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  • Standing Woman (work by Lehmbruck)

    Wilhelm Lehmbruck: …simplified forms of his sculpture Standing Woman (1910) reveal his new enthusiasm for the calm Classicism of the French sculptor Aristide Maillol. In this sculpture, the idealized face is softly modeled and evokes a sensitive, introspective mood. Lehmbruck’s style became less naturalistic and more psychologically powerful with sculptures such as…

  • Standing Woman (sculpture by Lachaise)

    Gaston Lachaise: Lachaise’s most famous work, Standing Woman (1932), typifies the image that Lachaise worked and reworked: a voluptuous female nude with sinuous, tapered limbs. Lachaise was also known as a brilliant portraitist. He executed busts of famous artists and literary celebrities, such as John Marin, Marianne Moore, and E.E. Cummings.…

  • Standing Youth (work by Lehmbruck)

    Western sculpture: Avant-garde sculpture (1909–20): …“Kneeling Woman” (1911) and “Standing Youth” (1913), in which his gothicized, elongated bodies with their angular posturings and appearance of growing from the earth give expression to his notions of modern heroism. In contrast to this spiritualized view is his “The Fallen” (1915–16), intended as a compassionate memorial for…

  • Standing, Guy (British economist)

    paternalism: History of paternalism: Guy Standing argued against supervision of the poor as the means of ensuring their economic security, echoing Mead but insisting that the human need for (and right to) collective agency and guaranteed “structured reciprocities” of mutual responsibility between citizen stakeholders and their government cannot be…

  • standing-wave linear accelerator

    linear accelerator: The proton linac, designed by the American physicist Luis Alvarez in 1946, is a more efficient variant of Wider?e’s structure. In this accelerator, electric fields are set up as standing waves within a cylindrical metal “resonant cavity,” with drift tubes suspended along the central axis. The…

  • standish

    Inkstand, receptacle for a pen, ink, and other writing accessories. In England such a utensil was called a standish from the 15th to the 18th century. Inkstands were made of silver, pewter, lead, earthenware, or porcelain. Silver was the most fashionable material used throughout the 18th century.

  • Standish, Burt L. (American author)

    baseball: Baseball and the arts: Using pseudonyms, Gilbert Patten (writing as Burt L. Standish), Edward Stratemeyer (as Lester Chadwick), and Harvey Shackleford (as Hal Standish) created all-American baseball heroes like Frank Merriwell, Baseball Joe, and Fred Fearnot to inspire and delight their readers. This tradition reached its height of popularity in the…

  • Standish, Hal (American author)

    baseball: Baseball and the arts: …Stratemeyer (as Lester Chadwick), and Harvey Shackleford (as Hal Standish) created all-American baseball heroes like Frank Merriwell, Baseball Joe, and Fred Fearnot to inspire and delight their readers. This tradition reached its height of popularity in the 1940s with the adolescent novels of John R. Tunis that featured the Brooklyn…

  • Standish, Miles (American colonist)

    Myles Standish, British-American colonist and military leader of the Plymouth colony. As a young man, Standish fought in the Netherlands, where he probably met the English religious exiles who later became known as the Pilgrims. He sailed with them to America on the “Mayflower” in 1620, serving as

  • Standish, Myles (American colonist)

    Myles Standish, British-American colonist and military leader of the Plymouth colony. As a young man, Standish fought in the Netherlands, where he probably met the English religious exiles who later became known as the Pilgrims. He sailed with them to America on the “Mayflower” in 1620, serving as

  • standpoint theory (feminism)

    Standpoint theory, a feminist theoretical perspective that argues that knowledge stems from social position. The perspective denies that traditional science is objective and suggests that research and theory has ignored and marginalized women and feminist ways of thinking. The theory emerged from

  • Standstill Agreement (Asian history [1947])

    Indus Waters Treaty: …the expiration of the short-term Standstill Agreement of 1947, on April 1, 1948, India began withholding water from canals that flowed into Pakistan. The Inter-Dominion Accord of May 4, 1948, required India to provide water to the Pakistani parts of the basin in return for annual payments. This too was…

  • standup (entertainment)

