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  • Smith, Donald Alexander (Canadian financier and statesman)

    Donald Alexander Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, Canadian fur trader, financier, railway promoter, and statesman. Smith was apprenticed to the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1838 and worked for many years at the fur trade in Labrador. He served as chief commissioner for the company in Canada

  • Smith, Dorothy (Canadian sociologist)

    standpoint theory: …the work of Canadian sociologist Dorothy Smith. In her book The Everyday World as Problematic: A Feminist Sociology (1989), Smith argued that sociology has ignored and objectified women, making them the “Other.” She claimed that women’s experiences are fertile grounds for feminist knowledge and that by grounding sociological work on…

  • Smith, E. E. (American author)

    E.E. Smith, American science-fiction author who is credited with creating in the Skylark series (1928–65) and the Lensman series (1934–50) the subgenre of “space opera,” action-adventure set on a vast intergalactic scale involving faster-than-light spaceships, powerful weapons, and fantastic

  • Smith, Edmund Kirby (United States military officer)

    E. Kirby-Smith, Confederate general during the American Civil War (1861–65) who controlled the area west of the Mississippi River for the Confederacy for almost two years after it had been severed from the rest of the South. Born Edmund Kirby Smith, he later signed his name E. Kirby Smith; the

  • Smith, Edward Elmer (American author)

    E.E. Smith, American science-fiction author who is credited with creating in the Skylark series (1928–65) and the Lensman series (1934–50) the subgenre of “space opera,” action-adventure set on a vast intergalactic scale involving faster-than-light spaceships, powerful weapons, and fantastic

  • Smith, Edward J. (British captain)

    Edward J. Smith, British captain of the passenger liner Titanic, which sank in 1912. Smith began working on boats while he was a teenager. In 1875 he earned a master’s certificate, which was required to serve as captain. In 1880 he became a junior officer with the White Star Line, and seven years

  • Smith, Edwin (American Egyptologist)

    Edwin Smith papyrus: …in 1862 by the American Edwin Smith, a pioneer in the study of Egyptian science. Upon his death in 1906, the papyrus was given to the New York Historical Society and turned over to U.S. Egyptologist James Henry Breasted in 1920 for study. A translation, transliteration, and discussion in two…

  • Smith, Eldred Gee (American religious leader)

    Eldred Gee Smith, American religious leader (born Jan. 9, 1907, Lehi, Utah—died April 4, 2013, Salt Lake City, Utah), was the seventh patriarch and longest-serving general authority (1947–79) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), the main branch of Mormonism. He was a direct

  • Smith, Eleanor Rosalynn (American first lady)

    Rosalynn Carter, American first lady (1977–81)—the wife of Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States—and mental health advocate. She was one of the most politically astute and active of all American first ladies. Rosalynn was the eldest of four children (two girls and two boys) born to

  • Smith, Elinor (American aviator)

    Elinor Smith, (Elinor Regina Patricia Ward; Elinor Smith Sullivan), American aviator (born Aug. 17, 1911, Long Island, N.Y.—died March 19, 2010, Palo Alto, Calif.), set several flying records and captured the country’s imagination with stunt flying in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Smith created a

  • Smith, Eliza Roxey Snow (American Mormon leader and poet)

    Eliza Roxey Snow Smith, American Mormon leader and poet, a major figure in defining the role of Mormon women through her work in numerous church organizations. Eliza Snow grew up from the age of two in Mantua, Ohio. Her family was deeply religious and in the 1820s joined the Campbellite sect of

  • Smith, Elizabeth (American singer)

    Bessie Smith, American singer, one of the greatest blues vocalists. Smith grew up in poverty and obscurity. She may have made a first public appearance at the age of eight or nine at the Ivory Theatre in her hometown. About 1913 she toured in a show with Ma Rainey, one of the first of the great

  • Smith, Elliot (anthropologist)

    Raymond A. Dart: …from the mosaicist position of Elliot Smith, who held that hominization began with an enlarged cranial capacity. Nevertheless, Dart lived to see his theories corroborated by further discoveries of Australopithecus remains at Makapansgat in South Africa in the late 1940s and by the subsequent discoveries of Louis Leakey, which firmly…

  • Smith, Elliott (American musician)

    Kenneth Anger: …was an elegy for singer Elliott Smith, who had committed suicide in 2003. Ich Will! (2008; “I Want!”) consisted of spliced-together Nazi propaganda footage.

