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  • stomach (anatomy)

    Stomach, saclike expansion of the digestive system, between the esophagus and the small intestine; it is located in the anterior portion of the abdominal cavity in most vertebrates. The stomach serves as a temporary receptacle for storage and mechanical distribution of food before it is passed into

  • stomach cancer (pathology)

    Stomach cancer, a disease characterized by abnormal growth of cells in the stomach. The incidence of stomach cancer has decreased dramatically since the early 20th century in countries where refrigeration has replaced other methods of food preservation such as salting, smoking, and pickling.

  • stomach oil (biology)

    procellariiform: Stomach oil: Most tubinares, when handled or threatened, eject the oily contents of the stomach with some force. In some species, notably the cliff-nesting fulmars, this habit, a fear reaction that also serves to lighten the bird for flight, has been exploited as a defensive…

  • stomach poison (chemistry)

    insecticide: Modes of penetration: Stomach poisons have gradually been replaced by synthetic insecticides, which are less dangerous to humans and other mammals.

  • stomach ulcer (pathology)

    peptic ulcer: …men than in women, but stomach ulcers affect women more frequently. The symptoms of gastric and duodenal ulcer are similar and include a gnawing, burning ache and hungerlike pain in the mid-upper abdomen, usually experienced from one to three hours after meals and several hours after retiring.

  • stomacher (garment)

    Stomacher, ornamental garment worn at the front of the upper body by men and women from the end of the 15th until the late 18th century. At the end of the 15th century, men’s jackets often had a V-opening allowing for a decorative front-piece, or stomacher, and women’s gowns were laced over an

  • stomacher brooch (ornament)

    jewelry: 17th century: …form spread throughout Europe: the stomacher brooch, which covered a woman’s entire bodice, from neckline to waist. With its heavily bejeweled composition of scrolls, leaves, and pendants on a gold framework that followed the curves of the body, even extending under the armpits, this jewel usually contained no fewer than…

  • stomas (plant anatomy)

    Stomate, any of the microscopic openings or pores in the epidermis of leaves and young stems. Stomata are generally more numerous on the underside of leaves. They provide for the exchange of gases between the outside air and the branched system of interconnecting air canals within the leaf. A

  • stomata (plant anatomy)

    Stomate, any of the microscopic openings or pores in the epidermis of leaves and young stems. Stomata are generally more numerous on the underside of leaves. They provide for the exchange of gases between the outside air and the branched system of interconnecting air canals within the leaf. A

  • stomate (plant anatomy)

    Stomate, any of the microscopic openings or pores in the epidermis of leaves and young stems. Stomata are generally more numerous on the underside of leaves. They provide for the exchange of gases between the outside air and the branched system of interconnecting air canals within the leaf. A

  • stomatogastric head ganglion (animal anatomy)

    nervous system: Simple mollusks: …last ganglia, also called the stomatogastric head ganglia, innervate the pharynx, salivary glands, and a plexus on the esophagus and stomach. Other nerve cords—the pedal cords—leave the cerebral ganglia ventrally and terminate in a pair of pedal ganglia, which innervate the foot muscles. Another pair of nerve cords—the visceral cords—leave…

  • stomatology (dental medicine)

    dentistry: Other disciplines: Oral medicine, or stomatology, treats the variety of diseases that affect both the skin and the oral mucous membranes. Some of these diseases, such as pemphigus vulgaris, can develop their first manifestations in the mouth and can be life-threatening. Oral cancer also has a high mortality rate, partly…

  • stomatopod (crustacean)

    Mantis shrimp, any member of the marine crustacean order Stomatopoda, especially members of the genus Squilla. Mantis shrimps are so called because the second pair of limbs are greatly enlarged and shaped like the large grasping forelimbs of the praying mantid, or mantis, an insect. They use these

  • Stomatopoda (crustacean)

    Mantis shrimp, any member of the marine crustacean order Stomatopoda, especially members of the genus Squilla. Mantis shrimps are so called because the second pair of limbs are greatly enlarged and shaped like the large grasping forelimbs of the praying mantid, or mantis, an insect. They use these

  • Stomiiformes (fish order)

    fish: Annotated classification: Stenopterygii Order Stomiiformes Adipose fin present or absent, some species with both a dorsal and a ventral adipose fin; swim bladder without duct or absent entirely; maxilla the dominant bone of the upper jaw; some species with greatly enlarged, depressable teeth; anterior vertebrae sometimes unossified; light organs…

  • Stommel, Henry Melson (American meteorologist and oceanographer)

    Henry Melson Stommel, American oceanographer and meteorologist. Stommel became internationally known during the 1950s for his theories on circulation patterns in the Atlantic Ocean. He suggested that the Earth’s rotation is responsible for the Gulf Stream along the coast of North America, and he

  • stomodaeum (anatomy)

    cnidarian: Size range and diversity of structure: …have an internal pharynx, or stomodaeum, connecting the mouth to the coelenteron.

