You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Sluis, Battle of (Hundred Years’ War)

    Edward III: Hundred Years’ War: …off the Flemish city of Sluis in June 1340, in which he all but destroyed the French navy. Despite this victory his resources were exhausted by his land campaign, and he was forced to make a truce (which was broken two years later) and return to England. During the years…

  • slum

    Slum, Densely populated area of substandard housing, usually in a city, characterized by unsanitary conditions and social disorganization. Rapid industrialization in 19th-century Europe was accompanied by rapid population growth and the concentration of working-class people in overcrowded, poorly

  • Slumdog Millionaire (film by Boyle [2008])

    Slumdog Millionaire, British dramatic film, released in 2008 and directed by Danny Boyle, that won eight Academy Awards, including those for best picture and best director, as well as several BAFTA awards and Golden Globe Awards, including those for best film and best director. As the film opens,

  • slump (geology)

    Slump, in geology, downward intermittent movement of rock debris, usually the consequence of removal of buttressing earth at the foot of a slope of unconsolidated material. It commonly involves a shear plane on which a back-tilting of the top of the slumped mass occurs. The plane is slightly

  • Slump of 1929 (economy)

    Great Depression, worldwide economic downturn that began in 1929 and lasted until about 1939. It was the longest and most severe depression ever experienced by the industrialized Western world, sparking fundamental changes in economic institutions, macroeconomic policy, and economic theory.

  • slump structure (geology)

    sedimentary rock: Deformation structures: structures, (2) convoluted structures, (3) slump structures, (4) injection structures, such as sandstone dikes or sills, and (5) organic structures.

  • slump, submarine (geology)

    Submarine slump, in a submarine canyon or on a continental slope, relatively rapid and sporadic downslope composed of sediment and organic debris that has built up slowly into an unstable or marginally stable mass. The greatest documented distance that an individual slump has transported sediment

  • Slums of Beverly Hills (film by Jenkins [1998])

    Rita Moreno: … (1961), Carnal Knowledge (1971), and Slums of Beverly Hills (1998).

  • S?upsk (Poland)

    S?upsk, city, Pomorskie województwo (province), northern Poland. It lies along the S?upia River, 11 miles (18 km) from the Baltic coast. A manufacturing centre producing mainly furniture for export, it is situated on the Gdynia-Szczecin railway line. The Museum of Middle Pomerania is a notable

  • slurry

    Slurry, watery mixture or suspension of insoluble matter. In the manufacture of portland cement, a mixture of the raw materials with water is called a slurry. Cement may be piped as a slurry in building construction. Coal may be transported over long distances as a slurry via pipeline; this method

  • slurry fuel (fuel)

    coal mining: Slurry pipelines: So-called heavy coal slurries or slurry fuels consist of 65 to 75 percent coal, with the remainder being water, methanol, or oil. Unlike traditional slurry—which is transported by pipeline to the user, who separates the water from the coal before burning—slurry fuels can be fired directly into boilers.

  • Slushball Earth hypothesis

    Slushball Earth hypothesis, in geology and climatology, a counter-premise to the “Snowball Earth” hypothesis. The “Slushball Earth” hypothesis, developed by American geologist Richard Cowen, contends that Earth was not completely frozen over during periods of extreme glaciation in Precambrian

  • Sluter, Claes (Dutch sculptor)

    Claus Sluter, influential master of early Netherlandish sculpture, who moved beyond the dominant French taste of the time and into highly individual monumental, naturalistic forms. The works of Claus Sluter infuse realism with spirituality and monumental grandeur. His influence was extensive among

  • Sluter, Claus (Dutch sculptor)

    Claus Sluter, influential master of early Netherlandish sculpture, who moved beyond the dominant French taste of the time and into highly individual monumental, naturalistic forms. The works of Claus Sluter infuse realism with spirituality and monumental grandeur. His influence was extensive among

  • Sluter, Klaas (Dutch sculptor)

    Claus Sluter, influential master of early Netherlandish sculpture, who moved beyond the dominant French taste of the time and into highly individual monumental, naturalistic forms. The works of Claus Sluter infuse realism with spirituality and monumental grandeur. His influence was extensive among

  • Slutsk (Belarus)

