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  • Smilacaceae (plant family)

    Liliales: Major families: Smilacaceae, or the greenbrier family, with 315 species in two genera (Smilax and Heterosmilax), is the second largest family in the order. These herbaceous or woody climbers are found around the world. Rhipogonum, another twiner from Australia and New Guinea, was formerly included in Smilacaceae…

  • Smilacina (plant)

    seed: Afterripening, stratification, and temperature effects: …lily of the valley and false Solomon’s seal. Here, two successive cold treatments separated by a warm period are needed for complete seedling development. The first cold treatment eliminates the dormancy of the root; the warm period permits its outgrowth; and the second cold period eliminates epicotyl or leaf dormancy.…

  • Smilansky, Yizhar (Israeli writer)

    S. Yizhar, (Yizhar Smilansky), Israeli writer and scholar (born Sept. 27, 1916, Rehovot, British-mandated Palestine [now in Israel]—died Aug. 21, 2006, Meishar, Israel), was one of Israel’s earliest and most richly lyrical Hebrew novelists. Although Yizhar was a devout Zionist, he did not shy a

  • Smilax (plant genus)

    Smilax, genus of plants in the family Smilacaceae, consisting of about 300 species of woody or herbaceous vines, variously known as catbriers and greenbriers, native to tropical and temperate parts of the world. The stems of many species are covered with prickles; the lower leaves are scalelike;

  • Smilax aspera (plant)

    Smilax: Young shoots of S. aspera are edible. Carrion flower (S. herbacea) and common catbrier (S. rotundifolia) of eastern North America are sometimes cultivated to form impenetrable thickets.

  • Smilax herbacea (plant, Smilax species)

    carrion flower: Smilax herbacea, a native American woodland vine, has malodorous flowers and is also called carrion flower. It is of the family Smilacaceae.

  • Smile (novel by Doyle)

    Roddy Doyle: In Smile (2017) a lonely middle-aged man looks back on his life, especially his troubled childhood. The Deportees (2007) and Bullfighting (2011) are short-story collections. Doyle also wrote a number of books for children, including Wilderness (2007) and A Greyhound of a Girl (2011).

  • Smile (album by Wilson)

    the Beach Boys: …in Brian’s career, however, was Smile (2004), finally offered to the world as a completed solo album after Brian had spent nearly four decades fine-tuning its sound; a boxed set of the original Smile recording sessions followed in 2011. After being presented with a Kennedy Center Honor in 2007, Brian…

  • Smile (film by Ritchie [1975])

    Michael Ritchie: Films: …the downside of competition with Smile (1975), a broad satire on another facet of American life, the teenage beauty pageant. Bruce Dern played a smarmy pageant judge, Barbara Feldon was a megalomaniacal director, and Michael Kidd was cast as an over-the-hill choreographer; Joan Prather, Melanie Griffith, and Annette O’Toole were…

  • smile (facial expression)

    human behaviour: The newborn infant: Smiling during infancy changes its meaning over the first year. The smiles that newborns display during their first weeks constitute what is called reflex smiling and usually occur without reference to any external source or stimulus, including other people. By two months, however, infants smile…

  • Smiles of a Summer Night (film by Bergman)

    Ingmar Bergman: Life: …success with Sommernattens leende (Smiles of a Summer Night), a bittersweet romantic comedy-drama in a period setting. In the next few years, a kind of Bergman fever swept over the international film scene: concurrently with the succession of his new films, which included two masterpieces—The Seventh Seal, a medieval…

  • Smiles, Samuel (Scottish writer)

    Samuel Smiles, Scottish author best known for his didactic work Self-Help (1859), which, with its successors, Character (1871), Thrift (1875), and Duty (1880), enshrined the basic Victorian values associated with the “gospel of work.” One of 11 children left fatherless in 1832, Smiles learned the

  • Smiley Smile (album by the Beach Boys)

    the Beach Boys: …tuneful but tentative release titled Smiley Smile (1967).