  • stomotion (architecture)

    Aegean civilizations: The Shaft Grave Period on the mainland (c. 1600–1450): …stones; a deep doorway, or stomion, covered over with one to three lintel blocks; and a circular chamber with a high vaulted or corbeled roof, the thalamos. When the facades are finely dressed with cut stones or recessed vertical panels, one may think of a Cretan connection; indeed, one of…

  • Stomoxys calcitrans (insect)

    Stable fly, (Stomoxys calcitrans), a species of vicious bloodsucking fly in the family Muscidae (sometimes placed in the family Stomoxyidae) in the fly order, Diptera. Stable flies are usually found in open sunny areas, although they may enter a house during bad weather. Often known as biting

  • Stompanato, Johnny (American gangster)

    Lana Turner: …death Turner’s abusive gangster boyfriend, Johnny Stompanato. Turner’s account of her life, Lana—the Lady, the Legend, the Truth, was published in 1982.

  • Stompin’ Tom (Canadian singer-songwriter)

    Tom Connors, (Charles Thomas Connors; “Stompin’ Tom”), Canadian folksinger-songwriter (born Feb. 9, 1936, St. John, N.B.—died March 6, 2013, Halton Hills, Ont.), rhapsodized about his beloved Canada in more than 300 songs, which were inspired by his vagabond-like travels across the country and his

  • Stomping the Blues (work by Murray)

    Albert Murray: In Stomping the Blues (1976), Murray maintained that blues and jazz musical styles developed as affirmative responses to misery; he also explored the cultural significance of these music genres and other artistic genres in The Hero and the Blues (1973), The Blue Devils of Nada (1996),…

  • Stone (film by Curran [2010])

    Edward Norton: …Niro in the crime drama Stone (2010) and as a 1960s scoutmaster in Wes Anderson’s whimsical Moonrise Kingdom (2012). In the spy thriller The Bourne Legacy (2012), Norton played a nefarious former CIA agent. In 2014 he portrayed a police inspector in Anderson’s stylized caper The Grand Budapest Hotel and…

  • stone (material)

    art conservation and restoration: Stone sculpture: With examples dating back to the enormous prehistoric statues of Easter Island, many types of stone have been employed over the centuries in sculpture. Some of these stones yield more readily to the sculptor’s chisel (such as limestone, marble, and soapstone), while others,…

  • stone (unit of weight)

    Stone, British unit of weight for dry products generally equivalent to 14 pounds avoirdupois (6.35 kg), though it varied from 4 to 32 pounds (1.814 to 14.515 kg) for various items over time. Originally any good-sized rock chosen as a local standard, the stone came to be widely used as a unit of

  • Stone Age (anthropology)

    Stone Age, prehistoric cultural stage, or level of human development, characterized by the creation and use of stone tools. The Stone Age, whose origin coincides with the discovery of the oldest known stone tools, which have been dated to some 3.3 million years ago, is usually divided into three

  • Stone and Kimball (American publishing company)

    typography: Mechanical composition: …endpapers for his Everyman’s Library; Stone and Kimball of Chicago and Thomas Mosher of Maine, who issued small, readable editions of avant-garde writers with Art Nouveau bindings and decorated title pages; the Insel Verlag in Germany, with millions of inexpensive yet well-printed and designed pocket books—these and their many colleagues…

  • Stone Angel, The (novel by Laurence)

    Margaret Laurence: In The Stone Angel (1964), an ancient prairie woman tells her life struggles. A Jest of God (1966; made into the motion picture Rachel, Rachel in 1968) and The Fire Dwellers (1969) are about two sisters, a Manitoba schoolteacher and a Vancouver housewife, each trying to…

