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  • Solar Delta (work by Otero)

    Latin American art: Trends, c. 1950–c. 1970: …in his monumental stainless steel Solar Delta (1977) on the Mall in Washington, D.C. More abstract sculptures were constructed by a number of Colombians in the early 1960s; Eduardo Ramírez Villamizar and Edgar Negret made metal sculptures out of coloured planes, often bearing titles that suggest mental and spiritual processes,…

  • solar distiller (thermoelectric device)

    Mária Telkes: …her most important inventions: a solar distiller capable of vaporizing seawater and recondensing it into drinkable water. Although the system was carried aboard life rafts during the war, it was also scaled up to supplement the water demands of the Virgin Islands. She remained at MIT after the war, becoming…

  • Solar Dynamics Observatory (United States satellite)

    Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), U.S. satellite designed to study the Sun. It was launched on February 11, 2010, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, by an Atlas V rocket into a geosynchronous orbit. SDO is the first satellite in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Living with a Star

  • solar eclipse (astronomy)

    eclipse: Solar eclipse phenomena: Totality at any particular solar eclipse can be seen only from a narrow belt on Earth, sometimes only 150 km (90 miles) wide. The various phases observable at a total solar eclipse are illustrated in the top portion of the figure. The…

  • solar elevation angle (meteorology)

    climate: Distribution of radiant energy from the Sun: …they receive depends on their solar elevation angle. (The maximum solar elevation is 90° for the overhead Sun.) This angle changes systematically with latitude, the time of year, and the time of day. The noontime elevation angle reaches a maximum at all latitudes north of the Tropic of Cancer (23.5°…

  • solar energy

    Solar energy, radiation from the Sun capable of producing heat, causing chemical reactions, or generating electricity. The total amount of solar energy incident on Earth is vastly in excess of the world’s current and anticipated energy requirements. If suitably harnessed, this highly diffused

  • solar flare (astronomy)

    Solar flare, sudden intense brightening in the solar corona, usually in the vicinity of a magnetic inversion near a sunspot group. The flare develops in a few minutes, or even seconds, and may last several hours. High-energy particles, electron streams, hard X-rays, and radio bursts are often

  • solar furnace (technology)
  • solar heating (technology)

    Solar heating, the use of sunlight to heat water or air in buildings. There are two types of solar heating, passive and active. Passive heating relies on architectural design to heat buildings. The building’s site, structure, and materials can all be utilized to maximize the heating (and lighting)

  • solar humidification (chemical process)

    desalination: Desalination processes: …a simple thermal process called solar humidification can be used. The heat of the Sun partially vaporizes salt water under a transparent cover. On the underside of the cover, the vapour condenses and flows into a collecting trough. The principal difficulty in this process is that large land areas are…

  • Solar Impulse (aviation project)

    Bertrand Piccard: …pilot André Borschberg, Piccard launched Solar Impulse, a project that had the ultimate goal of developing and launching a solar-powered airplane capable of circumnavigating the globe. The first of those planes, Solar Impulse, was completed in 2009, and a major step occurred when the plane, piloted by Borschberg, completed a…

  • Solar Impulse (aircraft)

    Bertrand Piccard: The first of those planes, Solar Impulse, was completed in 2009, and a major step occurred when the plane, piloted by Borschberg, completed a 26-hour flight over Switzerland on July 7–8, 2010, becoming the first solar-powered aircraft to fly through the night. Other pioneering milestones included an international flight from…

  • Solar Lottery (novel by Dick)

    Philip K. Dick: He published his first novel, Solar Lottery, in 1955. Early in Dick’s work the theme emerged that would remain his central preoccupation—that of a reality at variance with what it appeared or was intended to be. In such novels as Time out of Joint (1959), The Man in the High…

  • solar magnetic field (astronomy)

    heliosphere: … that is filled with the solar magnetic field and the protons and electrons of the solar wind.

  • solar magnetograph (instrument)

    Harold Delos Babcock: …Welcome Babcock invented (1951) the solar magnetograph, an instrument allowing detailed observation of the Sun’s magnetic field. With their magnetograph the Babcocks demonstrated the existence of the Sun’s general field and discovered magnetically variable stars. In 1959 Harold Babcock announced that the Sun reverses its magnetic polarity periodically. He was…

  • solar maximum (astronomy)

    space weather: Space weather phenomena: …several-year period known as the solar maximum. Between solar maxima there is a several-year period, called the solar minimum, when the Sun’s activity can be extremely low. The solar minimum that began in approximately 2007 and reached its lowest point in December 2008 was the deepest minimum in at least…

  • Solar Maximum Mission (United States space laboratory)

    telescope: Reflecting telescopes: …the Earth-orbiting space observatory, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), launched in 1980.