    Stand-up comedy, comedy that generally is delivered by a solo performer speaking directly to the audience in some semblance of a spontaneous manner. Stand-up, at least in the form it is known today, is a fairly recent entertainment phenomenon. In the United States, where it developed first and

  • standup comedy (entertainment)

    Stand-up comedy, comedy that generally is delivered by a solo performer speaking directly to the audience in some semblance of a spontaneous manner. Stand-up, at least in the form it is known today, is a fairly recent entertainment phenomenon. In the United States, where it developed first and

  • St?nescu, Nichita (Romanian author)

    Romanian literature: After World War II: Perhaps its best exponent was Nichita St?nescu, who wished to convey the totality of the universe in his metaphysical poems. Marin Sorescu, at once a poet of irony and of myth, became well known all over Europe as both a poet and a playwright. Ioan Alexandru was the poet of…

  • Stanfield, Agnes (American writer and actress)

    Ada Clare, American writer and actress remembered for her charm and wit and for her lively journalistic contributions. Jane McElhenney was of a prosperous and well-connected family. From about age 11 she grew up under the care of her maternal grandfather. About 1854 she struck out on her own. In

  • Stanfield, Robert L. (Canadian politician)

    Robert L. Stanfield, Canadian politician who, as leader of the Progressive Conservative Association in Nova Scotia, served as that province’s premier from 1956 to 1967. After graduating in 1939 from Harvard University Law School, Stanfield was called to the bar in 1940. From 1939 to 1945 he served

  • Stanfield, Robert Lorne (Canadian politician)

    Robert L. Stanfield, Canadian politician who, as leader of the Progressive Conservative Association in Nova Scotia, served as that province’s premier from 1956 to 1967. After graduating in 1939 from Harvard University Law School, Stanfield was called to the bar in 1940. From 1939 to 1945 he served

  • Stanford Industrial Park (area, California, United States)

    Silicon Valley: Terman and Stanford Industrial Park: …spearheaded the creation of the Stanford Industrial (now Research) Park, which granted long-term leases on university land exclusively to high-technology firms. Soon Varian Associates, Inc. (now Varian Medical Systems, Inc.), Eastman Kodak Company, General Electric Company, Admiral Corporation, Lockheed Corporation (now Lockheed Martin Corporation), Hewlett-Packard Company, and others turned

  • Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (laboratory, Menlo Park, California, United States)

    SLAC, U.S. national particle-accelerator laboratory for research in high-energy particle physics and synchrotron-radiation physics, located in Menlo Park, California. An exemplar of post-World War II Big Science, SLAC was founded in 1962 and is run by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of

  • Stanford Linear Collider (collider)

    SLAC: The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) project, which became operational in 1989, consisted of extensive modifications to the original linac to accelerate electrons and positrons to 50 GeV each before sending them in opposite directions around a 600-metre (2,000-foot) loop of magnets. The oppositely charged particles were…

  • stanford manzanita (plant)

    manzanita: stanfordiana, the stanford manzanita—are cultivated for their showy, massive displays of flowers and beautiful smooth bark. The fruit of the manzanita is a smooth brown or red berry that contains one or more stones.

  • Stanford Positron-Electron Asymmetric Rings (collider)

    SLAC: …with the completion of the Stanford Positron-Electron Asymmetric Rings (SPEAR), a collider designed to produce and study electron-positron collisions at energies of 2.5 GeV per beam (later upgraded to 4 GeV). In 1974 physicists working with SPEAR reported the discovery of a new, heavier flavour of quark, which became known…

  • Stanford Prison Experiment (social psychology study)

    Stanford Prison Experiment, a social psychology study in which college students became prisoners or guards in a simulated prison environment. The experiment, funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, took place at Stanford University in August 1971. It was intended to measure the effect of

  • Stanford Research Institute (institution, California, United States)

    Douglas Engelbart: …Stanford Research Institute (SRI; now SRI International) in Menlo Park, California.

