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  • Stephanites kai Ichnelates (Greek literature)

    Panchatantra: …11th-century version in Greek, the Stephanites kai Ichnelates, from which translations were made into Latin and various Slavic languages. It was the 12th-century Hebrew version of Rabbi Joel, however, that became the source of most European versions.

  • Stephanoaetus coronatus (bird)

    falconiform: The postfledging period: In the crowned eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus), for example, the postfledging period is 9 to 11 months, but in the related martial eagle (Polemaetus bellicosus) it is much shorter.

  • Stephanoberyciformes (fish order)

    fish: Annotated classification: Order Stephanoberyciformes (whalefishes, bigscale fishes, and allies) Body roundish, skull bones extremely thin, subocular shelf absent; supramaxilla reduced or absent; uniquely modified extrascapular bone. 9 families, 28 genera, and about 75 species. Marine. Order Beryciformes (squirrelfishes and several

  • Stephanoderes hamjei (insect)

    coffee production: …the coffee shrub is the berry borer (Stephanoderes hamjei), which damages the seeds of both Arabica and Robusta.

  • Stephanodrilus (leech genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …on freshwater crayfish; size, minute; Stephanodrilus. Order Acanthobdellida Primitive group; setae present on 5 anterior segments; no anterior sucker; parasitic on fish in Lake Baikal (U.S.S.R.); size, small; genera include Acanthobdella. Order Rhynchobdellida An eversible pharynx

  • Stephanopoulos, George (American political commentator)

    George Stephanopoulos, American political commentator, best known as an anchor of the ABC (American Broadcasting Company) morning news program Good Morning America (2009– ), chief Washington correspondent of ABC news (2005– ), and the host of ABC’s Sunday news program, This Week with George

  • Stephanos (Greek literature)

    Meleager: …and the whole was entitled Stephanos (“Garland”). Meleager’s own poems are neatly constructed, and they treat erotic themes with cleverness; they had a considerable influence on the epigrams written during the time of the Roman Empire. He lived in Tyre and, in old age, on the Aegean island of Cos.

  • Stephanotis (plant genus)

    Stephanotis, genus of the dogbane family (Apocynaceae), containing about 15 species of climbing plants native to Southeast Asia and Madagascar. Some botanists consider this genus a synonym of Marsdenia. Its members are hairless vines or shrubs that have opposite, undivided, leathery leaves. Their

  • Stephanotis floribunda (plant)

    Stephanotis: …member of the genus, the Madagascar jasmine (Marsdenia floribunda), waxflower, or floradora, is a popular greenhouse plant. This woody, twining vine is native to Madagascar. It has leathery, oval leaves that grow up to 10 cm (4 inches) long and clusters of waxy, white flowers that grow to 5 cm…

  • Stephansdom (cathedral, Vienna, Austria)

    Saint Stephen’s Cathedral, cathedral in Vienna that was burned out in the course of the Battle of Vienna in April 1945 and was reconstructed by 1952. Saint Stephen’s was established in 1147; only the west facade remains of the late Romanesque edifice that burned in 1258. A Gothic nave was built

  • Stephanskirche (cathedral, Vienna, Austria)

    Saint Stephen’s Cathedral, cathedral in Vienna that was burned out in the course of the Battle of Vienna in April 1945 and was reconstructed by 1952. Saint Stephen’s was established in 1147; only the west facade remains of the late Romanesque edifice that burned in 1258. A Gothic nave was built

  • Stephansson, Stephan G. (Icelandic poet)

    Stephan G. Stephansson, Icelandic-born poet who wrote virtually all his poems in North America. The son of an impoverished farmer, brought up on the Bible and the sagas, Stephansson emigrated to the United States at the age of 20. He worked as a labourer on farms and in railway construction camps

  • Stephanus family (French printers)

    history of publishing: France: …Bade, Geoffroy Tory, and the Estienne (Stephanus) family, who published without a break for five generations (1502–1674), carried France into the lead in European book production and consolidated the Aldine type of book—compact, inexpensive, and printed in roman and italic types. The golden age of French typography is usually placed…

  • Stephanus of Alexandria (Greek philosopher)

    Platonism: The later Neoplatonists: …known Alexandrian philosopher, the Christian Stephanus, was called to teach in the University of Constantinople.

