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  • star discrimeter (instrument)

    psychomotor learning: Devices and tasks: While using a star discrimeter, a person receives information about his errors through earphones; the task is to learn to selectively position one lever among six radial slots in accordance with signals from differently coloured stimulus lights. A trainee on a two-hand coordinator has to manipulate two lathe…

  • star dune (landform)

    sand mountain: …smaller versions they are called pyramidal or star dunes.

  • Star Dust (work by Bidart)

    Frank Bidart: …Dirt were later included in Star Dust (2005), which also features new material, including “The Third Hour of the Night,” a monumental narrative that examines the act of creation through the eyes of Renaissance artist Benvenuto Cellini. Watching the Spring Festival (2007), a book of lyric poems, included meditations on…

  • Star Film (French film company)

    history of the motion picture: Méliès and Porter: …following year he organized the Star Film company and constructed a small glass-enclosed studio on the grounds of his house at Montreuil, where he produced, directed, photographed, and acted in more than 500 films between 1896 and 1913.

  • star finch (bird)

    Star finch, species of grass finch

  • star ipomoea (plant)

    cypress vine: The closely related star ipomoea (I. coccinea), with crimson flowers and heart-shaped leaves, which grows wild over much the same area, is also an annual.

  • Star Is Born, A (film by Cukor [1954])

    A Star Is Born, American musical film, released in 1954, that was the third—and widely considered the most enduring—version of the classic tale of passion and jealousy between a Hollywood power couple. The film charts the rise of Esther Blodgett (played by Judy Garland) from band singer to

  • Star Is Born, A (film by Pierson [1976])

    Kris Kristofferson: Film career and Highwaymen: … (1976), opposite Sarah Miles; and A Star Is Born (1976), opposite Barbra Streisand. The latter was a breakthrough film for Kristofferson, earning him a Golden Globe for his performance as an aging alcoholic musician. However, Heaven’s Gate (1980), in which he also starred, was a critical and financial flop, and…

  • Star Is Born, A (film by Wellman [1937])

    Dorothy Parker: …more than 15 films, including A Star Is Born (1937), for which they were nominated for an Academy Award. She became active in left-wing politics, disdained her former role as a smart woman about town, reported from the Spanish Civil War, and discovered that her beliefs counted against her employment…

  • Star Is Born, A (film by Cooper [2018])

    Bradley Cooper: …a remake of the movie A Star Is Born, in 2018. He also cowrote the script and played the lead role, as a hard-drinking musician who facilitates the meteoric rise of a singer-songwriter (played by Lady Gaga). The film earned numerous Oscar nominations, and Cooper received nods for best actor…

  • star lift (ice skating)

    figure skating: Lifts: The star lift requires the man to raise his partner into the air by her hip while she forms a five-point “star” position with her extended legs, arms, and head. The twist lift requires both partners to skate backward as the man lifts his partner over…

  • Star Magazine (German news magazine)

    Stern, (German: “Star”) weekly general-interest magazine published in Germany. It began publication in 1948 and quickly became the leading post-World War II magazine in the country, known for its outstanding photography and its blend of light and serious material. It publishes issues-oriented

  • star magnolia (plant)

    magnolia: …tree with crimson fruits; and star magnolia (M. stellata), of similar height with spidery flowers.

  • Star Maker (novel by Stapledon)

    science fiction: Alien encounters: His Star Maker (1937) follows an Englishman whose disembodied mind travels across space and time, observing aliens as metaphysical actors in a fiery cosmic drama remote from all human concern, and encounters the creator of the universe (Star Maker). This critically acclaimed book is more a…

  • Star Man’s Son, 2250 A.D. (work by Norton)

    Andre Norton: …hand at science fiction, producing Star Man’s Son, 2250 A.D. (1952); it was reprinted in paperback as Daybreak—2250 A.D. and sold more than a million copies.