  • Smith, Emily James (American educator and historian)

    Emily James Smith Putnam, American educator and historian, remembered especially for her early influence on the academic quality of Barnard College in New York City. Emily Smith graduated from Bryn Mawr (Pennsylvania) College with the first class, that of 1889, and then attended Girton College,

  • Smith, Emmitt (American football player)

    Emmitt Smith, American gridiron football player who in 2002 became the all-time leading rusher in National Football League (NFL) history. He retired after the 2004 season with 18,355 yards rushing. He also holds the record for most rushing touchdowns in a career, with 164. Smith excelled early in

  • Smith, Emmitt James, III (American football player)

    Emmitt Smith, American gridiron football player who in 2002 became the all-time leading rusher in National Football League (NFL) history. He retired after the 2004 season with 18,355 yards rushing. He also holds the record for most rushing touchdowns in a career, with 164. Smith excelled early in

  • Smith, Erminnie Adele Platt (American anthropologist)

    Erminnie Adele Platt Smith, American anthropologist who was the first woman to specialize in ethnographic field work. Smith graduated from the Female Seminary of Troy, N.Y., in 1853. She married Simeon Smith, a Chicago lumber dealer and merchant, in 1855. When her sons were students in Germany, she

  • Smith, F. E. (British statesman)

    Frederick Edwin Smith, 1st earl of Birkenhead, British statesman, lawyer, and noted orator; as lord chancellor (1919–22), he sponsored major legal reforms and helped negotiate the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. A graduate (1895) of Wadham College, Oxford, Smith taught law at Oxford until 1899, when he

  • Smith, Florence Margaret (British poet)

    Stevie Smith, British poet who expressed an original and visionary personality in her work, combining a lively wit with penetrating honesty and an absence of sentiment. For most of her life Smith lived with an aunt in the same house in Palmers Green, a northern London suburb. After attending school

  • Smith, Frances Octavia (American actor, singer and writer)

    Dale Evans, (Frances Octavia Smith), American actress, singer, songwriter, and writer (born Oct. 31, 1912, Uvalde, Texas—died Feb. 7, 2001, Apple Valley, Calif.), reigned as “queen of the West” alongside her “king of the cowboys” husband, Roy Rogers, in films in the 1940s and early ’50s and on t

  • Smith, Fred (American business executive)

    Frederick W. Smith, American business executive who founded (1971) Federal Express (later called FedEx), one of the largest express-delivery companies in the world. Smith’s father was a successful businessman who founded Dixie Greyhound Lines, among other ventures. As a child, the younger Smith

  • Smith, Fred (American musician)

    Patti Smith: …she raised a family with Fred (“Sonic”) Smith, founder of the band MC5. Although she recorded an album with her husband in 1988 (Dream of Life) and began working on new songs with him a few years later, it was only after his sudden death from a heart attack in…

  • Smith, Fred (Sonic) (American musician)

    Patti Smith: …she raised a family with Fred (“Sonic”) Smith, founder of the band MC5. Although she recorded an album with her husband in 1988 (Dream of Life) and began working on new songs with him a few years later, it was only after his sudden death from a heart attack in…

  • Smith, Frederick W. (American business executive)

    Frederick W. Smith, American business executive who founded (1971) Federal Express (later called FedEx), one of the largest express-delivery companies in the world. Smith’s father was a successful businessman who founded Dixie Greyhound Lines, among other ventures. As a child, the younger Smith

  • Smith, Frederick Wallace (American business executive)

    Frederick W. Smith, American business executive who founded (1971) Federal Express (later called FedEx), one of the largest express-delivery companies in the world. Smith’s father was a successful businessman who founded Dixie Greyhound Lines, among other ventures. As a child, the younger Smith

  • Smith, Gene (American photographer)

    W. Eugene Smith, American photojournalist noted for his compelling photo-essays, which were characterized by a strong sense of empathy and social conscience. At age 14 Smith began to use photography to aid his aeronautical studies, and within a year he had become a photographer for two local

  • Smith, George (British Assyriologist)

    George Smith, English Assyriologist who advanced knowledge of the earliest (Sumerian) period of Mesopotamian civilization with his discovery of one of the most important literary works in Akkadian, the Epic of Gilgamesh. Moreover, its description of a flood, strikingly similar to the account in