  • Stanford Research Park (area, California, United States)

    Silicon Valley: Terman and Stanford Industrial Park: …spearheaded the creation of the Stanford Industrial (now Research) Park, which granted long-term leases on university land exclusively to high-technology firms. Soon Varian Associates, Inc. (now Varian Medical Systems, Inc.), Eastman Kodak Company, General Electric Company, Admiral Corporation, Lockheed Corporation (now Lockheed Martin Corporation), Hewlett-Packard Company, and others turned

  • Stanford University (university, Stanford, California, United States)

    Stanford University, private coeducational institution of higher learning at Stanford, California, U.S. (adjacent to Palo Alto), one of the most prestigious in the country. The university was founded in 1885 by railroad magnate Leland Stanford and his wife, Jane (née Lathrop), and was dedicated to

  • Stanford, Amasa Leland (American politician and industrialist)

    Leland Stanford, American senator from California and one of the builders of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad. Stanford is often grouped with the 19th-century entrepreneurial tycoons who were labeled “robber barons” by their critics and “captains of industry” by their champions. Stanford

  • Stanford, Leland (American politician and industrialist)

    Leland Stanford, American senator from California and one of the builders of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad. Stanford is often grouped with the 19th-century entrepreneurial tycoons who were labeled “robber barons” by their critics and “captains of industry” by their champions. Stanford

  • Stanford, Robert Allen (Antiguan-American banker)

    Antigua and Barbuda: History: financier Robert Allen Stanford, was arrested and charged with fraud; in 2012 a Texas court found him guilty of having run a Ponzi scheme from his offshore bank on Antigua. In the June 2014 legislative elections the ALP regained power under Gaston Browne. Browne and the…

  • Stanford, Sir Charles Villiers (British composer)

    Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, Anglo-Irish composer, conductor, and teacher who greatly influenced the next generation of British composers; Ralph Vaughan Williams, Sir Arthur Bliss, and Gustav Holst were among his pupils. Stanford studied at Trinity College, Dublin, and Queen’s College, Cambridge,

  • Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (psychology)

    intelligence test: …used intelligence tests include the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale and the Wechsler scales. The Stanford-Binet is the American adaptation of the original French Binet-Simon intelligence test; it was first introduced in 1916 by Lewis Terman, a psychologist at Stanford University. The individually administered test, revised in 1937, 1960, and 1972, evaluates…

  • Stang, Frederik (Norwegian politician)

    Frederik Stang, politician who was an early advocate of Norway’s transition to a capitalist economy. He was also the first minister of state for Norway in the Swedish-Norwegian union. As a university law professor in the 1830s, Stang was an early advocate of economic liberalism in the agricultural,

  • Stang, Sister Dorothy (American missionary and activist)

    Sister Dorothy Stang, American missionary and activist (born June 7, 1931, Dayton, Ohio—died Feb. 12, 2005, Anapu, Pará state, Braz.), was a staunch champion of peasant farmers in the Amazon rainforest during her 22 years spent helping them to attain a sustainable living, but her advocacy was o

  • Stangeria (plant genus)

    Stangeria, genus of fernlike cycads in the family Stangeriaceae, native to coastal regions of southern Africa. The genus contains only a single species, Stangeria eriopus, which has a thick tuberlike underground stem, cylindrical cones with more or less vertical ranks of sporophylls, and pinnately

  • Stangeria eriopus (plant)

    Stangeria: …contains only a single species, Stangeria eriopus, which has a thick tuberlike underground stem, cylindrical cones with more or less vertical ranks of sporophylls, and pinnately compound leaves resembling those of some genera of ferns. The plant is listed as vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

  • Stangeria paradoxa (plant)

    Stangeria: …contains only a single species, Stangeria eriopus, which has a thick tuberlike underground stem, cylindrical cones with more or less vertical ranks of sporophylls, and pinnately compound leaves resembling those of some genera of ferns. The plant is listed as vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

  • Stangeriaceae (gymnosperm family)

    cycadophyte: Classification: Family Stangeriaceae Fernlike leaves bearing pinnae with a prominent midrib and numerous dichotomously branching lateral veins; simple cones; female cones with biovulate megasporophylls; includes only Stangeria paradoxa, a southern African cycad. Family Boweniaceae Differ from other cycads in possessing bicompound