  • solar minimum (astronomy)

    Little Ice Age: Variability in solar output: Both solar minimums coincided with the coldest years of the Little Ice Age in parts of Europe. Some scientists therefore argue that reduced amounts of available solar radiation caused the Little Ice Age. However, the absence of sunspots has not explained the brief cooling episodes that…

  • solar motion (astronomy)

    Milky Way Galaxy: Solar motion: Solar motion is defined as the calculated motion of the Sun with respect to a specified reference frame. In practice, calculations of solar motion provide information not only on the Sun’s motion with respect to its neighbours in the Galaxy but also on…

  • solar nebula (astronomy)

    Solar nebula, gaseous cloud from which, in the so-called nebular hypothesis of the origin of the solar system, the Sun and planets formed by condensation. Swedish philosopher Emanuel Swedenborg in 1734 proposed that the planets formed out of a nebular crust that had surrounded the Sun and then

  • solar neutrino problem (cosmology)

    Solar neutrino problem, long-standing astrophysics problem in which the amount of observed neutrinos originating from the Sun was much less than expected. In the Sun, the process of energy generation results from the enormous pressure and density at its centre, which makes it possible for nuclei to

  • solar oven

    Solar oven, a device that harnesses sunlight as a source of heat for cooking foodstuffs. The solar oven is a simple, portable, economical, and efficient tool. Especially in the developing world, solar ovens are much to be preferred over other methods of cooking. Of the many advantages of solar

  • solar panel (technology)

    satellite communication: How satellites work: …power system, which includes the solar panels that provide power, and the propulsion system, which includes the rockets that propel the satellite. A satellite needs its own propulsion system to get itself to the right orbital location and to make occasional corrections to that position. A satellite in geostationary orbit…

  • solar panel payback (solar power)

    thin-film solar cell: Types of thin-film solar cells: smallest carbon footprint and quickest payback time of any thin-film solar cell technology on the market (payback time being the time it takes for the solar panel’s electricity generation to cover the cost of purchase and installation).

  • solar parallax (astronomy)

    parallax: Solar parallax: The basic method used for determining solar parallax is the determination of trigonometric parallax. In accordance with the law of gravitation, the relative distances of the planets from the Sun are known, and the distance of the Sun from Earth can be taken…

  • solar pond

    Solar pond, any large human-made body of salt water that collects and stores solar energy, thereby providing a sustainable source of heat and power. Although research on the practical applications of solar ponds did not begin until the late 1940s, a natural lake particularly well-suited for use as

  • solar power

    Solar energy, radiation from the Sun capable of producing heat, causing chemical reactions, or generating electricity. The total amount of solar energy incident on Earth is vastly in excess of the world’s current and anticipated energy requirements. If suitably harnessed, this highly diffused

  • solar power

    Solar power, form of renewable energy generated by the conversion of sunlight and artificial light into electricity. For an overview of solar energy conversion, see solar energy. For a discussion of the design, structure, and operation of photovoltaic cells, see solar

  • solar power payback (solar power)

    thin-film solar cell: Types of thin-film solar cells: smallest carbon footprint and quickest payback time of any thin-film solar cell technology on the market (payback time being the time it takes for the solar panel’s electricity generation to cover the cost of purchase and installation).

  • solar prominence (astronomy)

    Solar prominence, dense cloud of incandescent ionized gas projecting from the Sun’s chromosphere into the corona. Prominences sometimes extend hundreds of thousands of kilometres above the Sun’s chromosphere. Their causes are uncertain but probably involve magnetic forces. Prominences vary

  • solar quiet-day variation (geomagnetism)

    geomagnetic field: The ionospheric dynamo: …variation has been dubbed the solar quiet-day variation, Sq. The magnetic variations can be used to deduce an equivalent electric current system, which, if flowing in the E region of the ionosphere, would produce the observed changes. This system was shown for the equinoctial conditions of equal illumination of both…