    Slutsk, city, Minsk oblast (region), central Belarus. The city dates from the 12th century and was incorporated in 1795. In the 18th century it was a centre of weaving and other handicrafts, including the working of gold and silver. It now has food, engineering, metalworking, furniture, and linen

  • Slutskaya, Irina (Russian figure skater)

    Irina Slutskaya, Russian figure skater who dominated women’s figure skating in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Although her career was briefly interrupted by health problems, Slutskaya went on to become the first woman to win seven European championship titles. Slutskaya began skating at age four

  • Slutsky, Jean Evelyn (American entrepreneur)

    Jean Nidetch, (Jean Evelyn Slutsky), American entrepreneur (born Oct. 12, 1923, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died April 29, 2015, Parkland, Fla.), turned her determination to lose weight and maintain healthful eating habits into a successful business—the worldwide organization Weight Watchers International, Inc.

  • Slutzky, Meir (Israeli military leader, intelligence chief, and politician)

    Meir Amit, (Meir Slutzky), Israeli military leader, intelligence chief, and politician (born March 17, 1921, Tiberias, British Palestine—died July 17, 2009, Israel), was the only person in Israel’s history to lead the foreign intelligence agency Mossad and military intelligence simultaneously; he

  • Sluys, Battle of (European history [1340])

    Battle of Sluys, (24 June 1340). In 1337, Edward III of England laid claim to the French throne, thus starting the lengthy series of conflicts known as the Hundred Years’ War. The first major contact between the two sides was a naval battle off the coast of Flanders. England’s victory ended the

  • SLV-3 (Indian launch vehicle)

    launch vehicle: India: …1980 using the four-stage solid-fueled Satellite Launch Vehicle 3 (SLV-3), which was developed from the U.S. Scout launch vehicle first used in the 1960s. India did not have a prior ballistic missile program, but parts of the SLV-3 were later incorporated into India’s first IRBM, Agni. The four-stage Polar Satellite…

  • SLV-III (Indian launch vehicle)

    launch vehicle: India: …1980 using the four-stage solid-fueled Satellite Launch Vehicle 3 (SLV-3), which was developed from the U.S. Scout launch vehicle first used in the 1960s. India did not have a prior ballistic missile program, but parts of the SLV-3 were later incorporated into India’s first IRBM, Agni. The four-stage Polar Satellite…

  • Sly (opera by Wolf-Ferrari)

    Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari: In Sly (1927; based on the opening scenes of The Taming of the Shrew) and in his only tragic opera, I gioielli della Madonna (1911; The Jewels of the Madonna), he was influenced by the realistic, or verismo, style of Pietro Mascagni. He also composed chamber,…

  • Sly and the Family Stone (American music group)

    Sly and the Family Stone, American rock and funk band that became widely popular in the late 1960s with a string of anthemlike pop singles, stirring socially relevant albums, and memorable live performances. The members were Sly Stone (original name Sylvester Stewart; b. March 15, 1943, Denton,

  • Slyde, Jimmy (American tap dancer)

    Jimmy Slyde, (James Titus Godbolt), American tap dancer (born Oct. 2, 1927, Atlanta, Ga.—died May 16, 2008, Hanson, Mass.), was a master of rhythm tap, in which the dancer’s feet become a percussion instrument, with intricate footwork accentuating the dancer’s chosen rhythm. He had a smooth style,

  • Slye, Leonard Franklin (American actor-singer)

    Roy Rogers, (Leonard Franklin Slye), American cowboy actor-singer (born Nov. 5, 1911, Cincinnati, Ohio—died July 6, 1998, Apple Valley, Calif.), starred in some 90 motion pictures and over 100 episodes of a weekly television show from the late 1930s to the mid-1950s and reigned as king of the

  • slype (architecture)

    Slype, in architecture, covered passageway in a medieval English cathedral or monastery. The slype may lead from either the transept or the nave of the church proper to either the chapter house (the monks’ assembly room) or the deanery (the residence of the dean). Most frequently it is adjacent to

  • Sm (chemical element)

    Samarium (Sm), chemical element, a rare-earth metal of the lanthanide series of the periodic table. Samarium is a moderately soft metal, silvery white in colour. It is relatively stable in air, slowly oxidizing to Sm2O3. It rapidly dissolves in diluted acids—except hydrofluoric acid (HF), in which