  • stone bass (fish)

    Wreckfish, (Polyprion americanus), large, grayish fish of the family Polyprionidae (order Perciformes), found in the Mediterranean and in both sides of the Atlantic, generally in offshore waters. The wreckfish is deep-bodied, with a large head and jutting lower jaw, and attains a length and weight

  • Stone Bridal Bed, The (novel by Mulisch)

    Harry Mulisch: …novel Het stenen bruidsbed (1959; The Stone Bridal Bed), in which an American pilot involved in the bombing of Dresden returns to the city years later, won him an international audience. Twee vrouwen (1975; Two Women; filmed 1979) explored love between two women. Perhaps his most popular work is his…

  • stone bubble (geology)

    igneous rock: Small-scale structural features: Lithophysae, also known as stone bubbles, consist of concentric shells of finely crystalline alkali feldspar separated by empty spaces; thus, they resemble an onion or a newly blooming rose. Commonly associated with spherulites in glassy and partly crystalline volcanic rocks of salic composition, many lithophysae are about the size…

  • stone canal (anatomy)

    circulatory system: Echinodermata: …united via a duct (the stone canal) with a circular canal (ring canal) that circumvents the mouth. Long canals radiate from the water ring into each arm. Lateral canals branch alternately from the radial canals, each terminating in a muscular sac (or ampulla) and a tube foot (podium), which commonly…

  • stone cell (plant anatomy)

    pear: …flesh, the so-called grit, or stone cells. In general, pear fruits are elongate, being narrow at the stem end and broader at the opposite end. Pears are usually propagated by budding or grafting onto a rootstock, usually of Pyrus communis origin. In Europe the main rootstock used is quince (Cydonia…

  • stone centipede (arthropod)

    centipede: The little stone centipedes (order Lithobiomorpha) are short-bodied. They, like the house centipedes, run with the body held straight and are the fastest moving centipedes.

  • stone chest (funerary object)

    Cist, prehistoric European coffin containing a body or ashes, usually made of stone or a hollowed-out tree; also, a storage place for sacred objects. “Cist” has also been used in a more general sense to refer to the stone burial place itself, usually built in the form of a dolmen, with several

  • stone chimes (musical instrument)

    Stone chimes, a set of struck sonorous stones. Such instruments have been found—and in some cases, are still used—in Southeast, East, and South Asia as well as in parts of Africa, South America, and Oceania. In the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, for

  • stone china (pottery)

    Ironstone china, type of stoneware introduced in England early in the 19th century by Staffordshire potters who sought to develop a porcelain substitute that could be mass-produced. The result of their experiments was a dense, hard, durable stoneware that came to be known by several names—e.g.,

  • stone curlew (bird)

    Thickknee, any of numerous shorebirds that constitute the family Burhinidae (order Charadriiformes). The bird is named for the thickened intertarsal joint of its long, yellowish or greenish legs; or, alternatively, for its size (about that of a curlew, 35 to 50 centimetres, or 14 to 20 inches) and

  • Stone Desert, A (work by Wast)

    Hugo Wast: …and Desierto de piedra (1925; A Stone Desert)—portray rural people in their struggle against nature and adversity and their ability to endure personal hardship. In such novels as La casa de los cuervos (1916; The House of Ravens), he told tales of adventure set against historical backgrounds. At times he…

  • Stone Diaries, The (novel by Shields)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: The Stone Diaries (1993), which won a Pulitzer Prize, begins in early 20th-century Manitoba and follows the life of Daisy from birth to death in a variety of voices and textual strategies, while in Unless (2002) a middle-aged professional woman confronts the nature of goodness…

  • Stone Forest (rock formation, China)

    Kunming: The contemporary city: …of the city is the Shilin (“Stone Forest”) karst formation, consisting of rock caves, arches, and pavilions; a popular tourist destination, it and other karst areas in the region were collectively designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2007.