  • Smith, George (British publisher)

    George Smith, British publisher, best known for issuing the works of many Victorian writers and for publishing the first edition of the Dictionary of National Biography. Smith’s father, also named George Smith (1789–1846), learned bookselling in his native Scotland and, after moving to London,

  • Smith, George Albert (British filmmaker)

    history of the motion picture: Edison and the Lumière brothers: …and 1898, two Brighton photographers, George Albert Smith and James Williamson, constructed their own motion-picture cameras and began producing trick films featuring superimpositions (The Corsican Brothers, 1897) and interpolated close-ups (Grandma’s Reading Glass, 1900; The Big Swallow, 1901). Smith subsequently developed the first commercially successful photographic colour process (Kinemacolor, c.

  • Smith, George E. (American physicist)

    George E. Smith, American physicist who was awarded, with physicist Willard Boyle, the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2009 for their invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD). They shared the prize with physicist Charles Kao, who discovered how light could be transmitted through fibre-optic cables.

  • Smith, George Elwood (American physicist)

    George E. Smith, American physicist who was awarded, with physicist Willard Boyle, the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2009 for their invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD). They shared the prize with physicist Charles Kao, who discovered how light could be transmitted through fibre-optic cables.

  • Smith, George P. (American biochemist)

    George P. Smith, American biochemist known for his development of phage display, a laboratory technique employing bacteriophages (bacteria-infecting viruses) for the investigation of protein-protein, protein-DNA, and protein-peptide interactions. Phage display proved valuable to the development of

  • Smith, George Washington (American dancer)

    George Washington Smith, American dancer, ballet master, and teacher, considered the only male American ballet star of the 19th century. Smith’s talents were developed by studying with various visiting European teachers in his native Philadelphia, then a mecca for theatre and dance. His performing

  • Smith, Gerard (American musician)

    TV on the Radio: 24, 1974, California), and bassist-keyboardist Gerard Smith (in full Gerard Anthony Smith; b. Sept. 20, 1974, New York, N.Y.—d. April 20, 2011, Brooklyn, N.Y.).

  • Smith, Gerard Anthony (American musician)

    TV on the Radio: 24, 1974, California), and bassist-keyboardist Gerard Smith (in full Gerard Anthony Smith; b. Sept. 20, 1974, New York, N.Y.—d. April 20, 2011, Brooklyn, N.Y.).

  • Smith, Gerrit (American philanthropist and social reformer)

    Gerrit Smith, American reformer and philanthropist who provided financial backing for the antislavery crusader John Brown. Smith was born into a wealthy family. In about 1828 he became an active worker in the cause of temperance, and in his home village, Peterboro, he built one of the first

  • Smith, Gladys (American actress)

    Alexis Smith, (GLADYS SMITH), U.S. actress (born June 8, 1921, Penticton, B.C.—died June 9, 1993, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a striking and statuesque leading lady and supporting player in Hollywood during the 1940s and ’50s and made a spectacular splash on Broadway in 1971 with her performance as a

  • Smith, Gladys Louise (Canadian-born American actress)

    Mary Pickford, Canadian-born American motion-picture actress who was “America’s sweetheart” of the silent screen and one of the first film stars. At the height of her career, she was one of the richest and most famous women in the United States. Gladys Louise Smith grew up in precarious financial

  • Smith, Gladys Marie (Canadian-born American actress)

    Mary Pickford, Canadian-born American motion-picture actress who was “America’s sweetheart” of the silent screen and one of the first film stars. At the height of her career, she was one of the richest and most famous women in the United States. Gladys Louise Smith grew up in precarious financial

  • Smith, Grafton Elliot (British anthropologist)

    Davidson Black: …was studying comparative anatomy with G. Elliot Smith, who was at that time working on the Piltdown material, Black became deeply interested in the problems of man’s origin. After World War I and until his death, Black served in China as professor of embryology and neurology at the Peking (Beijing)…

  • Smith, H. Julius (American inventor)

    explosive: Blasting machines: …blasting machine was invented by H. Julius Smith, an American, in 1878. It comprised a gear-type arrangement of rack bar and pinion that operated an armature to generate electricity. When the rack bar was pushed down rapidly, it revolved the pinion and armature with sufficient speed to obtain the desired…