  • star map

    Astronomical map, any cartographic representation of the stars, galaxies, or surfaces of the planets and the Moon. Modern maps of this kind are based on a coordinate system analogous to geographic latitude and longitude. In most cases, modern maps are compiled from photographic observations made

  • Star Mosque (building, Dhaka, Bangladesh)

    Dhaka: The contemporary city: …buildings of note are the Star Mosque (Tara Masjid), built in the Mughal architectural style in the early 19th century with later renovations; Curzon Hall at the University of Dhaka, erected at the beginning of the 20th century, combining Mughal and European influences; and the National Assembly Building (Jatiya Sangsad…

  • star network (communications)

    telecommunications network: Broadcast network: …in a bus, ring, or star topology, as shown in the figure. Nodes connected together in a wireless LAN may broadcast via radio or optical links. On a larger scale, many satellite radio systems are broadcast networks, since each Earth station within the system can typically hear all messages relayed…

  • star nursery (astronomy)

    star: Star formation and evolution: …discovered stars that are well evolved or even approaching extinction, or both, as well as occasional stars that must be very young or still in the process of formation. Evolutionary effects on these stars are not negligible, even for a middle-aged star such as the Sun. More massive stars must…

  • Star of India (gem)

    Star of India, a large, cabochon-cut, gray-blue star sapphire, slightly oval in shape. The polished but unfaceted gem weighs 536 carats and was found in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). It was presented to the American Museum of Natural History, in New York City, by J.P.

  • Star of Redemption, The (work by Rosenzweig)

    Franz Rosenzweig: ” Der Stern der Erl?sung, completed in 1919, appeared in 1921. The work was ignored by the various trends in academic philosophy but highly regarded by Existentialist and, especially, younger Jewish theologians.

  • Star of South Africa (diamond)

    Star of South Africa, first large diamond found in South Africa; it was discovered in 1869 on the banks of the Orange River by an African shepherd boy, who traded it to a Boer settler for 500 sheep, 10 oxen, and a horse. It weighed about 84 carats in rough form and was cut to about 48 carats. When

  • Star of the South (diamond)

    Star of the South, unblemished 129-carat white diamond with a rosy glow, one of the largest ever found in Brazil; it weighed about 262 carats in rough form. It was discovered in 1853 in the Bagagem River (in Minas Gerais state) by a slave woman, who was given her freedom and pensioned as a reward.

  • Star Route Scandal (United States history)

    James A. Garfield: Presidency: …short term of office, the Star Route scandal, involved the fraudulent dispersal of postal route contracts. “Go ahead regardless of where or whom you hit,” Garfield told investigators. “I direct you not only to probe this ulcer to the bottom, but to cut it out.” Despite such strong talk, Grant…

  • star ruby (synthetic gem)

    Verneuil process: Synthetic corundum.: Star rubies and sapphires, first developed in 1947 in the United States, are made by adding one percent rutile (titanium oxide, TiO2) to the starting powder, forming the boules in the usual manner, and then heat treating them at temperatures between 1,100° C and 1,500°…

  • star sapphire (synthetic gem)

    Verneuil process: Synthetic corundum.: Star rubies and sapphires, first developed in 1947 in the United States, are made by adding one percent rutile (titanium oxide, TiO2) to the starting powder, forming the boules in the usual manner, and then heat treating them at temperatures between 1,100° C and 1,500° C. The rutile…

  • star streaming (astronomy)

    Milky Way Galaxy: Space motions: …used to demonstrate the so-called stream motion. Calculations based on the Dutch-born American astronomer Peter van de Kamp’s table of stars within 17 light-years, excluding the star of greatest anomalous velocity, reveal that dispersions in the V direction and the W direction are approximately half the size of the dispersion…

  • star sturgeon (fish)

    sturgeon: Distribution: The stellate, or star, sturgeon, A. stellatus, occurs in the rivers of the Black and Caspian seas and of the Sea of Azov. It has a long pointed snout like the sterlet, and its flesh, caviar, and isinglass are highly valued.