  • solar radiation

    Solar radiation, electromagnetic radiation, including X-rays, ultraviolet and infrared radiation, and radio emissions, as well as visible light, emanating from the Sun. Of the 3.8 × 1033 ergs emitted by the Sun every second, about 1 part in 120 million is received by its attendant planets and their

  • solar sail (spacecraft propulsion)

    Akatsuki: …traveled past Venus and tested solar sail technology. IKAROS was the first interplanetary spacecraft to use a solar sail for propulsion. Akatsuki arrived at Venus in December 2010, but it failed to enter orbit around Venus and went into orbit around the Sun instead. It approached Venus again in December…

  • solar still (technology)

    solar-powered desalination unit: …passive, unit, generically called a solar still, can be quite simple and inexpensive. The salt water in the desalination unit is heated by the Sun, converting the liquid to water vapour (a gas). As it is heated, the water vapour rises to the top of the unit, collects on the…

  • solar storm (atmospheric science)

    Geomagnetic storm, disturbance of Earth’s upper atmosphere brought on by coronal mass ejections—i.e., large eruptions from the Sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona. The material associated with these eruptions consists primarily of protons and electrons with an energy of a few thousand electron volts.

  • Solar Storms (novel by Hogan)

    Linda Hogan: …the novels Mean Spirit (1990), Solar Storms (1995), and People of the Whale (2008)—address ecological issues and the dispossession of Native Americans. Hogan also wrote the essay collection Dwellings: A Spiritual History of the Living World (1995) and the memoir The Woman Who Watches Over the World (2001).

  • Solar System (astronomy)

    Solar system, assemblage consisting of the Sun—an average star in the Milky Way Galaxy—and those bodies orbiting around it: 8 (formerly 9) planets with about 170 known planetary satellites (moons); countless asteroids, some with their own satellites; comets and other icy bodies; and vast reaches of

  • solar telescope (instrument)

    telescope: Solar telescopes: Either a refractor or a reflector may be used for visual observations of solar features, such as sunspots or solar prominences. Special solar telescopes have been constructed, however, for investigations of the Sun that require the use of such ancillary instruments as spectroheliographs…

  • Solar Temple, Order of the (New Religious Movement)

    Order of the Solar Temple, small New Religious Movement that was founded in Geneva in 1984 and is best known for the murder-suicide of 74 of its members in 1994–97. The Solar Temple was founded in Geneva in 1984 by Luc Jouret, a homeopathic physician and New Age lecturer, and Joseph De Mambro. Its

  • Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (United States spacecraft)

    Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), two U.S. spacecraft that were designed to observe the Sun from separate locations in space and thus provide a stereoscopic view of solar activities. The STEREO mission was launched on Oct. 25, 2006, by a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The

  • solar tide (physics)

    tide: Ocean tides: The effect of the Sun is similar and additive to that of the Moon. Consequently, the tides of largest range or amplitude (spring tides) occur at new moon, when the Moon and the Sun are in the same direction, and at full moon, when they are…

  • solar time (chronology)

    Solar time, time measured by Earth’s rotation relative to the Sun. Apparent solar time is that measured by direct observation of the Sun or by a sundial. Mean solar time, kept by most clocks and watches, is the solar time that would be measured by observation if the Sun traveled at a uniform

  • solar tracker (technology)

    Solar tracker, a system that positions an object at an angle relative to the Sun. The most-common applications for solar trackers are positioning photovoltaic (PV) panels (solar panels) so that they remain perpendicular to the Sun’s rays and positioning space telescopes so that they can determine

  • solar urticaria (dermatology)

    hives: …vesicles (large or small blisters); solar urticaria, produced by exposure to sunlight; and urticaria subcutanea, caused by swelling of the tissues underlying the skin.

  • solar water heater (technology)

    Solar water heater, device that uses solar heat energy to produce hot water. A typical solar water heater consists of a solar collector mounted on the roof of a building and connected to a water-storage tank. Depending on the system, unheated water either can be circulated from the tank through the

  • solar wind (astronomy)

    Solar wind, flux of particles, chiefly protons and electrons together with nuclei of heavier elements in smaller numbers, that are accelerated by the high temperatures of the solar corona, or outer region of the Sun, to velocities large enough to allow them to escape from the Sun’s gravitational

  • solar wind power satellite

    Solar wind power satellite, large hypothetical satellite that would harvest energy from solar wind. A stream of energized charged particles from the Sun, solar wind has the potential to be a major source of energy for human civilizations. In 2010 American scientists Brooks L. Harrop and Dirk