  • Smith, Hamilton O. (American biologist)

    Hamilton O. Smith, American microbiologist who shared, with Werner Arber and Daniel Nathans, the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1978 for his discovery of a new class of restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences of nucleotides in a molecule of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) and

  • Smith, Hamilton Othanel (American biologist)

    Hamilton O. Smith, American microbiologist who shared, with Werner Arber and Daniel Nathans, the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1978 for his discovery of a new class of restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences of nucleotides in a molecule of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) and

  • Smith, Hannah Whitall (American evangelist and reformer)

    Hannah Whitall Smith, American evangelist and reformer, a major public speaker and writer in the Holiness movement of the late 19th century. Hannah Whitall grew up in a strict Quaker home and had from childhood a deep concern with religion and a habit of introspection. In 1851 she married Robert

  • Smith, Harold Jacob (American screenwriter, director, and author)
  • Smith, Hazel Brannon (American publisher and editor)

    Hazel Brannon Smith, U.S. publisher and editor (born 1914?, Gadsden, Ala.—died May 14, 1994, Cleveland, Tenn.), courageously crusaded for social reform and consistently promoted unpopular causes as the editor of four Mississippi newspapers--the Durant News, Lexington Advertiser, Flora Banner C

  • Smith, Hoke (American politician)

    Hoke Smith, legislator, U.S. secretary of the interior (1893–96), and progressive figure in Georgia politics. Admitted to the bar in 1873, Smith practiced law in Atlanta and became active in local Democratic politics. He published the Atlanta Journal (1887–1900), which he used as a forum to

  • Smith, Horace (American manufacturer)

    Smith & Wesson: …first founded in 1852 by Horace Smith (1808–93) and Daniel B. Wesson (1825–1906) in Norwich, Connecticut, to make lever-action Volcanic repeating handguns firing caseless self-consuming bullets.

  • Smith, Horace (English writer)

    Horace Smith, English poet, novelist, and stockbroker who coauthored (with an older brother, James) Rejected Addresses; or, The New Theatrum Poetarum (1812), a collection of parodies of early 19th-century British writers that is considered a classic in the literature of parody. Smith was the son of

  • Smith, Horatio (English writer)

    Horace Smith, English poet, novelist, and stockbroker who coauthored (with an older brother, James) Rejected Addresses; or, The New Theatrum Poetarum (1812), a collection of parodies of early 19th-century British writers that is considered a classic in the literature of parody. Smith was the son of

  • Smith, Howard Kingsbury, Jr. (American journalist and broadcaster)

    Howard Kingsbury Smith, Jr., American journalist and broadcaster (born May 12, 1914, Ferriday, La.—died Feb. 15, 2002, Bethesda, Md.), was a longtime radio and television newscaster who remained true to his convictions and was willing to take a stand on important issues despite the fact that news r

  • Smith, Huey (American musician)

    Huey Smith, American pianist, bandleader, songwriter, and vocalist, a principal figure in the 1950s rock and roll that became known as the New Orleans sound. Smith contributed vocals and his aggressive boogie-based piano style to the rhythm-and-blues recordings of others before forming his own

  • Smith, Ian (prime minister of Rhodesia)

    Ian Smith, first native-born prime minister of the British colony of Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and ardent advocate of white rule, who in 1965 declared Rhodesia’s independence and its subsequent withdrawal from the British Commonwealth. Smith attended local schools and entered Rhodes

  • Smith, Ian Douglas (prime minister of Rhodesia)

    Ian Smith, first native-born prime minister of the British colony of Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and ardent advocate of white rule, who in 1965 declared Rhodesia’s independence and its subsequent withdrawal from the British Commonwealth. Smith attended local schools and entered Rhodes

  • Smith, J. M. P. (American biblical scholar)

    Edgar J. Goodspeed: …Testament and in 1939, with J.M.P. Smith, produced a translation of the entire Bible. Along with eight other scholars, he laboured for 15 years on the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, published in 1946; the same year, he wrote How to Read the Bible, which became a standard guide…

  • Smith, J. Russell (American geographer)

    geography: Geography in the United States: …early economic geographers such as J. Russell Smith, who worked in the Department of Geography and Industry at the University of Pennsylvania and published his Industrial and Commercial Geography in 1913. Economic or commercial geography courses were quite common in economics departments at American universities then, but with a shift…