  • stone fruit (plant anatomy)

    Drupe, in botany, simple fleshy fruit that usually contains a single seed, such as the cherry, peach, and olive. As a simple fruit, a drupe is derived from a single ovary of an individual flower. The outer layer of the ovary wall is a thin skin or peel, the middle layer is thick and usually fleshy

  • Stone Guest, The (play by Pushkin)

    The Stone Guest, blank verse drama by Aleksandr Pushkin, published posthumously in 1839 as Kamenny gost. The work is one of four acclaimed “little tragedies” completed by Pushkin in the fall of 1830. A highly intelligent poet and chronic seducer who thinks himself superior to almost everyone, Don

  • Stone Knife, The (novel by Revueltas)

    José Revueltas: …Human Mourning, also translated as The Stone Knife) is a powerful novel that uses flashbacks and interior monologues to present the plight of rural Mexicans from the pre-Columbian period up to the 1930s. In 1943 Revueltas was expelled from the Communist Party and took part in founding the Spartacus Leninist…

  • stone marten (mammal)

    marten: The stone marten, or beech marten (M. foina), inhabits wooded country in Eurasia. It has grayish brown fur with a divided white throat bib. It weighs 1–2.5 kg (about 2–5.5 pounds), is 42–48 cm (16.5–19 inches) long, and is 12 cm (roughly 5 inches) high at…

  • Stone Mattress (short stories by Atwood)

    Margaret Atwood: … (1991), Moral Disorder (2006), and Stone Mattress (2014). Her nonfiction includes Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing (2002), which grew out of a series of lectures she gave at the University of Cambridge; Payback (2008; film 2012), an impassioned essay that treats debt—both personal and governmental—as a cultural…

  • Stone Mountain (mountain, Georgia, United States)

    Decatur: Nearby Stone Mountain, which rises to more than 800 feet (245 metres) in an American Civil War memorial state park, constitutes the largest mass of exposed granite in North America. Carved on the side of the mountain are likenesses of the Confederate generals Robert E. Lee…

  • Stone Mountain Park (park, Georgia, United States)

    Georgia: Cultural life: Stone Mountain Park near Decatur (eastern suburb of Atlanta) is noted not only for its natural environment but for the massive Confederate memorial relief carved into the mountain’s open granite face. The mountainous north is dominated by Chattahoochee National Forest, which includes the Cohutta Wilderness…

  • stone net (geology)

    glacial landform: Permafrost, patterned ground, solifluction deposits, and pingos: …rings coalesce, they form polygonal stone nets. On steeper slopes, stone rings and stone nets are often stretched into stone stripes by slow downhill motion of the soggy active layer of the permafrost. In other areas, patterned ground is formed by vertical or subvertical polygonal cracks, which are initiated in…

  • stone pine (tree species)

    pine: …including black, white, Himalayan, and stone pines, and some are planted in reforestation projects or for windbreaks. Pine-leaf oil, used medicinally, is a distillation product of the leaves; charcoal, lampblack, and fuel gases are distillation by-products.

  • Stone Poneys, the (American musical group)

    Linda Ronstadt: …attention with a folk-oriented trio, the Stone Poneys, in California in the mid-1960s, Ronstadt embarked upon a solo career in 1968, introducing material by songwriters such as Neil Young and Jackson Browne and collaborating with top country-oriented rock musicians (including future members of the Eagles). Produced by Briton Peter Asher,…

  • stone ring (geology)

    glacial landform: Permafrost, patterned ground, solifluction deposits, and pingos: …the larger rocks are termed stone rings. When neighbouring stone rings coalesce, they form polygonal stone nets. On steeper slopes, stone rings and stone nets are often stretched into stone stripes by slow downhill motion of the soggy active layer of the permafrost. In other areas, patterned ground is formed…

  • Stone Roots (poetry by Alexander)

    Meena Alexander: …Name (1977), Without Place (1978), Stone Roots (1980), House of a Thousand Doors (1988), and The Storm: A Poem in Five Parts (1989). She also wrote a one-act play, In the Middle Earth (1977); a volume of criticism, Women in Romanticism (1989); a semiautobiographical novel set in Hyderabad, India, Nampally…

  • Stone Temple (church, Quincy, Massachusetts, United States)

    Alexander Parris: …works outside Boston is the Unitarian Church at Quincy, called the Stone Temple (1828), a severe and impressive building that shelters the burial vaults of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams.

  • stone thrower (cannon)

    military technology: Terminology and classification: …category of ordnance was the pedreros, stone-throwing guns with barrels of as little as eight to 10 calibres that were used in siege and naval warfare.