  • Stephen (king of England)

    Stephen, king of England from 1135 to 1154. He gained the throne by usurpation but failed to consolidate his power during the ensuing civil strife. Stephen was the third son of Stephen, Count of Blois and Chartres, and Adela, daughter of King William I the Conqueror. He was reared by his uncle, K

  • Stephen (prince of Moldavia)

    Stephen, voivod (prince) of Moldavia (1457–1504), who won renown in Europe for his long resistance to the Ottoman Turks. With the help of the Walachian prince Vlad III the Impaler, Stephen secured the throne of Moldavia in 1457. Menaced by powerful neighbours, he successfully repulsed an invasion

  • Stephen (count of Blois)

    Crusades: Preparations for the Crusade: …William II of England) and Stephen of Blois (the son-in-law of William the Conqueror). No king took part in the First Crusade, and the predominantly French-speaking participants came to be known by the Muslims as Franks.

  • Stephen (French crusader)

    Children's Crusade: Origins: …all probability, a shepherd boy, Stephen of Cloyes, and some of his fellow workers took part in them. The enthusiasm generated by these processions gave birth to a popular Crusading movement whose aims were summed up in acclamations shouted out by the pueri: “Lord God, raise up Christendom!” and “Lord…

  • Stephen (II) (unconsecrated pope)

    Stephen (II), unconsecrated pope from March 23 to March 25, 752. He was a priest when he was elected on March 23, 752, to succeed Pope St. Zacharias, but he died of apoplexy two days later without having been consecrated. Because consecration is the act considered necessary to mark the official

  • Stephen Báthory (king of Poland)

    Stephen Báthory, prince of Transylvania (1571–76) and king of Poland (1575–86) who successfully opposed the Habsburg candidate for the Polish throne, defended Poland’s eastern Baltic provinces against Russian incursion, and attempted to form a great state from Poland, Muscovy, and Transylvania. The

  • Stephen F. Austin State University (university, Nacogdoches, Texas, United States)

    Stephen F. Austin State University, public, coeducational institution of higher education in Nacogdoches, Texas, U.S. It comprises the Graduate School, the Arthur Temple College of Forestry, and colleges of applied arts and sciences, business, education, fine arts, liberal arts, and sciences and

  • Stephen F. Austin Teachers College (university, Nacogdoches, Texas, United States)

    Stephen F. Austin State University, public, coeducational institution of higher education in Nacogdoches, Texas, U.S. It comprises the Graduate School, the Arthur Temple College of Forestry, and colleges of applied arts and sciences, business, education, fine arts, liberal arts, and sciences and

  • Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park (park, White Springs, Florida, United States)

    White Springs: The Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park is a 247-acre (100-hectare) park with a museum displaying dioramas, musical instruments, and Foster memorabilia; atop a 200-foot (60-metre) tower is a 97-bell carillon, on which the composer’s works are performed daily. The National Stephen Foster Day Celebration (January) and…

  • Stephen I (king of Hungary)

    Stephen I, ; canonized 1083; feast day August 16), first king of Hungary, who is considered to be the founder of the Hungarian state and one of the most-renowned figures in Hungarian history. Stephen was a member of the árpád dynasty and son of the supreme Magyar chieftain Géza. He was born a pagan

  • Stephen I, Saint (pope)

    Saint Stephen I, ; feast day August 2), pope from 254 to 257. He was a priest when consecrated, probably on May 12, 254, as the successor to Pope St. Lucius. Details of Stephen’s papacy are known principally through three reports contained in the letters of his rival, Bishop St. Cyprian of

  • Stephen II (king of Hungary)

    Hungary: The early kings: …throne for his own son Stephen II (1116–31). Béla II (1131–41), the blinded boy, whom his father’s friends had brought up in secrecy, and Béla’s eldest son, Géza II (1141–62), ruled thereafter unchallenged, but the succession of Géza’s son, Stephen III (1162–72), was disputed by two of his uncles, Ladislas…

  • Stephen II (or III) (pope)

    Stephen II (or III), pope from 752 to 757. He severed ties with the Byzantine Empire and thus became the first temporal sovereign of the newly founded Papal States. He was a deacon when chosen on March 26, 752, as the second successor to Pope St. Zacharias (the first successor, Stephen II, had died

  • Stephen II Nemanja (king of Serbia)

    Serbia: The Golden Age: …in favour of his son Stefan (known as Prvoven?ani, the “First-Crowned”), who in 1217 secured from Pope Honorius III the title of “king of Serbia, Dalmatia, and Bosnia.” Under the Nemanji? dynasty, which was to rule the Serb lands for the next 200 years, a powerful state emerged to dominate…

