures. Gertrude Simmons was the daughter of a Yankton Sioux mother and a Euro-American father. She adopted the name Zitkala-Sa in her teens. When she was eight, she

  • Simmons, J. K. (American actor)

    J.K. Simmons, American character actor who had a wide-ranging and prolific career both before and after winning an Academy Award for his unnerving portrayal of the sadistic and perfectionist music instructor in Damien Chazelle’s drama Whiplash (2014). Simmons was the son of a music teacher, and he

  • Simmons, Jean (American actress)

    Jean Simmons, British-born American actress who was known for her cool elegance. At age 14, soon after she entered the Aida Foster School of Dancing, Simmons was persuaded by a talent scout to audition for what would be her debut film role, in Give Us the Moon (1943). Over the next several years

  • Simmons, Jean Merilyn (American actress)

    Jean Simmons, British-born American actress who was known for her cool elegance. At age 14, soon after she entered the Aida Foster School of Dancing, Simmons was persuaded by a talent scout to audition for what would be her debut film role, in Give Us the Moon (1943). Over the next several years

  • Simmons, Jonathan Kimble (American actor)

    J.K. Simmons, American character actor who had a wide-ranging and prolific career both before and after winning an Academy Award for his unnerving portrayal of the sadistic and perfectionist music instructor in Damien Chazelle’s drama Whiplash (2014). Simmons was the son of a music teacher, and he

  • Simmons, Mabel (fictional character)

    Tyler Perry: Perry’s trademark character, Madea, was created in his play I Can Do Bad All by Myself (2000; film 2009). The brutally honest, rambunctious gun-toting grandmother, whose name comes from the frequent African American contraction of “Mother Dear,” was played by Perry in drag. She was a recurring figure…

  • Simmons, Richard W. (American actor)

    Richard W. Simmons, American actor (born Aug. 19, 1913, St. Paul, Minn.—died Jan. 11, 2003, Oceanside, Calif.), appeared in numerous movies and television series during his 40-year career, most notably the 1950s TV series Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, in which his crime-solving endeavours were a

  • Simmons, Russell (American entrepreneur)

    Rick Rubin: After hearing “It’s Yours,” Russell Simmons, who was already a rising star in the hip-hop scene, joined Rubin at Def Jam. The two, based in Rubin’s dormitory room, collected demo tapes from aspiring rappers and disc jockeys. In 1984 they had their first hit with LL Cool J’s “I…

  • Simmons, William J. (American colonel and preacher)

    Ku Klux Klan: William J. Simmons, a preacher and promoter of fraternal orders who had been inspired by Thomas Dixon’s book The Clansman (1905) and D.W. Griffith’s film The Birth of a Nation (1915). The new organization remained small until Edward Y. Clarke and Elizabeth Tyler brought to…

  • Simms, F. R. (British inventor)

    tank: Earliest developments: …a powered quadricycle on which F.R. Simms mounted a machine gun in 1899 in England. The inevitable next step was a vehicle that was both armed and armoured. Such a vehicle was constructed to the order of Vickers, Sons and Maxim Ltd. and was exhibited in London in 1902. Two…

  • Simms, Ruth Hanna McCormick (American public official)

    Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms, American public official, an activist on behalf of woman suffrage, and a Republican representative to the U.S. Congress. Ruth Hanna was the daughter of industrialist and political kingmaker Mark Hanna, and she often accompanied her father as he attended to business and

  • Simms, William Gilmore (American novelist)

    William Gilmore Simms, outstanding Southern novelist. Motherless at two, Simms was reared by his grandmother while his father fought in the Creek wars and under Jackson at New Orleans in 1814. Simms lived a vicariously adventurous childhood through his father, while absorbing history through his

  • Simms, Willie (American jockey)

    Willie Simms, American jockey who is the only African American to have won all three of the races that compose the Triple Crown of American horse racing: the Kentucky Derby, the Belmont Stakes, and the Preakness Stakes. Simms began racing in the North in 1887 and became the most-successful rider to