  • Stangerup, Henrik (Danish writer and film director)

    Henrik Stangerup, Danish writer and film director whose internationally known works, influenced by the writings of S?ren Kierkegaard, revealed his feelings of alienation and contempt for societal attitudes; Manden der ville v?re skyldig (1975; The Man Who Wanted to Be Guilty, 1983) and Forf?reren

  • Stangl, Franz (German Nazi officer)

    Sobibor: …commandant of the camp was Franz Stangl, who, like many of his staff of 30 SS (Nazi paramilitary corps) men, was a veteran of the T4 Program to murder the infirm and disabled. They were assisted by 90–120 Ukrainians, former prisoners of war trained by the Germans for their new…

  • Stanhope gig (carriage)

    gig: …the Tilbury gig and the Stanhope gig, both designed by Fitzroy Stanhope. The Stanhope gig was an elegant carriage with low wheels that therefore required shafts with an upward reverse curve where attached to the horse’s harness. The Tilbury resembled the Stanhope except in its manner of suspension.

  • Stanhope, Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl (British politician and scientist)

    Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl Stanhope, radical English politician and noted experimental scientist, a brilliant eccentric in both capacities. The second but eldest surviving son of Philip, 2nd Earl Stanhope, he was styled Viscount, or Lord, Mahon from 1763 to 1786. He was educated at Eton and was a

  • Stanhope, James Stanhope, 1st Earl (British statesman)

    James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope, British soldier and statesman, the dominant minister during the first half (1714–21) of the reign of King George I. His policy of alliance with France secured the peace and minimized foreign support for the Jacobites, who sought to restore the Stuart monarchy in

  • Stanhope, Lady Hester (British noble)

    Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl Stanhope: His eldest daughter, Lady Hester Stanhope, was a traveler and an eccentric who became the de facto ruler of a mountain community in western Syria (modern Lebanon).

  • Stanhope, Philip Dormer, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (English writer)

    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th earl of Chesterfield, British statesman, diplomat, and wit, chiefly remembered as the author of Letters to His Son and Letters to His Godson—guides to manners, the art of pleasing, and the art of worldly success. After a short period of study at Trinity Hall, Cambridge,

  • Stanhope, Philip Henry Stanhope, 5th Earl (British politician)

    Philip Henry Stanhope, 5th Earl Stanhope, English politician and historian who was chiefly responsible for the founding of Britain’s National Portrait Gallery. Stanhope studied at Christ Church, Oxford, and entered Parliament in 1830. Although he made no special mark in politics, he was chiefly

  • Stanhope, Philip Henry Stanhope, 5th Earl, Viscount Stanhope of Mahon, Baron Stanhope of Elvaston (British politician)

    Philip Henry Stanhope, 5th Earl Stanhope, English politician and historian who was chiefly responsible for the founding of Britain’s National Portrait Gallery. Stanhope studied at Christ Church, Oxford, and entered Parliament in 1830. Although he made no special mark in politics, he was chiefly

  • Stanhope, William (British diplomat)

    William Stanhope, 1st earl of Harrington, British diplomat and statesman in the Walpole-Pelham era. Educated at Eton College, Harrington was elected a member of Parliament for Derby in 1715, became envoy to Turin (1718–20), and was then ambassador to Spain (1720–27). As a reward for his

  • Stanier, Roger Yate (Canadian microbiologist)

    protist: Defining the protists: …Edouard Chatton but universally overlooked, Roger Yate Stanier, Cornelius B. van Niel, and their colleagues formally proposed the division of all living things into two great groups, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. This organization was based on characteristics—such as the presence or absence of a true nucleus, the simplicity or…

  • Stanishev, Sergei (prime minister of Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: Bulgaria’s transition: …the 2005 legislative elections, and Sergei Stanishev of the BSP became prime minister.

