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  • Sinan (Ottoman architect)

    Sinan, most celebrated of all Ottoman architects, whose ideas, perfected in the construction of mosques and other buildings, served as the basic themes for virtually all later Turkish religious and civic architecture. The son of Greek or Armenian Christian parents, Sinan entered his father’s trade

  • Sinan Sheykih (Turkish poet)

    Sinan ?eyhi, poet who was one of the most important figures in early Ottoman literature. Little is known of his life. Besides being a poet, ?eyhi seems to have been a man of great learning and a disciple of the famous Turkish mystic and saint Haci (Hajji) Bayram Veli of Ankara, founder of the

  • Sinanthropus (former hominid genus)

    Sinanthropus, genus formerly assigned to Peking man (q.v.) and Lantian man (q.v.), both now classified as Homo

  • Sinanthropus lantianensis (anthropology)

    Lantian man, fossils of hominins (members of the human lineage) found in 1963 and 1964 by Chinese archaeologists at two sites in Lantian district, Shaanxi province, China. One specimen was found at each site: a cranium (skullcap) at Gongwangling (Kung-wang-ling) and a mandible (lower jaw) at

  • Sinanthropus pekinensis (anthropology)

    Peking man, extinct hominin of the species Homo erectus, known from fossils found at Zhoukoudian near Beijing. Peking man was identified as a member of the human lineage by Davidson Black in 1927 on the basis of a single tooth. Later excavations yielded several skullcaps and mandibles, facial and

  • Sinapis alba (plant)

    White mustard, (Sinapis alba), annual herbaceous plant of the family Brassicaceae grown primarily for its pungent seeds, which are a source of the condiment known as mustard. Native to the Mediterranean region, white mustard has naturalized throughout much of the world and is an agricultural weed

  • Sinapis arvensis (plant)

    Charlock, (Sinapis arvensis), early-flowering plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Charlock is native to the Mediterranean region and has naturalized in temperate regions worldwide; it is an agricultural weed and an invasive species in some areas outside its native range. Charlock reaches 1

  • Sinarquism (Mexican Fascist movement)

    Sinarquism, (from Spanish sin, “without,” anarquía, “anarchy”), fascist movement in Mexico, based on the Unión Nacional Sinarquista, a political party founded in 1937 at León, Guanajuato state, in opposition to policies established after the Revolution of 1911, especially in opposition to the

  • Sinarquismo (Mexican Fascist movement)

    Sinarquism, (from Spanish sin, “without,” anarquía, “anarchy”), fascist movement in Mexico, based on the Unión Nacional Sinarquista, a political party founded in 1937 at León, Guanajuato state, in opposition to policies established after the Revolution of 1911, especially in opposition to the

  • ?inasi, ?brahim (Turkish author)

    ?brahim ?inasi, writer who founded and led a Western movement in 19th-century Turkish literature. ?inasi became a clerk in the Ottoman general-artillery bureau. After learning French from a French officer who worked for the Ottoman army, ?inasi asked to be sent to study in France and spent five

  • Sinatra, Francis Albert (American singer and actor)

    Frank Sinatra, American singer and motion-picture actor who, through a long career and a very public personal life, became one of the most sought-after performers in the entertainment industry; he is often hailed as the greatest American singer of 20th-century popular music. Sinatra’s father,

  • Sinatra, Frank (American singer and actor)

    Frank Sinatra, American singer and motion-picture actor who, through a long career and a very public personal life, became one of the most sought-after performers in the entertainment industry; he is often hailed as the greatest American singer of 20th-century popular music. Sinatra’s father,

  • Sinatra, Nancy (American singer and actress)

    Lee Hazlewood: …hits with Frank Sinatra’s daughter Nancy, including some to which he contributed his own deadpan baritone as her duet partner.