  • Smith, Jack Martin (American art director)
  • Smith, Jackie (American football player)

    Arizona Cardinals: …Dan Dierdorf and tight end Jackie Smith, won 10 games and made the first of two consecutive trips to the play-offs, where they lost each time. The Cardinals returned to the play-offs again during the strike-shortened 1982 season, but a general lack of fan support—combined with the ownership’s desire for…

  • Smith, Jacob F. (United States general)

    Philippine-American War: Jacob F. Smith, enraged by a guerrilla massacre of U.S. troops, launched a retaliatory campaign of such indiscriminate ferocity that he was court-martialed and forced to retire.

  • Smith, James Oscar (American musician)

    Jimmy Smith, American musician who integrated the electric organ into jazz, thereby inventing the soul-jazz idiom, which became popular in the 1950s and ’60s. Smith grew up outside of Philadelphia. He learned to play piano from his parents and began performing with his father in a dance troupe at

  • Smith, James Todd (American rapper and actor)

    LL Cool J, American rapper and actor, a leading exponent of mid-1980s new-school rap and one of the few hip-hop stars of his era to sustain a successful recording career for more than a decade. Taking the stage name LL Cool J (“Ladies Love Cool James”) at age 16, Smith signed with fledgling rap

  • Smith, James Wiley (Fijian-born American professional wrestler)

    Jimmy (“Superfly”) Snuka, (James Wiley Smith), Fijian-born American professional wrestler (born May 18, 1943, Fiji—died Jan. 15, 2017, near Pompano Beach, Fla.), used acrobatic moves and an appealing performance style to become a popular star during the 1970s and ’80s, though his career was later

  • Smith, Jedediah (American explorer)

    Jedediah Smith, trader and explorer who was the first American to enter California from the east and return from it using an overland route. Smith probably made his first trip west while still in his teens. In 1822 he joined a fur-trading expedition to the Rocky Mountains and continued in the Rocky

  • Smith, Jedediah Strong (American explorer)

    Jedediah Smith, trader and explorer who was the first American to enter California from the east and return from it using an overland route. Smith probably made his first trip west while still in his teens. In 1822 he joined a fur-trading expedition to the Rocky Mountains and continued in the Rocky

  • Smith, Jeff (American television personality)

    Jeff Smith, (Jeffrey L. Smith), American television personality (born Jan. 22, 1939, Tacoma, Wash.—died July 7, 2004, Seattle, Wash.), hosted the extremely popular TV cooking show The Frugal Gourmet on PBS from 1983 until accusations of sexual misconduct derailed his career in 1997. Smith was o

  • Smith, Jeffrey L. (American television personality)

    Jeff Smith, (Jeffrey L. Smith), American television personality (born Jan. 22, 1939, Tacoma, Wash.—died July 7, 2004, Seattle, Wash.), hosted the extremely popular TV cooking show The Frugal Gourmet on PBS from 1983 until accusations of sexual misconduct derailed his career in 1997. Smith was o

  • Smith, Jennifer (premier of Bermuda)

    Bermuda: History: …1998 elections, and its leader, Jennifer Smith, became Bermuda’s first PLP premier; the party remained in power for the next 14 years. In the 2012 elections the One Bermuda Alliance (OBA)—formed the previous year through the merger of the UBP and another opposition party, the Bermuda Democratic Alliance—won a decisive…

  • Smith, Jessie Willcox (American painter and illustrator)

    Jessie Willcox Smith, American artist best remembered for her illustrations, often featuring children, for numerous popular magazines, advertising campaigns, and children’s books. At age 16 Smith entered the School of Design for Women in Philadelphia, and from 1885 to 1888 she studied with Thomas

  • Smith, Jimmy (American musician)

    Jimmy Smith, American musician who integrated the electric organ into jazz, thereby inventing the soul-jazz idiom, which became popular in the 1950s and ’60s. Smith grew up outside of Philadelphia. He learned to play piano from his parents and began performing with his father in a dance troupe at

  • Smith, John (British politician)

    John Smith, British politician (born Sept. 13, 1938, Dalmally, Argyll, Scotland—died May 12, 1994, London, England), as the pragmatic leader of the British Labour Party from July 1992, was credited with moving the traditionally left-wing party to a more centrist, pro-European stance. It was w