  • Stanislas of Kraków, Saint (Polish saint)

    Saint Stanislaus of Kraków, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 11, feast day in Kraków May 7), patron saint of Poland, the first Pole to be canonized. Of noble birth, Stanislaus studied at Gniezno, Pol., and probably at Paris. While serving as canon and preacher at Kraków (Cracow), he was

  • Stanislas of Szczepanow, Saint (Polish saint)

    Saint Stanislaus of Kraków, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 11, feast day in Kraków May 7), patron saint of Poland, the first Pole to be canonized. Of noble birth, Stanislaus studied at Gniezno, Pol., and probably at Paris. While serving as canon and preacher at Kraków (Cracow), he was

  • Stanislaus of Kraków, Saint (Polish saint)

    Saint Stanislaus of Kraków, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 11, feast day in Kraków May 7), patron saint of Poland, the first Pole to be canonized. Of noble birth, Stanislaus studied at Gniezno, Pol., and probably at Paris. While serving as canon and preacher at Kraków (Cracow), he was

  • Stanislaus of Szczepanów, Saint (Polish saint)

    Saint Stanislaus of Kraków, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 11, feast day in Kraków May 7), patron saint of Poland, the first Pole to be canonized. Of noble birth, Stanislaus studied at Gniezno, Pol., and probably at Paris. While serving as canon and preacher at Kraków (Cracow), he was

  • Stanislav (Ukraine)

    Ivano-Frankivsk, city, western Ukraine. It lies along the Bystritsa River just above its confluence with the Dniester River. Founded in 1662 as the Polish town of Stanis?awów (Ukrainian: Stanyslaviv), it occupied an important position on the northern approach to the Yablonitsky Pass over the

  • Stanislav of Znojmo (Czech priest)

    Jan Hus: Leader of Czech reform movement: …did, among them Hus’s teacher, Stanislav of Znojmo, and his fellow student, ?těpán Pále?.

  • Stanislavski, Konstantin Sergeyevich (Russian actor and director)

    Konstantin Stanislavsky, Russian actor, director, and producer, founder of the Moscow Art Theatre (opened 1898). He is best known for developing the system or theory of acting called the Stanislavsky system, or Stanislavsky method. Stanislavsky’s father was a manufacturer, and his mother was the

  • Stanislavsky method (acting)

    Stanislavsky system, highly influential system of dramatic training developed over years of trial and error by the Russian actor, producer, and theoretician Konstantin Stanislavsky. He began with attempts to find a style of acting more appropriate to the greater realism of 20th-century drama than

  • Stanislavsky system (acting)

    Stanislavsky system, highly influential system of dramatic training developed over years of trial and error by the Russian actor, producer, and theoretician Konstantin Stanislavsky. He began with attempts to find a style of acting more appropriate to the greater realism of 20th-century drama than

  • Stanislavsky, Konstantin (Russian actor and director)

    Konstantin Stanislavsky, Russian actor, director, and producer, founder of the Moscow Art Theatre (opened 1898). He is best known for developing the system or theory of acting called the Stanislavsky system, or Stanislavsky method. Stanislavsky’s father was a manufacturer, and his mother was the

  • Stanislavsky, Konstantin Sergeyevich (Russian actor and director)

    Konstantin Stanislavsky, Russian actor, director, and producer, founder of the Moscow Art Theatre (opened 1898). He is best known for developing the system or theory of acting called the Stanislavsky system, or Stanislavsky method. Stanislavsky’s father was a manufacturer, and his mother was the

  • Stanis?aw I (king of Poland)

    Stanis?aw I, king of Poland (1704–09, 1733) during a period of great problems and turmoil. He was a victim of foreign attempts to dominate the country. Stanis?aw was born into a powerful magnate family of Great Poland, and he had the opportunity to travel in western Europe as a young man. In 1702

  • Stanis?aw II August Poniatowski (king of Poland)

    Stanis?aw II August Poniatowski, last king of an independent Poland (1764–95). He was unable to act effectively while Russia, Austria, and Prussia dismembered his nation. He was born the sixth child of Stanis?aw Poniatowski, a Polish noble, and his wife, Princess Konstancja Czartoryska. After a

  • Stanis?aw z Krakowa, ?wi?ty (Polish saint)

    Saint Stanislaus of Kraków, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 11, feast day in Kraków May 7), patron saint of Poland, the first Pole to be canonized. Of noble birth, Stanislaus studied at Gniezno, Pol., and probably at Paris. While serving as canon and preacher at Kraków (Cracow), he was