  • star system (motion pictures)

    history of the motion picture: Pre-World War I American cinema: …strategy known as the “star system.” Borrowed from the theatre industry, this system involves the creation and management of publicity about key performers, or stars, to stimulate demand for their films. Trust company producers used this kind of publicity after 1910, when Carl Laemmle of Independent Motion Pictures (IMP)…

  • star topology (communications)

    telecommunications network: Broadcast network: …in a bus, ring, or star topology, as shown in the figure. Nodes connected together in a wireless LAN may broadcast via radio or optical links. On a larger scale, many satellite radio systems are broadcast networks, since each Earth station within the system can typically hear all messages relayed…

  • Star Tours (amusement park ride)

    virtual reality: Entertainment: …the early projects was Disneyland’s Star Tours, an immersive flight simulator ride based on the Star Wars movie series and designed in collaboration with producer George Lucas’s Industrial Light & Magic. Disney had long built themed rides utilizing advanced technology, such as animatronic characters—notably in Pirates of the Caribbean, an…

  • star trap (theatre)

    trap: …mysterious appearance is required, a star trap is used. The star trap is a circular opening with a lid composed of wedge-shaped sections, individually hinged to the circumference. An actor, standing below on a heavily counterweighted platform, can be projected through the opening with great speed. The sections of the…

  • Star Trek (film by Abrams [2009])

    J.J. Abrams: …2009 Abrams directed the film Star Trek, which explored the early years of the crew members of the 23rd-century starship USS Enterprise from the 1960s science-fiction TV series of the same name. The then 42-year-old director was credited with adding a youthful energy to a film franchise that many thought…

  • Star Trek (American television series [1966–1969])

    Star Trek, American television science-fiction series that ran on the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) network for only three seasons (1966–69) but that became one of the most popular brands in the American entertainment industry. Star Trek was created by American writer and producer Gene

  • Star Trek (media franchise)

    Star Trek and Our Nuclear World: …represented by the television series Star Trek, addressing those aspects of Star Trek technology that might be realistic or unrealistic. Perhaps what is most remarkable about the future envisioned by the writers of that program is that unlike many science fiction futures, this one is not dystopic. In the Star…

  • Star Trek and Our Nuclear World

    After atomic bombs were detonated over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Albert Einstein wrote, “The release of atomic power has changed everything except our way of thinking.” More than 70 years have passed since then, and our thinking has not changed. The world possesses more than

  • Star Trek Beyond (film by Lin [2016])

    Idris Elba: …played the villainous Krall in Star Trek Beyond, and his rich baritone voice could be heard in three animated films—as the tough police captain (and water buffalo) Chief Bogo in Zootopia, as the villainous tiger Shere Khan in The Jungle Book, and as the sea lion Fluke in Finding Dory.…

  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (motion picture [1982])

    Leonard Nimoy: …a string of sequels, including Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991). He also directed The Search for Spock…

  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (motion picture)

    Leonard Nimoy: …The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991). He also directed The Search for Spock (in which he appeared only briefly) and The…

  • Star Trek into Darkness (film by Abrams [2013])

    Benedict Cumberbatch: From Star Trek to Alan Turing: …Khan in the Hollywood blockbuster Star Trek into Darkness (2013). That same year he played WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in The Fifth Estate; a well-intentioned slave owner in 12 Years a Slave, an adaptation of Solomon Northup’s narrative (1853) of his life in captivity; and a hapless young man in…

  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (motion picture [1986])

    Leonard Nimoy: …The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991). He also directed The Search for Spock (in which he appeared only briefly) and The Voyage Home. Another directorial effort—the comedy Three Men…

  • Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (motion picture [1989])

    Leonard Nimoy: …IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991). He also directed The Search for Spock (in which he appeared only briefly) and The Voyage Home. Another directorial effort—the comedy Three Men and a Baby—was the most lucrative film…

  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (motion picture [1991])

    Leonard Nimoy: …The Final Frontier (1989), and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991). He also directed The Search for Spock (in which he appeared only briefly) and The Voyage Home. Another directorial effort—the comedy Three Men and a Baby—was the most lucrative film released in 1987. Known for his engagement with…

  • Star Trek—The Motion Picture (film by Wise [1979])

    Leonard Nimoy: …of Spock in the big-screen Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) and appeared in a string of sequels, including Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), and…

  • Star Trek: Insurrection (film by Frakes [1998])

    F. Murray Abraham: Allen’s Mighty Aphrodite (1995), Star Trek: Insurrection (1998), and Joel and Ethan Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis (2013). He also appeared in Wes Anderson’s comedies The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) and the stop-motion animated Isle of Dogs (2018), and he provided the voice of the villainous Grimmel in How

  • Star Trek: The Next Generation (American television program)

    Star Trek: …number of spin-off series, including Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987–94), Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993–99), Star Trek: Voyager (1995–2001), and Star Trek: Enterprise (2001–05). The franchise also yielded numerous feature films, among them Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), which was followed by five further movies featuring the…

  • Star Turns Red, The (work by O’Casey)

    Sean O'Casey: The Star Turns Red (1940) is an antifascist play, and the semiautobiographical Red Roses for Me (1946) is set in Dublin at the time of the Irish railways strike of 1911.