  • Stone Tombs I period (archaeological record)

    Stone Age: Asian cultures: …300 bc in Transbaikalia, called Stone Tombs I, exhibits a transition to nomadism and mounted-warrior conditions. Cultural elements held in common with the Scythian steppe zone appear as far in the northeast as the Lena River. South–north and north–south movements are attested in the last centuries bc. The south–north movement…

  • stone tool (archaeology)
  • stone tool industry (archaeology)

    Stone tool industry, any of several assemblages of artifacts displaying humanity’s earliest technology, beginning more than 2 million years ago. These stone tools have survived in great quantities and now serve as the major means to determine the activities of hominids. Archaeologists have

  • Stone v. Graham (law case)

    Stone v. Graham, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on November 17, 1980, ruled (5–4) that a Kentucky statute requiring school officials to post a copy of the Ten Commandments (purchased with private contributions) on a wall in every public classroom violated the First Amendment’s establishment

  • Stone, Amelia (American social reformer)

    Amelia Stone Quinton, organizer of American Indian reform in the United States. Amelia Stone grew up in a deeply religious Baptist household. As a young woman, she worked as a teacher and did charitable work at almshouses and prisons. She joined the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) in 1874

  • Stone, Barton W. (American clergyman)

    Barton W. Stone, Protestant clergyman and a founder of the Disciples of Christ, a major U.S. religious denomination. Stone was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1798, though he was more Arminian than Calvinist in his views and stressed primitive Christian thought and practice. He was preacher at

  • Stone, Barton Warren (American clergyman)

    Barton W. Stone, Protestant clergyman and a founder of the Disciples of Christ, a major U.S. religious denomination. Stone was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1798, though he was more Arminian than Calvinist in his views and stressed primitive Christian thought and practice. He was preacher at

  • Stone, Biz (American entrepreneur)

    Biz Stone, American entrepreneur who, with Evan Williams and Jack Dorsey, cofounded (2006) Twitter, an online microblogging service. Stone attended two universities in Boston (Northeastern University and the University of Massachusetts) for one year each and then worked as a designer at the

  • Stone, Charles Sumner, Jr. (American journalist)

    Chuck Stone, (Charles Sumner Stone, Jr.), American journalist (born July 21, 1924, St. Louis, Mo.—died April 6, 2014, Chapel Hill, N.C.), was the intrepid and trailblazing columnist (1972–91) for the Philadelphia Daily News and used his position as the newspaper’s first black writer and editor to

  • Stone, Christopher Isaac (American entrepreneur)

    Biz Stone, American entrepreneur who, with Evan Williams and Jack Dorsey, cofounded (2006) Twitter, an online microblogging service. Stone attended two universities in Boston (Northeastern University and the University of Massachusetts) for one year each and then worked as a designer at the

  • Stone, Chuck (American journalist)

    Chuck Stone, (Charles Sumner Stone, Jr.), American journalist (born July 21, 1924, St. Louis, Mo.—died April 6, 2014, Chapel Hill, N.C.), was the intrepid and trailblazing columnist (1972–91) for the Philadelphia Daily News and used his position as the newspaper’s first black writer and editor to

  • Stone, Edward Durell (American architect)

    Edward Durell Stone, American architect who directed the design of a number of significant modern buildings. Stone studied art at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, in 1920–23 and architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1927 he won a two-year

  • Stone, Emily Jean (American actress)

    Emma Stone, American actress known for her natural charm, husky voice, and adaptability to a wide range of roles. Stone gained her earliest acting experience performing with the Valley Youth Theatre in Phoenix. During her freshman year in high school, she persuaded her parents to allow her to move

  • Stone, Emma (American actress)

    Emma Stone, American actress known for her natural charm, husky voice, and adaptability to a wide range of roles. Stone gained her earliest acting experience performing with the Valley Youth Theatre in Phoenix. During her freshman year in high school, she persuaded her parents to allow her to move

  • Stone, Fred (American actor)

    Fred Stone, popular American stage actor and dancer known for his versatility. Stone was raised in Topeka, Kan., making his stage debut there at age 11, and soon joined his brother on tour with a number of small circuses. In the 1890s he teamed up with Dave Montgomery and together they toured in

  • Stone, Fred Andrew (American actor)

    Fred Stone, popular American stage actor and dancer known for his versatility. Stone was raised in Topeka, Kan., making his stage debut there at age 11, and soon joined his brother on tour with a number of small circuses. In the 1890s he teamed up with Dave Montgomery and together they toured in