  • Stanis?aw ze Szcyepanowa, ?wi?ty (Polish saint)

    Saint Stanislaus of Kraków, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 11, feast day in Kraków May 7), patron saint of Poland, the first Pole to be canonized. Of noble birth, Stanislaus studied at Gniezno, Pol., and probably at Paris. While serving as canon and preacher at Kraków (Cracow), he was

  • Stanis?awów (Ukraine)

    Ivano-Frankivsk, city, western Ukraine. It lies along the Bystritsa River just above its confluence with the Dniester River. Founded in 1662 as the Polish town of Stanis?awów (Ukrainian: Stanyslaviv), it occupied an important position on the northern approach to the Yablonitsky Pass over the

  • Stankonia (album by Outkast)

    OutKast: …Baghdad”), OutKast’s fourth studio album, Stankonia (2000), was a huge crossover success. It earned Grammys for best rap album and best performance by a rap duo/group for the heartfelt “Ms. Jackson,” and it placed at or near the top of most critics’ yearly “best of” lists. In 2003 the duo…

  • Stanky, Eddie (American baseball player)

    Edward Raymond Stanky, ( (“Eddie”; “the Brat”),), American baseball player whose aggressive play helped bring pennants to three different teams—the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, the Boston Braves in 1948, and the New York Giants in 1951; short and slight of build, he became adept at drawing walks to

  • Stanky, Edward Raymond (American baseball player)

    Edward Raymond Stanky, ( (“Eddie”; “the Brat”),), American baseball player whose aggressive play helped bring pennants to three different teams—the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, the Boston Braves in 1948, and the New York Giants in 1951; short and slight of build, he became adept at drawing walks to

  • Stanley (Tasmania, Australia)

    Stanley, town, northwestern Tasmania, Australia. It is situated on the eastern shore of Circular Head, a promontory extending into Bass Strait. From 1826 it was the hub of the settlement of the Van Diemen’s Land Company in that part of the state. First called Circular Head, the town was renamed in

  • Stanley (American television series)

    Carol Burnett: …later, on the short-lived comedy Stanley, in which she portrayed the girlfriend of the character played by Buddy Hackett. A guest appearance with Garry Moore on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) Morning Show in 1956 led to increased exposure for the young comedian, and in 1959 Moore added Burnett to…

  • Stanley (Falkland Islands, United Kingdom)

    Stanley, only town and, since 1842, capital of the Falkland Islands, an overseas territory of the United Kingdom in the South Atlantic Ocean. It lies on the northeast coast of East Falkland, along the southern shore of Port William inlet. Its fine inner and outer harbours attracted the early

  • Stanley (British Columbia, Canada)

    Nelson, city, southeastern British Columbia, Canada, on the western arm of Kootenay Lake, a few miles south of Kokanee Glacier Provincial Park and 408 miles (657 km) east of Vancouver. The discovery of gold at nearby Fortynine Creek in 1867 led to the development of several mines near Cottonwood

  • Stanley & Iris (film by Ritt [1990])

    Martin Ritt: Last films: Ritt’s final film was Stanley & Iris (1990), a love story about a blue-collar recluse (Robert De Niro) whose illiteracy is conquered by a grieving widow (Jane Fonda). Most critics found it to be sincere but stilted. Ritt died shortly after its completion.

  • Stanley Albaitero, Francisco (Mexican television personality)

    Francisco Stanley Albaitero, ( (“Paco”),), popular Mexican television personality who was the host of variety shows for two of Mexico’s largest networks, Televisa and TV Azteca, in a career spanning more than 25 years; his murder in a daylight attack on a busy Mexico City beltway rekindled fury at

  • Stanley and Livingstone (film by King [1939])

    Henry King: Films of the 1930s: …States with the period adventure Stanley and Livingstone (1939), a colourful account of reporter Henry M. Stanley (played by Tracy) and his quest through Africa to find long-lost missionary David Livingstone (Cedric Hardwicke).