  • Star TV (Asian company)

    Rupert Murdoch: 20th Century Fox, Fox News, and The Wall Street Journal: In 1993 he purchased Star TV, a pan-Asian television service based in Hong Kong, as part of his plan to build a global television network. In 1995 the News Corporation entered into a partnership with MCI Communications Corporation, a major provider of long-distance telecommunications services in the United States.…

  • Star Wars (United States defense system)

    Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), proposed U.S. strategic defensive system against potential nuclear attacks—as originally conceived, from the Soviet Union. The SDI was first proposed by President Ronald Reagan in a nationwide television address on March 23, 1983. Because parts of the defensive

  • Star Wars (film series)

    Star Wars, space opera film series (created by George Lucas) that became one of the most successful and influential franchises in motion picture history. Begun in the 1970s and ’80s and resuscitated at the turn of the 21st century, the Star Wars films continually advanced the field of motion

  • Star Wars (film score by Williams)

    Star Wars, film score by American composer John Williams for George Lucas’s Star Wars (1977), which launched the film series of the same name. At a time when many scores were largely compilations of popular music from the film’s period, Williams crafted a grand orchestral score in the tradition of

  • Star Wars (album by Wilco)

    Wilco: In 2015 Wilco unexpectedly released Star Wars, making it available for free on the band’s Web site. The concise album won praise for its experimentalism and songcraft. More accessible than the band’s last releases, Star Wars captured the spirit of Wilco’s live performances. Schmilco (2016) was largely acoustic, quiet, and…

  • Star Wars (film by Lucas [1977])

    Darth Vader: First seen in the movie Star Wars (1977; later retitled Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope), the towering, black-clad Darth Vader is a menacing villain. His head is covered by a mechanical helmet, and the sound of his breathing is an eerie, mechanical hiss. Armed with a deadly light sabre,…

  • Star Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace (film by Lucas [1999])

    George Lucas: The growth of Lucasfilm Ltd.: …anticipated releases of the decade, Star Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace (1999), the first installment in a prequel trilogy about the young Jedi knight Anakin Skywalker. For that film, which received mixed reviews but reaped enormous profits, Lucas returned to the director’s chair for the first time in more than…

  • Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones (film by Lucas [2002])

    George Lucas: The growth of Lucasfilm Ltd.: Lucas followed with Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones (2002) and Star Wars: Episode III—Revenge of the Sith (2005), both of which he also directed, before returning to an executive production role on the fourth Indiana Jones film, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull…

  • Star Wars: Episode III—Revenge of the Sith (film by Lucas [2005])

    George Lucas: The growth of Lucasfilm Ltd.: …of the Clones (2002) and Star Wars: Episode III—Revenge of the Sith (2005), both of which he also directed, before returning to an executive production role on the fourth Indiana Jones film, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008), which Spielberg directed. Lucas created two animated television…

  • Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope (film by Lucas [1977])

    Darth Vader: First seen in the movie Star Wars (1977; later retitled Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope), the towering, black-clad Darth Vader is a menacing villain. His head is covered by a mechanical helmet, and the sound of his breathing is an eerie, mechanical hiss. Armed with a deadly light sabre,…

  • Star Wars: Episode IX—The Rise of Skywalker (film by Abrams [2019])

    J.J. Abrams: …he subsequently decided to helm Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019), the ninth and final episode in the series; Abrams also cowrote the film.