  • Sinatruces (king of Parthia)

    Sanatruces, king of Parthia from 76/75 to 70/69 bc, who restored unity to his kingdom. Sanatruces may have been a son of Mithradates I (reigned 171–138), the Parthian king who had established the kingdom’s power. Following the death of King Mithradates II in 88 bc, dynastic struggles troubled

  • Sīnā? al-Janūbiyyah (governorate, Egypt)

    Janūb Sīnā?, (Arabic: “Southern Sinai”) mu?āfa?ah (governorate), southern part of Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The governorate was created out of Sīnā? mu?āfa?ah in late 1978, after the first stages of the Israeli withdrawal from the peninsula were initiated. The northern boundary of the governorate

  • Sīnā? al-Shamāliyyah (governorate, Egypt)

    Shamāl Sīnā?, (Arabic: “Northern Sinai”) (Arabic: “Northern Sinai”), mu?āfa?ah (governorate), northern part of the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The governorate was created out of Sīnā? mu?āfa?ah in 1978 after the initial stages of Israel’s withdrawal from the peninsula. The town of Al-?Arīsh is the

  • Sīnā?, Shibh Jazīrat (peninsula, Egypt)

    Sinai Peninsula, triangular peninsula linking Africa with Asia and occupying an area of 23,500 square miles (61,000 square km). The Sinai Desert, as the peninsula’s arid expanse is called, is separated by the Gulf of Suez and the Suez Canal from the Eastern Desert of Egypt, but it continues

  • Sinbad the Sailor (literary character)

    Sindbad the Sailor, hero of The Thousand and One Nights who recounts his adventures on seven voyages. He is not to be confused with Sindbad the Wise, hero of the frame story of the Seven Wise Masters. The stories of Sindbad’s travails, which were a relatively late addition to The Thousand and One

  • Sinbadnameh (story cycle)

    Seven Wise Masters, (“The Book of Sindbad”), a cycle of stories, presumably Indian in origin, that made its way through Middle Persian and Arabic into Western lore. In the frame story, an Oriental king entrusted the education of his son to a wise tutor named Sindbad (not to be confused with the

  • Sinbirsk (Russia)

    Ulyanovsk, city and administrative centre of Ulyanovsk oblast (region), western Russia. It lies along the Volga River at its confluence with the Sviyaga. Founded in 1648, it was a key fortress on the Sinbirsk defensive line; in 1924 it was renamed after V.I. Ulyanov (Lenin), who was born there and

  • Since Cézanne (work by Bell)

    Clive Bell: …his books Art (1914) and Since Cézanne (1922). He asserted that purely formal qualities—i.e., the relationships and combinations of lines and colours—are the most important elements in works of art. The aesthetic emotion aroused in the viewer by a painting springs primarily from an apprehension of its significant form, rather…

  • Since Lenin Died (work by Eastman)

    Lenin's Testament: …it and published them in Since Lenin Died in 1925, and The New York Times printed the entire testament, obtained indirectly through Krupskaya, who had joined the opposition against Stalin, in October 1926. Within the Soviet Union, however, it was not generally known and thus did little to retard Stalin’s…

  • Since U Been Gone (song by Clarkson)

    Kelly Clarkson: …These Hazel Eyes,” and “Since U Been Gone.” Breakaway won a Grammy Award for best pop vocal album, and “Since U Been Gone” was honoured with the award for best female pop vocal performance. Clarkson’s third album, My December (2007), marked a new era in her career; even more…

  • Since You Asked Me… (poem by Van Duyn)

    Mona Van Duyn: In “Since You Asked Me…,” she explained:

  • Since You Went Away (film by Cromwell [1944])

    John Cromwell: From The Prisoner of Zenda to Caged: …with Selznick for his prestigious Since You Went Away (1944), a lengthy but engrossing rendering of a family’s trials and tribulations during the war years. A critical and commercial success, it received a number of Oscar nominations, including a nod for best picture. The Enchanted Cottage (1945) was much more…

  • Sincelejo (Colombia)

    Sincelejo, city, capital of Sucre departamento, northern Colombia. It is located north of the Abibe Mountains, near the Gulf of Morrosquillo. The original Indian village of Cencelejo, which consisted of scattered clearings in dense forest, was beyond Spanish control in the 16th century. The actual

  • Sincerely, Willis Wayde (novel by Marquand)

    John P. Marquand: …about a professional soldier, and Sincerely, Willis Wayde (1955), a sharply satiric portrait of a big business promoter. His last important novel, Women and Thomas Harrow (1958), is about a successful playwright and is partly autobiographical.

