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  • Stjórn (Old Norwegian manuscript)

    biblical literature: Scandinavian versions: …through Kings in the so-called Stjórn (“Guidance”) manuscript in the Old Norwegian language, probably about 1300. Swedish versions of the Pentateuch and of Acts have survived from the 14th century, as has a manuscript of Joshua and Judges by Nicholaus Ragnvaldi of Vadstena from about 1500. The oldest Danish version,…

  • Stjukshon (Arizona, United States)

    Tucson, city, seat (1864) of Pima county, southeastern Arizona, U.S. Tucson lies along the Santa Cruz River on a hilly plain of the Sonoran Desert that is rimmed by the Santa Catalina and other mountains. The city lies at an elevation of 2,410 feet (735 metres) and is situated about 115 miles (185

  • STLA (political organization, United States)

    Daniel De Leon: …of Labor, subsequently forming the Socialist Trade and Labor Alliance (STLA). In 1899 a dissident faction left the SLP and formed what became the Socialist Party of America. The membership and prestige of the SLP declined thereafter.

  • STM (instrument)

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM), type of microscope whose principle of operation is based on the quantum mechanical phenomenon known as tunneling, in which the wavelike properties of electrons permit them to “tunnel” beyond the surface of a solid into regions of space that are forbidden to them

  • STN display (electronics)

    liquid crystal display: Supertwisted nematic displays: It was discovered in the early 1980s that increasing the twist angle of a liquid crystal cell to about 180–270° (with 240° being fairly common) allows a much larger number of pixel rows to be used, with a consequent increase in the…

  • stoa (architecture)

    Stoa, in Greek architecture, a freestanding colonnade or covered walkway; also, a long open building, its roof supported by one or more rows of columns parallel to the rear wall. The Stoa of Attalus at Athens is a prime example. Stoae surrounded marketplaces and sanctuaries and formed places of

  • Stoa Basileios (building, Athens, Greece)

    Euphranor: In the Stoa Basileios at Athens he painted the “Twelve Gods,” “Theseus with Democracy and Demos,” and the cavalry engagement at Mantinea (362); none of these works survives. At Ephesus he depicted the feigned madness of Odysseus. Fragments of a colossal statue found in the Agora at…

  • Stoa Poikile (hall, Olympia, Greece)

    Olympia: The remains: …Colonnade was officially called the Stoa Poikile, or Painted Colonnade, from the paintings that used to be on its walls. It received its popular name because a word uttered there was echoed seven times or more. The colonnade closed the east side of the Altis and was separated from the…

  • Stoa Poikile (hall, Athens, Greece)

    Athens: Athens at its zenith: …in the Agora, notably the Stoa Poikile, or Painted Colonnade, with its famous paintings by Polygnotus and Micon, one of which represented the Battle of Marathon. The Tholos, the round building that served as the headquarters of the executive committee of the council, was also built at this time. Lack…

  • stoae (architecture)

    Stoa, in Greek architecture, a freestanding colonnade or covered walkway; also, a long open building, its roof supported by one or more rows of columns parallel to the rear wall. The Stoa of Attalus at Athens is a prime example. Stoae surrounded marketplaces and sanctuaries and formed places of

  • stoat (mammal)

    Ermine, (Mustela erminea), northern weasel species in the genus Mustela, family Mustelidae. The species is called ermine especially during its winter white colour phase. The animal’s pelt was used historically in royal robes in Europe, and the term ermine also refers to the animal’s white coat,

  • Stobart, Florence Kathleen (British musician)

    Kathy Stobart, (Florence Kathleen Stobart), British jazz artist (born April 1, 1925, South Shields, Durham, Eng.—died July 6, 2014, England), featured a rich booming tenor saxophone sound that accompanied her fluent lyricism and irresistible swing. In her teens she began playing in dance bands and

  • Stobart, Kathy (British musician)

    Kathy Stobart, (Florence Kathleen Stobart), British jazz artist (born April 1, 1925, South Shields, Durham, Eng.—died July 6, 2014, England), featured a rich booming tenor saxophone sound that accompanied her fluent lyricism and irresistible swing. In her teens she began playing in dance bands and

