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  • Stevens, Jimmy (Vanuatuan politician)

    Vanuatu: History: …unsuccessful attempt in mid-1980 by Jimmy Stevens, the Na-Griamel Party leader, to establish the independence of the island of Espiritu Santo from the rest of the group, the New Hebrides became independent within the Commonwealth under the name of the Republic of Vanuatu on July 30, 1980; the next month…

  • Stevens, John (American inventor and lawyer)

    John Stevens, American lawyer, inventor, and promoter of the development of steam power for transportation. His petition to the U.S. Congress resulted in the Patent Law of 1790, the foundation of the present U.S. patent system. In 1776 Stevens became a captain in the American Revolutionary army and

  • Stevens, John C. (American shipwright)

    yacht: Yachting and yacht clubs: In 1844 John C. Stevens founded the New York Yacht Club aboard his schooner Gimcrack.

  • Stevens, John C. (American architect)

    Shingle style: …theoretician of the style was John C. Stevens (1855–1940), author of Examples of American Domestic Architecture (1889). Notable architects working in the Shingle style included William Ralph Emerson, H.H. Richardson, and Bruce Price. The Price version of the Shingle style, best seen in his homes at Tuxedo Park, N.Y. (1885),…

  • Stevens, John Christopher (American diplomat)

    2012 Benghazi attacks: The attacks: envoy John Christopher (“Chris”) Stevens first arrived in Benghazi on April 5, 2011, in an outreach mission to the Libyan rebels. He was appointed U.S. ambassador to Libya in May 2012 and was based in Tripoli. On September 10, 2012, he went to the U.S. compound…

  • Stevens, John Frank (American engineer)

    John Frank Stevens, American civil engineer and railroad executive who, as chief engineer of the Panama Canal from late 1905 to April 1907, laid the basis for that project’s successful completion. Stevens, who had only limited formal education, became an engineer through practical experience and

  • Stevens, John Paul (United States jurist)

    John Paul Stevens, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1975 to 2010. Stevens, who traced his American ancestry to the mid-17th century, attended the University of Chicago, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1941. During World War II he served in the

  • Stevens, John Peters (American merchant)

    J. P. Stevens, merchant who founded J.P. Stevens, one of the biggest firms in the American textile industry. John Stevens’ grandfather, Nathaniel Stevens, started in the textile industry during the War of 1812. Nathaniel’s son (John’s uncle) Moses took over the textile company and made it one of

  • Stevens, Margaret Dean (American author)

    Bess Genevra Streeter Aldrich, American author whose prolific output of novels and short stories evoked the American Plains and the people who settled them. Bess Streeter graduated from Iowa State Teachers College (now the University of Northern Iowa) in 1901 and then taught school for five years.

  • Stevens, Mina (American astronomer)

    Williamina Paton Stevens Fleming, American astronomer who pioneered in the classification of stellar spectra. Mina Stevens was educated in public schools and from age 14 was a teacher as well as student. In May 1877 she married James O. Fleming, with whom she immigrated to the United States and

  • Stevens, Nettie (American biologist and geneticist)

    Nettie Stevens, American biologist and geneticist who was one of the first scientists to find that sex is determined by a particular configuration of chromosomes. Stevens’s early life is somewhat obscure, although it is known that she taught school and attended the State Normal School (now

  • Stevens, Nettie Maria (American biologist and geneticist)

    Nettie Stevens, American biologist and geneticist who was one of the first scientists to find that sex is determined by a particular configuration of chromosomes. Stevens’s early life is somewhat obscure, although it is known that she taught school and attended the State Normal School (now

  • Stevens, Ris? (American opera singer)

    Ris? Stevens, (Ris? Gus Steenberg), American opera singer (born June 11, 1913, Bronx, N.Y.—died March 20, 2013, New York, N.Y.), attained superstar status onstage, on television and radio, and in films with her rich, velvety mezzo-soprano vocals. She was especially remembered for her performances

  • Stevens, Robert Livingston (American engineer)

    Robert Livingston Stevens, U.S. engineer and ship designer who invented the widely used inverted-T railroad rail and the railroad spike. He tested the first steamboat to use screw propellers, built by his father, the noted inventor John Stevens. He also assisted his father in the construction of

  • Stevens, Roger Lacey (American theatrical producer)

    Roger Lacey Stevens, American theatrical producer of such Broadway successes as West Side Story, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and A Man for All Seasons and fund-raiser who helped create and went on to lead Washington’s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (b. March 12, 1910, Detroit, Mich.--d.