  • Simnel, Lambert (English pretender)

    Lambert Simnel, impostor and claimant to the English crown, the son of an Oxford joiner, who was a pawn in the conspiracies to restore the Yorkist line after the victory of Henry VII (1485). A young Oxford priest, Richard Symonds, seeing in the handsome boy some alleged resemblance to Edward IV,

  • SIMNET (computer network)

    virtual reality: Entertainment: military’s SIMNET system of networked training simulators, BattleTech centres put players in individual “pods,” essentially cockpits that served as immersive, interactive consoles for both narrative and competitive game experiences. All the vehicles represented in the game were controlled by other players, each in his own pod…

  • Simocetus (fossil mammal)

    Simocetus, dolphinlike toothed whale (or odontocete) from the late Oligocene (28 million to 23 million years ago) known for its unusual facial characteristics. The fossil remains of Simocetus were found in the Alsea Formation, a geologic marine sequence made up of fine muds and sands on Oregon’s

  • Simon (Christian Apostle)

    St. Peter the Apostle, disciple of Jesus Christ, recognized in the early Christian church as the leader of the 12 disciples and by the Roman Catholic Church as the first of its unbroken succession of popes. Peter, a Jewish fisherman, was called to be a disciple of Jesus at the beginning of Jesus’

  • Simon (American jockey)

    African Americans and Horse Racing: …known by name was “Monkey” Simon, who rode at the Clover Bottom Race Track in Tennessee about 1806. During the 1820s, horse racing became the most popular sport in the United States, and a large number of the best trainers and jockeys in the country were African Americans.

  • Simon & Schuster, Inc. (American publishing house)

    Simon & Schuster, Inc., American publishing house. It was founded in 1924 by Richard L. Simon and M. Lincoln Schuster, whose initial project, the original crossword-puzzle book, was a best seller. Among their other innovations was Pocket Books, the first American paperback line, which was launched

  • Simon and Garfunkel (American music group)

    Columbia Records: Folk-Rock Fulcrum: Dylan, the Byrds, and Simon and Garfunkel.

  • Simon Boccanegra (opera by Verdi)

    Giuseppe Verdi: The later middle years: Two pieces for Italian theatres, Simon Boccanegra (1857) and Un ballo in maschera (1859; A Masked Ball), affected to a lesser extent by the impact of the grand operatic style, show the enrichment of Verdi’s power as an interpreter of human character and as a master of orchestral colour. Boccanegra,…

  • Simón Bolívar Centre (building, Caracas, Venezuela)

    Caracas: City layout: The twin towers of the Simón Bolívar Centre are also located nearby. Once the tallest buildings in the country, these 30-story structures house various ministries of the national government.

  • Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela (Venezuelan orchestra)

    Gustavo Dudamel: …him music director of the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela (SBYOV; later renamed the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela), the chief performing group. The next year Dudamel and the orchestra toured Germany, and in following years they made additional trips to Europe, all to ecstatic reviews. They played…

  • Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra (Venezuelan orchestra)

    Gustavo Dudamel: …him music director of the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela (SBYOV; later renamed the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela), the chief performing group. The next year Dudamel and the orchestra toured Germany, and in following years they made additional trips to Europe, all to ecstatic reviews. They played…

  • Simon Commission (Indian history [1927])

    Simon Commission, group appointed in November 1927 by the British Conservative government under Stanley Baldwin to report on the working of the Indian constitution established by the Government of India Act of 1919. The commission consisted of seven members—four Conservatives, two Labourites, and

  • Simon de Brie (pope)

    Martin IV, pope from 1281 to 1285. Of noble birth, Martin was a member of the council of King Louis IX of France and, in 1260, chancellor and keeper of the great seal. Pope Urban IV created him cardinal about 1261. He was elected pope on Feb. 22, 1281, assuming the name of Martin IV instead of

  • Simon de Brion (pope)

