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  • SP? (political party, Austria [1945])

    Austria: Political process: The centre-left Social Democratic Party of Austria (Sozialdemokratische Partei ?sterreichs; SP?; until 1991 the Socialist Party) was founded in 1945. It is a successor of the original Social Democratic Party (founded in 1889), which was a driving force in the establishment of the First Austrian Republic in…

  • Spock, Benjamin (American pediatrician)

    Benjamin Spock, American pediatrician whose books on child-rearing, especially his Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care (1946; 6th ed., 1992), influenced generations of parents and made his name a household word. Spock received his medical degree in 1929 from Columbia University’s College of

  • Spock, Benjamin McLane (American pediatrician)

    Benjamin Spock, American pediatrician whose books on child-rearing, especially his Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care (1946; 6th ed., 1992), influenced generations of parents and made his name a household word. Spock received his medical degree in 1929 from Columbia University’s College of

  • Spock, Dr. (American pediatrician)

    Benjamin Spock, American pediatrician whose books on child-rearing, especially his Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care (1946; 6th ed., 1992), influenced generations of parents and made his name a household word. Spock received his medical degree in 1929 from Columbia University’s College of

  • Spode porcelain (pottery)

    Spode porcelain, porcelain introduced about 1800 in the factory of Josiah Spode and Josiah Spode II at Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, Eng. This hybrid porcelain—combining the ingredients of hard-paste porcelain (china clay and china stone) and bone ash—became the standard English bone china.

  • Spode, Josiah, the Second (English potter)

    bone china: …bone china is attributed to Josiah Spode the Second, who introduced it around 1800. His basic formula of six parts bone ash, four parts china stone, and three and a half parts china clay remains the standard English body. Although hard porcelain is strong, it chips fairly easily and, unless…

  • Spodosol (soil type)

    Spodosol, one of the 12 soil orders in the U.S. Soil Taxonomy. Spodosols are ashy gray, acidic soils with a strongly leached surface layer. Their suitability for cultivation is limited to acid-tolerant crops and orchards, provided that sufficient lime and fertilizer are applied. Covering about 3.5

  • spodumene (mineral)

    Spodumene, a lithium aluminum silicate mineral (LiAlSi2O6) in the pyroxene family, an important ore of lithium and a source of ceramic materials. It is ordinarily found in lithium-bearing granite pegmatites. When brilliant and glassy, clear spodumene is valued as a semiprecious gem (more by

  • Spofford, Ainsworth Rand (American librarian)

    Library of Congress: Librarian of Congress Ainsworth Rand Spofford (1864–97) was the first to propose that the library be moved to a dedicated building. He also was instrumental in establishing the copyright law of 1870, which placed the Copyright Office in the Library of Congress and required anyone seeking a copyright…

  • Spofford, Harriet Elizabeth Prescott (American author)

    Harriet Elizabeth Prescott Spofford, American writer whose Gothic romances are set apart by luxuriant description and her unconventional handling of the female stereotypes of her day. Harriet Prescott moved from her native Maine to Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1849 and attended the Pinkerton

  • Spofforth, F. R. (British athlete)

    cricket: Test matches: …bowler of this era in F.R. Spofforth and the first of the great wicketkeepers in J.McC. Blackham.

  • Spohr, Arnold Theodore (Canadian dancer, choreographer, and artistic director)

    Arnold Theodore Spohr, Canadian dancer, choreographer, and artistic director (born Dec. 26, 1923, Rhein, Sask.—died April 12, 2010, Winnipeg, Man.), in his role as the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s (RWB’s) enterprising artistic director (1958–88), was responsible for transforming the struggling company

  • Spohr, Louis (German musician)

    Louis Spohr, German violinist, composer, and conductor whose compositions illustrate an early aspect of the Romantic period in German music. Spohr taught himself composition by studying the scores of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He studied violin with the leader of the Brunswick orchestra and in 1802

  • Spohr, Ludwig (German musician)

    Louis Spohr, German violinist, composer, and conductor whose compositions illustrate an early aspect of the Romantic period in German music. Spohr taught himself composition by studying the scores of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He studied violin with the leader of the Brunswick orchestra and in 1802

  • spoil bank (mining)

    land reclamation: Reclamation of mine spoils: …of piles of overburden, called spoil banks, with a deep trench at the side where operations ceased. The piles of overburden are generally loose and porous but barren of plant life and only slowly revegetated by natural processes. Historically, when the mineral deposits in an area were exhausted, the site…