  • Stevens, Ruby (American actress)

    Barbara Stanwyck, American motion-picture and television actress who played a wide variety of roles in more than 80 films but was best in dramatic parts as a strong-willed, independent woman of complex character. Stanwyck was effectively orphaned as a small child when her mother died and her father

  • Stevens, Siaka (president of Sierra Leone)

    Siaka Stevens, Sierra Leonean prime minister (1967 and 1968–71) and president (1971–85) who survived in office despite attempted coups, a burdensome national debt, and almost continual charges of gross mismanagement and governmental corruption. Stevens was a police officer, mine worker, and railway

  • Stevens, Stella (American actress)

    The Nutty Professor: …lovely young coed (played by Stella Stevens).

  • Stevens, Sufjan (American musician)

    Justin Peck: …set to the music of Sufjan Stevens, and Paz de la Jolla (2013), an exuberant number for 18 dancers inspired by California’s beach culture.

  • Stevens, Ted (United States senator)

    Ted Stevens, American politician who served as a Republican U.S. senator from Alaska (1968–2009). Stevens served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles with a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1947 and from Harvard Law

  • Stevens, Thaddeus (American politician)

    Thaddeus Stevens, U.S. Radical Republican congressional leader during Reconstruction (1865–77) who battled for freedmen’s rights and insisted on stern requirements for readmission of Southern states into the Union after the Civil War (1861–65). Admitted to the Maryland bar, he moved to Pennsylvania

  • Stevens, Theodore Fulton (United States senator)

    Ted Stevens, American politician who served as a Republican U.S. senator from Alaska (1968–2009). Stevens served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles with a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1947 and from Harvard Law

  • Stevens, Thomas Terry Hoar (British actor)

    Terry-Thomas, thickly mustachioed, gap-toothed British comic actor noted for his film roles as a pretentious, scheming twit. Terry-Thomas’s career progressed from music hall and cabaret performances to small film parts and radio, then to television, and finally to movie lead roles. He attended

  • Stevens, Wallace (American poet)

    Wallace Stevens, American poet whose work explores the interaction of reality and what man can make of reality in his mind. It was not until late in life that Stevens was read at all widely or recognized as a major poet by more than a few. Stevens attended Harvard for three years, worked briefly

  • Stevens, Williamina Paton (American astronomer)

    Williamina Paton Stevens Fleming, American astronomer who pioneered in the classification of stellar spectra. Mina Stevens was educated in public schools and from age 14 was a teacher as well as student. In May 1877 she married James O. Fleming, with whom she immigrated to the United States and

  • Stevens-Duryea (automobile)

    Charles E. Duryea and J. Frank Duryea: …three-wheeled, and Frank developed the Stevens-Duryea, one of the best known of the early standard makes, a high-priced limousine that continued in production into the 1920s.

  • Stevenson amendment (United States [1973])

    20th-century international relations: The distraction of Watergate: The Stevenson and Jackson–Vanik amendments imposed conditions (regarding Soviet policy on Jewish emigration) on administration plans to expand trade with the U.S.S.R. In 1974–75 Congress prevented the President from involving the United States in a crisis in Cyprus or aiding anti-Communist forces in Angola and passed…

  • Stevenson, Adlai (vice president of United States)

    Adlai Stevenson, 23rd vice president of the United States (1893–97) in the Democratic administration of President Grover Cleveland. Stevenson was the son of John Turner Stevenson, a tobacco farmer, and Eliza Ann Ewing. After studying law, he began his practice in Metamora, Ill. Stimulated by the

  • Stevenson, Adlai E. (American statesman)

    Adlai E. Stevenson, U.S. political leader and diplomat who helped found the United Nations (UN), where he served as chief U.S. delegate (1961–65); he is mainly remembered by his countrymen as the eloquent, witty, but unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1952 and 1956. Moving with

  • Stevenson, Adlai Ewing (vice president of United States)

    Adlai Stevenson, 23rd vice president of the United States (1893–97) in the Democratic administration of President Grover Cleveland. Stevenson was the son of John Turner Stevenson, a tobacco farmer, and Eliza Ann Ewing. After studying law, he began his practice in Metamora, Ill. Stimulated by the

  • Stevenson, Adlai Ewing (American statesman)

    Adlai E. Stevenson, U.S. political leader and diplomat who helped found the United Nations (UN), where he served as chief U.S. delegate (1961–65); he is mainly remembered by his countrymen as the eloquent, witty, but unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1952 and 1956. Moving with

  • Stevenson, Adlai Ewing, III (United States senator)

    Adlai E. Stevenson: His eldest son, Adlai E. Stevenson III, was elected to the U.S. Senate from Illinois in 1970 and again in 1974 (retiring in 1981), after having served in the state legislature (1965–67) and as state treasurer (1967–70).