  • Sinchi Roca (Inca emperor)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Settlement in the Cuzco Valley: …bore him a son named Sinchi Roca (Zinchi Roq’a). Eventually, the Inca arrived at the fertile area around Cuzco, where they attacked the local residents and drove them from the land. They then established themselves in Cuzco and gradually began to meddle in the affairs of their neighbours, forcing them…

  • Sinclair C5 (electric vehicle)

    Sinclair C5, tiny, electrically powered tricycle-like vehicle invented by Clive Sinclair in 1985. It was perhaps not the best of omens in 1985 that Sinclair chose a certain Barrie Wills as the managing director of Sinclair Vehicles. The new boss had been a senior manager at Belfast’s ill-fated

  • Sinclair Oil Corporation (American corporation)

    Harry F. Sinclair: …California), American oilman who founded Sinclair Oil Corporation, a major integrated petroleum company of the early and mid-20th century. He also figured in the Teapot Dome Scandal in the 1920s.

  • Sinclair v. United States (law case)

    legislative investigative powers: …Nearly four decades later, in Sinclair v. United States (1929), the court, less hostile to congressional inquiries, ruled that a witness could not refuse to answer questions on the grounds that questions related to his private affairs.

  • Sinclair, Catherine (English author)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): …is Holiday House (1839), by Catherine Sinclair, in which at last there are children who are noisy, even naughty, yet not destined for purgatory. Though Miss Sinclair’s book does conclude with a standard deathbed scene, the overall atmosphere is one of gaiety. The victories in the field of children’s literature…

  • Sinclair, Elizabeth (American businesswoman)

    Niihau: …for $10,000 in 1863 to Elizabeth Sinclair of Scotland. Her descendants, the Kamaaina (meaning “Old-Timer”) Robinson family, continue to live on the island and have attempted to preserve Hawaiian culture there. Residency on Niihau is restricted to Hawaiians, and tourism is prohibited; in 1959 it was the only island to…

  • Sinclair, Harry F. (American oilman)

    Harry F. Sinclair, American oilman who founded Sinclair Oil Corporation, a major integrated petroleum company of the early and mid-20th century. He also figured in the Teapot Dome Scandal in the 1920s. Sinclair grew up in Independence, Kansas, and studied pharmacy at the University of Kansas

  • Sinclair, Harry Ford (American oilman)

    Harry F. Sinclair, American oilman who founded Sinclair Oil Corporation, a major integrated petroleum company of the early and mid-20th century. He also figured in the Teapot Dome Scandal in the 1920s. Sinclair grew up in Independence, Kansas, and studied pharmacy at the University of Kansas

  • Sinclair, John (American poet and activist)

    the MC5: …influence of the band’s manager, John Sinclair. Sinclair was the founder of a political group patterned after the Black Panthers, the White Panther Party, for which the MC5 became the ministers of information. (In that capacity they performed outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.) Their first album, Kick…

  • Sinclair, Mark (American actor and producer)

    Vin Diesel, American actor and producer who was best known for his action films, most notably The Fast and Furious series. Sinclair grew up in New York City with his mother, fraternal twin brother, and African American stepfather, Irving Vincent, a theatre manager who provided him with some of his

  • Sinclair, Mary Amelia St. Clair (British writer and suffragist)