  • Stanley Brothers (American bluegrass duo)

    Stanley Brothers, American bluegrass duo. The duo consisted of Ralph (Edmund) Stanley (b. February 25, 1927, Stratton, Virginia, U.S.—d. June 23, 2016, Sandy Ridge, Virginia) on banjo and Carter (Glen) Stanley (b. August 27, 1925, McClure, Virginia—d. December 1, 1966, Bristol, Virginia) on lead

  • Stanley Cup (ice hockey trophy)

    Stanley Cup, trophy awarded to the winner of the world’s professional ice hockey championship, an annual play-off that culminates the season of the National Hockey League. The Stanley Cup was first awarded in the 1892–93 season and is the oldest trophy that can be won by professional athletes in

  • Stanley Elkin’s The Magic Kingdom (novel by Elkin)

    Stanley Elkin: …gained further critical acclaim for Stanley Elkin’s The Magic Kingdom (1985), in which Eddy Bale arranges a trip to Disney World for seven terminally ill British children, in honour of his young son’s death. In The MacGuffin (1991), Elkin attempted a more conventional narrative structure while maintaining his usual style…

  • Stanley Falls (waterfalls, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Boyoma Falls, seven cataracts in the Lualaba River, central Congo (Kinshasa). The falls extend for 60 miles (100 km) along a curve of the river between Ubundu and Kisangani. The total fall in the river’s elevation is about 200 feet (60 m), and the seventh and largest cataract is 800 yards (730 m) w

  • Stanley Hotel (hotel, Estes Park, Colorado, United States)

    The Shining: Origins: …staying a night at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado. In late September 1974, King and his wife, Tabitha, checked into what King described as a “grand old hotel.” Notably, the Kings stayed in room 217. King recalled that he and his wife were the only guests staying at…

  • Stanley of Preston, Frederick Arthur, Lord (Canadian governor-general)

    ice hockey: Early organization: …game when the Canadian governor-general, Frederick Arthur, Lord Stanley of Preston, donated a cup to be given annually to the top Canadian team. The three-foot-high silver cup became known as the Stanley Cup and was first awarded in 1892–93. (The first winner was the Montreal Amateur Athletic Association team, which…

  • Stanley Park (park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)

    Vancouver: The contemporary city: Stanley Park, with its gardens and large public aquarium, occupies some 1,000 acres (400 hectares) of the downtown peninsula at the harbour entrance and is surrounded by a scenic 5.5-mile (8.8-km) seawall that is popular with strollers, joggers, and inline skaters. Lost Lagoon, at the…

  • Stanley Pool (lake, Africa)

    Malebo Pool, lakelike expansion of the lower Congo River above Livingstone Falls, between the Republic of the Congo (Brazzaville) to the west and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa) to the east. It covers an area of 174 square miles (450 square km) and is divided into deep navigable

  • Stanley steamer (automobile)

    automobile: The age of steam: …Stanley brothers—one of whose “steamers” took the world speed record at 127.66 miles (205.45 km) per hour in 1906. The car designed by them and sold as the Locomobile became the first commercially successful American-made automobile (about 1,000 were built in 1900). It is estimated that in the year…

  • Stanley v. Georgia (law case)

    Bowers v. Hardwick: Dissenting opinions: …to engage in homosexual sodomy’…than Stanley v. Georgia [1969]…was about a fundamental right to watch obscene movies, or Katz v. United States [1967]…was about a fundamental right to place interstate bets from a telephone booth.” “Rather,” he added (quoting Louis Brandeis’s dissent in the Supreme Court’s decision in Olmstead v.…

  • Stanley, 2nd Baron (English noble)

    Thomas Stanley, 1st earl of Derby, a prominent figure in the later stage of England’s Wars of the Roses. Great-grandson of Sir John Stanley (died c. 1414), who created the fortunes of the Stanley family, Thomas Stanley began his career as a squire to King Henry VI in 1454. At the Battle of Blore

  • Stanley, Allan (Canadian ice hockey player)

    (Herbert) Allan Stanley, (“Snowshoes”), Canadian ice hockey player (born March 1, 1926, Timmins, Ont.—died Oct. 18, 2013, Bobcaygeon, Ont.), was a solid defensive player over a 21-season professional career (1948–69), but his greatest success was as a member (1958–68) of the Toronto Maple Leafs