  • Smiley, George (fictional character)

    George Smiley, fictional character, a British secret service agent who appears in many of the spy stories of John le Carré, beginning with Call for the Dead (1961). Smiley is an unobtrusive secret agent who leads an unglamorous life. A deceptively bland middle-aged man, he is trusted and respected

  • Smiley, Jane (American author)

    Jane Smiley, American novelist known for her lyrical works that centre on families in pastoral settings. Smiley studied literature at Vassar College (B.A., 1971) and the University of Iowa (M.A., 1975; M.F.A., 1976; Ph.D., 1978). From 1981 to 1996 she was a professor of English at Iowa State

  • Smiley, Jane Graves (American author)

    Jane Smiley, American novelist known for her lyrical works that centre on families in pastoral settings. Smiley studied literature at Vassar College (B.A., 1971) and the University of Iowa (M.A., 1975; M.F.A., 1976; Ph.D., 1978). From 1981 to 1996 she was a professor of English at Iowa State

  • Smiley, Tavis (American talk show host, journalist, and political commentator)

    Tavis Smiley, American talk show host, journalist, and political commentator. Smiley grew up near Kokomo, Indiana, and attended Indiana University at Bloomington but left in 1988 to work for Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley. (In 2003 he completed his bachelor’s degree.) Smiley became a national

  • smiling (facial expression)

    human behaviour: The newborn infant: Smiling during infancy changes its meaning over the first year. The smiles that newborns display during their first weeks constitute what is called reflex smiling and usually occur without reference to any external source or stimulus, including other people. By two months, however, infants smile…

  • Smiling God (Chavin god)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Chavín monuments and temples: …which has variously been called El Lanzón, the Great Image, and the Smiling God, is thought to have been the chief object of worship in the original temple. The southern arm of the temple was subsequently twice widened by rectangular additions, into which some of the original galleries were prolonged.…

  • Smiling Lieutenant, The (film by Lubitsch [1931])

    Ernst Lubitsch: Transition to sound: …was a box-office success was The Smiling Lieutenant (1931). Nominated for an Academy Award as best picture, this musical, set in 19th-century Vienna, starred Chevalier, Claudette Colbert, and Miriam Hopkins. Among the contributors to the screenplay was Samson Raphaelson, who would collaborate frequently with Lubitsch throughout the director’s

  • Smiling Woman (painting by John)

    Augustus John: …in the strong and sensuous Smiling Woman (c. 1908), a portrait of John’s second wife, Dorelia. John was known as a colourful personality who adopted an individualistic and bohemian lifestyle. Intrigued by gypsy culture and the Romany language, he spent periods traveling with gypsy caravans over Wales, Ireland, and Dorset.…

  • Smilla’s Sense of Snow (novel by H?eg)

    Peter H?eg: title Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow), a thriller that concerns the investigation into the death of a young boy.

  • Smillie, James D. (American painter)

    Samuel Colman: With James D. Smillie, he founded the American Water Color Society (1866), becoming its first president. His own watercolour paintings are particularly fine. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Design in 1862. Among his works are “The Ships of the Western Plains”…

  • Smilodectes (fossil primate genus)

    primate: Eocene: American genera, Notharctus and Smilodectes, which are well represented in the fossil deposits of the Bridger Basin, Wyoming, U.S., and Adapis, Europolemur, Anchomomys, and Pronycticebus from Europe. Notharctus and Smilodectes are not thought to be antecedent to living lemurs, though Notharctus was not unlike the modern lemurs in size…

  • Smilodon (extinct mammal genus)

    Smilodon, extinct genus of large mammalian carnivores known collectively by the common name sabre-toothed cat. Smilodon belongs to the subfamily Machairodontinae of the family

  • Smim Htaw Buddhaketi (king of Pegu)

    Binnya Dala: In 1747 Binnya Dala succeeded Smim Htaw Buddhaketi, who had seven years earlier been set up as king of the Mon in the new capital of Pegu after their successful revolt against the Burmans. Binnya Dala, who was his predecessor’s chief minister and a more capable military leader, made numerous…

  • Sminthopsis (marsupial)

    marsupial: Dunnarts (Sminthopsis) are so hyperactive—like shrews—that, in order to supply their high energy needs, they must devour their own weight in food (chiefly insects) each day. The numbat uses its remarkable wormlike tongue to lap up termites and ants. Many Australian possums, bandicoots, and American…

  • Sminthopsis crassicaudata (marsupial)

    marsupial mouse: The fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) stores excess fat in its tail. Members of all genera except Antechinus will go into torpor when food is scarce. The crest-tailed marsupial mouse, or mulgara (Dasycercus cristicauda), an arid-land species valued for killing house mice, gets all of its water…

  • Sminthurus viridis (arthropod)

    springtail: …small (2 mm long), green-coloured lucerne flea (Sminthurus viridis), one of the most common species, is a serious pest to crops in Australia. When necessary, insecticides are used to control springtails. Fossil springtails are among the oldest insect fossils known.