    May Sinclair, English writer and suffragist known for her innovations in the development of the psychological novel. After attending Cheltenham Ladies’ College for one year (1881–82), Sinclair began to develop her writing. She had originally hoped to become a poet and a philosopher, and though she

  • Sinclair, May (British writer and suffragist)

    May Sinclair, English writer and suffragist known for her innovations in the development of the psychological novel. After attending Cheltenham Ladies’ College for one year (1881–82), Sinclair began to develop her writing. She had originally hoped to become a poet and a philosopher, and though she

  • Sinclair, Sir Keith (New Zealand writer)

    Sir Keith Sinclair, poet, historian, and educator noted for his histories of New Zealand. Sinclair’s education at Auckland University College (until 1957 a college of the University of New Zealand; thereafter University of Auckland) was interrupted by army and navy service during World War II. He

  • Sinclair, Upton (American novelist)

    Upton Sinclair, prolific American novelist and polemicist for socialism, health, temperance, free speech, and worker rights, among other causes. His classic muckraking novel The Jungle (1906) is a landmark among naturalistic proletarian work, one praised by fellow socialist Jack London as “the

  • Sinclair, Upton Beall (American novelist)

    Upton Sinclair, prolific American novelist and polemicist for socialism, health, temperance, free speech, and worker rights, among other causes. His classic muckraking novel The Jungle (1906) is a landmark among naturalistic proletarian work, one praised by fellow socialist Jack London as “the

  • Sind (province, Pakistan)

    Sindh, province of southeastern Pakistan. It is bordered by the provinces of Balochistān on the west and north, Punjab on the northeast, the Indian states of Rajasthan and Gujarat to the east, and the Arabian Sea to the south. Sindh is essentially part of the Indus River delta and has derived its

  • Sind Kohistan (region, Pakistan)

    Kohistan: Sindh Kohistan, in the west of Sindh province, Pakistan, is a barren hilly tract consisting of outlying spurs of the Kirthar Range. Cultivation is possible only along the numerous hill streams (nalas) that carry water during the rains. Cattle grazing is the principal occupation.

  • Sind, University of (university, Jām Shoro, Pakistan)

    Hyderabad: The University of Sind with numerous affiliated colleges, founded in 1947 in Karachi and moved to Hyderabad in 1951, lies across the Indus. Other education needs are served by numerous government colleges, the Liaqat Medical College, and specialized vocational institutions.

  • Sindbad (literary character)

    Seven Wise Masters: …to a wise tutor named Sindbad (not to be confused with the sailor of The Thousand and One Nights). During a week when the prince was ordered by Sindbad to maintain silence, his stepmother tried to seduce him. Having failed, she tried to accuse the prince before the king and…

  • Sindbad the Sailor (literary character)

    Sindbad the Sailor, hero of The Thousand and One Nights who recounts his adventures on seven voyages. He is not to be confused with Sindbad the Wise, hero of the frame story of the Seven Wise Masters. The stories of Sindbad’s travails, which were a relatively late addition to The Thousand and One

  • Sindbad the Wise (literary character)

    Seven Wise Masters: …to a wise tutor named Sindbad (not to be confused with the sailor of The Thousand and One Nights). During a week when the prince was ordered by Sindbad to maintain silence, his stepmother tried to seduce him. Having failed, she tried to accuse the prince before the king and…

  • Sinden, Donald (actor)

    Sir Donald Alfred Sinden, British actor (born Oct. 9, 1923, Plymouth, Devon, Eng.—died Sept. 11, 2014, Romney Marsh, Kent, Eng.), was a stage and screen character actor who moved easily between dramatic roles and comedies for more than 50 years. Sinden was apprenticed in carpentry before he tried

  • Sindh (province, Pakistan)

    Sindh, province of southeastern Pakistan. It is bordered by the provinces of Balochistān on the west and north, Punjab on the northeast, the Indian states of Rajasthan and Gujarat to the east, and the Arabian Sea to the south. Sindh is essentially part of the Indus River delta and has derived its