  • solar year (chronology)

    year: The solar year (365 days 5 hours 48 minutes 46 seconds), also called tropical year, or year of the seasons, is the time between two successive occurrences of the vernal equinox (the moment when the Sun apparently crosses the celestial equator moving north). Because of the…

  • Solar-A (Japanese satellite)

    Yohkoh, Japanese satellite that provided continuous monitoring of the Sun from 1991 to 2001. Originally designated Solar-A, Yohkoh (“Sunlight”) was launched on Aug. 30, 1991, from the Kagoshima Space Center by Japan’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences. It had an international payload of

  • Solar-B (satellite)

    Hinode, a Japanese-U.S.-U.K. satellite that carried a 50-cm (20-inch) solar optical telescope, a 34-cm (13-inch) X-ray telescope, and an extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer to observe changes in intense solar magnetic fields that were associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections. It

  • solar-power array

    International Space Station: …four units that held large solar-power arrays and thermal radiators. Aside from the United States and Russia, station construction involved Canada, Japan, Brazil, and 11 ESA members. Russian modules were carried into space by Russian expendable launch vehicles, after which they automatically rendezvoused with and docked to the ISS. Other…

  • solar-powered desalination unit (technology)

    Solar-powered desalination unit, device that transforms salt water into drinking water by converting the Sun’s energy to heat, directly or indirectly, to drive the desalination process. Solar desalination mimics Earth’s natural water cycle (the process that generates rainfall) and has been

  • Solari, Andrea (Italian painter)

    Andrea Solari, Renaissance painter of the Milanese school, one of the most important followers of Leonardo da Vinci. Solari received his early training from his brother Cristoforo, a distinguished sculptor and architect. He probably accompanied his brother to Venice, where he seems to have been

  • Solari, Cristoforo (Italian sculptor and architect)

    Andrea Solari: …early training from his brother Cristoforo, a distinguished sculptor and architect. He probably accompanied his brother to Venice, where he seems to have been strongly influenced by Antonello da Messina, as can be seen in a fine portrait, “Man with a Pink [Carnation]” (c. 1492; National Gallery, London), which displays…

  • Solaria (Italian periodical)

    Italian literature: The return to order: Meanwhile, the Florentine literary reviews Solaria, Frontespizio, and Letteratura, while having to tread carefully with the authorities, provided an outlet for new talent. Carlo Emilio Gadda had his first narrative work (La Madonna dei filosofi [1931; “The Philosophers’ Madonna”]) published in Solaria, while the first part of his

  • Solario, Andrea (Italian painter)

    Andrea Solari, Renaissance painter of the Milanese school, one of the most important followers of Leonardo da Vinci. Solari received his early training from his brother Cristoforo, a distinguished sculptor and architect. He probably accompanied his brother to Venice, where he seems to have been

  • Solario, Pietro (Italian architect)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: …was built in 1491 by Pietro Solario, who designed most of the main towers; its belfry was added in 1624–25. The chimes of its clock are broadcast by radio as a time signal to the whole country. Also on the Red Square front is the St. Nicholas (Nikolskaya) Tower, built…

  • Solaris (film by Soderbergh [2002])

    Steven Soderbergh: Ocean’s series and Magic Mike: …films Full Frontal (2002) and Solaris (2002), Soderbergh directed Bubble (2005), a drama about three factory workers, one of whom is eventually murdered. The film, which featured amateur actors, was simultaneously released in theatres, on cable television, and on DVD. During this time he also created the television series K…

  • Solaris (film by Tarkovsky [1972])

    Stanis?aw Lem: The book was adapted for film by Soviet director Andrey Tarkovsky and won a Special Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 1972; a second adaptation, directed by Steven Soderbergh of the United States, was released in 2002. His Master’s Voice is another classic of traditional science fiction themes.…

  • Solaris (novel by Lem)

    Stanis?aw Lem: Solaris is a deeply philosophical work about contact with an utterly alien intelligence—a planet-girdling, sentient ocean. The book was adapted for film by Soviet director Andrey Tarkovsky and won a Special Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 1972; a second adaptation, directed by…

  • solarium (architecture)

    Solarium, in architecture, any room that is exposed to the sun. While the term may also be applied to the open sunporches or apartments on the roofs of ancient Greek or Roman houses, it is now used especially to designate a room that is enclosed in glass. In such a solarium, three or possibly four

  • solarization (photographic technique)

    Man Ray: …experimented with the technique called solarization, which renders part of a photographic image negative and part positive by exposing a print or negative to a flash of light during development. He and Miller were among the first artists to use the process, known since the 1840s, for aesthetic purposes.