  • Stevenson, Charles (American philosopher)

    ethics: Emotivism: …developed by the American philosopher Charles Stevenson (1908–79) in Ethics and Language (1945). As the titles of the books of this period suggest, moral philosophers (and philosophers in other fields as well) were now paying more attention to language and to the different ways in which it could be used.…

  • Stevenson, Matilda Coxe (American ethnologist)

    Matilda Coxe Stevenson, American ethnologist who became one of the major contributors to her field, particularly in the study of Zuni religion. Matilda Evans grew up in Washington, D.C. She was educated at Miss Anable’s Academy in Philadelphia. In April 1872 she married James Stevenson, a geologist

  • Stevenson, Robert (British engineer)

    Robert Stevenson, civil engineer who in 1797 succeeded his stepfather, Thomas Smith, as a member of the Scottish Lighthouse Board. In that capacity until 1843, he designed and built lighthouses (1797–1843) and invented intermittent and flashing lights as well as the hydrophore (an instrument for

  • Stevenson, Robert (American director)

    Robert Stevenson, British-born American director best known for his numerous Disney movies, which included such classics as Johnny Tremain (1957) and Mary Poppins (1964). After studying at the University of Cambridge, Stevenson embarked on a film career in Britain. He worked as a screenwriter

  • Stevenson, Robert Louis (British author)

    Robert Louis Stevenson, Scottish essayist, poet, and author of fiction and travel books, best known for his novels Treasure Island (1881), Kidnapped (1886), Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and The Master of Ballantrae (1889). Stevenson’s biography of Pierre-Jean de Béranger appeared

  • Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour (British author)

    Robert Louis Stevenson, Scottish essayist, poet, and author of fiction and travel books, best known for his novels Treasure Island (1881), Kidnapped (1886), Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and The Master of Ballantrae (1889). Stevenson’s biography of Pierre-Jean de Béranger appeared

  • Stevenson, Teófilo (Cuban boxer)

    Teófilo Stevenson, Cuban heavyweight boxer who became the first fighter to win three Olympic gold medals in one weight class and one of only two to win three World Amateur Boxing titles. The 6-ft 3-in (1.9-m) Stevenson shocked the boxing world in the quarterfinals of the 1972 Olympic Games in

  • stevia (plant)

    Stevia, (Stevia rebaudiana), flowering plant in the aster family (Asteraceae), grown for its sweet-tasting leaves. The plant is native to Paraguay, where it has a long history of use by the Guaraní people. The leaves contain a number of sweet-tasting chemicals known as steviol glycosides, which can

  • Stevia rebaudiana (plant)

    Stevia, (Stevia rebaudiana), flowering plant in the aster family (Asteraceae), grown for its sweet-tasting leaves. The plant is native to Paraguay, where it has a long history of use by the Guaraní people. The leaves contain a number of sweet-tasting chemicals known as steviol glycosides, which can

  • Stevie Wonder’s Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants (album by Wonder)

    Stevie Wonder: …and overambitious extended work called Stevie Wonder’s Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Thereafter his recordings became sporadic and often lacked focus, although his concerts were never less than rousing. The best of his work formed a vital link between the classic rhythm-and-blues and soul performers of the 1950s…

  • Stevin, Simon (Flemish mathematician)

    Simon Stevin, Flemish mathematician who helped standardize the use of decimal fractions and aided in refuting Aristotle’s doctrine that heavy bodies fall faster than light ones. Stevin was a merchant’s clerk in Antwerp for a time and eventually rose to become commissioner of public works and

  • steviol (chemical compound)

    stevia: …of sweet-tasting chemicals known as steviol glycosides, which can be used fresh or dried to sweeten beverages or desserts or can be commercially processed into powdered noncaloric sweeteners. Steviol glycosides, particularly the chemicals stevioside and rebaudioside A, can be more than 300 times sweeter than table sugar and are nonglycemic…

  • stevioside (chemistry)

    Paraguay: Plant and animal life: …export of medicinal teas and stevioside, which is extracted from the Stevia rebaudiana plant and used as a low-calorie natural sweetener.