  • Stobilanthes (plant genus)

    Acanthaceae: and Beloperone), Reullia (355), Stobilanthes (350), Barleria (300), Aphelandra (170), Staurogyne (140), Dicliptera (150), Blepharis (130), Lepidagathis (100), Hygrophila (100), Thunbergia (90), and

  • stochastic cooling (physics)

    particle accelerator: Proton storage rings: …a technique known as “stochastic cooling,” developed by Simon Van der Meer at CERN. Antiprotons are produced when a high-energy proton beam strikes a metal target, but they emerge from the target with a range of energies and directions, so the resulting antiproton beam is broad and diffuse. Stochastic…

  • stochastic process (mathematics)

    Stochastic process, in probability theory, a process involving the operation of chance. For example, in radioactive decay every atom is subject to a fixed probability of breaking down in any given time interval. More generally, a stochastic process refers to a family of random variables indexed

  • stock (horticulture)

    horticulture: Grafting: …the root is called the stock; the added piece is called the scion. When more than two parts are involved, the middle piece is called the interstock. When the scion consists of a single bud, the process is called budding. Grafting and budding are the most widely used of the…

  • stock (igneous rock)

    igneous rock: Intrusive igneous rocks: …shaped plutons are called either stocks or batholiths (see Figure 6), depending on their sizes. Plutons larger than 100 square kilometres in area are termed batholiths, while those of lesser size are called stocks. It may be possible, however, that some stocks are the visible portions of batholiths that have…

  • stock (business)

    Inventory, in business, any item of property held in stock by a firm, including finished goods ready for sale, goods in the process of production, raw materials, and goods that will be consumed in the process of producing goods to be sold. Inventories appear on a company’s balance sheet as an

  • stock (finance)

    Stock, in finance, the subscribed capital of a corporation or limited-liability company, usually divided into shares and represented by transferable certificates. The certificates may detail the contractual relationship between the company and its stockholders, or shareholders, and set forth the

  • stock (plant)

    Stock, (genus Matthiola), genus of about 50 species of plants in the mustard family (Brassicaceae), native to Eurasia and southern Africa. Many stock species are well known for the spicy fragrance of their flowers, and some are grown as ornamentals and for cut flowers. Gillyflowers, or common stock

  • stock (cookery)

    frozen prepared food: Preparing ingredients: Cream-based sauces begin with stock solutions, which are prepared by boiling raw stock material such as beef, fish, or poultry in water. Boiling is conducted in large kettles that may be operated either open to the atmosphere or under vacuum. Boiling under vacuum, accomplished at temperatures lower than 100°…

  • stock anchor (nautical device)

    anchor: It is known as a stock anchor in the United States and as a fisherman’s anchor in the United Kingdom.

  • stock car (freight car)

    freight car: …the common boxcar is the stock car with slatted sides, which is used to transport cattle, sheep, and other livestock. The flatcar has long been utilized for hauling heavy construction machinery and military equipment. During the 1950s British Railways and various other European railroad companies developed high-capacity flatcars suitable for…

  • stock certificate (business)

    security: Stock: A stock certificate ordinarily is given as documentary evidence of share ownership. Originally this was its primary function; but as interest in securities grew and the capital market evolved, the role of the certificate gradually changed until it became, as it is now, an important instrument…

  • stock character

    Stock character, a character in a drama or fiction that represents a type and that is recognizable as belonging to a certain genre. Most of the characters in the commedia dell’arte, such as Columbine and Harlequin, are stock characters. In Roman comedy there is the braggart soldier known as Miles

  • stock company (theatre)

    Stock company, troupe of actors performing regularly in a particular theatre, presenting a different play nightly from its repertory of prepared productions. Stock companies were usually composed of players who specialized in dramatic types such as the tragedian, or leading man; the leading lady;

  • stock control (business)

    operations research: Inventory control: Inventories include raw materials, component parts, work in process, finished goods, packing and packaging materials, and general supplies. The control of inventories, vital to the financial strength of a firm, in general involves deciding at what points in the production system stocks shall…

  • stock dividend (finance)