  • Solaro della Margarita, Clemente, Conte (Piedmontese statesman)

    Clemente, Count Solaro della Margarita, Piedmontese statesman who supported the old order against the Risorgimento. Entering the Piedmontese diplomatic service in 1816, Solaro della Margarita rose to become foreign minister in 1835. He pursued a policy of cautious neutrality between France and

  • solartropism (botany)

    polar ecosystem: Biota of the Arctic: …Arctic have flowers that are solartropic (turning in response to the Sun). Their parabolic-shaped blossoms track daily movements of the Sun, thereby concentrating solar heat on the developing ovary, warming pollinating insects that land there, and speeding the growth of embryonic seeds.

  • SOLAS (1914)

    shipping route: The first International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea was convened at London in 1913 as a result of the sinking of the British steamer Titanic. At the convention, companies were obliged to give public notice of the routes their vessels would follow, and owners were…

  • Solás Borrego, Humberto (Cuban film director and screenwriter)

    Humberto Solás Borrego, Cuban film director and screenwriter (born Dec. 4, 1941, Havana, Cuba—died Sept. 17, 2008, Havana), was a 14-year-old guerrilla in the Cuban Revolution (1959) led by Fidel Castro to overthrow dictator Fulgencio Batista; after Castro’s victory Solás became a prominent

  • Solaster (echinoderm genus)

    sea star: … of the genera Crossaster and Solaster are found in northern waters; they have numerous short rays and a broad, often sunburst-patterned disk. The widely distributed S. endeca is 10-rayed and sometimes 50 cm across; the very common spiny sun star (Crossaster papposus) has as many as 15 arms. Cushion stars,…

  • Solaster endeca (sea star)

    sea star: The widely distributed S. endeca is 10-rayed and sometimes 50 cm across; the very common spiny sun star (Crossaster papposus) has as many as 15 arms. Cushion stars, of the circumboreal genus Pteraster, are plump five-rayed forms with raised tufts of spines and webbed, short, blunt arms.

  • Solbad Hall (Austria)

    Solbad Hall, town, western Austria. It lies along the Inn River just east of Innsbruck. A settlement grew up about 1260 around the nearby salt mines. Chartered in 1303, the city in 1477 was granted a mint, which after 1567 was housed in the Münzerturm (“Mint Tower”). The town retains its late

  • Solbad Hall in Tirol (Austria)

    Solbad Hall, town, western Austria. It lies along the Inn River just east of Innsbruck. A settlement grew up about 1260 around the nearby salt mines. Chartered in 1303, the city in 1477 was granted a mint, which after 1567 was housed in the Münzerturm (“Mint Tower”). The town retains its late

  • Solberg, Erna (prime minister of Norway)

    Norway: Political and social change: …96 seats, and Conservative leader Erna Solberg became the first prime minister from her party since 1990. She headed a minority coalition government with the Progress Party, whose anti-immigration stance had mitigated against attracting a third party to the coalition, preventing it from forming a majority government, .

  • Soldado prático (work by do Couto)

    Portuguese literature: The literature of discovery and conquest: In Soldado prático (written before 1578, published in 1790; “Experienced Soldier”) Couto, who lived most of his life in the Indian city of Goa, added acute observations on the causes of Portuguese decadence in the East. Ten years of investigation in India underlay the História do…

  • Soldan, Mariano Paz (Peruvian mountaineer)

    Andes Mountains: Study and exploration: …Whymper in Ecuador, the Peruvian Mariano Paz Soldan in Peru, and the Italian geographer Agostino Codazzi, who produced detailed maps of Colombia and Venezuela. Since the late 19th century much Andean research has been directed toward economic development, primarily mining operations and railway construction.