  • Sindh Sagar Doab (region, Pakistan)

    Sindh Sagar Doab, one of the five major doabs of the Punjab province of Pakistan. Doab, a Persian term, signifies an area between two rivers. The Sindh Sagar Doab is the area between the Indus River and the Jhelum River. As such, it forms the northwestern portion of the Punjab plains. It is the

  • Sindh, and the Races That Inhabit the Valley of the Indus (work by Burton)

    Sir Richard Burton: Early life and career: …four books on India, including Sindh, and the Races That Inhabit the Valley of the Indus (1851), a brilliant ethnological study, published before the new science of ethnology had a proper tradition against which its merits could be evaluated. Meanwhile he perfected his long-cherished plans for going to Mecca.

  • Sindhi (people)

    Indus River: People: …of considerable antiquity, and the Sindhi pride themselves on their regional distinctiveness. Karachi, though in Sindh, is predominantly an Urdu-speaking city settled by Punjabis and muhajir, immigrants from India who arrived in Pakistan after partition of the subcontinent in 1947.

  • Sindhi language

    Sindhi language, Indo-Aryan language spoken by about 23 million people in Pakistan, mostly living in the southeastern province of Sindh, where it has official status, and in the adjacent Las Bela district of Balochistan. In India, where Sindhi is one of the languages recognized by the constitution,

  • Sindhi literature

    Sindhi literature, body of writings in the Sindhi language, an Indo-Aryan language used primarily in Pakistan and India. The beginning of Sindhi literature can be traced back to the 11th century in the stray verses of an Ismā?īlī missionary. But it was the poetic works of Qadi Qadan (1463?–1551),

  • Sindhi National Front (Pakistani political organization)

    Pakistan: Political process: …in Karachi and Hyderabad, the Sindhi National Front in Sind, and the Balochistan Students Union in Balochistan.

  • Sindhia family (Indian rulers)

    Sindhia family, Maratha ruling family of Gwalior, which for a time in the 18th century dominated the politics of northern India. The dynasty was founded by Ranoji Sindhia, who in 1726 was put in charge of the Malwa region by the peshwa (chief minister of the Maratha state). By his death in 1750,

  • Sindhia Mahadaji (Maratha leader)

    India: Subordinate Maratha rulers: …during the long reign of Mahadaji Sindhia, which began after Panipat and continued to 1794, that the family’s fortunes were truly consolidated.

  • Sindhia, Dattāji (Marā?hā chief)

    Battle of Barari Ghat: …of Delhi, the Maratha chief Dattaji Sindhia, retreating from the Punjab before the Afghan army of A?mad Shah Durrānī, was surprised by Afghan troops who, concealed by high reeds, crossed the river. Dattaji was killed and his army scattered. His defeat opened the way to the Afghan occupation of Delhi.

  • Sindhu (river, Asia)

    Indus River, great trans-Himalayan river of South Asia. It is one of the longest rivers in the world, with a length of some 2,000 miles (3,200 km). Its total drainage area is about 450,000 square miles (1,165,000 square km), of which 175,000 square miles (453,000 square km) lie in the ranges and

  • Sindia family (Indian rulers)

    Sindhia family, Maratha ruling family of Gwalior, which for a time in the 18th century dominated the politics of northern India. The dynasty was founded by Ranoji Sindhia, who in 1726 was put in charge of the Malwa region by the peshwa (chief minister of the Maratha state). By his death in 1750,

  • Sindona, Michele (Italian financier)

    Michele Sindona, Italian financier whose financial empire collapsed amid charges of fraud, bribery, and murder. The scandal also involved the Vatican. Educated at the University of Messina, Sindona practiced law in Sicily from 1940 to 1946 and then, from 1946, lived in Milan. Over the next decades,

  • Sindone, Santa (relic)