  • Star Wars: Episode V—The Empire Strikes Back (film by Kershner [1980])

    Irvin Kershner: Star Wars, James Bond, and RoboCop: …his at USC, to helm The Empire Strikes Back (1980), the second installment in the original series. With Lucas relegating his contribution to the basic plot, Kershner made arguably the best of the series’s original three films. He then turned to the blockbuster James Bond franchise with Never Say Never…

  • Star Wars: Episode VI—Return of the Jedi (film by Marquand [1983])

    George Lucas: The growth of Lucasfilm Ltd.: …Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Return of the Jedi (1983). He also created the popular character of the adventurous archeologist Indiana Jones, who was played by Ford in a series of films, beginning with Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), directed by Steven Spielberg and with Lucas as executive producer.…

  • Star Wars: Episode VII—The Force Awakens (film by Abrams [2015])

    J.J. Abrams: …sci-fi franchise with the film Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015), which he cowrote and directed. Set several decades after the 1983 Star Wars film Return of the Jedi, it was billed as the seventh episode in the series and featured both new and old characters. While he stated that…

  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars (animated feature film)

    Star Wars: …also the animated feature film Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008)—which depicted events occurring between Episode II and Episode III—and numerous successful video game lines created by another of Lucas’s companies, LucasArts. By the time the sixth film was released in 2005, nearly 30 years after the series began, it…

  • Star Wars: The Force Awakens (film by Abrams [2015])

    J.J. Abrams: …sci-fi franchise with the film Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015), which he cowrote and directed. Set several decades after the 1983 Star Wars film Return of the Jedi, it was billed as the seventh episode in the series and featured both new and old characters. While he stated that…

  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (film by Abrams [2019])

    J.J. Abrams: …he subsequently decided to helm Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019), the ninth and final episode in the series; Abrams also cowrote the film.

  • star worship

    nature worship: Stars and constellations: …of astronomy—was the origin of astral religions and myths that affected religions all over the world. Though the view is controversial, Mesopotamian astral worship and influence may have reached as far as Central and Andean America (by way of China or Polynesia). Sumerian, Elamite, and Hurrian contemplation of the stars…

  • Star! (film by Wise [1968])

    Robert Wise: Films of the 1960s: …return to the big-budget musical, Star! (1968), in which Andrews portrayed stage star Gertrude Lawrence, was a tremendous box-office failure.

  • Star, Order of the (French honour)

    France: Culture and art: When John II formed the Order of the Star (1351), an institution imitated by the great lords for their clientages, chivalry stood incorporated as the most distinguished of religious confraternities. The dream of the Crusade remained strong, notably among princes of the fleur-de-lis, who dominated the public life of Valois…

  • Star-Apple Kingdom, The (work by Walcott)

    Derek Walcott: In Sea Grapes (1976) and The Star-Apple Kingdom (1979), Walcott uses a tenser, more economical style to examine the deep cultural divisions of language and race in the Caribbean. The Fortunate Traveller (1981) and Midsummer (1984) explore his own situation as a black writer in America who has become increasingly…

  • Star-Child (work by Crumb)

    George Crumb: … (1970), for electric string quartet; Star-Child (1977), a huge choral and orchestral composition that required the use of four conductors; Celestial Mechanics, Makrokosmos IV (1978); and Apparition (1980). Crumb taught at the University of Colorado (1959–64) before joining (1965) the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, where he became the…

  • star-nosed mole (mammal)

    mole: Mole diversity: The star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata) has the body form and anatomical specializations of typical moles but possesses a longer tail and slightly smaller forefeet. It is unique among mammals in having a muzzle tipped with 22 fleshy tentacles that are constantly moving. The tentacles are extremely…

  • star-of-Bethlehem (plant)

    Ornithogalum: Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) and Arabian starflower (O. arabicum) are common garden ornamentals grown for their attractive star-shaped flowers.

  • Star-Spangled Banner

    national flag consisting of white stars (50 since July 4, 1960) on a blue canton with a field of 13 alternating stripes, 7 red and 6 white. The 50 stars stand for the 50 states of the union, and the 13 stripes stand for the original 13 states. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 10 to 19.After the

  • Star-Spangled Banner, The (American national anthem)

    The Star-Spangled Banner, national anthem of the United States, with music adapted from the anthem of a singing club and words by Francis Scott Key. After a century of general use, the four-stanza song was officially adopted as the national anthem by an act of Congress in 1931. Long assumed to have

  • Stara Planina (mountains, Europe)