  • Soldani-Benzi, Massimiliano (Italian sculptor)

    medal: The Baroque period: …scholar, courtier, and mint master Massimiliano Soldani-Benzi (1656–1740) revived the cast portrait medal in 1677 and founded a school with his pupils Antonio Selvi (1679–1753) and Lorenzo Maria Weber (1697–1774). The school lasted until the 1740s. In Rome, the few cast medals included works by Charles-Jean-Fran?ois Chéron (1635–98) and by…

  • Soldat med brutet gev?r (work by Moberg)

    Vilhelm Moberg: …Soldat med brutet gev?r (1944; When I Was a Child), Moberg considers it his calling to give a voice to the illiterate class from which he came. His most widely read and translated works include the Knut Toring trilogy (1935–39; The Earth Is Ours) and his four-volume epic of the…

  • Soldaten, Die (opera by Zimmermann)

    theatre music: Incidental music for the theatre: …his opera, Die Soldaten (The Soldiers). The alternative is described by another composer, John Cage, as “Single sounds or groups of sounds which are not supported by harmonies but resound within a space of silence” and are added more or less at random to the other elements. It remains…

  • Soldaten, Die (play by Lenz)

    Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz: …Education”), and his best play, Die Soldaten (performed 1763, published 1776; “The Soldiers”). His plays have dramatic and comic effects arising from strong characters and the swift juxtaposition of contrasting situations. Anmerkungen übers Theater (1774; “Observations on the Theatre”) contains a translation of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost and outlines Lenz’s…

  • Soldati, Mario (Italian author and director)

    Mario Soldati, Italian writer and filmmaker who directed some 30 motion pictures as well as television documentaries and light opera, but he was equally admired as a journalist, novelist, short-story writer, poet, screenwriter, and television critic (b. Nov. 17, 1906, Turin, Italy—d. June 19, 1999,

  • solder (metallurgy)

    tin processing: Tin-based solders: A second large application of tin is in solders for joining metals. The most common solders are basically alloys of lead and tin. Since these metals can be alloyed across the whole range of proportions, an infinite number of compositions is possible; in practice,…

  • soldering (metallurgy)

    Soldering, process that uses low-melting-point metal alloys to join metallic surfaces without melting them. The basic operational steps are as follows: (1) thorough cleaning of the metal to be joined by abrasive or chemical means, (2) application of a flux to remove oxides on heating and promote

  • soldier (insect caste)

    termite: Workers and soldiers: The sterile castes are the workers and soldiers. Both are wingless and usually lack eyes. Although these can be either male or female, they lack fully developed reproductive organs. In some species the workers and soldiers are dimorphic (of two sizes), with the larger…

  • soldier beetle (insect)

    Soldier beetle, any member of the approximately 3,500 species of the widely distributed insect family Cantharidae (order Coleoptera). These slender, soft-bodied beetles are brown or black and trimmed like a soldier’s uniform—with red, yellow, or orange. The adults range between 5 and 15 mm (0.2

  • Soldier Blue (film by Nelson [1970])

    Ralph Nelson: Perhaps the most-talked-about was Soldier Blue (1970), an ultraviolent statement about the U.S. military’s massacres of Native Americans during the 19th century that drew parallels to U.S. policy during the Vietnam War. He also continued to explore race relations with …tick…tick…tick (1970), a drama about the tensions that erupt…

  • Soldier Field (stadium, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Soldier Field, stadium in Chicago that was built in 1924 and is one of the oldest arenas in the NFL, home to the the city’s professional gridiron football team, the Bears, since 1971. In 1919 the South Park Commission (later reorganized as the Chicago Park District) held a design competition for

  • soldier fly (insect)

    Soldier fly, any member of the insect family Stratiomyidae (order Diptera), recognizable by the pattern of veins on its wings. Soldier flies may have a broad, flattened abdomen (Stratiomys) or an elongated abdomen that narrows at the base (Ptecticus). Often brightly coloured with yellow, green, or

  • Soldier in the Rain (film by Nelson [1963])

    Ralph Nelson: Soldier in the Rain (1963), an eccentric but likable military drama, starred Steve McQueen, Gleason, and Tuesday Weld. Next was Fate Is the Hunter (1964), a suspense film about a plane-crash investigation with Glenn Ford and Rod Taylor. In the amiable Father Goose (1964), Cary…

  • Soldier in the Rain (novel by Goldman)

    William Goldman: …published during this time were Soldier in the Rain (1960), set in a U.S. military training camp, and Boys and Girls Together (1964), a controversial drama about adolescents. In 1963 Soldier in the Rain was adapted for film, and soon afterward Goldman tried his hand at screenwriting, coauthoring the script…