  • Stephen III (king of Hungary)

    Hungary: The early kings: …the succession of Géza’s son, Stephen III (1162–72), was disputed by two of his uncles, Ladislas II (1162–63) and Stephen IV (1163–65). Happily, the death of Stephen IV exhausted the supply of uncles, and Stephen III’s brother, Béla III (1173–96), had no domestic rivals to the throne. However, the short…

  • Stephen III (or IV) (pope)

    Stephen III (or IV), pope from August 768 to 772. After the death in 767 of Pope St. Paul I, the papal throne was coveted by temporal rulers. Duke Toto of Nepi caused his brother Constantine (II), a layman, to be elected pope. The Lombard king Desiderius dispatched to Rome troops that killed Toto

  • Stephen IV (king of Hungary)

    Hungary: The early kings: …uncles, Ladislas II (1162–63) and Stephen IV (1163–65). Happily, the death of Stephen IV exhausted the supply of uncles, and Stephen III’s brother, Béla III (1173–96), had no domestic rivals to the throne. However, the short reign of Béla’s elder son, Emeric (1196–1204), was spent largely in disputes with his…

  • Stephen IV (or V) (pope)

    Stephen IV (or V), pope from June 816 to January 817. Of noble birth, he succeeded Pope St. Leo III in June 816. Immediately after his consecration he ordered the Romans to swear fidelity to the Carolingian emperor Louis I the Pious, whom he informed of his election and asked to meet in Gaul. Louis

  • Stephen IX (or X) (pope)

    Stephen IX (or X), pope from August 1057 to March 1058, one of the key pontiffs to begin the Gregorian Reform. The brother of Duke Godfrey of Lorraine, he studied at Liège, where he became archdeacon. Under his cousin Pope Leo IX he became a prime papal adviser and a member of the inner circle that

  • Stephen of Blois (king of England)

    Stephen, king of England from 1135 to 1154. He gained the throne by usurpation but failed to consolidate his power during the ensuing civil strife. Stephen was the third son of Stephen, Count of Blois and Chartres, and Adela, daughter of King William I the Conqueror. He was reared by his uncle, K

  • Stephen of Bourbon (French Dominican)

    Pope Joan: …by the 13th-century French Dominican Stephen of Bourbon, who dated Joan’s election c. 1100. In this account the nameless pontiff was a clever scribe who became a papal notary and later was elected pope; pregnant at the time of her election, she gave birth during the procession to the Lateran,…

  • Stephen of Cloyes (French crusader)

    Children's Crusade: Origins: …all probability, a shepherd boy, Stephen of Cloyes, and some of his fellow workers took part in them. The enthusiasm generated by these processions gave birth to a popular Crusading movement whose aims were summed up in acclamations shouted out by the pueri: “Lord God, raise up Christendom!” and “Lord…

  • Stephen of Decani (king of Serbia)

    Stefan Du?an: Background and early years: …Du?an was the son of Stefan Uro? III, who was the eldest son of the reigning king, Stefan Uro? II Milutin. While Du?an was still a boy, his father, who governed the maritime provinces of the Serbian state, rebelled against his own father. Milutin took him prisoner, blinded him in…

  • Stephen of Garland (French official)

    France: The monarchy: In a notorious case, Stephen of Garland tried to claim the seneschalsy as his property and for a time even held three offices at once; but this abuse was soon remedied and taught caution to Louis VI and his successors. The chancellor drafted the king’s decrees and privileges with…

  • Stephen of Perm, Saint (Russian Orthodox missionary)

    Saint Stephen of Perm, ; feast day April 26), one of the most successful and dynamic missionaries of the Russian Orthodox Church. During the 13th and 14th centuries, the Russian Orthodox Church expanded northward and eastward and succeeded in establishing monasteries at Sarai and at Lake Ladoga to

  • Stephen the Great (prince of Moldavia)

    Stephen, voivod (prince) of Moldavia (1457–1504), who won renown in Europe for his long resistance to the Ottoman Turks. With the help of the Walachian prince Vlad III the Impaler, Stephen secured the throne of Moldavia in 1457. Menaced by powerful neighbours, he successfully repulsed an invasion

  • Stephen Uro? II (king of Serbia)