  • Stevns Klint (cliff, Zealand, Denmark)

    Zealand: …chalk and limestone cliffs at Stevns Klint—which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2014—but is generally obscured by thick morainic deposits forming a gently undulating landscape. Its irregular coastline is broken by Ise Fjord and Roskilde Fjord. The northern part of the island is well-wooded and lake-strewn, with…

  • stew (food)

    Stew, dish of meat, poultry, or fish, usually with vegetables, cooked in liquid in a closed vessel over low heat. Prepared properly, the stew never boils, but simmers at about 190° F (88° C), a process that tenderizes tougher foods and mingles flavours. Meats to be stewed are cut in cubes, fowls

  • steward (royal official)

    public administration: Early systems: …for the provision of wine), steward (responsible for feasting arrangements), chamberlain (often charged with receiving and paying out money kept in the royal sleeping chamber), and chancellor (usually a priest with responsibilities for writing and applying the seal in the monarch’s name). With the 13th century a separation began between…

  • steward (shipping personnel)

    ship: Crewing: …at-sea maintenance, and (3) the stewards department, which did the work of a hotel staff for the crew and passengers. The total number of crew varied widely with the function of the ship and with changes in technology. For example, an early 20th-century transatlantic liner might carry 500 stewards, 300…

  • Steward, Emanuel (American boxing trainer)

    Emanuel Steward, American boxing trainer (born July 7, 1944, Bottom Creek, W.Va.—died Oct. 25, 2012, Chicago, Ill.), coached more than 40 champion boxers, including Lennox Lewis, Tommy Hearns, Evander Holyfield, and Wladimir Klitschko, mainly at Detroit’s inner-city Kronk Gym in a 35-year career

  • Steward, Julian (American anthropologist)

    Julian Steward, American anthropologist best known as one of the leading neoevolutionists of the mid-20th century and as the founder of the theory of cultural ecology. He also did studies of the social organization of peasant villages, conducted ethnographic research among the North American

  • Steward, Julian Haynes (American anthropologist)

    Julian Steward, American anthropologist best known as one of the leading neoevolutionists of the mid-20th century and as the founder of the theory of cultural ecology. He also did studies of the social organization of peasant villages, conducted ethnographic research among the North American

  • Stewart Island (island, New Zealand)

    Stewart Island, third largest island of New Zealand, in the southwest Pacific Ocean off the southern tip of South Island. Roughly triangular and measuring 45 by 25 miles (70 by 40 km), the island has a total land area of 674 square miles (1,746 square km). It is generally hilly (rising to 3,215

  • Stewart River (river, Yukon, Canada)

    Yukon River: Physiography and hydrology: The Stewart River, having about the same drainage area as the White River, flows out of the former mining area of Mayo–Keno City to the east. At Dawson the Yukon has an average flow of 74,000 cubic feet (2,095 cubic metres) per second, but there is…

  • Stewart, Alexander (British military officer)

    Battle of Eutaw Springs: …British troops under Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Stewart and American forces commanded by General Nathanael Greene. Greene wished to prevent Stewart from joining General Lord Cornwallis in the event of that leader’s retreat south from Yorktown. About 2,000 American troops, many ill-clad and barefoot, were slightly outnumbered. In the early fighting…

  • Stewart, Alexander Turney (American merchant)

    Alexander Turney Stewart, American textile merchant whose dry-goods store grew into a giant wholesale and retail business. Stewart came to New York City from Ireland as an adolescent. He returned to Ireland a few years later to collect an inheritance, which he used to purchase $3,000 in Irish

  • Stewart, Arabella (English noble)

    Arabella Stuart, English noblewoman whose status as a claimant to the throne of her first cousin King James I (James VI of Scotland) led to her tragic death. The daughter of James’s uncle Charles Stewart, Earl of Lennox, and great-granddaughter of King Henry VIII’s sister Margaret Tudor, Arabella

  • Stewart, Balfour (British meteorologist and geophysicist)