  • Stone, Harlan Fiske (chief justice of United States Supreme Court)

    Harlan Fiske Stone, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1925–41) and 12th chief justice of the United States (1941–46). Sometimes considered a liberal and occasionally espousing libertarian ideas, he believed primarily in judicial self-restraint: the efforts of government to meet changing

  • Stone, Henry (American businessman)
  • Stone, I. F. (American journalist)

    I. F. Stone, spirited and unconventional American journalist whose newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly (later I.F. Stone’s Bi-Weekly), captivated readers by the author’s unique blend of wit, erudition, humanitarianism, and pointed political commentary. Feinstein worked on newspapers while still in high

  • Stone, Irving (American author)

    Irving Stone, American writer of popular historical biographies. Stone first came to prominence with the publication of Lust for Life (1934), a vivid fictionalized biography of the painter Vincent Van Gogh. After receiving his B.A. in 1923 at the University of California, Berkeley, and his master’s

  • Stone, Isidor Feinstein (American journalist)

    I. F. Stone, spirited and unconventional American journalist whose newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly (later I.F. Stone’s Bi-Weekly), captivated readers by the author’s unique blend of wit, erudition, humanitarianism, and pointed political commentary. Feinstein worked on newspapers while still in high

  • Stone, Jesse (American musician)

    Jesse Stone, American musician, songwriter, and rhythm-and-blues pioneer who, with his songs “Shake, Rattle and Roll” and “Money Honey,” figured largely in the birth of rock and roll; he also wrote the jazz standard “Idaho” (b. Nov. 16, 1901, Atchison, Kan.—d. April 1, 1999, Altamonte Springs,

  • Stone, Julius (legal philosopher)

    legal profession: The bench’s independence: …the 20th-century English legal philosopher Julius Stone observed, society of necessity has a government both of laws and of men, and the demand for legal autonomy is often seen in practice as a demand for freedom of the lawyers from undue political influence. The demand for autonomy has been expressed…

  • Stone, Lucy (American suffragist)

    Lucy Stone, American pioneer in the women’s rights movement. Stone began to chafe at the restrictions placed on the female sex while she was still a girl. Her determination to attend college derived in part from her general desire to better herself and in part from a specific resolve, made as a

  • Stone, Marshall (American mathematician)

    algebra: The structural approach dominates: …the work of the American Marshall Stone, who in the late 1930s defined Boolean algebras, bringing under a purely algebraic framework ideas stemming from logic, topology, and algebra itself.

  • Stone, Matt (American screenwriter, actor, and producer)

    Matt Stone, American screenwriter, actor, and producer who was best known as the cocreator, with Trey Parker, of the subversive animated television series South Park (1997– ). At a young age, Stone moved with his family to Littleton, Colorado, where he spent his childhood. While pursuing a double

  • Stone, Matthew Richard (American screenwriter, actor, and producer)

    Matt Stone, American screenwriter, actor, and producer who was best known as the cocreator, with Trey Parker, of the subversive animated television series South Park (1997– ). At a young age, Stone moved with his family to Littleton, Colorado, where he spent his childhood. While pursuing a double

  • Stone, Melville E. (American editor)

    Chicago Daily News: …a four-page, five-column daily by Melville E. Stone. Competition was fierce and money scarce, however, and in 1876 a financier, Victor F. Lawson, was persuaded to become the paper’s business manager. When Lawson took over full ownership in 1888, the Daily News had a circulation exceeding 200,000, the second highest…

  • Stone, Nicholas, Sr. (English sculptor)

    Nicholas Stone, Sr., the most important English mason-sculptor of the early 17th century. Stone studied under Hendrick de Keyser in Amsterdam (1606–13) and was the master mason under Inigo Jones in the construction of the Banqueting House at Whitehall (1619–22). As a tomb sculptor, Stone was well

  • Stone, Oliver (American director, producer, and screenwriter)

    Oliver Stone, American film director, screenwriter, and producer known for his ambitious and often controversial movies. Stone, the son of a wealthy stockbroker, was raised in New York City. He briefly studied at Yale University before dropping out to teach English in South Vietnam. Upon his

  • Stone, Peter (American screenwriter)

    Peter Stone, American screenwriter and librettist (born Feb. 27, 1930, Los Angeles, Calif.—died April 26, 2003, New York, N.Y.), was the first writer to win the Emmy, Oscar, and Tony awards. He won his first award, an Emmy, for The Defenders in the early 1960s. His first movie script was Charade (

  • Stone, Philip (American lawyer)

    William Faulkner: Youth and early writings: …later under the guidance of Phil Stone, a family friend who combined study and practice of the law with lively literary interests and was a constant source of current books and magazines.