  • Soldier of Love (album by Sade)

    Sade: The Grammy-winning title track of Soldier of Love (2010) incorporated martial beats and harsh guitars, and critics praised the trip-hop and reggae influences that coloured Sade’s trademark soulful melodies. Following another hiatus, Sade contributed the song “Flower of the Universe” to the film soundtrack for A Wrinkle in Time (2018).…

  • soldier orchid (plant)

    Orchis: anthropophora), the soldier, or military, orchid (O. militaris), and the naked man orchid (O. italica) all have flowers that resemble helmeted human figures. (See also man orchid.) Other Eurasian species of Orchis include some known as marsh orchids and others known as spotted orchids.

  • Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries, A (film by Ivory [1998])

    Kris Kristofferson: Film career and Highwaymen: …American novelist in James Ivory’s A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries (1998), based on the life of writer James Jones. Kristofferson acted in a steady stream of feature films that included Sayles’s Limbo (1999), Tim Burton’s Planet of the Apes (2001), Ethan Hawke’s Chelsea Walls (2001), Ken Kwapis’s He’s Just Not…

  • Soldier’s Pay (work by Faulkner)

    William Faulkner: Youth and early writings: His first novel, Soldiers’ Pay (1926), given a Southern though not a Mississippian setting, was an impressive achievement, stylistically ambitious and strongly evocative of the sense of alienation experienced by soldiers returning from World War I to a civilian world of which they seemed no longer a part.…

  • Soldier’s Play, A (play by Fuller)

    A Soldier’s Play, drama in two acts by Charles Fuller, produced and published in 1981 and awarded the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1982. Set on an army base in Louisiana during World War II, the play deals with the open and covert conflicts between whites and blacks that limit the possibility of

  • Soldier’s Pocket-book for Field Service (work by Wolseley)

    Garnet Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley: …service, as revealed in his Soldier’s Pocket-book for Field Service (1869), led to his appointment (May 1871) as assistant adjutant general at the War Office.

  • Soldier’s Story, A (film by Jewison [1984])

    Norman Jewison: …again examined racial prejudice in A Soldier’s Story (1984), about the murder of an African American army sergeant. Later efforts included Moonstruck (1987), a romantic comedy starring Cher that won him a third Oscar nod, and Bogus (1996), a film about a boy and his imaginary friend, played by Gérard…

  • Soldier’s Tale, The (work by Ramuz and Stravinsky)

    Igor Stravinsky: Life and career: …on Russian folk idioms, while The Soldier’s Tale (1918), a mixed-media piece using speech, mime, and dance accompanied by a seven-piece band, eclectically incorporates ragtime, tango, and other modern musical idioms in a series of highly infectious instrumental movements. After World War I the Russian style in Stravinsky’s music began…

  • Soldier, The (poem by Brooke)

    The Soldier, sonnet by Rupert Brooke, published in 1915 in the collection 1914. Perhaps his most famous poem, it reflects British sorrow over and pride in the young men who died in World War I. Narrated in the first person by an English soldier, the poem is sentimental, patriotic, and epitaphic. In

  • soldierfish (fish)

    Squirrelfish, any of about 70 species of large-eyed, colourful, tropical reef fish of the family Holocentridae (order Beryciformes). Squirrelfish are edible fish found throughout the tropics. They have spiny fins and rough, prickly scales; some also have a sharp spine on each cheek. Most

  • Soldiers, The (opera by Zimmermann)

    theatre music: Incidental music for the theatre: …his opera, Die Soldaten (The Soldiers). The alternative is described by another composer, John Cage, as “Single sounds or groups of sounds which are not supported by harmonies but resound within a space of silence” and are added more or less at random to the other elements. It remains…

  • sole (fish family)

    Sole, any of a variety of flatfishes, but, more strictly, those of the family Soleidae (order Pleuronectiformes). Soles in this restricted sense constitute about 30 genera and 130 species of flatfishes found in temperate and tropical seas. Like numerous other flatfishes, soles are flattened, more

  • sole marking (geology)

    sedimentary rock: Bedding structure: A great variety of markings, such as flutes and scour and fill grooves, can be found on the undersides of some sandstone beds. These markings are caused by swift currents during deposition; they are particularly abundant in sandstones deposited by turbidity currents.

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