  • SM fiber (communications technology)

    telecommunications media: Optical fibres: …type of fibre, known as single-mode (SM) fibre, eliminates multimode dispersion by reducing the diameter of the core to a point at which it passes only light rays of the zeroth order mode. Typical SM core diameters are 10 micrometres or less, while standard SI core diameters are in the…

  • SMA (telescope array, Mauna Kea, Hawaii, United States)

    radio telescope: Radio telescope arrays: …Sinica of Taiwan, completed the Submillimeter Array (SMA), located near the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, at an elevation of 4,080 metres (13,385 feet). This is an eight-element array of 6-metre (20-foot) dishes designed to work at wavelengths as short as 0.3 mm (0.01 inch). A major new international facility—under…

  • Smack (American musician)

    Fletcher Henderson, American musical arranger, bandleader, and pianist who was a leading pioneer in the sound, style, and instrumentation of big band jazz. Henderson was born into a middle-class family; his father was a school principal and his mother a teacher. He changed his name (James was his

  • Smackout (American radio program)

    Jim Jordan and Marian Jordan: …starred them in his show Smackout, based on a grocer who was always smack out of goods but never out of tall tales. In 1935 the show was purchased by Johnson’s Wax. Fibber McGee and Molly made its radio debut on April 16, 1935.

  • Smackover Formation (geological formation, North America)

    Jurassic Period: North America: The Smackover Formation of the Gulf Coast sequences is a sedimentary unit typical of the Middle Jurassic.

  • Sm?land (province, Sweden)

    Sm?land, landskap (province), southern Sweden, extending from the Baltic Sea on the east to the provinces of Halland and V?sterg?tland on the west and from ?sterg?tland on the north to Sk?ne and Blekinge on the south. Sm?land is the largest traditional province in southern Sweden and is composed

  • Smale, John Gray (American businessman)

    John Gray Smale, Canadian-born American businessman (born Aug. 1, 1927, Listowel, Ont.—died Nov. 19, 2011, Cincinnati, Ohio), doubled profits at the consumer-products firm Procter & Gamble Co. as CEO and later staged a boardroom coup to take over as chairman of General Motors Corp. After receiving

  • Smale, Stephen (American mathematician)

    Stephen Smale, American mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1966 for his work on topology in higher dimensions. Smale grew up in a rural area near Flint. From 1948 to 1956 he attended the University of Michigan, obtaining B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics. As an instructor

  • Small and Medium Entrepreneurs Union (European organization)

    Jacques Santer: …of the SME Union (Small and Medium Entrepreneurs Union), a network of probusiness conservative political organizations overseen by the European People’s Party. After stepping down from that post, he maintained the title of honorary president of the SME Union.

  • small arm (military technology)

    Small arm, any handheld firearm. Since the introduction of the flintlock musket in the 17th century, military small arms have gone through a series of significant changes. By employing different projectiles and successively improved chemical propellants, the dual goal of most arms designers has

  • small arms protective inserts (body armour)

    armour: Modern body armour systems: …mm, and two ceramic “small arms protective inserts,” or SAPI plates, which can be inserted into the vest to provide additional protection. Altogether the full system weighs some 16 pounds (7.25 kg), but it provides protection against 7.62-mm full-metal-jacket rifle bullets—a level of protection that earlier versions of body…

  • Small Back Room, The (work by Balchin)

    Nigel Balchin: In The Small Back Room (1943), his best-known novel, Balchin describes the conversation, behaviour, and intrigues for position and power of the “backroom boys” with whom he worked during the war. Almost as successful is Mine Own Executioner (1945), a study of a psychiatrist unable to…

  • small beer (alcoholic beverage)

    beer: Types of beer: …yielded the poorest-quality beer, called small beer. In the 18th century, London brewers departed from this practice and produced porter. Made from a mixture of malt extracts, porter was a strong, dark-coloured, highly hopped beer consumed by the market porters in London. Brewers in Burton upon Trent, using the famous…

  • small body (astronomy)

    Small body, any natural solar system object other than the Sun and the major planets and dwarf planets and their satellites (moons). The small bodies populate the solar system in vast numbers and include the mostly rocky asteroids, or minor planets, the predominantly icy comets, and the fragments

  • Small Business Administration (United States agency)

    Small Business Administration (SBA), U.S. federal agency that aids small businesses and assists in economic recovery following disasters. The Small Business Administration (SBA) provides support to prospective entrepreneurs, new start-up businesses, and existing small businesses through a variety

  • Small Catechism (work by Luther)

    catechism: …any Reformer was Martin Luther’s Small Catechism (1529), which added discussions of baptism and the Eucharist to the usual three subjects. Luther’s Large Catechism (1529) was intended for use by the clergy.