  • spoilage (decomposition)

    baking: Spoilage by microbes: Bakery products are subject to the microbiological spoilage problems affecting other foods. If moisture content is kept below 12 to 14 percent (depending on the composition), growth of yeast, bacteria, and molds is completely inhibited. Nearly all crackers and cookies fall below…

  • spoiler (vehicle part)

    airplane: Devices for aerodynamic control: …found on military aircraft, and spoilers, which are surfaces that can be extended on the wing or fuselage to disrupt the air flow and create drag or to act in the same manner as ailerons. Drag can also be provided by extension of the landing gear or, at the appropriate…

  • Spoilers, The (film by Enright [1942])

    Ray Enright: …most notable of which were The Spoilers (1942), a Yukon adventure based on the novel by Rex Beach (which had been filmed three times previously), with the cast of Marlene Dietrich, John Wayne, and Randolph Scott (who made six other films with Enright); and ‘Gung Ho!’: The Story of Carlson’s…

  • Spoils of Poynton, The (novel by James)

    The Spoils of Poynton, short novel by Henry James, first published as a serial titled The Old Things in The Atlantic Monthly in 1896. Retitled The Spoils of Poynton, it was published as a book in 1897. Poynton Park is the home of old Mrs. Gereth, an antique collector with impeccable taste who has

  • spoils system (politics)

    Spoils system, practice in which the political party winning an election rewards its campaign workers and other active supporters by appointment to government posts and by other favours. The spoils system involves political activity by public employees in support of their party and the employees’

  • Spoilt City, The (novel by Manning)

    The Balkan Trilogy: …of The Great Fortune (1960), The Spoilt City (1962), and Friends and Heroes (1965), the trilogy is a semiautobiographical account of a British couple living in the Balkans during World War II. The complex narrative, composed of several different voices, is noted for its vivid historicity.

  • Spokan (people)

    Plateau Indian: Language: Sanpoil, Nespelim, Spokan, Kalispel, Pend d’Oreille, Coeur d’Alene, and Flathead peoples. Some early works incorrectly denote all Salishan groups as “Flathead.”

  • Spokane (Washington, United States)

    Spokane, city, seat (1879) of Spokane county, eastern Washington, U.S., at the falls of the Spokane River. Frequented by trappers when the North West Company built a trading post there in 1810, the site was settled in 1872 and laid out in 1878. Known as Spokane Falls (for the Spokane Indians, whose

  • Spokane Falls (Washington, United States)

    Spokane, city, seat (1879) of Spokane county, eastern Washington, U.S., at the falls of the Spokane River. Frequented by trappers when the North West Company built a trading post there in 1810, the site was settled in 1872 and laid out in 1878. Known as Spokane Falls (for the Spokane Indians, whose

  • Spokane River (river, United States)

    Spokane River, river rising in Coeur d’Alene Lake, Kootenai county, northern Idaho, U.S., and flowing west across the Washington border through Spokane for about 50 miles (80 km) to the Columbia River. The Spokane is 100 miles (160 km) long and has several dams, including Long Lake Dam

  • spoked wheel (technology)

    bicycle: Wheels: Bicycle wheels have a rim to retain the tire, a ball-bearing hub, and spokes between hub and rim. Spokes are made of steel wire, laced tangentially and kept under tension by threaded nipples in the rims that are adjusted to keep the rim straight…

  • Spoken from the Heart (autobiography by Bush)

    Laura Welch Bush: Laura later wrote an autobiography, Spoken from the Heart (2010), in which she defended her husband and for the first time publicly discussed the 1963 car accident.