    Dividend, an individual share of earnings distributed among stockholders of a corporation or company in proportion to their holdings and as determined by the class of their holdings. Dividends are usually payable in cash, although sometimes distributions are made in the form of additional shares of

  • stock dove (bird)

    columbiform: General habits: stock dove (C. oenas) of Europe rarely take green vegetation, do not feed in trees, and so are examples of the trend toward complete ground feeding. These doves subsist almost entirely on seeds collected from low herbage or the ground. In winter such food sources…

  • Stock Exchange (building, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Hendrik Petrus Berlage: …best known work is the Stock Exchange in Amsterdam (1898–1903). It is notable for its rounded Romanesque arches and the forthright use of structural steel and traditional brick, examples of Berlage’s concern that materials be used truthfully. Beginning in the early 1900s, he carried out city planning for residential areas…

  • Stock Exchange (stock exchange, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Chicago Stock Exchange (CHX), largest of the regional stock exchanges in the United States. The Chicago Stock Exchange was founded in 1882 to trade primarily local securities, particularly stocks and bonds of utility, banking, and railroad companies. In 1949 the exchange merged with those of St.

  • Stock Exchange (stock exchange, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), one of the world’s largest marketplaces for securities and other exchange-traded investments. The exchange evolved from a meeting of 24 stockbrokers under a buttonwood tree in 1792 on what is now Wall Street in New York City. It was formally constituted as the New

  • Stock Exchange (Irish company)

    Dublin: Finance and other services: The Irish Stock Exchange, an integral part of the British Stock Exchange system, is also located in central Dublin and is one of the oldest such markets in the world, trading continuously since 1793.

  • stock exchange (finance)

    Stock exchange, organized market for the sale and purchase of securities such as shares, stocks, and bonds. In most countries the stock exchange has two important functions. As a ready market for securities, it ensures their liquidity and thus encourages people to channel savings into corporate

  • Stock Exchange (British company)

    London Stock Exchange (LSE), a London marketplace for securities. After having long been situated closer to the Bank of England and the Royal Exchange, in 2004 the London Stock Exchange relocated elsewhere in the City of London to Paternoster Square. The market was formed in 1773 by several

  • stock keeping unit (inventory)

    SKU, a code number, typically used as a machine-readable bar code, assigned to a single item of inventory. As part of a system for inventory control, the SKU represents the smallest unit of a product that can be sold from inventory, purchased, or added to inventory. Applied to wholesale, retail, or

  • stock market (finance)

    Stock exchange, organized market for the sale and purchase of securities such as shares, stocks, and bonds. In most countries the stock exchange has two important functions. As a ready market for securities, it ensures their liquidity and thus encourages people to channel savings into corporate

  • stock market crash of 1929 (American history)

    Stock market crash of 1929, a sharp decline in U.S. stock market values in 1929 that contributed to the Great Depression of the 1930s. The Great Depression lasted approximately 10 years and affected both industrialized and nonindustrialized countries in many parts of the world. During the mid- to

  • stock option (securities trading)

    Stock option, contractual agreement enabling the holder to buy or sell a security at a designated price for a specified period of time, unaffected by movements in its market price during the period. Put and call options, purchased both for speculative and hedging reasons, are made by persons

  • Stock Photographs (photography by Winogrand)

    Garry Winogrand: …1970s was the cleverly titled Stock Photographs, documenting the Fort Worth Fat Stock Show, an annual livestock exposition and rodeo, which became Winogrand’s final photo book, published in 1980.

  • stock purchase warrant (securities trading)

    business finance: Convertible bonds and stock warrants: Companies sometimes issue bonds or preferred stock that give holders the option of converting them into common stock or of purchasing stock at favourable prices. Convertible bonds carry the option of conversion into common stock at a specified price during a particular period.…

  • stock rights option (securities trading)

    stock option: The stock rights option gives a stockholder the choice of (1) buying additional stock at a price below the current market price for a specified period of time, usually briefer than the life span of stock purchase warrants, or (2) selling the rights on the market.…

  • stock saddle

    horsemanship: Stock saddle: The stock saddle seat is appropriate for ranchers but is also used at rodeos and by many pleasure and trail riders. The saddle, which can weigh as much as 40 pounds (18 kilograms), is designed for rounding up cattle and is distinguished by…