  • Small Catechism (work by Nowell)

    Alexander Nowell: Nowell’s “Small Catechism,” inserted before the order of confirmation in the Prayer Book of 1549 and supplemented in 1604, remains the official Anglican catechism. He was also the author of a “Larger Catechism” and a “Middle Catechism,” designed for school use, both printed in 1570.

  • Small Ceremonies (novel by Shields)

    Carol Shields: Her first two novels, Small Ceremonies (1976) and The Box Garden (1977), are interconnected, concerning the choices made by two sisters. In Happenstance (1980) and A Fairly Conventional Woman (1982), Shields used overlapping narratives to escape the strictures of straightforward narrative told from a single perspective. Marketed in Canada…

  • small cubit (ancient Egyptian unit of measurement)

    measurement system: The Egyptians: …or six palms, were a small cubit.

  • Small Dark Spot (feature, Neptune)

    Neptune: The atmosphere: Two large dark ovals were clearly visible in Voyager images of Neptune’s southern hemisphere. The largest, called the Great Dark Spot because of its similarity in latitude and shape to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, is comparable to Earth in size. It was near this storm system that…

  • Small Faces, the (British rock group)

    Jeff Beck: …join the Small Faces (later the Faces), and Beck was injured in a car accident later that year, forcing him to put his career on hiatus. In 1971 he resurfaced with a new Jeff Beck Group that included Bobby Tench on lead vocals and Cozy Powell on the drums. They…

  • small fruit fly (insect)

    Vinegar fly, (genus Drosophila), any member of a genus in the small fruit fly family, Drosophilidae (order Diptera). Drosophila species number about 1,500. Some species, particularly D. melanogaster, are used extensively in laboratory and field experiments on genetics and evolution because they are

  • Small Gaps Between Primes (paper by Goldston and Yildirim)

    twin prime conjecture: …Yildirim published a paper, “Small Gaps Between Primes,” that established the existence of an infinite number of prime pairs within a small difference (16, with certain other assumptions, most notably that of the Elliott-Halberstam conjecture). Although their proof was flawed, they corrected it with Hungarian mathematician János Pintz in…

  • small hail (meteorology)

    climate: Hail: The second is small hail (ice grains or pellets), which are transparent or translucent pellets of ice that are spherical, spheroidal, conical, or irregular in shape, with diameters of a few millimetres. They may consist of frozen raindrops, of largely melted and refrozen snowflakes, or of snow pellets…

  • Small House at Allington, The (novel by Trollope)

    The Small House at Allington, novel by Anthony Trollope, published serially in The Cornhill Magazine from September 1862 to April 1864 and in two volumes in 1864, the fifth of his six Barsetshire

  • small intestine (anatomy)

    Small intestine, a long, narrow, folded or coiled tube extending from the stomach to the large intestine; it is the region where most digestion and absorption of food takes place. It is about 6.7 to 7.6 metres (22 to 25 feet) long, highly convoluted, and contained in the central and lower abdominal

  • Small Is Beautiful (work by Schumacher)

    E.F. Schumacher: In his book Small Is Beautiful (1973), he argued that capitalism brought higher living standards at the cost of deteriorating culture. His belief that natural resources should be conserved led him to conclude that bigness—in particular, large industries and large cities—would lead to the depletion of those resources.