  • Stanley, Augustus Owsley III (American audio engineer)

    Owsley Stanley , (Augustus Owsley Stanley III), American audio engineer (born Jan. 19, 1935, Kentucky—died March 13, 2011, near Mareeba, Queens., Australia), achieved legendary status during the psychedelic era of the late 1960s as the music industry’s premier supplier of LSD. He gained experience

  • Stanley, Carter (American musician)

    Stanley Brothers: …Ridge, Virginia) on banjo and Carter (Glen) Stanley (b. August 27, 1925, McClure, Virginia—d. December 1, 1966, Bristol, Virginia) on lead guitar. The brothers rose to fame performing traditional religious songs in an Appalachian bluegrass style marked by tight, high-pitched harmonies and strongly influenced by Bill Monroe. With their band,…

  • Stanley, Carter Glen (American musician)

    Stanley Brothers: …Ridge, Virginia) on banjo and Carter (Glen) Stanley (b. August 27, 1925, McClure, Virginia—d. December 1, 1966, Bristol, Virginia) on lead guitar. The brothers rose to fame performing traditional religious songs in an Appalachian bluegrass style marked by tight, high-pitched harmonies and strongly influenced by Bill Monroe. With their band,…

  • Stanley, Edward (prime minister of Great Britain)

    Edward Stanley, 14th earl of Derby, English statesman, important as leader of the Conservative Party during the long period 1846–68, thrice prime minister, and one of England’s greatest parliamentary orators; nevertheless, he has no great political reputation. Entering Parliament as a Whig in 1820,

  • Stanley, Francis Edgar (American inventor)

    Francis Edgar Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley: ), American inventors, twin brothers, the most famous manufacturers of steam-driven automobiles.

  • Stanley, Francis Edgar; and Stanley, Freelan O. (American inventors)

    Francis Edgar Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley, American inventors, twin brothers, the most famous manufacturers of steam-driven automobiles. In 1883 Francis invented a photographic dry-plate process, and together the brothers began to manufacture the plates. In 1897 they began developing their

  • Stanley, Freelan O. (American inventor)

    Francis Edgar Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley: ), American inventors, twin brothers, the most famous manufacturers of steam-driven automobiles.

  • Stanley, George (American sculptor)

    Academy Award: Oscar statuette: Sculptor George Stanley was commissioned to create the original statuette based on Gibbons’s design. For many years the statuettes were cast in bronze, with 24-karat gold plating. During World War II the statuettes were made of plaster because of metal shortages. They are now made of…

  • Stanley, Henry Morton (British explorer)

    Henry Morton Stanley, British American explorer of central Africa, famous for his rescue of the Scottish missionary and explorer David Livingstone and for his discoveries in and development of the Congo region. He was knighted in 1899. Stanley’s parents, John Rowlands and Elizabeth Parry, gave

  • Stanley, Herbert Allan (Canadian ice hockey player)

    (Herbert) Allan Stanley, (“Snowshoes”), Canadian ice hockey player (born March 1, 1926, Timmins, Ont.—died Oct. 18, 2013, Bobcaygeon, Ont.), was a solid defensive player over a 21-season professional career (1948–69), but his greatest success was as a member (1958–68) of the Toronto Maple Leafs

  • Stanley, James (English commander)

    James Stanley, 7th earl of Derby, prominent Royalist commander in the English Civil War, who was executed by the Parliamentarians. Eldest son of William, the 6th earl, he was returned to Parliament for Liverpool in 1625 and on March 7, 1628, entered the House of Lords as Baron Strange. When the

  • Stanley, Kim (American actress)

    Kim Stanley, (Patricia Beth Reid), American actress (born Feb. 11, 1925, Tularosa, N.M.—died Aug. 20, 2001, Santa Fe, N.M.), achieved renown on the Broadway stage in roles that ranged from the tomboyish Millie in Picnic (1953) to the nightclub singer Cherie in Bus Stop (1955) and to Masha in The T

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