  • stock setting (theatre)

    stagecraft: History: The stock sets produced by these manufacturers were not tailored to the specific needs of any particular play but instead depicted locations that were standard to most: a nobleman’s library, a courtyard, a forest, and so forth. If a script called for a specific location—for example,…

  • Stock, Alfred (German chemist)

    borane: …1937 by the German chemist Alfred Stock. He called them boranes in analogy to the alkanes (saturated hydrocarbons), the hydrides of carbon (C), which is the neighbour of boron in the periodic table. Because the lighter boranes were volatile, sensitive to air and moisture, and toxic, Stock developed high-vacuum methods…

  • Stock, Dennis (American photographer)

    Dennis Stock, American photographer (born July 24, 1928, Bronx, N.Y.—died Jan. 11, 2010, Sarasota, Fla.), amassed an impressive portfolio that included images of such jazz performers as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and Billie Holiday, but he was best remembered for his 1955 iconic Life magazine

  • stock-car racing (sport)

    Stock-car racing, form of automobile racing, popular in the United States, in which cars that conform externally to standard U.S. commercial types are raced, usually on oval, paved tracks. Stock-car racing is said to have originated during the U.S. Prohibition period (1919–33), when illegal still

  • Stockbridge (Massachusetts, United States)

    Stockbridge, town (township), Berkshire county, western Massachusetts, U.S. It lies along the Housatonic River in the Berkshire Hills, 12 miles (19 km) south of Pittsfield. In 1737 John Sergeant and Timothy Woodbridge chartered a Christian mission on the site, which became known as Indian Town.

  • Stockbridge band (North American Indian group)

    Mohican: …and became known as the Stockbridge band; other groups scattered and merged with other tribes. The Stockbridge band later moved to Wisconsin and were joined by the Munsee band; the two groups were allotted a joint reservation in Wisconsin in the 19th century. The American novelist James Fenimore Cooper drew…

  • Stockdale, James (United States admiral)

    James Bond Stockdale, vice admiral (ret.), U.S. Navy (born Dec. 23, 1923, Abingdon, Ill.—died July 5, 2005, Coronado, Calif.), received the Medal of Honor in 1976 for his bravery in the face of torture and imprisonment during the Vietnam War. He flew over 200 missions over Vietnam before he was s

  • Stockelsdorf faience (pottery)

    Stockelsdorf faience, tin-glazed earthenware made at Stockelsdorf near Lübeck, Germany. In what was probably an earlier stove-tile factory, Stockelsdorf began to make faience in 1771, specializing in tea trays and stoves. Between about 1773 and about 1775 Johann Buchwald (as director) and Abraham

  • St?cker, Adolf (German politician)

    Adolf Stoecker, cleric, conservative politician, and reformer who founded the German Christian Social Party and promoted political anti-Semitism in Germany. An army chaplain during the Franco-German War (1870–71), Stoecker secured appointment as a court preacher at the cathedral in Berlin in 1874.

  • Stockerau (Austria)

    Stockerau, city, northeastern Austria. It lies about 12.5 miles (20 km) northwest of Vienna, on a tributary of the Danube River. Stockerau was mentioned as a town in 1012 but was not chartered as a city until 1893. Like Klosterneuburg, M?dling, Baden, Schwechat, and other suburbs, it is considered

  • stockfish (fish)

    hake: …the American Atlantic; and the stockfish (M. capensis) of South Africa.

  • Stockhausen, Karlheinz (German composer)

    Karlheinz Stockhausen, German composer, an important creator and theoretician of electronic and serial music who strongly influenced avant-garde composers from the 1950s through the ’80s. Stockhausen studied at the State Academy for Music in Cologne and the University of Cologne from 1947 to 1951.