    Martin IV, pope from 1281 to 1285. Of noble birth, Martin was a member of the council of King Louis IX of France and, in 1260, chancellor and keeper of the great seal. Pope Urban IV created him cardinal about 1261. He was elected pope on Feb. 22, 1281, assuming the name of Martin IV instead of

  • Simon Fraser University (university, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada)

    Simon Fraser University, privately endowed university in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, with branch campuses in Vancouver and Surrey. It was established in 1963 and named after the explorer Simon Fraser. It has faculties of arts, science, applied sciences, graduate studies, business

  • Simon Lee (work of Wordsworth)

    bathos: …for the old huntsman in “Simon Lee” is defeated by the following lines:

  • Simon Maccabaeus (Jewish leader)

    Palestine: The Hasmonean priest-princes: When Simon succeeded Jonathan, he acquired the status of a recognized secular ruler; the year he assumed rule was regarded as the first of a new era, and official documents were dated in his name and by his regnal year. He secured from the new Seleucid…

  • Simon Maccabeus (Hasmonean leader)

    Hasmonean Dynasty: In 143 (or 142) bc Simon Maccabeus, son of Mattathias (and brother of Judas Maccabeus), succeeded his brother Jonathan as leader of the Maccabean revolt against the Seleucid dynasty. He soon became independent of the Seleucids as high priest, ruler, and ethnarch of Judaea; the offices were hereditary, and Simon…

  • Simon Magus (Samarian magician)

    Simon Magus, practitioner of magical arts who probably came from Gitta, a village in biblical Samaria. Simon, according to the New Testament account in Acts of the Apostles 8:9–24, after becoming a Christian, offered to purchase from the Apostles Peter and John the supernatural power of

  • Simon of Saint-Quentin (French friar)

    Simon of Saint-Quentin, French Dominican friar, who accompanied a diplomatic and proselytizing mission sent by Pope Innocent IV to the Mongols of Persia and Armenia in 1247. Much of his account of the mission is preserved in the Speculum historiale (“Mirror of History”) of the French medieval

  • Simon of Stackpole Elidor, John Allse Brook Simon, 1st Viscount (British statesman)

    John Allse Brook Simon, 1st Viscount Simon, British home secretary (1915–16, 1935–37), foreign secretary (1931–35), chancellor of the exchequer (1937–40), and lord chancellor (1940–45) who was identified with the appeasement policy of Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s government toward Nazi

  • Simon of Sudbury (English archbishop)

    Simon Of Sudbury, archbishop of Canterbury from 1375 and chancellor of England from 1380 who lost his life in the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. Simon served for 12 years as an auditor (judge) of the Rota at the papal Curia, and in 1359 Pope Innocent VI employed him in an attempt to persuade King E

  • Simon Rodia, Towers of (towers, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Watts: A notable local attraction is Watts Towers (now a state historic park and a national historic landmark), a group of 17 bricolage spires constructed from 1921 to 1954 by Italian immigrant Simon Rodia from broken tiles, dishes, rocks, bottles, and seashells; the tallest of the towers rises to nearly 100…

  • Simon Says (work by Forth)

    serialism: In Simon Says (1972) by Beauregard Forth, serial elements include specific harmonies, melodies, metres (organizations of the beats or pulses), and key centres. Other composers who have written music that serializes more than the pitch element include the Catalonia-centred composer Roberto Gerhard, the Austrian-American Ernst Krenek,…

  • Simon Stock, Saint (13th-century monk)

    Carmelite: Simon Stock, and the order was adapted to the conditions of the Western lands to which it had been transplanted: the order transformed itself from one of hermits into one of mendicant friars. In this form the Carmelites established themselves throughout western Europe, becoming popular…

  • Simon Templar (fictional character)

    The Saint, fictional English gentleman-adventurer who was the protagonist of short stories and mystery novels by Leslie Charteris. A good-natured, gallant figure, Templar defies social convention and lives outside the law, and yet he emerges untarnished from his shadowy adventures. Meet the Tiger