  • spoken language (language)

    Speech, human communication through spoken language. Although many animals possess voices of various types and inflectional capabilities, humans have learned to modulate their voices by articulating the laryngeal tones into audible oral speech. Human speech is served by a bellows-like respiratory

  • spoken-word program (broadcasting)

    broadcasting: Spoken word: Spoken-word programs have included entertainment types, such as “This Is Your Life” and many of the “talk shows,” in which a personality interviewer questions celebrities, sometimes with interludes of music or comedy or with serious discussions, documentaries, or lectures. A fear of controversy,…

  • spokeshave (tool)

    hand tool: Plane: The spokeshave, which may be likened to a short-bodied plane with a handle on either side allowing the tool to be pulled toward the operator, has left little in the way of a record. The term was first used about 1510, but the earliest known example…

  • Sp?ksonaten (play by Strindberg)

    The Ghost Sonata, one-act drama in three scenes by August Strindberg, written and published as Sp?ksonaten in 1907 and performed the following year. The drama is considered the best of Strindberg’s four chamber plays, written during his years as director of Stockholm’s Intima Theatre, and it is one

  • Spolète, Gui de (Holy Roman emperor)

    Guy II, duke of Spoleto, who was claimant to the throne of the Holy Roman Empire in the chaotic end of the Carolingian era. His father, Guy I, duke of Spoleto, had come to Italy in the entourage of Lothar I and had successfully expanded his family’s power in central and southern Italy. Eventually

  • Spoletium (Italy)

    Spoleto, town and archiepiscopal see, Umbria regione, central Italy; it lies on a detached spur at the southern extremity of the central Umbrian plain, commanding the passes southward and eastward toward Terni and Norcia, north of Rome. The site of an Umbrian township from at least the 7th to the

  • Spoleto (Italy)

    Spoleto, town and archiepiscopal see, Umbria regione, central Italy; it lies on a detached spur at the southern extremity of the central Umbrian plain, commanding the passes southward and eastward toward Terni and Norcia, north of Rome. The site of an Umbrian township from at least the 7th to the

  • Spoleto Festival (festival, Charleston, South Carolina, United States)

    South Carolina: Sports and recreation: …prominent of these is Charleston’s Spoleto Festival, which was founded in 1977 by the Italian opera composer Gian Carlo Menotti as the New World branch of his Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. The annual event features hundreds of actors, singers, dancers, musicians, and other artists in more than…

  • Spoleto, cathedral of (cathedral, Spoleto, Italy)

    Spoleto: …ancient citadel, and by the cathedral, consecrated in 1198 and extensively remodeled in 1634–44. The cathedral, with eight rose windows and a central mosaic by Solsternus (1207), contains a magnificent fresco of the Coronation of the Virgin by Fra Filippo Lippi and pupils, as well as Lippi’s tomb. Other notable…

  • Spoleto, Lambert di (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lambert Of Spoleto, duke of Spoleto, king of Italy, and Holy Roman emperor (892–898) during the turbulent late Carolingian Age. He was one of many claimants to the imperial title. Crowned coemperor with his father, Guy of Spoleto, at a ceremony in Ravenna in 892, Lambert ruled alone after his f

  • spondai (ritualized treaty)

    ancient Greek civilization: Formal relationships: …for such a treaty is spondai, which literally means “libations” to the guaranteeing gods). The earliest surviving inscriptional peace treaty “for all time” dates from the 6th century and was found at Olympia. Nonetheless, there were surely agreements to limit warfare over strips of boundary land before that date. Archaeology…

  • spondaic foot (prosody)

    Spondee, metrical foot consisting of two long (as in classical verse) or stressed (as in English verse) syllables occurring together. The term was derived from a Greek word describing the two long musical notes that accompanied the pouring of a libation. Spondaic metre occurred occasionally in

  • spondee (prosody)

    Spondee, metrical foot consisting of two long (as in classical verse) or stressed (as in English verse) syllables occurring together. The term was derived from a Greek word describing the two long musical notes that accompanied the pouring of a libation. Spondaic metre occurred occasionally in

  • Spondee (American author and lawyer)

    Royall Tyler, U.S. lawyer, teacher, and dramatist, author of the first American comedy, The Contrast (1787). After graduating from Harvard University, Tyler served in the U.S. Army and later became a lawyer. A meeting with Thomas Wignell, the star comedian of the American Company, in New York City,

  • Spondias mombin (plant)

    Hog plum, (Spondias mombin), ornamental tree of the cashew family (Anacardiaceae), native to the tropical Americas. The hog plum and several other species of the genus Spondias are cultivated for their edible plumlike fruits. The young leaves can also be eaten, and various parts of the plant are

  • spondylitis (pathology)

    Spondylitis, inflammation of one or more of the vertebrae. Spondylitis takes several forms; the most widely occurring forms are ankylosing spondylitis, hypertrophic spondylitis, and tuberculous spondylitis. Ankylosing spondylitis (also called Bekhterev spondylitis, deforming spondylitis, or