  • stockholder (business)

    corporate governance: Shareholder governance: In liberal models of capitalism, such as Great Britain and the United States, shareholder governance is the dominant company form. On this model, companies exist to serve the interests of shareholders. Shareholders are deemed to be the owners of a firm, which means…

  • Stockholm (film by Budreau [2018])

    Ethan Hawke: …an eccentric bank robber in Stockholm, a farce about the 1973 hostage situation that gave rise to the term Stockholm syndrome. That year he also cowrote and directed Blaze, a biopic about a little-known folk musician. The film was lauded for its unconventional narrative. Movies from 2019 included The Kid,…

  • Stockholm (national capital, Sweden)

    Stockholm, capital and largest city of Sweden. Stockholm is located at the junction of Lake M?lar (M?laren) and Salt Bay (Saltsj?n), an arm of the Baltic Sea, opposite the Gulf of Finland. The city is built upon numerous islands as well as the mainland of Uppland and S?dermanland. By virtue of its

  • Stockholm (county, Sweden)

    Stockholm, l?n (county) of east-central Sweden. It lies along the Baltic Sea and surrounds Stockholm, the national capital and seat of the l?n’s governor, yet is administratively separate from that city. The l?n includes parts of the traditional landskap (provinces) of S?dermanland (south) and

  • Stockholm (ship)

    Andrea Doria: …1956, after colliding with the Stockholm off the coast of Nantucket in the Atlantic Ocean. The maritime disaster resulted in the deaths of 51 people—46 from the Andrea Doria and 5 from the Stockholm.

  • Stockholm 1912 Olympic Games

    Stockholm 1912 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Stockholm that took place May 5–July 27, 1912. The Stockholm Games were the fifth occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. Known as the “Swedish Masterpiece,” the 1912 Olympics were the best organized and most efficiently run Games to that

  • Stockholm Appeal of 1950 (European history)

    20th-century international relations: The race for nuclear arms: The Stockholm Appeal of 1950, initiated by the French Communist physicist Frédéric Joliot-Curie, gathered petitions allegedly signed by 273,470,566 persons (including the entire adult population of the U.S.S.R.). Similar movements organized marches and protests in Western countries against nuclear arms (no such manifestations occurred in the…

  • Stockholm Bloodbath (Swedish history)

    Stockholm Bloodbath, (Nov. 8–9, 1520), the mass execution of Swedish nobles by the Danish king Christian II (reigned 1513–23), which led to the final phase of the Swedish war of secession from the Kalmar Union of the three Scandinavian kingdoms under Danish paramountcy. With the support of the

  • Stockholm Conference

    United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, the first United Nations (UN) conference that focused on international environmental issues. The conference, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from June 5 to 16, 1972, reflected a growing interest in conservation issues worldwide and laid the foundation

  • Stockholm Convention (Europe [1959])

    European Free Trade Association: …EFTA is based on the Stockholm Convention signed by the seven nations in November 1959 and becoming operative in May 1960. Finland became an associate member in 1961 and a full member in 1986; Iceland was admitted to full membership in 1970; and Liechtenstein (formerly associated through a customs union…

  • Stockholm Declaration (1972, UN)

    common but differentiated responsibilities: …was featured explicitly in the Stockholm Declaration).

  • Stockholm Exposition (exposition, Stockholm, Sweden)

    Gunnar Asplund: He planned the Stockholm Exposition of 1930, for which he designed a number of pavilions and the Paradise Restaurant.

  • Stockholm Observatory (observatory, Saltsj?baden, Sweden)

    Bertil Lindblad: , Lindblad joined the Stockholm Observatory and in 1927 was appointed director, a post he held until 1965. He planned the observatory’s relocation in 1931 to nearby Saltsj?baden and modernized its facilities.

  • Stockholm school (economics)

    Erik Robert Lindahl: …of the members of the Stockholm school of economics that developed during the late 1920s and early ’30s from the macroeconomic theory of Knut Wicksell.

  • Stockholm syndrome (psychology)

    Stockholm syndrome, psychological response wherein a captive begins to identify closely with his or her captors, as well as with their agenda and demands. The name of the syndrome is derived from a botched bank robbery in Stockholm, Sweden. In August 1973 four employees of Sveriges Kreditbank were

  • Stockholm tar

    wood tar: Pine-wood tar, commonly called Stockholm, or Archangel, tar, is made extensively in the forests of Russia, Sweden, and Finland. It is the residue after the turpentine has been distilled, usually with the aid of steam. It is widely used in manufacturing tarred ropes and twine…

  • Stockholm, Treaties of (European history)