    Stefan Du?an: Background and early years: …reigning king, Stefan Uro? II Milutin. While Du?an was still a boy, his father, who governed the maritime provinces of the Serbian state, rebelled against his own father. Milutin took him prisoner, blinded him in order to make him unfit to claim the throne, and about 1314 exiled him to…

  • Stephen Uro? III (king of Serbia)

    Stefan Du?an: Background and early years: …Du?an was the son of Stefan Uro? III, who was the eldest son of the reigning king, Stefan Uro? II Milutin. While Du?an was still a boy, his father, who governed the maritime provinces of the Serbian state, rebelled against his own father. Milutin took him prisoner, blinded him in…

  • Stephen Uro? IV (emperor of Serbia)

    Stefan Du?an, king of Serbia (1331–46) and “Emperor of the Serbs, Greeks, and Albanians” (1346–55), the greatest ruler of medieval Serbia, who promoted his nation’s influence and gave his people a new code of laws. Stefan Du?an was the son of Stefan Uro? III, who was the eldest son of the reigning

  • Stephen V (king of Hungary)

    Stephen V, king of Hungary (1270–72), the eldest son of Béla IV. In 1262, as crown prince, he compelled his father, whom he had assisted in the Bohemian war, to surrender 29 counties to him, virtually dividing Hungary into two kingdoms; while afterward he seized the southern banate of Macso, which

  • Stephen V (or VI) (pope)

    Stephen V (or VI), pope from 885 to 891 whose pontificate witnessed the disintegration of the Carolingian Empire and intermittent struggles for the Italian crown. Of noble birth, he was created cardinal by Pope Marinus I and was elected on May 17, 885, to succeed Pope St. Adrian III. Although

  • Stephen VI (or VII) (pope)

    Stephen VI (or VII) , pope from May 896 to August 897. The era in which he was elected as the successor to Pope Boniface VI was torn by factions led by Roman aristocrats and by rulers of Naples, Benevento, Tuscany, and Spoleto (of whose ruling family Stephen was a member). Guy, duke of Spoleto, had

  • Stephen VII (or VIII) (pope)

    Stephen VII (or VIII), pope from 928 to 931. As cardinal priest of St. Anastasia, Rome, he was active in the administration of the Roman Church before his consecration in December 928 as Pope Leo VI’s successor. His election was probably influenced by Marozia, senatrix of Rome, whose powerful

  • Stephen VIII (or IX) (pope)

    Stephen VIII (or IX), pope from 939 to 942. Educated in Germany, he became cardinal priest of the Roman Church of SS. Silvester and Martin. He was elected pope on July 14, 939, to succeed Leo VII. Because Duke Alberic II of Spoleto, virtual dictator of Rome, dominated his pontificate, Stephen had

  • Stephen’s woodrat (rodent)

    woodrat: …three species exhibit dietary specialization: Stephen’s woodrat (N. stephensi) subsists almost entirely on juniper sprigs, and N. albigula and N. lepida feed mostly on prickly pear, cholla cacti, and yucca plants.

  • Stephen, Adeline Virginia (British writer)

    Virginia Woolf, English writer whose novels, through their nonlinear approaches to narrative, exerted a major influence on the genre. While she is best known for her novels, especially Mrs. Dalloway (1925) and To the Lighthouse (1927), Woolf also wrote pioneering essays on artistic theory, literary

  • Stephen, Saint (king of Hungary)

    Stephen I, ; canonized 1083; feast day August 16), first king of Hungary, who is considered to be the founder of the Hungarian state and one of the most-renowned figures in Hungarian history. Stephen was a member of the árpád dynasty and son of the supreme Magyar chieftain Géza. He was born a pagan

  • Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames, 1st Baronet (British law scholar)

    Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, 1st Baronet, British legal historian, Anglo-Indian administrator, judge, and author noted for his criminal-law reform proposals. His Indictable Offences Bill (late 1870s), though never enacted in Great Britain, has continued to influence attempts to recast the criminal

  • Stephen, Sir Leslie (British critic)

    Sir Leslie Stephen, English critic, man of letters, and first editor of the Dictionary of National Biography. A member of a distinguished intellectual family, Stephen was educated at Eton, at King’s College, London, and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, where he was elected to a fellowship in 1854 and

  • Stephen, St. (Christian martyr)

    St. Stephen, ; feast day December 26), Christian deacon in Jerusalem and the first Christian martyr, whose apology before the Sanhedrin (Acts of the Apostles 7) points to a distinct strand of belief in early Christianity. His defense of his faith before the rabbinic court enraged his Jewish