  • small letter (calligraphy)

    Minuscule, in calligraphy, lowercase letters in most alphabets, in contrast to majuscule (uppercase or capital) letters. Minuscule letters cannot be fully contained between two real or imaginary parallel lines, since they have ascending stems (ascenders) on the letters b, d, f, h, k, and l, and

  • Small Magellanic Cloud (astronomy)

    Magellanic Cloud: …diameter, and the other, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), measures less than 2° across. The Magellanic Clouds are visible to the unaided eye in the Southern Hemisphere, but they cannot be observed from most northern latitudes. The LMC is about 160,000 light-years from Earth, and the SMC lies 190,000 light-years…

  • Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology-1 (European Space Agency lunar probe)

    SMART-1, first lunar probe of the European Space Agency. SMART-1 was launched on Sept. 27, 2003. The 367-kg (809-pound) probe had a xenon-ion engine that generated only 7 grams (0.2 ounce) of thrust, but it was sufficient to nudge SMART-1 from its first stop (the first Lagrangian point between

  • small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (biochemistry)

    nucleic acid: Splicing: …consists of a number of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) that contain small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs).

  • small nuclear RNA (biochemistry)

    nucleic acid: Other RNAs: For example, small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are involved in RNA splicing (see below), and other small RNAs that form part of the enzymes telomerase or ribonuclease P are part of ribonucleoprotein particles. The RNA component of telomerase contains a short sequence that serves as a template for…

  • small numbers, law of

    probability theory: The Poisson approximation: The weak law of large numbers and the central limit theorem give information about the distribution of the proportion of successes in a large number of independent trials when the probability of success on each trial is p. In the mathematical formulation of…

  • Small Passion (woodcut by Dürer)

    Albrecht Dürer: Development after the second Italian trip: …and 1511 he produced the Small Passion in woodcuts. Both of these works are characterized by their tendency toward spaciousness and serenity. During 1513 and 1514 Dürer created the greatest of his copperplate engravings: the Knight, Death and Devil, St. Jerome in His Study, and Melencolia I—all of approximately the…

  • Small Place, A (essay by Kincaid)

    Jamaica Kincaid: A Small Place (1988), a three-part essay, continued her depiction of Antigua and her rage at its despoliation. Kincaid’s treatment of the themes of family relationships, personhood, and the taint of colonialism reached a fierce pitch in The Autobiography of My Mother (1996) and My…

  • Small Rain, The (work by L’Engle)

    Madeleine L'Engle: …before publishing her first book, The Small Rain (1945), a novel about an aspiring pianist who chooses her art over personal relationships. After writing her first children’s book, And Both Were Young (1949), she began a series of juvenile fictional works about the Austin family—Meet the Austins (1960), The Moon…

  • small rice rat (rodent)

    rice rat: … (Oecomys), dark rice rats (Melanomys), small rice rats (Microryzomys), and pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys), among others. All belong to the subfamily Sigmodontinae of the “true” mouse and rat family Muridae within the order Rodentia.

  • small scabious (plant)

    scabious: Major species: Small scabious (S. columbaria; also known as dwarf pincushion flower), from Eurasia and Africa, reaches 60 cm (24 inches). It is a perennial with toothed elongate oval basal leaves and cut stem leaves. The light blue flowers are 3.5 cm (about 1.5 inches) across.

  • Small Scale Experimental Machine (computer)

    Tom Kilburn: The computer was called the Small Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) or just “Baby.” It was the world’s first working stored-program computer, and the Williams tube became one of the two standard methods of storage used by computers worldwide until the advent of magnetic-core storage in the mid-1950s. By April 1949…

  • small solar system body (astronomy)

    Small body, any natural solar system object other than the Sun and the major planets and dwarf planets and their satellites (moons). The small bodies populate the solar system in vast numbers and include the mostly rocky asteroids, or minor planets, the predominantly icy comets, and the fragments

  • small span (ancient Egyptian unit of measurement)

    measurement system: The Egyptians: …or three palms, equaled a small span. Fourteen digits, or one-half a cubit, equaled a large span. Sixteen digits, or four palms, made one t’ser. Twenty-four digits, or six palms, were a small cubit.

  • small state plan (United States history)

    William Paterson: …large-state) Plan, Paterson submitted the New Jersey (or small-state) Plan, also called the Paterson Plan, which advocated an equal vote for all states. The issue was finally resolved with the compromise embodied in the bicameral Congress—representation by population in the House of Representatives, and equality of states in the Senate.