    Balfour Stewart, Scottish meteorologist and geophysicist noted for his studies of terrestrial magnetism and radiant heat. Stewart pursued a mercantile career for 10 years before becoming an assistant at Kew Observatory and later an assistant to James Forbes at Edinburgh University, where Stewart

  • Stewart, Charles Hugh (American photographer)

    Chuck Stewart, (Charles Hugh Stewart), American photographer (born May 21, 1927, Henrietta, Texas—died Jan. 20, 2017, Teaneck, N.J.), was an admired and respected portraitist who produced thousands of intimate black-and-white photos—including many hundreds of album covers—that documented the jazz

  • Stewart, Chuck (American photographer)

    Chuck Stewart, (Charles Hugh Stewart), American photographer (born May 21, 1927, Henrietta, Texas—died Jan. 20, 2017, Teaneck, N.J.), was an admired and respected portraitist who produced thousands of intimate black-and-white photos—including many hundreds of album covers—that documented the jazz

  • Stewart, Donald (American screenwriter)
  • Stewart, Donald Ogden (American actor and writer)

    Donald Ogden Stewart, American humorist, actor, playwright, and screenwriter who won a 1940 Academy Award for his screenplay adaptation of The Philadelphia Story. After graduation from Yale University (1916) Stewart served as chief quartermaster in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force during World War I

  • Stewart, Douglas (New Zealand writer)

    Douglas Stewart, poet, playwright, and critic who helped establish an Australian national tradition through mythical re-creation of the past in his plays. Stewart studied at Victoria University College but left to take up journalism. He later traveled to London to find work in journalism, but

  • Stewart, Douglas Alexander (New Zealand writer)

    Douglas Stewart, poet, playwright, and critic who helped establish an Australian national tradition through mythical re-creation of the past in his plays. Stewart studied at Victoria University College but left to take up journalism. He later traveled to London to find work in journalism, but

  • Stewart, Dugald (British philosopher)

    Dugald Stewart, philosopher and major exponent of the Scottish “common sense” school of philosophy. Educated at the University of Edinburgh, where his father was professor of mathematics, Stewart began teaching there when he was 19. In 1775 he took over his father’s chair and 10 years later was

  • Stewart, Ella Winter (Australian-born journalist)

    Ella Winter Stewart, Australian-born journalist who devoted her life to radical causes, to the peace movement, and to support for struggling writers and artists. After her parents moved to London in 1910, Winter attended the London School of Economics and in 1924 met her first husband, American

  • Stewart, Ellen (American theatre director)

    Ellen Stewart, American theatre director who founded (1961) and for nearly 50 years remained the visionary artistic director of the seminal La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club, an Off-Off-Broadway mainstay known for presenting avant-garde international theatre in New York City’s Lower East Side. In

  • Stewart, Frances Teresa, Duchess of Richmond and Lennox (English mistress)

    Frances Teresa Stuart, duchess of Richmond and Lennox, a favourite mistress of Charles II of Great Britain. The daughter of Walter Stuart (or Stewart), a physician in the household of Queen Henrietta Maria when in exile after the death of her husband, Charles I, in 1649, Frances Stuart was brought

  • Stewart, Harold (Australian author)

    Australian literature: Literature from 1940 to 1970: …the poets James McAuley and Harold Stewart, writing as a deceased mechanic-salesman-poet, parodied what they saw as the meaninglessness of experimental verse, was an indication of the demand for new standards. Similarly Patrick White, a Nobel Prize winner (1973) and the most important and influential of the modern Australian novelists,…

  • Stewart, Henry (British lord)

    Henry Stewart, Lord Darnley, cousin and second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, father of King James I of Great Britain and Ireland (James VI of Scotland), and direct ancestor of all subsequent British sovereigns. Darnley was the son of Matthew Stewart, 4th earl of Lennox, whose pretension to the

  • Stewart, House of (Scottish and English royal family)

    House of Stuart, royal house of Scotland from 1371 and of England from 1603. It was interrupted in 1649 by the establishment of the Commonwealth but was restored in 1660. It ended in 1714, when the British crown passed to the house of Hanover. The first spelling of the family name was undoubtedly

  • Stewart, Isabella (American arts patron)

    Isabella Stewart Gardner, eclectic American socialite and art collector, a patron of many arts, remembered largely for the distinctive collection of European and Asian artworks that she assembled in Boston. Isabella Stewart was the daughter of a wealthy businessman. In 1860 she married John L.