    Shroud of Turin, a length of linen that for centuries was purported to be the burial garment of Jesus Christ. It has been preserved since 1578 in the royal chapel of the cathedral of San Giovanni Battista in Turin, Italy. Measuring 4.3 metres (14 feet 3 inches) long and 1.1 metres (3 feet 7 inches)

  • Sindoro, Mount (mountain, Indonesia)

    Central Java: …(3,000 metres), including Mounts Slamet, Sindoro, Sumbing, and Merbabu. A discontinuous series of plateaus flanks the widely spaced volcanic peaks and merges with the foothills and coastal lowlands (the latter as much as 20 miles [30 km] wide) to the north and south. The major streams include the Bodri and…

  • sine (mathematics)

    mathematics: History of analysis: …by his introduction of the sine and cosine functions. Trigonometry tables had existed since antiquity, and the relations between sines and cosines were commonly used in mathematical astronomy. In the early calculus mathematicians had derived in their study of periodic mechanical phenomena the differential equation

  • sine wave (physics)

    mathematics: Mathematical astronomy: …to what is actually a sinusoidal variation.) While observations extending over centuries are required for finding the necessary parameters (e.g., periods, angular range between maximum and minimum values, and the like), only the computational apparatus at their disposal made the astronomers’ forecasting effort possible.

  • Sinemurian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Sinemurian Stage, second of the four divisions of the Lower Jurassic Series, representing all rocks formed worldwide during the Sinemurian Age, which occurred between 199.3 million and 190.8 million years ago during the Early Jurassic Period. The Sinemurian Stage overlies the Hettangian Stage and

  • Sinentomata (arthropod suborder)
  • sines, law of (mathematics)

    Law of sines, Principle of trigonometry stating that the lengths of the sides of any triangle are proportional to the sines of the opposite angles. That is, when a, b, and c are the sides and A, B, and C are the opposite

  • Sinfonia (work by Berio)

    Luciano Berio: …include Laborintus II (1965) and Sinfonia (1968), which incorporate a wide range of literary and musical references. Sinfonia also gathers a large performance force using an orchestra, organ, harpsichord, piano, chorus, and reciters. Berio’s Coro (1976) is written for 40 voices and 40 instruments. Among his later pieces are the…

  • sinfonia (music)

    Sinfonia, in music, any of several instrumental forms, primarily of Italian origin. In the earlier Baroque period (mid-17th century), the term was used synonymously with canzona and sonata. For most of the 17th and 18th centuries, the name referred particularly to orchestral introductions to operas

  • sinfonia concertante (music)

    Symphonie concertante, in music of the Classical period (c. 1750–c. 1820), symphony employing two or more solo instruments. Though it is akin to the concerto grosso of the preceding Baroque era in its contrasting of a group of soloists with the full orchestra, it rather resembles the Classical solo

  • Sinfonía Dante (work by Pacini)

    Giovanni Pacini: …string quartets and the programmatic Sinfonia Dante (1864?). The first three movements of the latter work supposedly depicted the three main sections of Dante’s Divine Comedy, while the fourth and final movement—as indicated by its title—evoked Il trionfo di Dante (“The Triumph of Dante”). Pacini’s instrumental works, though generally respected,…

  • Sinfonía de Antígona (symphony by Chávez)

    Carlos Chávez: …compositions are two early symphonies, Sinfonía de Antígona (1933) and Sinfonía India (1935), both one-movement works using indigenous themes. The Concerto No. 1 for piano and orchestra (1940) is highly percussive. The Toccata for percussion instruments (1942) is scored for 11 types of percussion instruments, some of them indigenous, played…

  • Sinfonía India (symphony by Chávez)

    Sinfonía india, (Spanish: “Indian Symphony”) symphony by Carlos Chávez that is strongly flavoured by the musical spirit of Mexico. It was written during the Mexican-born composer’s lengthy visit to the U.S., and it was first performed in a broadcast concert in New York City on January 23, 1936,