  • small strain (mechanics)

    mechanics of solids: Strain and strain-displacement relations: …to this situation, are called small strain or infinitesimal strain. Expressions for strain will also be given that are valid for rotations and fractional length changes of arbitrary magnitude; such expressions are called finite strain.

  • small teasel (plant)

    teasel: Major species: Shepherd’s rod, or small teasel (D. pilosus), native to Europe, has a globe-shaped flower head and white blooms with violet anthers.

  • Small Temple (archaeological site, Egypt)

    Abu Simbel, site of two temples built by the Egyptian king Ramses II (reigned 1279–13 bce), now located in Aswān mu?āfa?ah (governorate), southern Egypt. In ancient times the area was at the southern frontier of pharaonic Egypt, facing Nubia. The four colossal statues of Ramses in front of the main

  • Small Time Crooks (film by Allen [2000])

    Woody Allen: 2000 and beyond: Small Time Crooks (2000) was a modest comedy starring Allen and Tracy Ullman as a married couple whose elaborate (but essentially absurd) bank robbery plan predictably goes off the rails. The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001), a B-movie tribute set in the New York…

  • Small Town Girl (film by Wellman [1936])

    William Wellman: Films of the early to mid-1930s: …appearances; and the love story Small Town Girl (1936), which teamed Robert Taylor and Janet Gaynor.

  • Small Town Tyrant (work by Heinrich Mann)

    Heinrich Mann: …provincial schoolmaster, Professor Unrat (1905; Small Town Tyrant), became widely known through its film version Der blaue Engel (1928; The Blue Angel). His Kaiserreich trilogy—consisting of Die Armen (1917; The Poor); Der Untertan (1918; The Patrioteer); and Der Kopf (1925; The Chief)—carries even further his indictment of the

  • Small Trades (portrait collection by Penn)

    Irving Penn: …created in 1950–51, collectively called Small Trades, was of labourers in New York, Paris, and London formally posed in their work clothes and holding the tools of their trade. This project eventually extended to places such as Nepal, New Guinea, Dahomey (now Benin), and Morocco. Penn’s later platinum prints of…

  • Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (oceanography)

    undersea exploration: Platforms: …use include that of the Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) variety. This design type requires the use of twin submerged, streamlined hulls to support a structure that rides above the water surface. The deck shape is entirely unconstrained by the hull shape, as is the case for conventional surface…

  • Small World: An Academic Romance (novel by Lodge)

    David Lodge: …Tale of Two Campuses (1975), Small World: An Academic Romance (1984), and Nice Work (1988). The latter two were short-listed for the Booker Prize. Among his later novels were Paradise News (1991), Therapy (1995), Thinks… (2001), and Deaf Sentence (2008). Author, Author (2004) and A Man of Parts (2011) are…

  • Small, Adam (South African poet)

    South African literature: In Afrikaans: …vernacular of the Cape Coloureds, Adam Small was the most talented.

  • Small, Albion W. (American sociologist)

    Albion W. Small, sociologist who won recognition in the United States for sociology as an academic discipline with professional standards. In 1892 he became the first professor of sociology in the United States, at the University of Chicago, where he organized the first U.S. sociology department.

  • Small, Albion Woodbury (American sociologist)

    Albion W. Small, sociologist who won recognition in the United States for sociology as an academic discipline with professional standards. In 1892 he became the first professor of sociology in the United States, at the University of Chicago, where he organized the first U.S. sociology department.

  • Small, Millie (American singer)

    novelty song: disco, and hip-hop, respectively, with Millie Small’s “My Boy Lollipop” (1964), Rick Dees’s “Disco Duck” (1976), and the Sugarhill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight” (1979). It is also true, however, that records that initially sound peculiar cease to as people learn their language. It is in this way—as an entry point—that novelty…

  • Small, William (American professor)

    Thomas Jefferson: Early years: …influences on his learning were William Small, a Scottish-born teacher of mathematics and science, and George Wythe, the leading legal scholar in Virginia. From them Jefferson learned a keen appreciation of supportive mentors, a concept he later institutionalized at the University of Virginia. He read law with Wythe from 1762…

  • small-angle neutron scattering (physics)

    nanoparticle: Detection, characterization, and isolation: …small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), along with their surface-specific analogues GISAXS and GISANS, where GI is “grazing incidence,” and X-ray or neutron reflectometry (XR/NR). The advantage of those techniques is that they are able to simultaneously sample and average very large numbers of nanoparticles and often…