  • Stephen, Vanessa (British painter and designer)

    Vanessa Bell, British painter, designer, and founding member of the Bloomsbury group who was known for her colourful portraits and still-life paintings and for her dust-jacket designs. Bell was born into a Victorian upper-middle-class literary family, daughter of literary critic Sir Leslie Stephen

  • Stephens, Alexander H. (vice president of Confederate States of America)

    Alexander H. Stephens, politician who served as vice president of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–65). Called “Little Ellick” by his colleagues because he weighed only about 100 pounds, Stephens was admitted to the bar in 1834. Though plagued by infirmities, he

  • Stephens, Alexander Hamilton (vice president of Confederate States of America)

    Alexander H. Stephens, politician who served as vice president of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–65). Called “Little Ellick” by his colleagues because he weighed only about 100 pounds, Stephens was admitted to the bar in 1834. Though plagued by infirmities, he

  • Stephens, Alfred George (Australian literary critic and journalist)

    Alfred George Stephens, Australian literary critic and journalist whose writings in newspapers and periodicals set standards for Australian literature. He is considered Australia’s pioneer man of letters. As a youth Stephens was apprenticed to a Sydney printer, and he later became a journalist.

  • Stephens, Alice Barber (American illustrator)

    Alice Barber Stephens, American illustrator whose work appeared regularly in the most popular books and magazines of her day. Alice Barber grew up in New Jersey and in Philadelphia. She began drawing at an early age, and in 1870, while still attending public school, she began taking classes at the

  • Stephens, Ann Sophia (American editor and author)

    Ann Sophia Stephens, American editor and writer whose melodramatic novels, popular in serialized form, gained an even wider readership as some of the first "dime novels." Ann Winterbotham knew from childhood that she wanted to be a writer. In 1831 she married Edward Stephens and settled in

  • Stephens, Helen (American athlete)

    Helen Stephens, American runner who won two gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin and was undefeated in official competition. Known as the Fulton Flash, Stephens had won nine Amateur Athletic Union track-and-field titles by the age of 18. At the 1936 Olympic Games, Stephens won the 100-metre

  • Stephens, Jack (set designer and art director)
  • Stephens, James (Irish writer)

    James Stephens, Irish poet and storyteller whose pantheistic philosophy is revealed in his fairy tales set in the Dublin slums of his childhood and in his compassionate poems about animals. Stephens was working as a solicitor’s clerk and educating himself when he met the Irish poet AE (George

  • Stephens, James (Irish rebel)

    Fenian raids: …O’Mahony and in Ireland by James Stephens (1858).

  • Stephens, Jody (American musician)

    Big Star: …19, 2010, Weatherford, Texas), and Jody Stephens (b. Oct. 4, 1952, Memphis).

  • Stephens, John Lloyd (American archaeologist)

    John Lloyd Stephens, American traveler and archaeologist whose exploration of Maya ruins in Central America and Mexico (1839–40 and 1841–42) generated the archaeology of Middle America. Bored with the practice of law and advised to travel for reasons of health, in 1834 he set out on a journey that

  • Stephens, John Roger (American musician)

    John Legend, American singer-songwriter and pianist who achieved success in the early 21st century with his fusion of R&B and soul music. He also was a sought-after session musician. Legend was the first African American man to win all four major North American entertainment awards (EGOT: Emmy,

  • Stephens, Martin (British actor)

    The Innocents: Cast:

  • Stephens, Olin James, II (American architect)

    Olin James Stephens II, American naval architect who was designer, skipper, and navigator of the yacht Dorade, the winner of the 1931 Transatlantic and Fastnet races, and who was codesigner and relief helmsman of the J-class Ranger, the winner of the America’s Cup in 1937. The Sparkman & Stephens

  • Stephens, Sir Robert (British actor)

    Sir Robert Stephens, British actor who was a star with the National Theatre in the 1960s; after a period of personal and professional decline following a divorce from actress Maggie Smith in 1975, he made a spectacular comeback in the 1990s playing Falstaff and King Lear for the Royal Shakespeare

  • Stephens, Uriah Smith (American social reformer)

    Uriah Smith Stephens, American utopian reformer who was instrumental in founding the Knights of Labor, the first national labour union in the United States. Stephens wanted to become a Baptist minister, but family financial reverses (largely brought about by the Panic of 1837) led him into an