  • Smith, John (English minister)

    John Smyth, English religious libertarian and Nonconformist minister, called “the Se-baptist” (self-baptizer), who is generally considered the founder of the organized Baptists of England. He also influenced the Pilgrim Fathers who immigrated to North America in 1620. Most of Smyth’s early years

  • Smith, John (American wrestler)

    John Smith, American freestyle wrestler who won six consecutive world championships (1987–92) and won two Olympic gold medals in the featherweight class. Smith, whose three brothers were all accomplished wrestlers, competed at Oklahoma State University, winning the National Collegiate Athletic

  • Smith, John (British explorer)

    John Smith, English explorer and early leader of the Jamestown Colony, the first permanent English settlement in North America. Smith played an equally important role as a cartographer and a prolific writer who vividly depicted the natural abundance of the New World, whetting the colonizing

  • Smith, John Stafford (English composer)

    The Star-Spangled Banner: Origin of the melody: Written by British composer John Stafford Smith—whose identity was discovered only in the 1970s by a librarian in the music division of the Library of Congress—the song was sung to signal a transition between the evening’s orchestral music concert and after-dinner participatory singing. Its original lyrics were written in…

  • Smith, Joseph (American religious leader [1805–1844])

    Joseph Smith, American prophet and founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Smith came from an unremarkable New England family. His grandfather, Asael Smith, lost most of his property in Topsfield, Massachusetts, during the economic downturn of the 1780s and eventually moved to

  • Smith, Joseph (English merchant)

    Canaletto: …this point, an early acquaintance, Joseph Smith—publisher, merchant, and later British consul in Venice—stepped into the breach. As standardized views of Venice dropped from demand, Smith seems to have encouraged Canaletto to expand his range of subjects to include Roman monuments and the area of Padua and the Brenta River.…

  • Smith, Joseph F. (American religious leader)

    Joseph F. Smith, American religious leader, sixth president (1901–18) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the main Mormon denomination). After his uncle Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism, and his father, Hyrum Smith, were murdered in Carthage, Ill., in 1844, he and his mother

  • Smith, Joseph Fielding (American religious leader)

    Joseph F. Smith, American religious leader, sixth president (1901–18) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the main Mormon denomination). After his uncle Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism, and his father, Hyrum Smith, were murdered in Carthage, Ill., in 1844, he and his mother

  • Smith, Joseph V. (English geologist)

    geologic history of Earth: The pregeologic period: According to the English-born geologist Joseph V. Smith, a minimum of 500 to 1,000 impact basins were formed on Earth within a period of about 100 to 200 million years prior to 3.95 billion years ago. Moreover, plausible calculations suggest that this estimate represents merely the tail end of an…

  • Smith, Joseph, III (American religious leader [1832-1914])

    Joseph Smith, III, American religious leader, first president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was the son of Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism. Smith was a boy of 11 when his father was murdered by a mob, and he did not go to Utah with Brigham Young’s group

  • Smith, Joseph, Jr. (American religious leader [1805–1844])

    Joseph Smith, American prophet and founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Smith came from an unremarkable New England family. His grandfather, Asael Smith, lost most of his property in Topsfield, Massachusetts, during the economic downturn of the 1780s and eventually moved to

  • Smith, Josephine Donna (American poet)

    Ina Donna Coolbrith, popular American poet of moderate talent who nonetheless became a major figure in literary and cultural circles of 19th- and early 20th-century San Francisco. Coolbrith, a niece of Joseph Smith (the founder of Mormonism), was born in the first major Mormon settlement. Shortly

  • Smith, Julia (British director)

    Julia Smith, British television producer and director who was one of the creators of the long-running BBC soap opera "EastEnders," which from its first airing in 1985 was one of the most popular television programs in Great Britain (b. June 1927--d. June 19,

  • Smith, Julia Evelina (American suffragist)

    Abby Hadassah Smith and Julia Evelina Smith: By 1869 Abby and Julia were the only surviving members of the family. In that year, aroused by inequities in local tax rates, they attended a woman suffrage meeting in Hartford, and in 1873 Abby traveled to New York to attend the first meeting of the Association for the…

  • Smith, Julie Anne (American actress)