  • small-cell carcinoma (pathology)

    lung cancer: Small-cell lung cancer: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), also called oat-cell carcinoma, is rarely found in people who have never smoked. It is characterized by cells that are small and round, oval, or shaped like oat grains. SCLC is the most aggressive type of lung cancer;…

  • small-cell lung cancer (pathology)

    lung cancer: Small-cell lung cancer: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), also called oat-cell carcinoma, is rarely found in people who have never smoked. It is characterized by cells that are small and round, oval, or shaped like oat grains. SCLC is the most aggressive type of lung cancer;…

  • small-eared zorro (mammal)

    canine: Paleontology and classification: Atelocynus (small-eared zorro) 1 species of South America. Genus Cerdocyon (crab-eating fox) 1 species of South America. Genus Chrysocyon (maned wolf) 1 species of South America.

  • small-flowered fishhook cactus (plant)

    barrel cactus: Almost as large is the small-flowered fishhook cactus (S. parviflorus) native to the Colorado Plateau. The remaining species of small cacti grow in widely scattered colonies.

  • small-flowered hedgehog cactus (plant)

    hedgehog cactus: The small-flowered hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus viridiflorus), with small fragrant green to brown flowers, is the northernmost group, growing from Mexico to Wyoming and South Dakota. The claret cup (E. triglochidiatus) ranges from north of Mexico City to northern Utah and southern

  • small-fruited cranberry (plant)

    cranberry: The small-fruited, or northern, cranberry (V. oxycoccos) is found in marshy land in northern North America and Asia and in northern and central Europe. The lingonberry, or cowberry (V. vitis-idaea), also known as mountain or rock cranberry, is not cultivated but is used in northern Europe…

  • small-headed fly (insect)

    Balloon fly, (family Acroceridae), any member of a family of flies in the insect order Diptera that are named for their swollen abdomen. It is also characterized by an extremely small head and a humped back. Some adults have a slender proboscis (feeding organ) and feed from flowers, whereas others

  • small-leaf linden (plant)

    linden: Small-leaf, or little-leaf, linden (T. cordata), a European tree, is widely planted as a street tree. The hybrid Crimean linden (T. euchlora, a cross between T. cordata and T. dasystyla), which grows up to 20 metres (66 feet), has yielded a graceful pyramidal variety, the…

  • small-scale industry

    industry: Secondary industry: Light, or small-scale, industry may be characterized by the nondurability of manufactured products and a smaller capital investment in plants and equipment, and it may involve nonstandard products, such as customized or craft work. The labour force may be either low skilled, as in textile…

  • small-schools movement (education)

    Deborah Meier: …the founder of the “small-schools movement,” a vision of education as a cooperative investment of teachers, parents, students, and community.

  • small-seal style (calligraphy)

    Xiaozhuan, (Chinese: “small seal”) in Chinese calligraphy, a standardized and simplified form of the earlier dazhuan script, in which all lines are of even thickness and curves and circles are relatively predominant. Its development during the Qin dynasty (221–206 bc) is traditionally attributed to

  • small-spotted genet (mammal)

    genet: small-spotted genet (G. genetta), which also occurs in western Asia and southern Europe, they are found only in Africa. Genets live alone or in pairs and are active mainly at night. They frequent forests, grasslands, and brush and are as agile in the trees as…

  • smallage (plant)

    Smallage, (Apium graveolens), wild celery; strongly scented, erect, biennial herb of the carrot family (Apiaceae, or Umbelliferae) widely distributed in moist places within the temperate zones, and grown for use as a flavouring similar to celery. In traditional medicine, smallage roots are used as

  • Smaller Computer System Interface (computing)

    SCSI, Once common standard for connecting peripheral devices (disks, modems, printers, etc.) to small and medium-sized computers. SCSI has given way to faster standards, such as Firewire and

  • smaller European elm bark beetle (insect)

    Dutch elm disease: …fungus normally occurs by the smaller European elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus), less commonly by the American elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes). Female beetles seek out dead or weakened elm wood to excavate an egg-laying gallery between the bark and the wood. If the fungus is present, tremendous numbers of…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载