  • Stephens, Woodford Cefis (American horse trainer)

    Woody Stephens, American horse trainer (born Sept. 1, 1913, Stanton, Ky.—died Aug. 22, 1998, Miami Lakes, Fla.), was one of the most accomplished and respected trainers in thoroughbred racing in the United States and was best known for winning the Belmont Stakes five consecutive times, beginning i

  • Stephens, Woody (American horse trainer)

    Woody Stephens, American horse trainer (born Sept. 1, 1913, Stanton, Ky.—died Aug. 22, 1998, Miami Lakes, Fla.), was one of the most accomplished and respected trainers in thoroughbred racing in the United States and was best known for winning the Belmont Stakes five consecutive times, beginning i

  • Stephenson, Frank (American designer)

    industrial design: Postmodern design and its aftermath: carmaker BMW enlisted American designer Frank Stephenson to create the new Mini (2002), a revival of the iconic British car of the 1960s.

  • Stephenson, George (British inventor)

    George Stephenson, English engineer and principal inventor of the railroad locomotive. Stephenson was the son of a mechanic who operated a Newcomen atmospheric-steam engine that was used to pump out a coal mine at Newcastle upon Tyne. The boy went to work at an early age and without formal

  • Stephenson, George Robert (British railroad engineer)

    George Robert Stephenson, pioneer English railroad engineer who assisted his uncle George Stephenson and his cousin Robert Stephenson in their work. Educated at King William College, Isle of Man, he entered his uncle’s employ on the Manchester and Leeds Railway in 1837, later served as consultant

  • Stephenson, John Edward Drayton (Irish militant)

    Sean MacStiofain, (John Edward Drayton Stephenson), British-born Irish militant (born Feb. 17, 1928, London, Eng.—died May 17, 2001, Navan, County Meath, Ire.), was the first chief of staff of the Provisional Irish Republican Army after the hard-line militarist wing’s split from the Official IRA i

  • Stephenson, Robert (British engineer)

    Robert Stephenson, outstanding English Victorian civil engineer and builder of many long-span railroad bridges, most notably the Britannia Bridge over the Menai Strait, North Wales. He was the only son of George Stephenson, inventor of the railroad locomotive. He was educated at Bruce’s Academy,

  • Stephenson, William Samuel (Canadian industrialist)

    William Stephenson, Canadian-born millionaire industrialist whose role as Britain’s intelligence chief in the Western Hemisphere in World War II was chronicled in A Man Called Intrepid (1979). The son of a lumber-mill owner, Stephenson dropped out of college to serve in the Royal Canadian Engineers

  • Stepnoy (Russia)

    Elista, city, capital of Kalmykia republic, southwestern Russia. It was founded in 1865 and became a city in 1930. In 1944, when the Kalmyks were exiled by Joseph Stalin for their alleged collaboration with the Germans, the republic was dissolved and the city became known as Stepnoy (“Steppe”). The

  • Stepnoy Korol Lir (story by Turgenev)

    A Lear of the Steppes, short story by Ivan Turgenev, published in 1870 as “Stepnoy Korol Lir”; it has also been translated as “King Lear of the Steppes.” A loose adaptation of William Shakespeare’s tragedy King Lear, set in the Russian countryside, the story concerns the disrespectful treatment the

  • Steppe (work by Chekhov)

    Anton Chekhov: Literary maturity: …question—a long story entitled “Steppe”—he at last turned his back on comic fiction. “Steppe,” an autobiographical work describing a journey in the Ukraine as seen through the eyes of a child, is the first among more than 50 stories published in a variety of journals and selections between 1888…

  • steppe (grassland)

    Asia: The steppes: The animal life of the steppes differs as much from that of the taiga as from that of the tundra. It includes many burrowing rodents, such as jerboas, marmots, and pikas, and larger mammals, such as numerous antelope. The steppes were the original home…

  • steppe bison (extinct mammal)

    bison: …of what was likely a steppe bison (Bison cf. priscus) from the Yukon suggested that the first bison in North America migrated from Asia across the Bering Land Bridge sometime between 95,000 and 135,000 years ago before spreading rapidly throughout the continent. Some authorities distinguish two subspecies of American bison,…

  • steppe cat (mammal)

    Pallas’s cat, (Felis manul), small, long-haired cat (family Felidae) native to deserts and rocky, mountainous regions from Tibet to Siberia. It was named for the naturalist Peter Simon Pallas. The Pallas’s cat is a soft-furred animal about the size of a house cat and is pale silvery gray or light