    Julianne Moore, American actress known for her exacting and sympathetic portrayals of women at odds with their surroundings, often in films that examined social issues. Smith was the eldest of three children; her American father was a military lawyer and judge, and her Scottish immigrant mother was

  • Smith, Kate (American singer)

    Kate Smith, American singer on radio and television, long known as the “first lady of radio.” Smith started singing before audiences as a child, and by age 17 she had decided on a career in show business. She went to New York City in 1926 and landed a role in a Broadway musical, Honeymoon Lane, the

  • Smith, Kate Douglas (American author)

    Kate Douglas Wiggin, American author who led the kindergarten education movement in the United States. Kate Douglas Smith attended a district school in Philadelphia and for short periods the Gorham Female Seminary in Maine, the Morison Academy in Maryland, and the Abbott Academy in Massachusetts.

  • Smith, Kathryn Elizabeth (American singer)

    Kate Smith, American singer on radio and television, long known as the “first lady of radio.” Smith started singing before audiences as a child, and by age 17 she had decided on a career in show business. She went to New York City in 1926 and landed a role in a Broadway musical, Honeymoon Lane, the

  • Smith, Kevin (American director and actor)

    Ben Affleck: Early life and career: …Dazed and Confused (1993) and Kevin Smith’s Mallrats (1995). Smith was impressed by Affleck and cast him as the lead in his next film, Chasing Amy (1997).

  • Smith, Kiki (American artist)

    Kiki Smith, German-born American sculptor, installation artist, and printmaker whose intense and expressionistic work investigated the body and bodily processes. The daughter of the American actress and opera singer Jane Lawrence and the American architect and sculptor Tony Smith, she was born in

  • Smith, Lamar (American politician)

    Patrick Leahy: Lamar Smith, he cowrote the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (2011), which was called the most significant reform of U.S. patent law in the modern era; it established priority for inventions by filing date rather than by first demonstration. In addition, Leahy propounded legislation that protected…

  • Smith, Lee (American author)

    Lee Smith, American author of fiction about her native southeastern United States. Smith was educated at Hollins College, Roanoke, Virginia (B.A., 1967), and the Sorbonne in Paris; she taught at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University. Her first novel, The Last Day the

  • Smith, Leonard (American cinematographer)
  • Smith, Leslie Charles (British manufacturer)

    Leslie Charles Smith, British toy manufacturer (born March 6, 1918, Enfield, Middlesex, Eng.—died May 26, 2005, London, Eng.), as joint founder of Lesney Products, in 1953 pioneered Matchbox toys—scale-model die-cast metal replicas small enough to fit inside a British cardboard matchbox. The p

  • Smith, Linda (British comedian)

    Linda Smith, British comedian (born Jan. 25, 1958, Erith, Kent, Eng.—died Feb. 27, 2006, London, Eng.), delighted millions with her warm, but often satiric, humour about the foibles of everyday life. Smith received a conventional education at the University of Sheffield and then toured (1983) w

  • Smith, Lowell Dennis (American dancer)

    Lowell Dennis Smith, American dancer (born June 5, 1951, Memphis, Tenn.—died Oct. 22, 2007, Los Angeles, Calif.), performed for 17 years with the Dance Theater of Harlem, becoming a principal dancer known for his strength, dramatic expressiveness, and imposing presence. Smith was best remembered

  • Smith, Lula Carson (American author)

    Carson McCullers, American writer of novels and stories that depict the inner lives of lonely people. At age 17 Lula Carson Smith, whose father was a modestly successful jeweler in Columbus, Georgia, went to New York City to study at Columbia and New York universities, and in 1937 she married

  • Smith, Maggie (British actress)

    Maggie Smith, English stage and motion-picture actress noted for her poignancy and wit in comic roles. Smith studied acting at the Oxford Playhouse School and began appearing in revues in Oxford in 1952 and London in 1955. She first achieved recognition in the Broadway revue New Faces of 1956 and

  • Smith, Malcolm (American football player)

    Malcolm Smith, Arguably no player in the 47-year history of the NFL championship game was ever more unheralded prior to winning the Super Bowl MVP award than was Seattle Seahawks outside linebacker Malcolm Smith, who in 2014 was named MVP following Seattle’s 43–8 victory over the Denver Broncos in

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