  • spondyloarthropathy (pathology)

    arthritis: Spondyloarthropathies: Ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, and arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease are a subset of conditions known as spondyloarthropathies. Typically affected are the sacrum and vertebral column, and back pain is the most common presenting symptom. Enthesitis,

  • spondylolisthesis (medical disorder)

    Spondylolisthesis, forward slipping of one of the vertebrae on the subjacent vertebra or on the sacrum, the triangular bone at the base of the spinal column. The most common vertebrae involved are the lumbar (lower back). The condition is often associated with degenerative joint disease or with

  • spondylosis (pathology)

    Spondylosis, noninflammatory degenerative disease of the spine resulting in abnormal bone development around the vertebrae and reduced mobility of the intervertebral joints. It is primarily a condition of age and occurs much more commonly in men than in women; onset of symptoms is gradual, but

  • sponge (baking)

    baking: The sponge-and-dough method: …stage, the mixture, called the sponge, usually contains one-half to three-fourths of the flour, all of the yeast, yeast foods, and malt, and enough water to make a stiff dough. Shortening may be added at this stage, although it is usually added later, and one-half to three-fourths of the salt…

  • sponge (animal)

    Sponge, any of the primitive multicellular aquatic animals that constitute the phylum Porifera. They number approximately 5,000 described species and inhabit all seas, where they occur attached to surfaces from the intertidal zone to depths of 8,500 metres (29,000 feet) or more. The members of one

  • sponge cake (cake)

    cake: Spongecake and angel food cake are examples of unshortened mixtures. These cakes depend largely upon incorporated air for leavening, and, unless modified recipes are used, chemical raising agents are unnecessary, sufficient air to produce a light product being incorporated by whisking the eggs. In angel…

  • sponge candy (food)

    Sponge candy, a crunchy, bite-size, chocolate-covered crystalline candy. Much like malt balls, it has a crispy inner texture that melts away quickly when eaten. The sweet filling usually tastes of caramelized sugar or molasses, while the covering is typically milk chocolate or dark chocolate. The

  • sponge gourd (plant)

    Loofah, (genus Luffa), genus of seven species of annual climbing vines of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), native to the Old World tropics. Two species (Luffa acutangula and L. aegyptiaca) are commonly cultivated for their fruits, which are edible when young and have a fibrous spongelike interior

  • sponge kidney (pathology)

    renal cyst: In medullary cystic diseases, also thought to be congenital in origin, cysts form in the small collecting tubules that transport urine from the nephrons, the urine-producing units of the kidney. The disease generally does not have warning symptoms, but affected persons become anemic and have low…

  • sponge rubber (chemical compound)

    Foam rubber, flexible, porous substance made from a natural or synthetic latex compounded with various ingredients and whipped into a froth. The resulting product contains roughly 85 percent air and 15 percent rubber and can be molded and vulcanized. Its uses include padding for furniture,

  • sponge-dough method (baking)

    bread: …performed by the straight-dough or sponge-dough methods or the newer continuous-mixing process. In the straight-dough method, frequently used in small bakeries, all ingredients are mixed at one time. In the sponge-dough method, only some of the ingredients are mixed, forming a sponge that is allowed to ferment and is then…

  • SpongeBob SquarePants (American animated television series)

    Nickelodeon: …programs, such as the animated SpongeBob SquarePants (1999– ) and the live-action sitcom iCarly (2007–12), frequently ranked among the highest-rated cable programs in the United States. Nickelodeon’s offerings aimed at preschoolers, a key element of its success, included Blue’s Clues (1996–2006), Dora the Explorer (2000–14), and Go, Diego, Go! (2005–11).

  • spongecake (cake)

    cake: Spongecake and angel food cake are examples of unshortened mixtures. These cakes depend largely upon incorporated air for leavening, and, unless modified recipes are used, chemical raising agents are unnecessary, sufficient air to produce a light product being incorporated by whisking the eggs. In angel…

  • spongiform encephalopathy (disease)

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: …diseases are types of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, so called because of the characteristic spongelike pattern of neuronal destruction that leaves brain tissue filled with holes.

  • Spongilla (invertebrate)

    Freshwater sponge, any of about 20 species of the genus Spongilla (class Demospongiae, siliceous sponges), a common, widely occurring group. Spongilla species are found in clean lake waters and slow streams. Freshwater sponges are delicate in structure, growing as encrusting or branching masses.