  • Sing (film by Jennings [2016])

    Jennifer Hudson: …included the animated family comedy Sing, in which she provided the voice of a sheep, and the live telecast of the musical Hairspray Live!, in which she portrayed Motormouth Maybelle. She performed (2017–18) as a coach on the television singing competition The Voice UK, and she was also a coach…

  • Sing My Tongue the Glorious Battle (work by Fortunatus)

    Venantius Fortunatus: …noblest expression: these poems, the Pange lingua and the Vexilla regis, have been translated into English by John Mason Neale as “Sing My Tongue the Glorious Battle” and “The Royal Banners Forward Go.”

  • Sing Sing (prison, Ossining, New York, United States)

    Sing Sing, maximum-security prison located in Ossining, New York. In use since 1826, it is one of the oldest penal institutions in the United States. It is also among the most well-known in the country, especially notable for its harsh conditions in the 19th and 20th centuries. Originally known as

  • Sing Sing Correctional Facility (prison, Ossining, New York, United States)

    Sing Sing, maximum-security prison located in Ossining, New York. In use since 1826, it is one of the oldest penal institutions in the United States. It is also among the most well-known in the country, especially notable for its harsh conditions in the 19th and 20th centuries. Originally known as

  • Sing Sing Sing (recording by Goodman)

    Gene Krupa: …the classic drum workout “Sing, Sing, Sing”); he was also a fixture in the Benny Goodman Trio (featuring Goodman and pianist Teddy Wilson) and subsequent Quartet (adding vibraphonist Lionel Hampton). With his movie-star good looks and tousle-haired, gum-chewing “hot jazzman” persona, Krupa attracted many female fans and provided the…

  • Sing, Baby, Sing (film by Lanfield [1936])

    Sidney Lanfield: Films of the 1930s: …star: King of Burlesque and Sing, Baby, Sing. In the latter film, Faye starred as a nightclub singer, with Adolphe Menjou as a movie star and Gregory Ratoff as her madcap agent; the Ritz Brothers provided comic relief. The popular musical comedy One in a Million (1936) was Norwegian skating…

  • Sing, You Sinners (film by Ruggles [1938])

    Wesley Ruggles: Later films: Ruggles’s success continued with Sing You Sinners (1938), which starred Bing Crosby as a gambler and MacMurray as his disapproving brother; the film was an entertaining blend of sentiment, comedy, and songs. Invitation to Happiness (1939) centred on the marital struggles of a boxer (MacMurray) and his socialite wife…

  • sing-bya (bird)

    Tibet: Plant and animal life: …include gulls, sheldrakes, cinnamon teals, sing-bya (tiny owl-like birds), khra (crow-sized, hawklike birds), bya-long (birds about the size of a duck), and skya-ka (black-and-white crow-sized birds). The calls of the rmos-’debs—a small gray bird that inhabits agricultural regions—signal the opening of the planting season.

  • Singanhoe (Korean politics)

    Singanhoe, united national independence front formed by the Korean nationalists and the Korean communists that was organized in 1927 to seek more concerted efforts toward winning Korea’s independence from Japan. The group attempted to encourage a national consciousness and promote anti-Japanese

  • Singapore

    Singapore, city-state located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, about 85 miles (137 kilometres) north of the Equator. It consists of the diamond-shaped Singapore Island and some 60 small islets; the main island occupies all but about 18 square miles of this combined area. The main island

  • Singapore (national capital, Singapore)

    Singapore, city, capital of the Republic of Singapore. It occupies the southern part of Singapore Island. Its strategic position on the strait between the Indian Ocean and South China Sea, complemented by its deepwater harbour, has made it the largest port in Southeast Asia and one of the world’s

  • Singapore Botanic Gardens (gardens, Singapore)

    Singapore Botanic Gardens, botanical garden in Singapore that is one of the world’s finest in terms of both its aesthetic appeal and the quality of its botanical collection. The garden has approximately 3,000 species of tropical and subtropical plants and a herbarium of about 500,000 preserved

  • Singapore Grip, The (work by Farrell)

    J.G. Farrell: The Singapore Grip (1978), the final novel in the series, ambitiously recounts through both personal and political lenses the Battle of Singapore during World War II, in which the British colony fell to the Japanese.