  • Stone, Robert (American author)

    Robert Stone, American author of fiction about individuals in conflict with the decaying late 20th-century Western societies in which they live. Stone served in the U.S. Navy before attending New York (1958–59) and Stanford (1962–64) universities. He wrote advertising copy and newspaper articles

  • Stone, Robert Anthony (American author)

    Robert Stone, American author of fiction about individuals in conflict with the decaying late 20th-century Western societies in which they live. Stone served in the U.S. Navy before attending New York (1958–59) and Stanford (1962–64) universities. He wrote advertising copy and newspaper articles

  • Stone, Roger (American political consultant)

    United States: Sessions’s resignation, choosing a new attorney general, and the ongoing Mueller investigation: …on Trump’s inauguration committee, and Roger Stone, a longtime friend and adviser of Trump. Michael Cohen, Trump’s former personal lawyer, pled guilty to lying to Congress and to charges related to his involvement in paying hush money to two women who alleged that Trump had sex with them. Having cooperated…

  • Stone, Sir Benjamin (English photographer)

    history of photography: Social documentation: …up in the mid-1890s by Benjamin Stone, a British member of Parliament. Left to the city of Birmingham, the collection included photographs taken by Stone and others of vanishing local customs. Other times this led to an interest in the particularities of dress and custom of those living in distant…

  • Stone, Sir John Richard Nicholas (British economist)

    Sir Richard Stone, British economist who in 1984 received the Nobel Prize for Economics for developing an accounting model that could be used to track economic activities on a national and, later, an international scale. He is sometimes known as the father of national income accounting. Stone

  • Stone, Sir Richard (British economist)

    Sir Richard Stone, British economist who in 1984 received the Nobel Prize for Economics for developing an accounting model that could be used to track economic activities on a national and, later, an international scale. He is sometimes known as the father of national income accounting. Stone

  • Stone, Sly (American musician)

    Sly and the Family Stone: …songwriter, and social satirist, bandleader Sly Stone stood among the giants of rock.

  • Stone, Toni (American athlete)

    Toni Stone, American baseball player who, as a member of the Negro American League’s Indianapolis Clowns, was the first woman to ever play professional baseball as a regular on a big-league team. Stone’s love for the game began when she was a child. At age 10 she played in a league sponsored by a

  • Stone, W. Clement (American businessman and philanthropist)

    W. Clement Stone, American businessman and philanthropist (born May 4, 1902, Chicago, Ill.—died Sept. 3, 2002, Evanston, Ill.), made a fortune in insurance but became better known for promoting his philosophy of success and for his support of political and social causes. He espoused what he c

  • Stone, William Clement (American businessman and philanthropist)

    W. Clement Stone, American businessman and philanthropist (born May 4, 1902, Chicago, Ill.—died Sept. 3, 2002, Evanston, Ill.), made a fortune in insurance but became better known for promoting his philosophy of success and for his support of political and social causes. He espoused what he c

  • Stone, William Oliver (American director, producer, and screenwriter)

    Oliver Stone, American film director, screenwriter, and producer known for his ambitious and often controversial movies. Stone, the son of a wealthy stockbroker, was raised in New York City. He briefly studied at Yale University before dropping out to teach English in South Vietnam. Upon his

  • Stonebraker, Michael (American computer engineer)

    Michael Stonebraker, American computer engineer known for his foundational work in the creation, development, and refinement of relational database management systems (RDBMSs) and data warehouses. Stonebraker received the 2014 Association for Computing Machinery’s A.M. Turing Award. Stonebraker

  • Stonebraker, Michael Ralph (American computer engineer)

    Michael Stonebraker, American computer engineer known for his foundational work in the creation, development, and refinement of relational database management systems (RDBMSs) and data warehouses. Stonebraker received the 2014 Association for Computing Machinery’s A.M. Turing Award. Stonebraker

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