    Balkan Mountains, chief range of the Balkan Peninsula and Bulgaria and an extension of the Alpine-Carpathian folds. The range extends from the Timok River valley near the Yugoslav (Serbian) border, spreading out eastward for about 330 miles (530 km) into several spurs, rising to 7,795 feet (2,376

  • Stara Zagora (Bulgaria)

    Stara Zagora, town, central Bulgaria. It lies in the southern foothills of the Sredna Mountains and on the fringe of the fertile Stara Zagora plain. The town has varied industries producing cotton, textiles, chemicals, fertilizers, agricultural implements, machine tools, and cigarettes as well as

  • Starachowice (Poland)

    Starachowice, city, ?wi?tokrzyskie województwo (province), southeastern Poland. Historically, it lies along the Kamienna River, a tributary of the Vistula River. Starachowice was an industrial centre located in the Staropolskie Zag??bie Przemys?owe (Old Poland Industrial Basin) on the rail line

  • Staraia Russa (Russia)

    Staraya Russa, river port and capital of the Staraya Russa raion (sector), Novgorod oblast (region), northwestern Russia, on the Polist River. It is one of the oldest settlements by Lake Ilmen, having been mentioned in documents as early as 1167. Its mineral springs made it an important spa town in

  • Staraja Russa (Russia)

    Staraya Russa, river port and capital of the Staraya Russa raion (sector), Novgorod oblast (region), northwestern Russia, on the Polist River. It is one of the oldest settlements by Lake Ilmen, having been mentioned in documents as early as 1167. Its mineral springs made it an important spa town in

  • Starapol? (Lithuania)

    Marijampol?, administrative centre of a rayon (sector), Lithuania. Marijampol? lies along both banks of the ?e?up? River. The settlement developed as a monastic centre in the 18th century, when it was known as Starapol?, and achieved urban status in 1758. After World War II it developed as an

  • Staraya Russa (Russia)

    Staraya Russa, river port and capital of the Staraya Russa raion (sector), Novgorod oblast (region), northwestern Russia, on the Polist River. It is one of the oldest settlements by Lake Ilmen, having been mentioned in documents as early as 1167. Its mineral springs made it an important spa town in

  • Starboy (album by The Weeknd)

    The Weeknd: The Weeknd’s success continued with Starboy (2016), which featured collaborations with Kendrick Lamar and Daft Punk. It was a commercial hit and earned a Grammy for best urban contemporary album. His next release, My Dear Melancholy, (2018), recalled the moody, atmospheric sounds of his earlier music. In 2019 The Weeknd…

  • Starbright (missile)

    submarine: Attack submarines: Beginning in 1971, the SS-N-7 Starbright cruise missile, which could be launched underwater and could strike ships 35 nautical miles (65 km) away, was deployed in Soviet Charlie-class submarines. The SS-N-7 began a series of dive-launched antiship cruise missiles of increasing range, culminating in the SS-N-19 Shipwreck, a supersonic…

  • Starbuck (fictional character)

    Starbuck, fictional character, the scrupulous and steadfast first mate of the Pequod in the novel Moby Dick (1851) by Herman

  • Starbuck Island (island, Kiribati)

    Starbuck Island, coral atoll in the Central and Southern Line Islands, part of Kiribati, southwestern Pacific Ocean. It lies 2,000 miles (3,200 km) south of Hawaii. A barren formation rising only to 26 feet (8 metres), it has a land area of 8 square miles (21 square km) and a lagoon 5.5 miles by 2

  • Starbucks (American company)

    Starbucks, American company that is the largest coffeehouse chain in the world. Its headquarters are in Seattle, Washington. Starbucks was founded by Jerry Baldwin, Gordon Bowker, and Zev Siegl, opening its first store in 1971 near the historic Pike Place Market in Seattle. The three Starbucks

  • Star?evi?, Ante (Croatian political leader)

    Croatia: Croatian national revival: …Party of Right, led by Ante Star?evi?, which emphasized the idea of Croatian “state rights” and aspired to the creation of an independent Great Croatia. The necessity of relying on the other South Slavs in opposition to the Habsburgs and Hungarians also kept alive the Illyrian idea, revived in the…

  • starch (chemical compound)