  • Simon the Apostle, Saint (Christian Apostle)

    Saint Simon the Apostle, ; Western feast day October 28, Eastern feast day June 19), one of the Twelve Apostles. In the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, he bears the epithet Kananaios, or the Cananaean, often wrongly interpreted to mean “from Cana” or “from Canaan.” Kananaios is the Greek

  • Simon the Cananean (Christian Apostle)

    Saint Simon the Apostle, ; Western feast day October 28, Eastern feast day June 19), one of the Twelve Apostles. In the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, he bears the epithet Kananaios, or the Cananaean, often wrongly interpreted to mean “from Cana” or “from Canaan.” Kananaios is the Greek

  • Simon the Leper (biblical figure)

    Bethany: …have been the home of Simon the Leper (Matthew 26; Mark 14). Jesus lodged in the village after his entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:17), and it was also there that he parted from his disciples (Luke 24:50–51).

  • Simon the Magician (Samarian magician)

    Simon Magus, practitioner of magical arts who probably came from Gitta, a village in biblical Samaria. Simon, according to the New Testament account in Acts of the Apostles 8:9–24, after becoming a Christian, offered to purchase from the Apostles Peter and John the supernatural power of

  • Simon the Sorcerer (Samarian magician)

    Simon Magus, practitioner of magical arts who probably came from Gitta, a village in biblical Samaria. Simon, according to the New Testament account in Acts of the Apostles 8:9–24, after becoming a Christian, offered to purchase from the Apostles Peter and John the supernatural power of

  • Simon the Zealot (Christian Apostle)

    Saint Simon the Apostle, ; Western feast day October 28, Eastern feast day June 19), one of the Twelve Apostles. In the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, he bears the epithet Kananaios, or the Cananaean, often wrongly interpreted to mean “from Cana” or “from Canaan.” Kananaios is the Greek

  • Simon Wiesenthal Center (human rights organization)

    Simon Wiesenthal: Vision: …lent his name to the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, but he was involved only indirectly in that centre’s activity.

  • Simon’s Town (South Africa)

    Simon’s Town, town and naval base, Western Cape province, South Africa. It is located on the eastern side of the Cape Peninsula, on False Bay of the Atlantic Ocean, 25 miles (40 km) south of Cape Town. Named for Governor Simon van der Stel, it was a Dutch naval anchorage from 1741, and its harbour

  • Simon, Barney (South African director)

    Barney Simon, South African theatre director (born April 13, 1932, Johannesburg, South Africa—died June 30, 1995, Johannesburg), was a longtime force behind the growth of indigenous South African black drama and served as the artistic director of the nonracial Market Theatre in Johannesburg from i

  • Simon, Carly (American singer-songwriter)

    Carly Simon, American singer-songwriter and children’s book writer known for her pop songs. She had a number of hits in the 1970s, including “You’re So Vain” and “Anticipation.” Simon was raised in an upper-class musical home. Her father was a cofounder of the Simon & Schuster publishing house and

  • Simon, Claude (French author)

    Claude Simon, writer whose works are among the most authentic representatives of the French nouveau roman (“new novel”) that emerged in the 1950s. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1985. The son of a cavalry officer who was killed in World War I, Simon was raised by his mother in

  • Simon, Claude Eugène Henri (French author)

    Claude Simon, writer whose works are among the most authentic representatives of the French nouveau roman (“new novel”) that emerged in the 1950s. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1985. The son of a cavalry officer who was killed in World War I, Simon was raised by his mother in

  • Simon, David (American writer and producer)

    David Simon, American journalist, writer, and producer who was best known as the creator, writer, and executive producer of the critically acclaimed television series The Wire (2002–08). Simon was raised in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Silver Spring, Maryland. He became interested in journalism

  • Simon, David, Lord Simon of Highbury (British industrialist and politician)

    David Simon, Lord Simon of Highbury, British industrialist and politician who served as the chief executive officer of British Petroleum (BP; now BP PLC) from 1992 to 1997 and as minister for trade and competitiveness in Europe for the Labour government from 1997 to 1999. After graduating (1961)

  • Simon, Gustav (German physician)

    urology: …stones until the German surgeon Gustav Simon in 1869 demonstrated that human patients could survive the removal of one kidney, provided the remaining kidney was healthy.