  • spongillafly (insect)

    Spongillafly, (family Sisyridae), any of a group of insects (order Neuroptera) that are smoky brown in colour and resemble lacewings. Females deposit clusters of eggs under a silky web near or on the water. The larva lives as a parasite on a freshwater sponge. It leaves the water when fully grown

  • spongin (biochemistry)

    sponge: Other types: …(Ceractinomorpha) has a type of spongin, which, in certain orders (Axinellida, Poecilosclerida, and Haplosclerida), cements the spicules in bundles or meshes, thereby increasing the elastic nature of the skeleton. In another group of Demospongiae (Keratosa), spongin fibres constitute the entire skeleton; the spongin fibres may be branched (order Dendroceratida), netlike…

  • spongocoel (anatomy)

    sponge: Water-current system: …into the central cavity, or spongocoel, and leaves by way of an osculum. In most syconoid sponges (e.g., Scypha) the radial canals are bordered by incurrent canals through which passes the water entering the pores; other openings (prosopyles) allow water into the choanocytes, from which it passes directly into the…

  • Spongospora subterranea (chromist)

    Plasmodiophoromycota: …cabbage and related plants, and Spongospora subterranea, which causes powdery scab of potatoes.

  • spongy bone (anatomy)

    Cancellous bone, light, porous bone enclosing numerous large spaces that give a honeycombed or spongy appearance. The bone matrix, or framework, is organized into a three-dimensional latticework of bony processes, called trabeculae, arranged along lines of stress. The spaces between are often

  • spongy mesophyll (plant tissue)

    angiosperm: Leaves: …to the leaf surface, and spongy parenchyma, located in the lower part of the leaf and composed of irregularly shaped cells. The veins contain primary xylem and phloem and are enclosed by a layer of parenchyma called the bundle sheath. Only the midvein and some large lateral veins have any…

  • spongy parenchyma (plant tissue)

    angiosperm: Leaves: …to the leaf surface, and spongy parenchyma, located in the lower part of the leaf and composed of irregularly shaped cells. The veins contain primary xylem and phloem and are enclosed by a layer of parenchyma called the bundle sheath. Only the midvein and some large lateral veins have any…

  • sponsor (Christianity)

    Godparent, in Christianity, one who stands surety for another in the rite of baptism. In the modern baptism of an infant or child, the godparent or godparents make a profession of faith for the person being baptized (the godchild) and assume an obligation to serve as proxies for the parents if the

  • spontaneous combustion (chemical reaction)

    Spontaneous combustion, the outbreak of fire without application of heat from an external source. Spontaneous combustion may occur when combustible matter, such as hay or coal, is stored in bulk. It begins with a slow oxidation process (as bacterial fermentation or atmospheric oxidation) under

  • spontaneous emission (physics)

    radiation: Absorption and emission: …multiplied by the probability of spontaneous emission, Aji, to the ground state plus the additional induced emission term, Nj Bji I(ν), in which Bji is a term that Einstein showed to be equal to Bi

  • spontaneous fission (physics)

    Spontaneous fission, type of radioactive decay in which certain unstable nuclei of heavier elements split into two nearly equal fragments (nuclei of lighter elements) and liberate a large amount of energy. Spontaneous fission, discovered (1941) by the Russian physicists G.N. Flerov and K.A.

  • spontaneous generation (biological theory)

    Spontaneous generation, the hypothetical process by which living organisms develop from nonliving matter; also, the archaic theory that utilized this process to explain the origin of life. According to that theory, pieces of cheese and bread wrapped in rags and left in a dark corner, for example,

  • spontaneous ignition (chemical reaction)

    Spontaneous combustion, the outbreak of fire without application of heat from an external source. Spontaneous combustion may occur when combustible matter, such as hay or coal, is stored in bulk. It begins with a slow oxidation process (as bacterial fermentation or atmospheric oxidation) under

  • spontaneous innovation (philosophy)

    history of technology: Innovation: …hand is the theory of spontaneous innovation, according to which the primary determinant of technological innovation is social need. Scholarship is as yet unable to solve the problem so far as technological advances of the Middle Ages are concerned because much information is missing. But it does seem likely that…

  • spontaneous order (political philosophy)