  • Smirke, Sir Robert (British architect)

    Western architecture: Great Britain: Following this were Sir Robert Smirke’s Covent Garden Theatre (1809), London’s first Greek Doric building; Wilkins’s Grange Park, Hampshire (1809), a monumental attempt to cram an English country house into the form of a Greek temple; Smirke’s vast Ionic British Museum (1824–47); and St. Pancras Church (1819–22) by…

  • Smirnov, Ivan (Russian revolutionary)

    Great Purge: …Yevseyevich Zinovyev, Lev Kamenev, and Ivan Smirnov, all of whom had been prominent Bolsheviks at the time of the October Revolution (1917) and during the early years of the Soviet regime. With 13 codefendants they were accused of having joined Leon Trotsky in 1932 to form a terrorist organization in…

  • Smirnov, Stanislav (Russian mathematician)

    Stanislav Smirnov, Russian mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 2010 for his work in mathematical physics. Smirnov graduated with a degree in mathematics in 1992 from St. Petersburg State University in St. Petersburg, Russia. He received a doctorate in mathematics in 1996 from the

  • Smit, Bartho (South African author)

    African literature: Afrikaans: Bartho Smit wrote Moeder Hanna (1959; “Mother Hanna”), an acclaimed drama about the South African War. He also wrote Putsonderwater (1962; “Well-Without-Water”), considered among the finest plays produced in Afrikaans; it could not be performed because of its political message. Elsa Joubert wrote a novel…

  • smith (metalworker)

    Blacksmith, craftsman who fabricates objects out of iron by hot and cold forging on an anvil. Blacksmiths who specialized in the forging of shoes for horses were called farriers. The term blacksmith derives from iron, formerly called “black metal,” and farrier from the Latin ferrum, “iron.” Iron

  • Smith & Wesson (American company)

    Smith & Wesson, American firearms manufacturer based in Springfield, Massachusetts. The partnership was first founded in 1852 by Horace Smith (1808–93) and Daniel B. Wesson (1825–1906) in Norwich, Connecticut, to make lever-action Volcanic repeating handguns firing caseless self-consuming bullets.

  • Smith Act (United States [1940])

    Smith Act, U.S. federal law passed in 1940 that made it a criminal offense to advocate the violent overthrow of the government or to organize or be a member of any group or society devoted to such advocacy. The first prosecutions under the Smith Act, of leaders of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP),

  • Smith and Jones (work by Monsarrat)

    Nicholas Monsarrat: …Lost Its Head (1956), and Smith and Jones (1963), which was based on the 1951 Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean spy defection to the Soviet Union. Life is a Four-Letter Word (2nd ed., 1966, 1970; abridged as Breaking In, Breaking Out, 1971) is an autobiography to 1956. His last novel,…

  • Smith Center (Kansas, United States)

    Smith Center, city, seat (1872) of Smith county, northern Kansas, U.S. Smith Center is located about 85 miles (135 km) northwest of Salina. It was founded in 1871 by L.T. Reese with the aim of making it the county seat (the county had been named after Major J. Nelson Smith). The economy of Smith

  • Smith College (college, Northampton, Massachusetts, United States)

    Smith College, liberal arts college for women in Northampton, Massachusetts, U.S. One of the Seven Sisters schools, it is among the largest privately endowed colleges for women in the United States. Bachelor’s degrees are granted in 29 departmental and 8 interdepartmental programs, and

  • Smith de Bruin, Michelle (Irish swimmer and lawyer)

    Michelle Smith, Irish swimmer and lawyer who won four medals at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games to become the most successful Olympian in Ireland and the country’s first woman to capture a gold medal. Smith began swimming competitively at age 13. Though she developed into one of Ireland’s premier

  • Smith et al. v. Doe et al. (law case)

    crime: Rule against retroactivity: Supreme Court ruled in Smith et al. v. Doe et al. that Alaska’s Megan’s law was nonpunitive and thus constitutional (see also sexual-predator law).