  • Simon, Helmut (German traveler)

    ?tzi: …found by a German tourist, Helmut Simon, on the Similaun Glacier in the Tirolean ?tztal Alps, on the Italian-Austrian border, on September 19, 1991. Radiocarbon-dated to 3300 bce, the body is that of a man aged 25 to 35 who had been about 1.6 metres (5 feet 2 inches) tall…

  • Simon, Herbert A. (American social scientist)

    Herbert A. Simon, American social scientist known for his contributions to a number of fields, including psychology, mathematics, statistics, and operations research, all of which he synthesized in a key theory that earned him the 1978 Nobel Prize for Economics. Simon and his longtime collaborator

  • Simon, Herbert Alexander (American social scientist)

    Herbert A. Simon, American social scientist known for his contributions to a number of fields, including psychology, mathematics, statistics, and operations research, all of which he synthesized in a key theory that earned him the 1978 Nobel Prize for Economics. Simon and his longtime collaborator

  • Simon, Hymie (American comic book artist)

    Joe Simon, (Hymie Simon; Joseph Henry Simon), American cartoonist (born Oct. 11, 1913, Rochester, N.Y.—died Dec. 14, 2011, New York, N.Y.), created (together with Jack Kirby) a cast of superheroes that included Captain America, a star-spangled supersoldier; Manhunter, a former big-game hunter

  • Simon, Joe (American comic book artist)

    Joe Simon, (Hymie Simon; Joseph Henry Simon), American cartoonist (born Oct. 11, 1913, Rochester, N.Y.—died Dec. 14, 2011, New York, N.Y.), created (together with Jack Kirby) a cast of superheroes that included Captain America, a star-spangled supersoldier; Manhunter, a former big-game hunter

  • Simon, John Allse Brook Simon, 1st Viscount (British statesman)

    John Allse Brook Simon, 1st Viscount Simon, British home secretary (1915–16, 1935–37), foreign secretary (1931–35), chancellor of the exchequer (1937–40), and lord chancellor (1940–45) who was identified with the appeasement policy of Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s government toward Nazi

  • Simon, Joseph Henry (American comic book artist)

    Joe Simon, (Hymie Simon; Joseph Henry Simon), American cartoonist (born Oct. 11, 1913, Rochester, N.Y.—died Dec. 14, 2011, New York, N.Y.), created (together with Jack Kirby) a cast of superheroes that included Captain America, a star-spangled supersoldier; Manhunter, a former big-game hunter

  • Simon, Jules-Fran?ois (French politician)

    Jules Simon, French political leader, philosopher, and theorist of the French Radical Party who as premier in 1876–77 became a central figure in the formative crisis of the Third Republic. He was elected to the National Assembly of 1848 as a liberal and was philosophically devoted to the cause of

  • Simon, Kate (American writer)

    Kate Simon, memoirist and travel writer whose work was noted for its readability and its wit. Simon’s family immigrated to the United States in 1917 and settled in New York, first in Harlem and then in the Bronx. Simon graduated from Hunter College of the City University of New York with a

  • Simon, Marvin Neil (American dramatist)

    Neil Simon, American playwright, screenwriter, television writer, and librettist who was one of the most popular playwrights in the history of the American theatre. Simon was raised in New York City and had a difficult childhood. His parents’ relationship was volatile, and his father left the

  • Simon, Neil (American dramatist)

    Neil Simon, American playwright, screenwriter, television writer, and librettist who was one of the most popular playwrights in the history of the American theatre. Simon was raised in New York City and had a difficult childhood. His parents’ relationship was volatile, and his father left the

  • Simon, Norton (American industrialist)

    Norton Simon, U.S. industrialist and art collector (born Feb. 5, 1907, Portland, Ore.—died June 2, 1993, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a savvy businessman who amassed a fortune after he parlayed a bankrupt orange-juice company into a consumer-products conglomerate, Norton Simon Inc., which boasted s

  • Simon, Oliver (English publisher)

    typography: Mechanical composition: In 1923 he joined Oliver Simon in publishing The Fleuron, a journal of printing history and design in which he published a number of important articles on calligraphy and typography.