    Second Northern War: By the Treaties of Stockholm (1719–20), Sweden, Saxony, and Poland returned to the status quo ante bellum, and Denmark gave back its conquests to Sweden in return for a substantial sum of money. Sweden ceded Bremen to Hanover and gave up Stettin (Szczecin) and part of Swedish…

  • Stockholms (county, Sweden)

    Stockholm, l?n (county) of east-central Sweden. It lies along the Baltic Sea and surrounds Stockholm, the national capital and seat of the l?n’s governor, yet is administratively separate from that city. The l?n includes parts of the traditional landskap (provinces) of S?dermanland (south) and

  • Stockholms Blodbad (Swedish history)

    Stockholm Bloodbath, (Nov. 8–9, 1520), the mass execution of Swedish nobles by the Danish king Christian II (reigned 1513–23), which led to the final phase of the Swedish war of secession from the Kalmar Union of the three Scandinavian kingdoms under Danish paramountcy. With the support of the

  • Stockholmsposten (Swedish periodical)

    Johan Henrik Kellgren: …with the influential literary journal Stockholmsposten, which he edited in the years 1780–84 and 1788–95. A sensuous poet and a radical defender of the Enlightenment from Voltaire to the French Revolution, Kellgren used his literary and intellectual skills to attack superstition and criticize a broad array of social vices. He…

  • stockinette (textile)

    knitting: …knitting, this structure is called stockinette. Pile-surfaced fabrics produced by variations of the plain knit include velour and fake furs. Rib knits have pronounced lengthwise ribs formed by wales alternating on both sides of the fabric. These knits are fairly heavy, have good elasticity, and are more durable than the…

  • stockinette stitch (textiles)

    Plain stitch, basic knitting stitch in which each loop is drawn through other loops to the right side of the fabric. The loops form vertical rows, or wales, on the fabric face, giving it a sheen, and crosswise rows, or courses, on the back. Plain-stitch knitting is a filling knit construction and

  • stocking (clothing)

    dress: Colonial America: Stockings were either knitted or cut from woven cloth and sewn to fit the leg. They were attached to men’s breeches by points, or strings, which were also used to secure other garments; later, sashlike garters replaced points. Both men and women wore stout leather…

  • stocking frame (knitting machine)

    Stocking frame, Knitting machine invented in 1589 that produced a stocking stitch. Knitted fabrics are constructed by the interlocking of a series of loops made from one or more yarns, with each row of loops caught into the previous row; the stocking frame allowed production of a complete row of

  • Stocking, George Ward, Jr. (American social science historian)

    George Ward Stocking, Jr., American social science historian (born Dec. 8, 1928, Berlin, Ger.—died July 13, 2013, Chicago, Ill.), was a leading authority on the history of American sociocultural anthropology and British social anthropology. His extensive research and writing, including discussions

  • stockless anchor (nautical device)

    anchor: The stockless anchor (Figure 2), which was patented in England in 1821, came into wide use principally because of its ease of handling and stowing. The crown, arms, and flukes of a stockless anchor are cast in one piece and can pivot slightly from side to…

  • Stockman, Shawn (American singer)

    Boyz II Men: ), Shawn Stockman (in full Shawn Patrick Stockman; b. September 26, 1972, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.), and Wanya Morris (in full Wanyá Jermaine Morris; b. July 29, 1973, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.).

  • Stockman, Shawn Patrick (American singer)

    Boyz II Men: ), Shawn Stockman (in full Shawn Patrick Stockman; b. September 26, 1972, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.), and Wanya Morris (in full Wanyá Jermaine Morris; b. July 29, 1973, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.).