    Starch, a white, granular, organic chemical that is produced by all green plants. Starch is a soft, white, tasteless powder that is insoluble in cold water, alcohol, or other solvents. The basic chemical formula of the starch molecule is (C6H10O5)n. Starch is a polysaccharide comprising glucose

  • starch retrogradation (biochemistry)

    baking: Staling: Starch retrogradation, the cause of ordinary texture staling of the crumb, can be slowed by the addition of certain compounds to the dough. Most of the effective chemicals are starch-complexing agents. Monoglycerides of fatty acids have been widely used as dough additives to retard staling…

  • starch-splitting enzyme (biochemistry)

    Amylase, any member of a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis (splitting of a compound by addition of a water molecule) of starch into smaller carbohydrate molecules such as maltose (a molecule composed of two glucose molecules). Three categories of amylases, denoted alpha, beta, and

  • starchwort (plant)

    Jack-in-the-pulpit, (species Arisaema triphyllum), a North American plant of the arum family (Araceae), noted for the unusual shape of its flower. The plant is native to wet woodlands and thickets from Nova Scotia to Minnesota and southward to Florida and Texas. It is a stoutish perennial, 1 to

  • starchy root (plant)

    human nutrition: Starchy roots: Starchy roots consumed in large quantities include potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, taro, and cassava. Their nutritive value in general resembles that of cereals. The potato, however, provides some protein (2 percent) and also contains vitamin C. The

  • Starck, Philippe (French designer)

    Philippe Starck, French designer known for his wide range of designs, including everything from interior design to household objects to boats to watches. He has also worked as an architect. Most likely influenced by his father, who worked as an aircraft engineer, Starck studied at the école Nissim

  • StarCraft (electronic game)

    StarCraft, electronic game published by Blizzard Entertainment (now a division of Activision Blizzard). Released in March 1998, it went on to become one of the most successful real-time strategy (RTS) games of all time. StarCraft incorporated many of the features that were regarded as standard for

  • StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty (electronic game)

    StarCraft: After years of anticipation, StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty debuted in July 2010. It retained the core elements of StarCraft and continued the single-player story where the original had left off. It also featured vastly improved graphics and customizable game elements, similar to those found in role-playing games, that…

  • Stardust (song by Carmichael)

    Hoagy Carmichael: …version of his song “Stardust” in 1927; the song, an instrumental until fitted with lyrics by Mitchell Parrish in 1929, attracted little notice at first. In 1930 Isham Jones and his Orchestra had a hit with the song, and it went on to become one of the most renowned…

  • Stardust (United States space probe)

    Stardust/NExT, a U.S. space probe that captured and returned dust grains from interplanetary space and from a comet. Stardust was launched on February 7, 1999. It flew past the asteroid Annefrank on November 2, 2002, and the comet Wild 2 on January 2, 2004. A sample capsule containing the dust

  • Stardust Memories (film by Allen [1980])

    Woody Allen: The 1980s: Stardust Memories (1980), in which Allen plays a filmmaker who is becoming increasingly contemptuous of his fans and his work, was apparently his attempt to wed the storytelling style of Federico Fellini (another of his idols) to his own particular vision. However, some critics found…

  • Stardust Sample Collection Apparatus (instrument)

    Stardust/NExT: …most significant instrument was the Stardust Sample Collection Apparatus, two arrays of aerogel mounted on opposite sides of a common plate. Aerogel is an inert silica-based substance that has an extremely low density (2 mg per cubic cm [0.001 ounce per cubic inch]). It is designed to capture particles by…

  • Stardust/NexT (United States space probe)

    comet: Spacecraft exploration of comets: Stardust/NExT (New Exploration of Tempel 1) flew past Tempel 1 on February 14, 2011, and it imaged the spot where the Deep Impact daughter spacecraft had struck the nucleus. Some scientists believed that they saw evidence of a crater about 150 metres (500 feet) in…

  • Stare Bródno (medieval settlement, Poland)

    Warsaw: Foundation and early development: …have confirmed the existence of Stare Bródno, a small trading settlement of the 10th and early 11th centuries ce. Its functions were taken over successively by Kamion (c. 1065) and Jazdow (first recorded in 1262). About the end of the 13th century, Jazdow was moved about two miles to the…

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