  • Smith House (building, Darien, Connecticut, United States)

    Richard Meier: …received critical acclaim for the Smith House (1965–67) in Darien, Connecticut, the first of his so-called white buildings, which clearly built upon the pristine Modernism of Le Corbusier’s work in the 1920s and ’30s. During this period he formed a loose association with a group of young architects, known as…

  • Smith Mountain (mountain, California, United States)

    Mount Palomar, peak (6,126 feet [1,867 metres]) in Cleveland National Forest, southern California, U.S. It lies about 40 miles (65 km) north-northeast of San Diego. The nearly 2,000-acre (800-hectare) Palomar Mountain State Park extends up the mountain slope, and the Palomar Observatory (operated

  • Smith Sound (sound, North America)

    Smith Sound, Arctic sea passage between Ellesmere Island, Can. (west), and northwestern Greenland (east). The sound, 30–45 miles (48–72 km) wide, extends northward for 55 miles (88 km) from Baffin Bay to the Kane Basin. The sound was discovered in 1616 by William Baffin and named for Sir Thomas

  • Smith v. Allwright (law case)

    Thurgood Marshall: …voters from primary elections (Smith v. Allwright [1944]), state judicial enforcement of racial “restrictive covenants” in housing (Shelley v. Kraemer [1948]), and “separate but equal” facilities for African American professionals and graduate students in state universities (Sweatt v. Painter and McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents

  • Smith v. City of Jackson, Mississippi (law case)

    Smith v. City of Jackson, Mississippi, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on March 30, 2005, held in a 5–3 decision (one justice did not participate) that claims alleging violations of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) may be brought on the basis of an adverse

  • Smith’s Crossroads (Tennessee, United States)

    Dayton, city, seat (1899) of Rhea county, southeastern Tennessee, U.S. It lies on Richland Creek near the Tennessee River, 36 miles (58 km) northeast of Chattanooga. Originally called Smith’s Crossroads (c. 1820), it was renamed Dayton in the 1870s. The Rhea County Courthouse in Dayton was the

  • Smith’s Dream (novel by Stead)

    C.K. Stead: Stead’s first novel, Smith’s Dream (1971), is a disturbing fantasy set in a fascist New Zealand of the future; it was the basis of a 1977 film, Sleeping Dogs. Other novels include All Visitors Ashore (1984), The Death of the Body (1986), Sister Hollywood (1989), The End of…

  • Smith’s martesia (mollusk)

    piddock: Smith’s martesia (M. smithi), which resembles a fat, gray pea, bores into rocks and mollusk shells in the Atlantic Ocean from New York to the Gulf of Mexico.

  • Smith’s shoveler (bird)
  • Smith, A. H. (Scottish forger)

    forgery: Instances of literary forgery: (“Antique”) Smith, who was responsible for forgeries of Robert Burns, Sir Walter Scott, Mary Stuart, and other persons from Scottish literature and history—a feat that ultimately earned him 12 months’ imprisonment.

  • Smith, A. J. M. (Canadian poet and anthologist)

    A.J.M. Smith, Canadian poet, anthologist, and critic who was a leader in the revival of Canadian poetry of the 1920s. As an undergraduate at McGill University in Montreal, Smith founded and edited the McGill Fortnightly Review (1925–27), the first literary magazine dedicated to freeing Canadian

  • Smith, Abby Hadassah (American suffragist)

    Abby Hadassah Smith and Julia Evelina Smith: By 1869 Abby and Julia were the only surviving members of the family. In that year, aroused by inequities in local tax rates, they attended a woman suffrage meeting in Hartford, and in 1873 Abby traveled to New York to attend the first meeting of the Association…

  • Smith, Abby Hadassah; and Smith, Julia Evelina (American suffragists)

    Abby Hadassah Smith and Julia Evelina Smith, American suffragists who relentlessly protested for their property and voting rights, drawing considerable national and international attention to their situation and their cause. The Smith sisters, the youngest of five children, lived almost their

  • Smith, Abiel (American businessman and philanthropist)

    African Meeting House: Origins: …school had an endowment from Abiel Smith, a wealthy Boston businessman who was an early supporter of the education of black youth.