  • Stewart, J. I. M. (British author)

    J.I.M. Stewart, British novelist, literary critic, and educator who created the character of Inspector John Appleby, a British detective known for his suave humour and literary finesse. Stewart was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, and lectured in English at the University of Leeds from 1930 to

  • Stewart, James (American actor)

    James Stewart, major American motion-picture star who was known for his portrayals of diffident but morally resolute characters. Stewart graduated from Princeton University in 1932 with a degree in architecture. He then became part of the University Players, a summer stock company in Falmouth,

  • Stewart, James Maitland (American actor)

    James Stewart, major American motion-picture star who was known for his portrayals of diffident but morally resolute characters. Stewart graduated from Princeton University in 1932 with a degree in architecture. He then became part of the University Players, a summer stock company in Falmouth,

  • Stewart, Jim (American record producer)

    Stax Records: …by country music fiddle player Jim Stewart and his sister Estelle Axton, following a previous false start with Satellite Records, Stax maintained a down-home, family atmosphere during its early years. Black and white musicians and singers worked together in relaxed conditions, where nobody looked at a clock or worried about…

  • Stewart, Jimmy (American actor)

    James Stewart, major American motion-picture star who was known for his portrayals of diffident but morally resolute characters. Stewart graduated from Princeton University in 1932 with a degree in architecture. He then became part of the University Players, a summer stock company in Falmouth,

  • Stewart, John (American singer and songwriter)

    John Coburn Stewart, American singer and songwriter (born Sept. 5, 1939, San Diego, Calif.—died Jan. 19, 2008, San Diego), rose to fame when he wrote the chart-topping hit single “Daydream Believer” (1967) for the pop-rock group the Monkees. Stewart was playing the guitar and banjo and had written

  • Stewart, John Coburn (American singer and songwriter)

    John Coburn Stewart, American singer and songwriter (born Sept. 5, 1939, San Diego, Calif.—died Jan. 19, 2008, San Diego), rose to fame when he wrote the chart-topping hit single “Daydream Believer” (1967) for the pop-rock group the Monkees. Stewart was playing the guitar and banjo and had written

  • Stewart, John Innes Mackinstosh (British author)

    J.I.M. Stewart, British novelist, literary critic, and educator who created the character of Inspector John Appleby, a British detective known for his suave humour and literary finesse. Stewart was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, and lectured in English at the University of Leeds from 1930 to

  • Stewart, John, 2nd duke of Albany (Scottish regent)

    John Stewart, 2nd duke of Albany, regent of Scotland during the reign of James V and advocate of close ties between France and Scotland. His father, Alexander Stewart (c. 1454–85), the 1st duke of Albany of the second creation, died when he was scarcely more than an infant, and he was raised in

  • Stewart, John, 4th Earl of Atoll (Scottish noble)

    John Stewart, 4th earl of Atholl, Roman Catholic Scottish noble, sometime supporter of Mary, Queen of Scots. The son of John Stewart, the 3rd Earl of Atholl in the Stewart line (whom he succeeded in 1542), Atholl was particularly trusted by Mary Stuart; but, after the murder of Mary’s husband Lord

  • Stewart, John, Earl of Carrick (king of Scotland)

    Robert III, king of Scots from 1390, after having ruled Scotland in the name of his father, Robert II, from 1384 to 1388. Physically disabled by a kick from a horse, he was never the real ruler of Scotland during the years of his kingship. The eldest son of Robert the Steward (the future Robert II)

  • Stewart, Jon (American comedian)

    Jon Stewart, American comedian best known for hosting (1999–2015) the satiric television news program The Daily Show. Stewart graduated from the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1984 and then held a series of odd jobs before pursuing a career in comedy. In the late 1980s he

  • Stewart, La Belle (English mistress)

    Frances Teresa Stuart, duchess of Richmond and Lennox, a favourite mistress of Charles II of Great Britain. The daughter of Walter Stuart (or Stewart), a physician in the household of Queen Henrietta Maria when in exile after the death of her husband, Charles I, in 1649, Frances Stuart was brought

  • Stewart, Lynne (American attorney)

    Omar Abdel Rahman: …April 2002 Abdel Rahman’s attorney, Lynne Stewart, was arrested and charged with helping the cleric pass messages to his followers. Stewart was convicted in February 2005 and ultimately sentenced to 10 years in prison.