    F.A. Hayek: The critique of socialism and the defense of classical liberal institutions: …made a distinction between “spontaneous orders” and “constructed orders.” He averred that many social institutions—among them language, money, the common law, the moral code, and trade—are instances of spontaneous orders. These orders arise as a result of human action, and they come about as a result of individuals pursuing…

  • spontaneous pneumothorax (pathology)

    pneumothorax: Spontaneous pneumothorax is the passage of air into the pleural sac from an abnormal connection created between the pleura and the bronchial system. It may be characterized as either of two types: primary, in which the patient has no prior thoracic trauma or predisposing lung…

  • Spontini, Gaspare (Italian musician)

    Gaspare Spontini, Italian composer and conductor whose early operas, notably his masterpiece, La vestale (1807), represent the spirit of the Napoleonic era and form an operatic bridge between the works of Christoph Gluck and Richard Wagner. Entering the Conservatorio della Pietà dei Turchini in

  • spoofing (military technology)

    warning system: Radio sensors: …by radio silence and by spoofing, the transmission of signals intended to deceive. In 1967 the Israelis transmitted voluminous radio messages from empty airfields to hide the fact that aircraft had been moved to other locations.

  • Spook Country (novel by Gibson)

    William Gibson: In Spook Country (2007), characters navigate a world filled with spies, ghosts, and other nefarious unseen agents. Zero History (2010), which completed a trilogy that includes his previous two novels, reveals hidden governmental conspiracies through a search for a missing fashion designer. The Peripheral (2014) investigates…

  • Spook Show, The (stage show by Goldberg)

    Whoopi Goldberg: Eventually she developed The Spook Show, a one-woman stage show noted for its humour, satire, and drama, which she performed throughout the United States and Europe. That performance became the basis for the critically acclaimed Broadway show Whoopi Goldberg, which debuted in 1984, and in 1985 Goldberg won…

  • spookfish (fish)

    Spookfish, any of about 11 species of small marine fishes constituting the family Opisthoproctidae (order Salmoniformes), with representatives in each of the major oceans. The name spookfish, or barreleye, as they are sometimes called, originates from their unusual eyes, which are pointed upward

  • spool furniture

    Bobbin furniture, heavy furniture made in the late 17th century, whose legs and other parts were lathe-turned to ornamental shapes; also lighter, less boldly turned pieces made in 19th-century cottage style (see cottage furniture). Bobbin turning was a type of ornament consisting of a series of s

  • spool valve (device)

    valve: …medium is usually pressurized oil, spool valves are employed to regulate the oil flow. The valve shown in the Figure provides two flow paths for the output from a pump. In the extreme upper position, as shown, active flow is from the pump port P to the working, or load,…

  • spoon (utensil)

    Spoon, an implement consisting of a small shallow bowl-shaped receptacle supported by a handle, used for eating, serving, and cooking foods. Spoons, together with forks, are known as

  • Spoon River (river, Illinois, United States)

    Spoon River, river in west-central Illinois, U.S. It rises at the confluence of the West Fork Spoon and East Fork Spoon rivers in Stark county and flows south and southwest to a point west of Lewistown, where it turns southeast, joining the Illinois River opposite Havana after a course of about 160

  • Spoon River Anthology (poetry by Masters)

    Spoon River Anthology, poetry collection, the major work of Edgar Lee Masters, published in 1915. It was inspired by the epigrams in the Greek Anthology. The Spoon River Anthology is a collection of 245 free-verse epitaphs in the form of monologues. They are spoken from beyond the grave by former

  • Spoon, Mark (German disc jockey and musician)

    Mark Spoon, (Markus L?ffel), German disc jockey and musician (born Nov. 27, 1966, Frankfurt, W.Ger.—died Jan. 11, 2006, Berlin, Ger.), helped pioneer the form of electronic dance music known as trance, derived from house and techno music. Spoon began working as a disc jockey at parties and clubs i

  • spoon-billed cat (fish)

    paddlefish: The American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), also called the Mississippi paddlefish or spoonbill, is greenish or gray and averages about 18 kg (40 pounds); however, some specimens can grow up to 2.2 metres (7.2 feet) long and 90.7 kg (200 pounds) in weight. It lives in open…