  • Smith, Abigail (American first lady)

    Abigail Adams, American first lady (1797–1801), the wife of John Adams, second president of the United States, and mother of John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States. She was a prolific letter writer whose correspondence gives an intimate and vivid portrayal of life in the young

  • Smith, Adam (Scottish philosopher)

    Adam Smith, Scottish social philosopher and political economist. After two centuries, Adam Smith remains a towering figure in the history of economic thought. Known primarily for a single work—An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776), the first comprehensive system of

  • Smith, Adolphe (English photographer)

    history of photography: Social documentation: …Life in London (1877), by Adolphe Smith and John Thomson, included facsimile reproductions of Thomson’s photographs and produced a much more persuasive picture of life among London’s working class. Thomson’s images were reproduced by Woodburytype, a process that resulted in exact, permanent prints but was costly because it required hand…

  • Smith, Al (American politician)

    Al Smith, U.S. politician, four-time Democratic governor of New York and the first Roman Catholic to run for the U.S. presidency (1928). When his father died, young Smith interrupted his schooling and went to work for seven years at the Fulton fish market in New York City to help support his

  • Smith, Alexis (American actress)

    Alexis Smith, (GLADYS SMITH), U.S. actress (born June 8, 1921, Penticton, B.C.—died June 9, 1993, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a striking and statuesque leading lady and supporting player in Hollywood during the 1940s and ’50s and made a spectacular splash on Broadway in 1971 with her performance as a

  • Smith, Alfred Emanuel (American politician)

    Al Smith, U.S. politician, four-time Democratic governor of New York and the first Roman Catholic to run for the U.S. presidency (1928). When his father died, young Smith interrupted his schooling and went to work for seven years at the Fulton fish market in New York City to help support his

  • Smith, Alva Ertskin (American suffragist)

    Alva Belmont, prominent socialite of New York City and Newport, Rhode Island, who, in her later years, became an outspoken suffragist. Alva Smith grew up in her birthplace of Mobile, Alabama, and, after the American Civil War, in France. She married William K. Vanderbilt, grandson of Cornelius, in

  • Smith, Amanda (American religious leader)

    Amanda Smith, American evangelist and missionary who opened an orphanage for African-American girls. Born a slave, Berry grew up in York county, Pa., after her father bought his own freedom and that of most of the family. She was educated mainly at home and at an early age began working as a

  • Smith, Anna Deavere (American playwright, actress, author, journalist, and educator)

    Anna Deavere Smith, American playwright, actress, author, journalist, and educator, who was best known for her one-woman plays that examined the social issues behind current events. Smith was raised in a racially segregated middle-class section of Baltimore. She was a shy child who nonetheless

  • Smith, Anna Nicole (American celebrity)

    Anna Nicole Smith, (Vickie Lynn Hogan), American celebrity (born Nov. 28, 1967 , Mexia, Texas—died Feb. 8, 2007, Hollywood, Fla.), engaged in a lifestyle that frequently captured tabloid headlines, especially when she married 89-year-old Texas oil billionaire J. Howard Marshall II in 1994, at the

  • Smith, Anthony John Francis (British explorer, and writer, and television presenter)

    Anthony John Francis Smith, British explorer, writer, and television presenter (born March 30, 1926, Taplow, Buckinghamshire, Eng.—died July 7, 2014, Oxford, Eng.), chronicled ambitious world adventures in a series of travel memoirs. His best-known expedition, which he undertook in 2011 at age 85,

  • Smith, Anthony Peter (American architect, sculptor, and painter)

    Tony Smith, American architect, sculptor, and painter associated with Minimalism as well as Abstract Expressionism and known for his large geometric sculptures. As a child, Smith was quarantined with tuberculosis and did not emerge into public life until high school. While living behind his

  • Smith, Arnold Cantwell (Canadian diplomat)

    Arnold Cantwell Smith, Canadian diplomat (born Jan. 18, 1915, Toronto, Ont.—died Feb. 7, 1994, Toronto), as the first secretary-general of the Commonwealth, organized and coordinated association activities but, more important, demonstrated aplomb while serving (1965-75) as a troubleshooter during s

  • Smith, Art (American filmmaker)
  • Smith, Arthur (American musician)

    Arthur Smith, American musician (born April 1, 1921, Clinton, S.C.—died April 3, 2014, Charlotte, N.C.), was a virtuoso guitarist and banjo player who wrote or co-wrote more than 500 compositions that encompassed such genres as country, gospel, and boogie-woogie, but he was indelibly identified as

  • Smith, Arthur James Marshall (Canadian poet and anthologist)

    A.J.M. Smith, Canadian poet, anthologist, and critic who was a leader in the revival of Canadian poetry of the 1920s. As an undergraduate at McGill University in Montreal, Smith founded and edited the McGill Fortnightly Review (1925–27), the first literary magazine dedicated to freeing Canadian

  • Smith, Barbara Leigh (British activist)

    Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, English leader in the movement for the education and political rights of women who was instrumental in founding Girton College, Cambridge. In 1857 Barbara Smith married an eminent French physician, Eugène Bodichon, continuing, however, to lead the movements that she

  • Smith, Barnabas (British minister)

    Isaac Newton: Formative influences: …her husband, the well-to-do minister Barnabas Smith, left young Isaac with his grandmother and moved to a neighbouring village to raise a son and two daughters. For nine years, until the death of Barnabas Smith in 1653, Isaac was effectively separated from his mother, and his pronounced psychotic tendencies have…

  • Smith, Bernard (British organ maker)

    Bernard Smith, German-born master organ builder in Restoration England. Smith was an apprentice of the German organ builder Christian F?rmer but adapted easily to the English style of building after his emigration there in 1660. Some years after building an instrument for the Chapel Royal at

  • Smith, Bessie (American singer)

    Bessie Smith, American singer, one of the greatest blues vocalists. Smith grew up in poverty and obscurity. She may have made a first public appearance at the age of eight or nine at the Ivory Theatre in her hometown. About 1913 she toured in a show with Ma Rainey, one of the first of the great

  • Smith, Billy (Canadian hockey player)

    New York Islanders: …future Hall-of-Fame players including goaltender Billy Smith, defenseman Denis Potvin, right wing Mike Bossy, centre Bryan Trottier, and left wing Clark Gillies. That young group (all but Smith were no older than age 25 at the start of the 1979–80 season) played with postseason poise that belied their youth, losing…

  • Smith, Bruce (American football player)

    Bruce Smith, American professional gridiron football defensive end who holds the National Football League (NFL) career record for quarterback sacks (200). Smith played college football at Virginia Tech, where he was a consensus All-American and won the Outland Trophy as the best lineman in the

  • Smith, Bruce Bernard (American football player)

    Bruce Smith, American professional gridiron football defensive end who holds the National Football League (NFL) career record for quarterback sacks (200). Smith played college football at Virginia Tech, where he was a consensus All-American and won the Outland Trophy as the best lineman in the

  • Smith, Bubba (American football player and actor)

    Bubba Smith, (Charles Aaron Smith), American football player and actor (born Feb. 28, 1945, Beaumont, Texas—found dead Aug. 3, 2011, Los Angeles, Calif.), impressed many fans as much for his role as the soft-spoken Moses Hightower in six Police Academy films (1984–89) as he did during his nine

  • Smith, Carl M. (American singer)

    Carl M. Smith, American country music singer (born March 15, 1927, Maynardville, Tenn.—died Jan. 16, 2010, Franklin, Tenn.), was one of the most popular country music recording stars of the 1950s and ’60s as well as a regular fixture on television, which showcased his polished and handsome

  • Smith, Cecile (American artist)

    Cecile de Wentworth, American painter who established a reputation in Europe for her portraits of important personages. Cecile Smith was educated in convent schools. In 1886 she went to Paris, where she studied painting with Alexandre Cabanel and édouard Detaille. Within the next three years she

  • Smith, Chad (American musician)

    Red Hot Chili Peppers: ) and drummer Chad Smith (b. October 25, 1962, St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.).

  • Smith, Charles Aaron (American football player and actor)

    Bubba Smith, (Charles Aaron Smith), American football player and actor (born Feb. 28, 1945, Beaumont, Texas—found dead Aug. 3, 2011, Los Angeles, Calif.), impressed many fans as much for his role as the soft-spoken Moses Hightower in six Police Academy films (1984–89) as he did during his nine

  • Smith, Charles H. (scientist)

    biogeographic region: Afrotropical region: …reanalysis of mammal distributions by Charles H. Smith, however, has concluded that the Mediterranean region, including both its southern and northern shores, is actually much more Paleotropical than Holarctic in aspect (Figure 4; compare Figure 2). Strictly speaking, the term Afro-Tethyan (in reference to the Tethys Sea; see above The…

  • Smith, Charles Richard (British artist)

    Richard Smith, (Charles Richard Smith), British painter and printmaker (born Oct. 27, 1931, Letchworth, Hertfordshire, Eng.—died April 15, 2016, Patchogue, N.Y.), created bold large-scale abstract paintings, many of which were sculptural three-dimensional constructions. He was particularly known

  • Smith, Charlotte (English writer)

    Charlotte Smith, English novelist and poet, highly praised by the novelist Sir Walter Scott. Her poetic attitude toward nature was reminiscent of William Cowper’s in celebrating the “ordinary” pleasures of the English countryside. Her radical attitudes toward conventional morality (the novel

  • Smith, Clarence (American revisionist leader)

    Five Percent Nation: …American revisionist movement, led by Clarence 13X, which split from the Nation of Islam in 1963. The movement rejected being called a religion, preferring instead to be known as a culture and way of life. Its teachings are referred to as “Supreme Mathematics.”