  • Simon, Paul (United States senator)

    Paul Martin Simon, American politician and educator (born Nov. 29, 1928, Eugene, Ore.—died Dec. 9, 2003, Springfield, Ill.), had a long career in public life that was highlighted by two terms as a U.S. senator (1985–97) and a brief run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988. Sporting h

  • Simon, Paul (American musician)

    Paul Simon, American singer-songwriter who brought a highbrow sensibility to rock music. One of the most paradoxical figures in rock-and-roll history, Simon exemplified many of the principles against which the music initially reacted. From his first big hit, “The Sounds of Silence,” in 1965, Simon

  • Simon, Paul Frederic (American musician)

    Paul Simon, American singer-songwriter who brought a highbrow sensibility to rock music. One of the most paradoxical figures in rock-and-roll history, Simon exemplified many of the principles against which the music initially reacted. From his first big hit, “The Sounds of Silence,” in 1965, Simon

  • Simon, Paul Martin (United States senator)

    Paul Martin Simon, American politician and educator (born Nov. 29, 1928, Eugene, Ore.—died Dec. 9, 2003, Springfield, Ill.), had a long career in public life that was highlighted by two terms as a U.S. senator (1985–97) and a brief run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988. Sporting h

  • Simon, Richard (French theologian)

    history of Europe: History and social thought: Bossuet had encouraged Richard Simon when he set out to refute Protestantism through historical study of the Bible but was shocked when he saw where it led. Inevitably, scholarship revealed inconsistencies and raised questions about the way that the Bible should be treated: if unreliable as history, then…

  • Simon, Sam (American television writer and producer)

    Sam Simon, (Samuel Michael Simon), American television writer and producer (born June 6, 1955, Los Angeles, Calif.—died March 8, 2015, Los Angeles), was one of the original creative forces who brought the long-running animated series The Simpsons to prime-time television in 1989; he was credited

  • Simon, Samuel Michael (American television writer and producer)

    Sam Simon, (Samuel Michael Simon), American television writer and producer (born June 6, 1955, Los Angeles, Calif.—died March 8, 2015, Los Angeles), was one of the original creative forces who brought the long-running animated series The Simpsons to prime-time television in 1989; he was credited

  • Simon, Simone (French actress)

    Simone Simon, French actress (born April 23, 1910, Béthune, France—died Feb. 22, 2005, Paris, France), was much admired for her innocent appearance and on-screen sensuality, notably in Jean Renoir’s La Bête humaine (1938), but she was best known to American audiences for the stylish low-budget t

  • Simon, Sir John (British surgeon)

    Sir John Simon, English surgeon and public health reformer whose efforts to improve the hygienic quality of urban life led to the establishment of modern standards of public health service. A surgeon at King’s College Hospital, London (1840–47), Simon was appointed first medical officer of health

  • Simon, Taryn (American photographer)

    Taryn Simon, American photographer known for her formal, richly textured images, usually captured with an antique large-format camera. She typically assembled her photographs around a predetermined theme or concept and drew the often disparate results together with academically precise textual

  • Simon, Théodore (French psychologist)

    Alfred Binet: …1905 and 1911 he and Théodore Simon developed highly influential scales for the measurement of intelligence of children. Binet also published works on suggestibility (1900) and hysteria (1910) and was working on a revision of his scales at the time of his death.