  • Stewart, Margery (American actress and pinup girl)

    Margie Stewart , (Margery Stewart; Margie Stewart Johnson), American actress and pinup girl (born Dec. 14, 1919, Wabash, Ind.—died April 26, 2012, Burbank, Calif.), was selected by the U.S. Army as its official and only World War II poster girl. Her wholesome image was emblazoned on 12 posters (94

  • Stewart, Margie (American actress and pinup girl)

    Margie Stewart , (Margery Stewart; Margie Stewart Johnson), American actress and pinup girl (born Dec. 14, 1919, Wabash, Ind.—died April 26, 2012, Burbank, Calif.), was selected by the U.S. Army as its official and only World War II poster girl. Her wholesome image was emblazoned on 12 posters (94

  • Stewart, Maria W. (American author)

    African American literature: Antebellum literature: …who was a fellow Bostonian, Maria W. Stewart, the first African American woman political writer, issued her Productions of Mrs. Maria W. Stewart in 1835, in which she encouraged black women in the North to take a more outspoken role in civil rights agitation and black community building. A year…

  • Stewart, Martha (American entrepreneur and television personality)

    Martha Stewart, American entrepreneur and domestic lifestyle innovator who built a catering business into an international media and home-furnishing corporation, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc. Raised in Nutley, New Jersey, Stewart grew up in a Polish American household where the traditional

  • Stewart, Mary (queen of Scotland)

    Mary, queen of Scotland (1542–67) and queen consort of France (1559–60). Her unwise marital and political actions provoked rebellion among the Scottish nobles, forcing her to flee to England, where she was eventually beheaded as a Roman Catholic threat to the English throne. Mary Stuart was the

  • Stewart, Mary (British author [born 1916])

    Mary Stewart, (Mary Florence Elinor Rainbow), British author (born Sept. 17, 1916, Sunderland, Durham, Eng.—died May 9, 2014, Loch Awe, Scot.), was best known for her update of the Arthurian legend in a popular trilogy of novels about the magician Merlin—The Crystal Cave (1970; filmed for

  • Stewart, Mary Anne (British author)

    Lady Mary Anne Barker, writer best known for her book Station Life in New Zealand (1870), a lively account of life in colonial New Zealand. Stewart was educated in England, and at age 21 she married George R. Barker, then a captain of the Royal Artillery. He was knighted for his military service in

  • Stewart, Matthew (British lord)

    Margaret Douglas, countess of Lennox: …Stewart (1516–71), 4th Earl of Lennox. Because of her nearness to the English crown, Lady Margaret Douglas was brought up chiefly at the English court in close association with Princess Mary (afterward Queen Mary I), who remained her fast friend throughout life.

  • Stewart, Patrick (British actor)

    Patrick Stewart, British actor of stage, screen, and television who was perhaps best known for his work on the series Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987–94) and its related films. His father served in the military, but Patrick, while his brothers completed military service of their own, began

  • Stewart, Payne William (American golfer)

    Payne William Stewart, American golfer who during a 19-year career captured 18 professional tournaments, notably the Professional Golfers’ Association 1989 title and the 1991 and 1999 U.S. Open titles as well as a stunning comeback victory as part of the 1999 U.S. Ryder Cup squad; he was instantly

  • Stewart, Phyllis (American writer and political activist)

    Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist who was best known for her opposition to the women’s movement and especially the Equal Rights Amendment. She was a leading conservative voice in the late 20th century and a lightning rod for fervent debate about cultural values. Phyllis

  • Stewart, Potter (United States jurist)

    Potter Stewart, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1958–81). Stewart was admitted to the bar in New York and Ohio in 1941 and after World War II settled in Cincinnati. He served on the city council and as vice mayor before his appointment to the Court of Appeals for the sixth

  • Stewart, Rex (American musician)

    Rex Stewart, black American jazz musician unique for playing the cornet, rather than the trumpet, in big bands as well as small groups throughout his career. His mastery of expressive effects made him one of the most distinctive of all brass improvisers. Stewart grew up in Philadelphia and

  • Stewart, Rex William, Jr. (American musician)

    Rex Stewart, black American jazz musician unique for playing the cornet, rather than the trumpet, in big bands as well as small groups throughout his career. His mastery of expressive effects made him one of the most distinctive of all brass improvisers. Stewart grew up in Philadelphia and

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