  • Smith, Claydes Charles (American musician)

    Charles Smith, American musician (born Sept. 6, 1948, Jersey City, N.J.—died June 20, 2006, Maplewood, N.J.), was the lead guitarist for the group Kool and the Gang, which reached the zenith of its popularity in the 1980s. He was also the author of some of the band’s most memorable songs, i

  • Smith, Clint (Canadian hockey player)

    Clint Smith, (“Snuffy”), Canadian hockey player (born Dec. 12, 1913, Assiniboia, Sask.—died May 19, 2009, North Vancouver, B.C.), was a highly skilled centre who, during his 11 seasons (1936–47) in the National Hockey League (NHL), became known for his playmaking ability as well as for his

  • Smith, Cyril Stanley (American metallurgist)

    Cyril Stanley Smith, American metallurgist who in 1943–44 determined the properties and technology of plutonium and uranium, the essential materials in the atomic bombs that were first exploded in 1945. Obtaining his education in England and the United States, Smith became a research associate

  • Smith, Cyrus Rowlett (American businessman)

    American Airlines: Cyrus Rowlett Smith was elected president in that year and, as president or chairman of the board, guided the company’s fortunes until 1968, when he became U.S. secretary of commerce. Returning briefly as chief executive officer in 1973, he retired in 1974.

  • Smith, Dame Margaret Natalie (British actress)

    Maggie Smith, English stage and motion-picture actress noted for her poignancy and wit in comic roles. Smith studied acting at the Oxford Playhouse School and began appearing in revues in Oxford in 1952 and London in 1955. She first achieved recognition in the Broadway revue New Faces of 1956 and

  • Smith, David (American sculptor)

    David Smith, American sculptor whose pioneering welded metal sculpture and massive painted geometric forms made him the most original American sculptor in the decades after World War II. His work greatly influenced the brightly coloured “primary structures” of Minimal art during the 1960s. Smith

  • Smith, David Hamilton (American medical researcher)

    David Hamilton Smith, American medical researcher who in 1996 was honoured with the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research for work that led to the development of a vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae type B, or Hib, which causes meningitis (b. 1932?, Canton, Ohio—d. Feb. 23/24, 1999,

  • Smith, David Roland (American sculptor)

    David Smith, American sculptor whose pioneering welded metal sculpture and massive painted geometric forms made him the most original American sculptor in the decades after World War II. His work greatly influenced the brightly coloured “primary structures” of Minimal art during the 1960s. Smith

  • Smith, Dean (American coach)

    Dean Smith, American collegiate basketball coach at the University of North Carolina (1961–97) who, with 879 career victories, retired as the most successful men’s collegiate basketball coach; his record was broken by Bob Knight in 2007. Smith earned a degree in mathematics (1953) from the

  • Smith, Dean Edwards (American coach)

    Dean Smith, American collegiate basketball coach at the University of North Carolina (1961–97) who, with 879 career victories, retired as the most successful men’s collegiate basketball coach; his record was broken by Bob Knight in 2007. Smith earned a degree in mathematics (1953) from the

  • Smith, Dick (American makeup artist)

    Dick Smith, (Richard Emerson Smith), American makeup artist (born June 26, 1922, Larchmont, N.Y.—died July 30, 2014, Los Angeles, Calif.), used revolutionary makeup-application techniques that radically transformed actors for their on-screen roles; his methods for creating fake blood and for using

  • Smith, Dick (Australian aviator and businessman)

    Dick Smith, Australian aviator, filmmaker, explorer, businessman, and publisher, renowned for his aviation exploits. Smith had limited formal education at public schools and a technical high school, but his inventiveness and curiosity soon turned him into one of the signal success and survival

  • Smith, Doc (American author)

    E.E. Smith, American science-fiction author who is credited with creating in the Skylark series (1928–65) and the Lensman series (1934–50) the subgenre of “space opera,” action-adventure set on a vast intergalactic scale involving faster-than-light spaceships, powerful weapons, and fantastic

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