  • Simon, Walter (linguist)

    Sino-Tibetan languages: Phonological correspondences: …and Old Tibetan made by Walter Simon in 1929, although limited in some ways, pointed to enough sound resemblances in important items of basic vocabulary to eliminate the possibility of coincidental similarities between unrelated languages. A few examples of similar words in Old Tibetan and Old Chinese, respectively, follow: “bent,”…

  • Simon, William Edward (American banker)

    William Edward Simon, American investment banker and government official (born Nov. 27, 1927, Paterson, N.J.—died June 3, 2000, Santa Barbara, Calif.), served as U.S. treasury secretary during the administrations of presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. Simon was a partner at the investment f

  • Simond, Paul-Louis (French physician)

    plague: History: The following year Paul-Louis Simond, a French researcher sent by the Pasteur Institute to India, announced the results of experiments demonstrating that Oriental rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) carried the plague bacillus between rats. It was then demonstrated definitively that rat fleas would infest humans and transmit plague through…

  • Simonde de Sismondi, J.-C.-L. (Swiss economist)

    J.-C.-L. Simonde de Sismondi, Swiss economist and historian who warned against the perils of unchecked industrialism. His pioneering theories on the nature of economic crises and the risks of limitless competition, overproduction, and underconsumption influenced such later economists as Karl Marx

  • Simonds, Ossian C. (American architect)

    William Holabird: …own practice in 1880 with Ossian C. Simonds, who subsequently left for a career in landscape architecture. Roche joined the firm in 1881. Holabird and Roche were responsible for many innovations identified with the Chicago School, such as the so-called Chicago School windows, which resulted in a facade almost entirely…

  • Simone, Giovanni di (Italian engineer)

    Leaning Tower of Pisa: Giovanni di Simone, the engineer in charge when construction resumed, sought to compensate for the lean by making the new stories slightly taller on the short side, but the extra masonry caused the structure to sink still further. The project was plagued with interruptions, as…

  • Simone, Nina (American singer)

    Nina Simone, American singer who created urgent emotional intensity by singing songs of love, protest, and black empowerment in a dramatic style, with a rough-edged voice. A precocious child, Simone played piano and organ in girlhood. She became sensitive to racism when at age 12 she gave a piano

  • Simoneau, Léopold (Canadian singer)

    Léopold Simoneau, French Canadian lyric tenor (born May 3, 1916, Saint-Flavien, Que.—died Aug. 24, 2006, Victoria, B.C.), used intelligence and passion, a sparkling voice, and clear diction to become a leading hero in Mozart operas in the 1950s and ’60s. Simoneau studied voice in Quebec City and M

  • Simonianism (religious doctrine)

    Simonianism, the doctrine professed by followers of Simon Magus

  • Simonides (Polish poet)

    Polish literature: Kochanowski and his followers: …notable of Kochanowski’s followers was Szymon Szymonowic (Simonides). He introduced in his Sielanki (1614; “Idylls”) a poetic genre that was to retain its vitality until the end of the 19th century. These pastoral poems exemplify the processes of imitation, adaptation, and assimilation by which Renaissance writers brought foreign models into…

  • Simonides of Ceos (Greek poet)

    Simonides of Ceos, Greek poet, noted for his lyric poetry, elegiacs, and epigrams; he was an uncle of the Greek lyric poet Bacchylides. Simonides began writing poetry on Ceos, but he was soon called to the court of the Peisistratids (the tyrants of Athens), which was a lively cultural and artistic

  • Simonin, Albert-Charles (French writer)

    Albert-Charles Simonin, French writer who brilliantly exploited the language of the Parisian underworld in tough, fast-talking thrillers that rivaled those of the leading American practitioners in the genre. The authenticity of Simonin’s work was guaranteed by his upbringing in La Chapelle district

  • Simonon, Paul (British musician)

    Damon Albarn: …also featured former Clash bassist Paul Simonon, and the eponymously titled Rocket Juice & the Moon (2012), which employed the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Flea on bass.

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