  • Singapore Island (island, Singapore)

    Singapore: It consists of the diamond-shaped Singapore Island and some 60 small islets; the main island occupies all but about 18 square miles of this combined area. The main island is separated from Peninsular Malaysia to the north by Johor Strait, a narrow channel crossed by a road and rail causeway…

  • Singapore Kudiyarasu

    Singapore, city-state located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, about 85 miles (137 kilometres) north of the Equator. It consists of the diamond-shaped Singapore Island and some 60 small islets; the main island occupies all but about 18 square miles of this combined area. The main island

  • Singapore Strait (channel, southeast Asia)

    Singapore Strait, channel extending for 65 miles (105 km) between the Strait of Malacca (west) and the South China Sea (east). The strait is 10 miles (16 km) wide and lies between Singapore Island (north) and the Riau Islands (south), part of Indonesia. It includes Johore Strait (q.v.), Keppel

  • Singapore, flag of

    horizontally divided red-white national flag with a white crescent and five stars in the upper hoist corner. The width-to-length ratio of the flag is 2 to 3.In the 19th century, British settlements in Southeast Asia were combined to form the colony of the Straits Settlements; the flag badge for its

  • Singapore, history of

    Singapore: History: Singapore Island originally was inhabited by fishermen and pirates, and it served as an outpost for the Sumatran empire of Srīvijaya. In Javanese inscriptions and Chinese records dating to the end of the 14th century, the more-common name of the island is Tumasik, or…

  • Singapore, Republic of

    Singapore, city-state located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, about 85 miles (137 kilometres) north of the Equator. It consists of the diamond-shaped Singapore Island and some 60 small islets; the main island occupies all but about 18 square miles of this combined area. The main island

  • Singapura (national capital, Singapore)

    Singapore, city, capital of the Republic of Singapore. It occupies the southern part of Singapore Island. Its strategic position on the strait between the Indian Ocean and South China Sea, complemented by its deepwater harbour, has made it the largest port in Southeast Asia and one of the world’s

  • Singapura, Republik

    Singapore, city-state located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, about 85 miles (137 kilometres) north of the Equator. It consists of the diamond-shaped Singapore Island and some 60 small islets; the main island occupies all but about 18 square miles of this combined area. The main island

  • Singaradja (Indonesia)

    Singaraja, city, Bali propinsi (or provinsi; province), north-central Bali, Indonesia. It is located near the north coast and is linked by road with other cities on the island. Buleleng to the north is its port on the Java Sea. Under Dutch colonial rule, Singaraja was the capital of Nusa Tenggara

  • Singaraja (Indonesia)

    Singaraja, city, Bali propinsi (or provinsi; province), north-central Bali, Indonesia. It is located near the north coast and is linked by road with other cities on the island. Buleleng to the north is its port on the Java Sea. Under Dutch colonial rule, Singaraja was the capital of Nusa Tenggara

  • singeing (textile production)

    textile: Singeing: Also called gassing, singeing is a process applied to both yarns and fabrics to produce an even surface by burning off projecting fibres, yarn ends, and fuzz. This is accomplished by passing the fibre or yarn over a gas flame or heated copper plates…

  • Singeing of the King of Spain’s Beard (Spanish history [1587])

    Battle of Cadiz, (29 April–1 May 1587). Intense rivalry between England and Spain during the reign of Elizabeth I led Philip II of Spain to prepare an armada to invade England. In response, Elizabeth ordered a preemptive strike against the Spanish fleet, a daring raid its leader, Francis Drake,

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