  • Stockmar, Christian Friedrich, Freiherr von (German physician)

    Christian Friedrich, baron von Stockmar, German physician who became influential in Belgian and then in British politics, as secretary to King Leopold I of the Belgians and as adviser to Queen Victoria and Albert, the prince consort, of Great Britain. His ardent constitutionalism helped to form

  • stockpiling (commerce)

    storage: Storage facilities must also serve as a reservoir to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand. Efficiency in the transportation of goods often makes the accumulation of a reserve in storage (called stockpiling) advisable. Stockpiling is often advisable for greatest production efficiency as well, for it enables…

  • Stockport (England, United Kingdom)

    Stockport, urban area (from 2011 built-up area) and metropolitan borough in the southeastern part of the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, northwestern England. Most of the borough, including the historic town of Stockport, lies in the historic county of Cheshire, but it includes an area

  • Stockport (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Stockport: Stockport, urban area (from 2011 built-up area) and metropolitan borough in the southeastern part of the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, northwestern England. Most of the borough, including the historic town of Stockport, lies in the historic county of Cheshire, but it includes an area…

  • stocks (corporal punishment)

    pillory: …were the feet in the stocks) so as to be held fast and exposed in front of it. In a more-complicated form of the instrument, the frame consisted of a perforated iron circle that could secure the head and hands of several persons at the same time, but, in the…

  • stocktaking period (psychology)

    collective behaviour: Impact and stocktaking period: In disasters such as floods and some hurricanes there is a distinctly long period of impact, which can be separated from a subsequent period of stocktaking or immobility. In earthquakes and explosions, on the other hand, the impact is so brief that the…

  • Stockton (California, United States)

    Stockton, city, seat (1850) of San Joaquin county, north-central California, U.S. It lies along the San Joaquin River, 40 miles (65 km) south of Sacramento. Connected westward with San Francisco Bay by the river’s 78-mile (126-km) channel, Stockton is, with Sacramento, one of the state’s two inland

  • Stockton & Darlington Railway (British railway)

    Stockton & Darlington Railway, in England, first railway in the world to operate freight and passenger service with steam traction. In 1821 George Stephenson, who had built several steam engines to work in the Killingworth colliery, heard of Edward Pease’s intention of building an 8-mile (12.9-km)

  • Stockton, Abbye (American athlete)

    physical culture: Bodybuilding: Abbye (“Pudgy”) Stockton, the first woman bodybuilder, and her husband, Les, were gym owners on Sunset Boulevard and early participants at Muscle Beach. Another regular, Harold Zinkin, invented the Universal Gym in 1957. (Universal machines have weight stacks that allow quick changes in resistance and…

  • Stockton, Francis Richard (American novelist)

    Frank Stockton, American popular novelist and short-story writer of mainly humorous fiction, best known as the author of the title story of a collection called The Lady, or the Tiger? (1884). Stockton refused to study medicine as his father wished and became a wood engraver. He contributed to and

  • Stockton, Frank (American novelist)

    Frank Stockton, American popular novelist and short-story writer of mainly humorous fiction, best known as the author of the title story of a collection called The Lady, or the Tiger? (1884). Stockton refused to study medicine as his father wished and became a wood engraver. He contributed to and

  • Stockton, Frank Richard (American novelist)

    Frank Stockton, American popular novelist and short-story writer of mainly humorous fiction, best known as the author of the title story of a collection called The Lady, or the Tiger? (1884). Stockton refused to study medicine as his father wished and became a wood engraver. He contributed to and

  • Stockton, John (American basketball player)

    John Stockton, American professional basketball player who is considered one of the greatest point guards ever to play the sport. In his 19-year career with the Utah Jazz, he set National Basketball Association (NBA) records for most career assists (15,806) and steals (3,265). Stockton played

  • Stockton, John Houston (American basketball player)

    John Stockton, American professional basketball player who is considered one of the greatest point guards ever to play the sport. In his 19-year career with the Utah Jazz, he set National Basketball Association (NBA) records for most career assists (15,806) and steals (3,265). Stockton played

  • Stockton, Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Harold Macmillan, British politician who was prime minister from January 1957 to October 1963. The son of an American-born mother and the grandson of a founder of the London publishing house of Macmillan & Co., he was educated at Balliol College, Oxford. He distinguished himself in combat during

  • Stockton, Pudgy (American athlete)

    physical culture: Bodybuilding: Abbye (“Pudgy”) Stockton, the first woman bodybuilder, and her husband, Les, were gym owners on Sunset Boulevard and early participants at Muscle Beach. Another regular, Harold Zinkin, invented the Universal Gym in 1957. (Universal machines have weight stacks that allow quick changes in resistance and…

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