  • spoon-winged lacewing (insect)

    neuropteran: Annotated classification: Family Nemopteridae (thread-winged or spoon-winged lacewings) Adults delicate; head snoutlike; antennae short; posterior wings greatly elongated, ribbonlike or threadlike; often expanded distally to appear spoonlike. Larval antennae long, filiform; jaws incurved; mandibles with or without internal teeth; with or without an elongated neck formed by anterior…

  • spoonbill (fish)

    paddlefish: The American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), also called the Mississippi paddlefish or spoonbill, is greenish or gray and averages about 18 kg (40 pounds); however, some specimens can grow up to 2.2 metres (7.2 feet) long and 90.7 kg (200 pounds) in weight. It lives in open…

  • spoonbill (bird)

    Spoonbill, any member of six species of long-legged wading birds that constitute the subfamily Plataleinae of the family Threskiornithidae (order Ciconiiformes), which also includes the ibises. Spoonbills are found in estuaries, saltwater bayous, and lakes. They feed by sweeping the long bill from

  • spoonbill cat (fish)

    paddlefish: The American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), also called the Mississippi paddlefish or spoonbill, is greenish or gray and averages about 18 kg (40 pounds); however, some specimens can grow up to 2.2 metres (7.2 feet) long and 90.7 kg (200 pounds) in weight. It lives in open…

  • spoonbill sturgeon (fish)

    paddlefish: The American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), also called the Mississippi paddlefish or spoonbill, is greenish or gray and averages about 18 kg (40 pounds); however, some specimens can grow up to 2.2 metres (7.2 feet) long and 90.7 kg (200 pounds) in weight. It lives in open…

  • Spoonbridge and Cherry (sculpture by Oldenburg and van Bruggen)

    Claes Oldenburg: …created such large-scale sculptures as Spoonbridge and Cherry (1985–88) for the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, as well as a soft sculpture of an oversized shuttlecock specially for a 1995 retrospective of his work at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City.

  • Spooner Act (United States [1902])

    John Spooner: He was author of the Spooner Act (1902), which authorized Pres. Theodore Roosevelt to purchase rights to build the Panama Canal. At the 1904 Republican national convention in Chicago, Spooner, as the head of the regular Wisconsin delegation, became embroiled in a bitter credentials fight with state Progressives led by…

  • Spooner Amendment (United States [1901])

    Spooner Amendment, congressional amendment to the Army Appropriations Act of 1901 that called for the end of the U.S. military government in the Philippines. By the terms of the Treaty of Paris (December 1898), sovereignty over the Philippine Islands had passed from Spain to the United States.

  • Spooner, John Coit (United States senator)

    John Spooner, U.S. senator from Wisconsin (1885–91; 1897–1907), a powerful conservative force in his state and in Congress. Spooner moved to Wisconsin as a youth. After service in the Union Army during the Civil War, he was admitted to the bar (1867). He began a law practice at Hudson, Wis., and

  • Spooner, William Archibald (British clergyman)

    spoonerism: …derived from the name of William Archibald Spooner (1844–1930), a distinguished Anglican clergyman and warden of New College, Oxford, a nervous man who committed many “spoonerisms.” Such transpositions are sometimes made intentionally to produce comic effect.

  • spoonerism (rhetoric)

    Spoonerism, reversal of the initial letters or syllables of two or more words, such as “I have a half-warmed fish in my mind” (for “half-formed wish”) and “a blushing crow” (for “a crushing blow”). The word was derived from the name of William Archibald Spooner (1844–1930), a distinguished

  • Spoonful of Sugar, A (song by Sherman and Sherman)

    Mary Poppins: …such as “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” and “A Spoonful of Sugar” entering popular culture as classics. The unique combination of live action and animation was a stunning effect in 1964, though Travers is said to have despised it. Mary Poppins was a triumph at the 1965 Oscars, winning five awards and being…

  • spoonwood (shrub)

    Mountain laurel, (Kalmia latifolia), Flowering evergreen shrub of the heath family, occurring in most mountainous regions of eastern North America. It grows to about 3–18 feet (1–6 metres) in height and has oval leaves. The rosy, pink, or white flowers appear in large clusters above the foliage.

  • spoonworm (invertebrate)

    Spoonworm, any member of the invertebrate phylum Echiura, also known as Echiuroidea, or Echiurida. Nearly all spoonworms are exclusively marine. They are sausage-shaped organisms with a flattened extension of the “head” that is curved along its lateral edges and sometimes shaped like a scoop or

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