  • steppe climate

    alluvial fan: …more prominent in arid and semiarid regions, however, and generally are regarded as characteristic desert landforms. This is particularly true in the basin-and-range type of areas of parts of Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the western United States, Chile and Peru, Sinai and western Arabia, and Central Asia, where the basic landscape…

  • steppe fox (mammal)

    fox: Classification: corsac (corsac, or steppe, fox) Small and social steppe-dwelling fox that inhabits steppes and semideserts of eastern Eurasia; coat yellowish gray or brown to reddish gray; body similar in form to the red fox, but with larger legs and ears. V. ferrilata (Tibetan fox) Short-eared, short-tailed…

  • steppe hedgehog (mammal)

    hedgehog: …hedgehogs (genus Hemiechinus), and two steppe hedgehogs (genus Mesechinus). European hedgehogs are kept as pets, as is the African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

  • steppe lemming (rodent)

    lemming: …wood lemming (Myopus schisticolor) and steppe lemming (Lagurus lagurus) are the smallest, measuring 8 to 12 cm (3.1 to 4.7 inches) in body length and weighing 20 to 30 grams (0.7 to 1.0 ounce). The other species are larger, weighing 30 to 112 grams, with bodies 10 to 22 cm…

  • steppe murrain (animal disease)

    Rinderpest, an acute, highly contagious viral disease of ruminant animals, primarily cattle, that was once common in Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East. Rinderpest was a devastating affliction of livestock and wildlife, and for centuries it was a major threat to food production

  • steppe pika (mammal)

    pika: The steppe pika (O. pusilla) has been reported to have litters of as many as 13 young and breed up to five times in a year.

  • steppe polecat (mammal)

    polecat: Much lighter fur distinguishes the masked, or steppe, polecat (M. p. eversmanni) of Asia.

  • Steppe, the (geographical area, Eurasia)

    The Steppe, belt of grassland that extends some 5,000 miles (8,000 kilometres) from Hungary in the west through Ukraine and Central Asia to Manchuria in the east. Mountain ranges interrupt the steppe, dividing it into distinct segments; but horsemen could cross such barriers easily, so that steppe

  • steppe-desert (geography)

    Asia: Semidesert and desert: Through inner Kazakhstan and Mongolia stretches a zone of semidesert, and in Middle Asia, the Junggar (Dzungarian) Basin, the Takla Makan Desert, and Inner Mongolia, there is a belt of temperate-zone deserts. A belt of subtropical deserts extends through the

  • stepped leader (lightning)

    thunderstorm: Initial stroke: …to thousands of amperes, the stepped leader propagates toward the ground at an average velocity of 1.5 × 105 metres per second, or about one two-thousandth the speed of light. It is called a stepped leader because of its downward-moving “stepped” pulses of luminosity. Diameter estimates for the stepped leader…

  • stepped lending (finance)

    microcredit: …approach to Grameen-style lending is stepped lending, in which a borrower begins with a very small loan, repays it, and qualifies for successive loans at higher values.

  • stepped lens

    Fresnel lens, succession of concentric rings, each consisting of an element of a simple lens, assembled in proper relationship on a flat surface to provide a short focal length. The Fresnel lens is used particularly in lighthouses and searchlights to concentrate the light into a relatively narrow

  • stepped pyramid (pyramid, ?aqqārah, Memphis, Egypt)

    Heb-Sed: …the Heb-Sed court in the Step Pyramid complex of Djoser, in ?aqqārah, much information has been gleaned about the festival. The king first presented offerings to a series of gods and then was crowned, first with the white crown of Upper Egypt and then with the red crown of Lower…

  • Stepped stage (theatrical device)

    theatre: Production aspects of Expressionist theatre: …earned his stage the name Treppenbühne (“stepped stage”). He utilized screens in the manner advocated by Craig, and his productions illustrated a plastic concept of stage setting, which allowed the action to flow freely with minimum hindrance. Some of Jessner’s productions relied heavily on steps and levels for this plasticity,…

  • stepped-index fibre

    industrial glass: Properties: …different refractive properties, are called stepped-index fibres. For various reasons, superior performance can be obtained from a graded-index fibre, in which the glass composition, and hence the refractive indices, change progressively, without abrupt transition, between the core and the outer diameter.

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